35 Burst results for "Amadeus"

"amadeus" Discussed on Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

07:26 min | 2 d ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

"Welcome back to the zone on. Paul amadeus lane here on. Abc news radio am and fm shutout audience on fire tv on roku vr tech zoned channels. He that's what. I'm talking about thinking so much for tuning in. We mentioned this in the beginning of our show about how sensor technology has really intrigued me. I cover cas we broadcast live from there. We talked to a lot of magnificent companies out there. And i remember when i was first introduced to sensor technology several years ago and of course all thing users for we don't need this but over the years we see how important and vital this is especially when it comes to the elderly and disabled community how sensors allow people to be more independent. But then we started to see how sensors can be used if you are in business. I'm sorry i mispronounced that in business because of you in business you ain't doing right in business. That means he was successful. Still a bad being set. I ran across this. This company and their innovation is like mind blowing. It helps you. If you're a business owner a company to keep track of certain things in your business not business give you and business you successful if your business is successful. But i thought this was really really intriguing. Some of the things that that they're innovation allows you to do to keep track of certain things and also with all the bad things we're hearing that's happening at places a businesses This be used even help ones if bear in distress you when you look at innovation and technologies. Sometimes you may think of. Why do we need. That isn't that a intrusion of my privacy blah blah blah blah blah but. Then we start to see world events happen in our mind start to change and we're like i wonder if this can help this right here and my next guest is going to talk about what his company is doing. And much more when it comes to censor innovation joining me right now. Is the chief operating officer of picton. We have dos dos. Welcome to the show. How are you on being bit. Volume it dos. I am doing fantastic. Dos before brought you on. I kinda fumbled through a little bit about what impact does. But i'm gonna leave it to the to the experts dos. You can give us a brief explanation about the company. Then we'll get into the nuts and bolts of our conversation. Sure thankful so induction is an intelligence company republic trade. The nasdaq under ryan. Px our mission is to do good with indoor data By which we mean that we captured into and give context to indoor data so that it can get translated into actionable intelligence by which an organization an enterprise can successfully enhance their safety security increase productivity and reduce cost. That's that's our goal. We also help individuals to have more enriched and safe practically lives with these information that they they procure from ardita. I love the love dawson. When we look at am cova demo- we went through last year. it really seems in picks in is really going to set us up for the future so that we can learn something things certain things about the workspace and everything. If you don't mind sharing show with us how that's gonna play a role going in the future. Yeah see the pandemic has created an environment where connected location technology And i o t tribes right this transformation initiatives that have been regularly different are now taking place really rapidly. This digital transmission. Transformation is across all the industries right. The the pandemic has sparked the controversy change. How do you work Both from office an onsite and offsite. How'd you connect. How do you make sure that your workplace is safe. How you integrate technology into space right so unfortunately you know going has changed our lives but in a way the technology that apple has also enabled us to respond For the future need and dos when we look at the the term hot dense king And how it works You know some may not be familiar with that term out there but if you can explain that to us if you don't mind sure husking is one of the things where you have a desk. That is not a hundred percent assigned to you all time so you don't have an office or say a busy desk that you put your picture frames your family on the desk And these will be yours. Come back to every day right. hoteling best. Getting our workspace booking is where you will book a workspace based on your requirement It at any given time away. You're meeting your team members or you're coming to war or you're doing phone calls. What have you utilize space. According to an extent. I mean just want to get up in the context. Oh yeah yeah. Sure sure doesn't obliged glenn share that Nas but not connecting it with the workplace transformation that's right enterprises bringing in a workplace transformation to bring in safety social distancing and fifties management. Because we don't need that much space. Because people are working for offsite so archaeology ambitions technology is working with similar for partners and using our core product. Set of positioning mapping undertakes and security to deliver these next generation. Smart workspace a right and held a or on technology. Set that can bring in resilient environment post pandemic i love adoption dawson. Unlike here in la area we have Used to be called a business incubators right where we're no one really owned and office space. But they can come in iranian often space and they can share like a common area and things like that and was a really cool really cool concept but you know germs just the the senate sanitization of certain things out there you can see like host kovin things are going to need to change your your innovation. Your technology is going to help really if that continues to be the norm to make sure it's clean. Make sure it's safe and make sure that there's the hot spots out there and if there are hot spots right something tells me that you're.

apple Paul amadeus picton iranian last year roku vr several years ago fm first Abc news radio am Both cova hundred percent things one of fifties love dawson senate kovin tv
"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

"For me. Yeah because he he's like really but i again. It's kind of a stagey performance. To but yeah i don't i don't know i don't know i. I like both of their performances. But i felt like i had to me. It's it's tough because murray's got the the big scenes where he's old man but in all the stuff with mozart he's essentially reacting like mozart is the lead i think performance and he's like giving the reaction shots he's the one that closing his eyes and get into vapors and buckling the knees and you know Nostrils expanding and things like that and and halsey is able to do the the delete work but What what do i know. I'm a. I'm a bit of philistine. Here saying is no. I really really liked this movie. And every time i watch it i like it a little bit more. It gets funnier. There's some feels like patrick. O'brien humor where like fifteen minutes of setup will lead to like this extraordinarily funny thing happening in only works with all that kind of setup and then ultimately it turns into this tragedy and the relationship. I didn't we didn't even say the stuff like Like when when wolfgang moves arts father. I shows up. And he's like at the top of the stairs is like there's a so many great moments like that where his father's entrance His father's re the wear that goddamn mask us. Hillary showing up in pretending to be the ghost of his father is so much stuff that gets so gothic and psychological. At the end. I think a lot of people would like it. But i also understand that. It's a long you know. when is my early twenties. This movie was a long way to go for its charms. And now now it's more of like i appreciate the leisurely stroll i truly spectacular visas. That that you get in this movie And is heaps getting better at the the more i watch it. Well all right that will do it. For amadeus hope. You appreciate it. This look at a very prestigious movie. we'll be back with another prestige film next week or perhaps tv show regard depending on where we're at in the schedule Thanks for listening to this one. We'll see on the next one. Until then i may run. Jim see all..

Jim Hillary fifteen minutes next week both halsey patrick amadeus mozart O'brien Nostrils twenties
"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

05:51 min | 2 weeks ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

"Know His his what kind of sickness he had but his drinking and all that like he's he led. He started to believe that he was writing his own funeral music. And it kinda did like fuck with his mind. And also the larry did die in a mental institution because he had gone senile. They take the bare facts. And you know. The amadeus that mozart died kind penniless. But there's also some interesting mistranslations like They talked about Contemporaneous lead that mozart was buried in a common grave which a lot of people later assumed like a big pit. Like you saw in the movie and what that meant is like a common grave as opposed to an aristocrats grave common grave. You could recycle every ten years aristocrat. You had to leave him buried where they're at so you kid you know. He had just like middle class kind of funeral and also he was well respected in this time. Like mozart wasn't like you know like scenario did ruin his appreciation. Everyone loved this shit and when he died there is tons of memorial concerts and all that but they dissects up the like the the little bit of early details and turn it into does does gothic thing that i think is I guess it'd been better if it's a true story but happened. Three hundred years ago is tough to say a what even did happen and be. You're making fiction you know. You're you're making a movie if you want a documentary on this. Go watch documentary right right right. We talked a lot about solari mozart. I like how they introduce him because he got his laugh. His grab ass the fact. He finds a way to moon his sponsor while he's getting an ovation from an audience. You know like how. He's outspoken. Like these these court composers are talking about how the language of opera and why is it. Us because lovin mozarts You guys got nothing. Nothing about love. Look at your operas. We got these fat men and women screaming at each other. It's nothing and how like arrogant and impatient. He is but like i. It seemed very childish but then at the end of the movie. That's one thing. I got from that final scene of Mozart can you know dictating to salary is like he just was that much far ahead of the time. Yeah you know. He's like playing johnny. Be good to a bunch of fifties kids and they dislike just ahead of the curve and he. He wasn't patient with people because people couldn't keep up. And you know people were saying stuff as long and boring. And he's like no. It's like the an as. I just thought that was the way the he played that very similar to robert. Downey junior as any of the other precocious guys. He's played or like like tony stark. Where he's like kind of amused slash pissed off and everything is going around him. Every time they would say too many notes i'd like i would just hear commentators on the radio and television talking about heavy metal in the nineties eighties. Feel like it's just too damn loud. What does that mean. Yeah you get like a nine minute bass solo. like metallica. track is like is. Do you really need that well. I don't know. I'm glad. I kinda did when i was fourteen. Yeah and if you don't need to listen to it it's not like there isn't a.

Mozart robert johnny Downey nine minute Three hundred years ago nineties eighties fourteen one thing mozart lovin mozarts tony stark ten years fifties kids solari tons of memorial concerts amadeus people notes
"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

03:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Bald Movies

"With that context. I started watching the entire movie and i just started noticing just like man these performances like and the situations like it takes like an hour to get into the scene. Where you know. Larry writes this march to show off the emperor for mozart being introduced in the court and five minutes later. Mozart is just just decide. Humiliating him without even trying like showing him up as kind of like this inferior talent and like the happens again and again and and a lot of times salaries. The blame like these situations would never have happened. Had it not been for salerii like trying to impose himself in a situation than ends up getting humiliated secondhand. And like that's the stuff that i think. Still make it for me. It's like like what would be like to be celerion. Hate this guy so much and you try to defeat him and by the time you do you can't even enjoy it. It's like it. It's the thing that's like. That's why so edgar allan poe like. This guys is wasting away in a mental institution ranting and raving about he killed the great moats art and he's the patron saint of mediocrities when he really was just a very like. There's this thing going. In for the second and third act where solari has essentially ruined mozart in terms of bankrupted him making him persona non grata on the court. And he's enjoying the height of his success he's wrote as banger of an ark of the covenant Opera than fucking emperor gives them award for it and everything like he's getting the adulation. He's playing to packed house. Mozart cant even sell tickets to his theater. And all that has all that gets ruined by mozart coming down and saying like to snoeng committal sentences about you know damning his play with faint praise you can say about. It is salutary sweat. Can you say salary. And i don't know there's like this like there's there's a scene in like in his eyes wide shut because what else do we do. Because i really wanna talk about these. These these scenes that i like but also kinda wanna talk about the characters and i feel like okay. Yeah about celerion. Mozart but real quick i wanna say. I don't know how factually accurate this is. And i know they've taken large liberties in some areas of the story. For instance salary being some kind of chased Non-sexual man is completely false. He was married. Harry fucking kids. Come on who right so like that is just a complete fabrication. I sure. I assume that everything i'm seeing here has basically no foundation of reality. So it's kinda like henry the eighth though it's like there's a lot of basic details but when you see it in like five different movies in three different shakespeare act that -tations like what's real. What's not like yeah. I guess like the some of the basics of the plot like mozart beena genius of course him coming to vienna who has sponsors were the fact a celebrity as an italian composer did try to block some of the german influences and did an intentionally tried to suppress his like early enforce. Some of his early works but by the time mozart was in his late twenties early thirties. I guess they were considered to be friends. Yeah yeah but i guess the other thing is according to amadeus widow. Everything about the requiem is true. Like this this mysterious man came to a sponsor this requiem that he wanted to write and mozarts in his late stage. Kind of like..

Larry five different movies Mozart second vienna amadeus italian solari three different shakespeare ac five minutes later german edgar allan poe mozart third act Harry eighth this march celerion an hour early thirties
Audioburst CEO Amir Hirsh on the Benefits of the 'Burst'

Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

02:07 min | Last month

Audioburst CEO Amir Hirsh on the Benefits of the 'Burst'

"Know you rabbit hole trying to find if you put in A good search engine like what you guys have over there and audio burst the kind of homes in on what you're looking for so you don't get a lot of hodgepodge out there. Why is that so much. Challenge out there and how did you. How did you and your company Overcome that challenge to to make it make it more more easier. More user friendly win ones are searching for different content so when we look at that problem we mapped multiple challenges that exist in audio mailing or that doesn't exist in texts and in other mediums mainly texts that we're accustomed to today In discovering and finding audio there are several challenges. One audio is usually produced in long forms. It's the thirty minutes or one hour. Long of a podcast. It's a forty five minute long over show and win. I want to hear something specific. Or even if i want to subscribe to podcasts. I wanna get a taste before. I wanna understand. What is being spoken. I cannot listen to the full show halfway through it. Understand that you know what. That's not exactly what i was looking for. Preferred different opinion or a different type of reporting so the first thing sold is that we've cut it into what we call burst into a short clips into specific items. So when you search. I don't give the beginning of the podcast you're brought to that burst that section that answered your question and you can get the exact answer that you're looking for especially in today's short attention span that humanity has you get the essence of what you're looking for and then you can make the decision whether you want to go the full thing you want to listen to the long form the full show or you want to listen to another result. Perhaps there's a better pocket that will answer your needs so the first challenge that made audio difficult to Fine to discover was to make it more concise to the point than we thought that by cutting it into bursts.

"amadeus" Discussed on Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Tech Zone With Paul Amadeus Lane

"We welcome you and yes. We have a channel. Make sure you downloaded and check it out. It's the texan. We're so happy to have you on this edition of the show shampoo. Why because we believe this show today is really going to give us food for thought. We're going to talk about how we can guitar mental to get we know during this pandemic it has pushed so many to the edge that they are in a in a deep depression. Some don't even a no longer want to be here and sad to say some have even took their life. We're gonna be talking about how we can get our minds right and how technology can help us out and our second part of the show we're going to be joined by a very very knowledgeable individuals gonna talk on the subject coming up in this first segment of the show. I'm so excited. Could have one of my awesome colleagues and the tech world. He and i sat on the united spinal association tech access group. We use our voice to further technology and inclusion and ever. Since i met this guy over year and a half ago he and i always enjoy talking about tech. And i am inspired by him. And you're going to be inspired by his story. And when made him get to the to the tech world so you don't wanna miss that remember. You can connect with me. Paul amadeus lane dot com all social media platforms. Paul ominously. you could see me having some fun me lip synching i lip sync lada songs and have fun so make sure you follow me on is with. I think this week You see me do a little heart. These i see when i go outside Every month eleven. Legal do that this week but have a lot of fun there and i want to connect with you as well. Thank you so much for your support. You sat out to the team out there. Mama's fourth media and also came et abc news radio and you sued newsradio cam t fm am. Thank you all for getting the show on and just helping the show. Just just just blow up. I appreciate everybody helping all right. What does it mean. If you're no longer able to function as a normal person what would you do. No doubt it would be a shock. This is what happened to me personally. At a very young age i was evolved. An automobile accident that many of you know that left me a quadriplegic end and a wheelchair user. I mean some people in my life that really inspired me by their drive and their determination. And i so so once you to experience why these ones inspire me my next guess. It is really an honor to talk with him. This is a good friend of mine. Tyler shrink tyler my friend. How're you doing. Well baseball keeping me. Hey great to have you. You know before brought you on. I talked about tyler. How you ni- are part of the united spinal association a tag group in what we do with furthering. The cause when it comes assistive and adaptive technologies and also talked about just the incredible Team that we have with us in our minds that we have We work together and talk about things that can really help our community out. And but tyler. There is so much more you know about you that i want the world to know about and and tyler when we look at what you're doing now but i let me backup little bit tyler. What tiller audience. What caused you to be in a wheelchair so in two thousand twelve. I as filed injury luck nick airlines from the neck down and what happened happened was a friend iowa alkaline golf around but the jump the lake even though freezing cold in the middle of the so as you'd imagine i loss and fractured my net. That's what started it. And then you know it. Tell her how mongoose in two thousand twelve two thousand twelve for you coming up on your eleven years. Yeah and in tyler. How was it adjusting to the the new normal talk about it had to be challenging because me kinda going through something similar you know we can. We can talk. We can talk. We talk truth to power so so. Tell me how you had just my friends. It was definitely really tough hers. I dealt at tana social anxiety and depression own. Pray do outside. Your doctor is beef for mice. Longboard injury or was really. I worked for my stepdad's construction company. And i worked at cost time because it was a roofing company in there wasn't always work and out all my time and energy his appearance i look at the guy from the jersey shore and someone who would be technically Computer go suntanning. Strategic hours computer but after my injury i You know after years salon donated a surfaced tower to me and i believe took to not getting the journey that helped me learn that all time and energy into my body or whatever i was doing before dramatic bent. Put it in my mind to be just as half and so talented and tyler. Out of noted about umass. Yeah i thought. I was the only guy who got my got my nails done and i got my hair done and everything. I don't know if you would have known each other about about up and around talented in trouble we'd been sharing love. Hey the tyler whit would made you want to really be voice of change when it comes to assistive and adaptive technologies. What what about it kind of you know made you say hey. Let me do this now well. Is this a huge after myla. I mentioned that service towels you know. I didn't do anything watch. Tbn sleep eat sleep. Repeat day out over and over and over and all ended a person's baseball but it was something different but more independent. So after the tablet we figured out that i do by voice control controlling television by in all these products were official consumer products and thus fairly inexpensive. You know this is the technology incredibly expensive. It wasn't accessible car. Bailable for most disabilities so that certainly changed since and i noticed that and i thought well if i start getting this information help people they might be all rummage through bucks for amazon echo controller aunts. Or whatever they like. So that's.

Paul eleven years Paul amadeus second part echo iowa amazon this week today fourth media first segment over year and a half ago two thousand Tyler shrink one united united spinal dot com two thousand twelve two thousa eleven
Who Was Mary Fields

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:36 min | 5 months ago

Who Was Mary Fields

"Mary. field was born. Enslaved eighteen thirty two like most formerly enslaved people from history. Her exact birthday and birthplace aren't known but some historians believe. Mary was born in tennessee though. Details about her childhood were lost. There are records of her working for enslavers in west virginia. She was emancipated following the civil war. Afterwards mary decided to travel north along the mississippi river seeking an area of the country more sympathetic to formerly enslaved people along the way she worked on steamboats servant and lawn dress she settled down in an unlikely spot. The ursuline convent of the sacred heart in toledo ohio. It's unclear why. Mary settled in the convent to work as a grounds keeper. Some say she traveled there with a family friend or the daughter of her former enslavers. Whatever her reason. Mary didn't quite fit in among the disciplined nuns. She had quite the temper and to happen for cursing and drinking. She argued with the nuns for a higher salary and yelled anyone who stepped on her freshly trimmed grass. Mary left toledo and headed west. Most likely to care for the sacred heart. Convents mother superior. Mother amadeus done. Mother done had moved to montana for missionary work and their fell ill but mary caught wind. That mother done was sick. Mary traveled to cascade montana to nurse her back to health and to work for a new convent nearby. Mary was fiercely loyal. She wasn't suited for convent life. She raucously drank in bars with men and women's clothing at one point. She one of the convents meal. Janitors got in an argument that escalated until both at them drew their guns though. No guns were fired. Conference bishop had had enough and kicked mary out out of work. Mary did odd jobs to get buy some say. She tried opening a restaurant which failed when she gave away too. Many free meals others say she opened up a laundry shop. Her love of hard liquor and gunfights quickly earned her a reputation in her new home. Town in nineteen eighty-five. Mary got a job with the postal service protecting mail along. Its delivery route in the harsh conditions of northern montana. She was the second woman and first black woman to hold this position known as a star route carrier. Though mary was already in her sixties this turned out to be the perfect job for her. Mary grew famous for her fearlessness against all threats on the montana trail legend say she fought back a whole pack of wolves with her rifle bandits. Didn't stand a chance against her. She was a beloved figure cascade known for her generosity and kindness towards children. The locals called her stagecoach mary and honor of the vehicle she used to deliver. Even after mary retired from the position she maintained her legendary reputation restaurants and bars gave her free food and drinks and she even became the mascot for the town baseball team mary fields passed away on december fifth nineteen fourteen. She had one of the most attended funerals and cascade history

Mary Toledo Montana Mississippi River West Virginia Tennessee Amadeus Field Ohio Cascade Mary Fields Baseball
"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"In alpha's case. He thought all these things had taken place in the present. But with paul davis dina. He was convinced he had lived through the future. Which is actually something that scientists today are studying. They call it krona seizure or mental time travel. It's basically were someone imagined something that happened to them in the future but it's coded into their memory as a present moment now. This is like way on the fringes of science and we really don't know how it works exactly but it could explain why paul was so convinced. He wasn't dreaming. His memories felt so real. He was convinced he had actually lived them but it was probably just his imagination playing tricks on him. This makes sense when we think of the future. Paul experienced a lot of the futuristic philosophy in particular seems similar to eastern religions which paul probably went into his coma already. Knowing a lot about in fact the hindu religion believes in something called the samadi which sounds a lot like the word summit. In paul's dreams there are even hindu spiritual elites called brahmin who are said to access the somali so all of this the hindu samadi the brahmin. It could all be the basis for the valley of the roses and the spiritually in tune. People who lived there like maybe paul's imagination was pulling all these references together in his psyche to form this realistic seeming place in the future. Which sounds like a logical explanation until you remember that polls diary gives us a breakdown of history leading up to the forty th century and a lot of what he predicts is scarily close to our present situation so according to paul the twenty th century would be shaped by agricultural and environmental problems. The rise of individualism a collapse of human rights and the existential threat of nuclear weapons. The list goes on and on but his predictions eerily accurate. Like these are clearly things we are dealing with one hundred years later and they were all predicted by a man from the early nineteen twenty s. It's hard to believe. Paul could have just come up with this stuff on his own in nineteen twenty two world war. Two hadn't even happened yet. Which kick started the scientific and technological revolution the manhattan project the secret. Us program that invented the first nuclear weapon wouldn't begin for almost twenty more years like paul wouldn't have even known what nuclear weapons were let alone but they would become a primary threat to civilization. There's just no rational explanation for how paul could have known about these things but in the end it's just too big of a coincidence to dismiss like who knows what we're capable of doing and seeing when our bodies are asleep or in a coma maybe our consciousness really can travel to the future and inhabit another person's body just whether or not that's actually possible. We just might have to wait until thirty. Nine.

paul paul davis dina coma Paul Us
"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

07:23 min | 5 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"Apparently sometime before. Paul second coma. He told his priests that he was suspicious of religion had been actually questioning his fate. But now paul says he no longer has those thoughts instead. He makes these vague sweeping statements. Like only you knew all the great things there are and you cannot even what is actually out there. It's almost as if paul's implying that the priest doesn't know as much as he does about religion or the afterlife but when the priest tries to ask paul more about it he refuses to elaborate. It's definitely strange but it's possible that everything paul's behavior his interest in philosophy. His conversations with the priest is just his way of coping with his mother's death in his own mortality which makes a lot of sense. Because paul isn't exactly healthy in the months after his coma he comes down with tuberculosis when his lungs don't clear up by october of nineteen twenty two polls physicians decide. He needs a changing climate. So they encourage him to move. Somewhere more temperate. Paul isn't exactly seeing friends and his mother has passed. So he's like why not. He picks up his life and moves to athens greece where he gets a position teaching french and german to adult students. At first it seems like just the thing. He's been needing. Paul enjoys long hours out in the sunlight and in the evenings. He wonders the bustling streets and admires the local culture but holes. Not totally back to being himself. Because some of his students their new teacher to be a bit strange now to be fair. Paul doesn't exactly speak great greek so the language barrier is already a little awkward. But it's more than that like one afternoon. A student finds paul sitting across from the parthenon. Which is this massive ancient temple in the middle of athens. Paul is staring intently through the barrier bars. At one of the large rocks the student probably figures. This is a good chance to just make small talk so he sits down next to paul and remarks how strange it is that someone two thousand years ago could have been looking at this exact same rock and like this is pretty normal. Thought that most of us might have right but paul basically responds. Yes that's true but also that same rock will be here in two thousand more years so if you stare at it long enough. His almost like you're living in the future. This totally catches the student off guard like houston making a basic observation. But paul's response was so serious that this guy has no idea what to say. Meanwhile paul seems to be concentrating on something and sure enough after a few moments. Paul adds that there won't be any bars around it in the future. He says that people will do away with them which is just even more of a weird thing to say like how could haul be so confident about something so specific and the student doesn't really have a choice other than to chalk it up to paul's eccentricity in any case there is one person who manages to get close to paul while he's in athens. It's another one of paul's students. A guy named george papa. Hajjis paul seems to respect and trust george and a to become somewhat close but paul still never breathe a word to george or anyone about whatever he experienced during his second coma unfortunately by april of nineteen twenty. Three about six months after moving to athens. Paul is coughing more and more. His burke. yellow says has only gotten worse at this point. It seems inevitable. That paul will die within a year or so so he cuts back on teaching bill last year. Of paul's life is kind of a gray area but we know that one of the last interactions he had was with his landlady one day. She knocks on paul's door and he answers but instead of his calm level-headed self. Paul greets her almost manically he gives her a massive hug and tells her he's completely overjoyed. He says he can finally write everything down. But he doesn't explain what he's referring to. He seems really excited and almost almost like relieved about something. In any case the next time we hear about paul is when he dies sometime in the spring of nineteen twenty four but it's unclear whether he passes in athens or if he dies in italy on his way back home to switzerland. His name doesn't come up again for another fifty years until nineteen seventy two when old friend. George publishes a book. It's a translation of paul's diary entries and it contains the story of what really happened to paul during his second coma turns out he wasn't just lying. There unconscious his doctors and loved ones believed. Paul was actually busy living in the future coming up. Paul pays a visit to thirty nine zero six c. e. high listeners. Kate here from podcast network with a special announcement. Our newest spotify original from podcast is exploring all things superstitions the origin stories of bad omens the hidden lessons inside good luck charms. The old wives tales. You really don't want to ignore every episode of superstitions presents a new drama that unpack a different belief can holding your breath while passing a cemetery. Save your life will carrying a rabbit's foot bring you luck. Why should you never stay on the thirteenth floor of a hotel. They may see mr cole or eerie or completely logical but if every culture has them and so many of us believe in them there has to be something to them right. Superstitions airs every wednesday free on spotify or wherever. You get your podcasts. To hear more. Parker shows search podcast network in the spotify search bar and find a growing slate of thrilling new series to enjoy. 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"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

04:13 min | 5 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"Story begins in nineteen seventeen in switzerland. Paul is a swiss teacher and academic enthusiast in his twenties he pursued humanitarian studies cultural history and something called classical philology which is basically the study of ancient greek and latin written language. But now paul's thirty one years old and he teaches mostly history and as far as we know he's fairly healthy but then one day out of nowhere hall just falls asleep presumably. It's in the middle of a normal everyday activity because his family and friends tried to rouse him. But paul doesn't wake up this freaks everyone out so they take him to the hospital. The doctors say paul has slipped into a coma but they can't find anything physically wrong with him and paul stays like this for fifteen days until finally he wakes up. It's snowing outside and the second. Paul opens his eyes. His mother falls onto the floor. She is sobbing with relief. Halls a little disoriented when he wakes up but that he seems buying doctors still can't figure out what caused the two week coma but after a few months. Paul seems to be back to normal. Everyone hopes it just a weird one time incident but four years later in may of nineteen twenty one. It happens again. Paul falls asleep and once more. His friends and family can't wait kim. Only this time it lasts longer than a few weeks. A month passes and still nothing at this point. Things are looking even more dire than before. The doctors have to put paul on a feeding tube to keep them alive. Meanwhile his aging mother and his other friends and family continue to visit him. All they can do is pray paul spontaneously wake up but another month goes by and people start to give up hope. His mother even dies during this time. Presumably of natural causes still. It's got to be just the worst way to go knowing that your son is in a mysterious coma even if he does wake. You didn't even get to say goodbye. Finally paul does wake up in may of nineteen twenty two one year after he fell asleep. He opens his eyes. Paul's completely awake and aside from his muscles not being used in a while. He's fully functioning but again doctors have no idea what was wrong with him or if it will happen again. Worst of all someone has to tell him about his mother's passing which breaks his heart. And maybe it's this grief that's weighing on paul. Because from the moment he wakes up. He's acting cagey as he won't say anything about what he experienced during the coma. Which makes sense if there was nothing to talk about but from the way polls refusing to answer his questions. It seems like maybe something did happen while he was unconscious. And that whatever it is he literally doesn't want anyone to know and paul. Strange behaviour doesn't end there because as the months go by he basically becomes a recluse he wants see or talk to any friends or family but from what they can tell. Paul seems to be preoccupied with getting his affairs. In order he cleans out his deceased. Mother's house takes care of his inheritance issues and sell some land other than that. He keeps himself so busy with manual labor. It's as if he's purposefully preoccupying himself and he prefers to spend his evenings alone reading philosophy books and to be fair. Paul is a teacher and he was probably a big reader before but he more invested than ever in his studies specifically anything having to do with philosophy and he's spending a lot of time talking to his priest which is a pretty new development.

paul coma Paul Amadeus dina switzerland kim
The mystery Of Paul Amadeus Dienach

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

04:13 min | 5 months ago

The mystery Of Paul Amadeus Dienach

"Story begins in nineteen seventeen in switzerland. Paul is a swiss teacher and academic enthusiast in his twenties he pursued humanitarian studies cultural history and something called classical philology which is basically the study of ancient greek and latin written language. But now paul's thirty one years old and he teaches mostly history and as far as we know he's fairly healthy but then one day out of nowhere hall just falls asleep presumably. It's in the middle of a normal everyday activity because his family and friends tried to rouse him. But paul doesn't wake up this freaks everyone out so they take him to the hospital. The doctors say paul has slipped into a coma but they can't find anything physically wrong with him and paul stays like this for fifteen days until finally he wakes up. It's snowing outside and the second. Paul opens his eyes. His mother falls onto the floor. She is sobbing with relief. Halls a little disoriented when he wakes up but that he seems buying doctors still can't figure out what caused the two week coma but after a few months. Paul seems to be back to normal. Everyone hopes it just a weird one time incident but four years later in may of nineteen twenty one. It happens again. Paul falls asleep and once more. His friends and family can't wait kim. Only this time it lasts longer than a few weeks. A month passes and still nothing at this point. Things are looking even more dire than before. The doctors have to put paul on a feeding tube to keep them alive. Meanwhile his aging mother and his other friends and family continue to visit him. All they can do is pray paul spontaneously wake up but another month goes by and people start to give up hope. His mother even dies during this time. Presumably of natural causes still. It's got to be just the worst way to go knowing that your son is in a mysterious coma even if he does wake. You didn't even get to say goodbye. Finally paul does wake up in may of nineteen twenty two one year after he fell asleep. He opens his eyes. Paul's completely awake and aside from his muscles not being used in a while. He's fully functioning but again doctors have no idea what was wrong with him or if it will happen again. Worst of all someone has to tell him about his mother's passing which breaks his heart. And maybe it's this grief that's weighing on paul. Because from the moment he wakes up. He's acting cagey as he won't say anything about what he experienced during the coma. Which makes sense if there was nothing to talk about but from the way polls refusing to answer his questions. It seems like maybe something did happen while he was unconscious. And that whatever it is he literally doesn't want anyone to know and paul. Strange behaviour doesn't end there because as the months go by he basically becomes a recluse he wants see or talk to any friends or family but from what they can tell. Paul seems to be preoccupied with getting his affairs. In order he cleans out his deceased. Mother's house takes care of his inheritance issues and sell some land other than that. He keeps himself so busy with manual labor. It's as if he's purposefully preoccupying himself and he prefers to spend his evenings alone reading philosophy books and to be fair. Paul is a teacher and he was probably a big reader before but he more invested than ever in his studies specifically anything having to do with philosophy and he's spending a lot of time talking to his priest which is a pretty new development.

Paul Coma Switzerland KIM
"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

06:12 min | 5 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

"Named paul. Amadeus dina just before his death. Paul wrote about his experience being in a coma in nineteen twenty two. He claimed he traveled to the future where he lived for a year in another man's body and to this day we can't plane how paul could have known about the future world events in technology that he described will explore the mystery coming up. Stay with us. This episode is brought to you by cleo black friday cyber monday and the holiday season are rapidly approaching. If you're behind on planning clave yo can help. Their the ultimate e commerce marketing platform for online brands of all kinds and all sizes with the mation. Sms marketing list growth tools and more. You'll get everything you need to build strong relationships that keep your customers coming back get started with a free trial at clavijo dot com slash supernatural. That's hey l. A. v. i. y. o. dot com slash supernatural. This episode is brought to you by progressive drivers who switch and save with progressive. Save an average of over seven hundred and fifty dollars on car insurance get a quote at progressive dot com to see how much you could be. Saving national annual average auto insurance savings by new customers surveyed in twenty nineteenth potential. Savings will very look around you. Is it cozy or two. Something feel like it's just missing sometimes which you're looking for can't be seen that's glades fragrances. Come in with candles for every moment. Like pine wonderland apple pie and very merry and bright glades limited edition since can give the holiday season the festive moods or after buying your sent for for the holidays with a glade. Limited edition holiday collection story begins in nineteen seventeen in switzerland. Paul is a swiss teacher and academic enthusiast in his twenties he pursued humanitarian studies cultural history and something called classical philology which is basically the study of ancient greek and latin written language. But now paul's thirty one years old and he teaches mostly history and as far as we know he's fairly healthy but then one day out of nowhere hall just falls asleep presumably. It's in the middle of a normal everyday activity because his family and friends tried to rouse him. But paul doesn't wake up this freaks everyone out so they take him to the hospital. The doctors say paul has slipped into a coma but they can't find anything physically wrong with him and paul stays like this for fifteen days until finally he wakes up. It's snowing outside and the second. Paul opens his eyes. His mother falls onto the floor. She is sobbing with relief. Halls a little disoriented when he wakes up but that he seems buying doctors still can't figure out what caused the two week coma but after a few months. Paul seems to be back to normal. Everyone hopes it just a weird one time incident but four years later in may of nineteen twenty one. It happens again. Paul falls asleep and once more. His friends and family can't wait kim. Only this time it lasts longer than a few weeks. A month passes and still nothing at this point. Things are looking even more dire than before. The doctors have to put paul on a feeding tube to keep them alive. Meanwhile his aging mother and his other friends and family continue to visit him. All they can do is pray paul spontaneously wake up but another month goes by and people start to give up hope. His mother even dies during this time. Presumably of natural causes still. It's got to be just the worst way to go knowing that your son is in a mysterious coma even if he does wake. You didn't even get to say goodbye. Finally paul does wake up in may of nineteen twenty two one year after he fell asleep. He opens his eyes. Paul's completely awake and aside from his muscles not being used in a while. He's fully functioning but again doctors have no idea what was wrong with him or if it will happen again. Worst of all someone has to tell him about his mother's passing which breaks his heart. And maybe it's this grief that's weighing on paul. Because from the moment he wakes up. He's acting cagey as he won't say anything about what he experienced during the coma. Which makes sense if there was nothing to talk about but from the way polls refusing to answer his questions. It seems like maybe something did happen while he was unconscious. And that whatever it is he literally doesn't want anyone to know and paul. Strange behaviour doesn't end there because as the months go by he basically becomes a recluse he wants see or talk to any friends or family but from what they can tell. Paul seems to be preoccupied with getting his affairs. In order he cleans out his deceased. Mother's house takes care of his inheritance issues and sell some land other than that. He keeps himself so busy with manual labor. It's as if he's purposefully preoccupying himself and he prefers to spend his evenings alone reading philosophy books and to be fair. Paul is a teacher and he was probably a big reader before but he more invested than ever in his studies specifically anything having to do with philosophy and he's spending a lot of time.

paul coma Paul Amadeus dina switzerland kim
Groundcovers With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:09 min | 7 months ago

Groundcovers With Ken Druse

"You know that I used to love for its variegated sort of silvery and green leaves. kind of almost looks like an IV ish Gr-. vining but low prostrate thing lamb the astrum galley. Dolan Yellow Archangel which you know thirty or more years ago when I planted it, it was like a coveted thing. And now it's on the invasive list in the North West and it's invading into woodland's as the climate warms. In. The Northeast and you're starting to see it on the invasive list in in new areas and so forth and I, have suddenly forty miles of it in my garden because it no longer stays. You know within a reasonable range. So I mean maybe we should I say what's the ground cover and what do we want to use anyway, right Okay The me okay. I. Think a ground cover is a plant that increases in numbers over time but does not run away or spread too fast it's usually we'd suppressing that's what we hope and we have a couple of those. And you think of ground cover is something you can walk on, but there's not a whole lot of plants that will tolerate. Being walked on besides grass lawn but a ground cover is anything that could do what I suggested I. You know spread a bit and suppress weeds and it could be seven feet tall. It can be a big SHRUB and I've seen that. But. I. Guess. What do you think is that just about it? Yeah, and and like what you said you know we think when we hear if you hear the phrase ground cover, you would think, oh, turf can walk on it but there really ain't no such things I mean there are so few things that can tolerate that I mean maybe creeping timing lawn, you could technically walk on but you know really almost none of them so So yeah. So it can be any hide I completely agree it's it's it's maybe a living mulch is. Is the. cloudy a west of landscape designer of fido studios. She says, plants are the MULCH. You know that's one of her key phrases that we need to remember and I think in a way. Like I have a lot of masses of ground cover. Like Geranium Macrocosm, the big route Geranium. Yeah and doesn't seed around doesn't it is rise Amadeus, but the rise zones don't spread sideways underground. It's of like it sounds big route on the surface. So, I find that he's unit, you can just edit it. You can pull out a bunch and throw it away and so forth but it gives you weed suppression that you were talking about right it's it's it's a living mulch It shades the ground under the trees and shrubs. Moishe helps keeps moisture and etcetera etcetera, but it's not so rambunctious that it's troublemaker It won't jump out of where it was where you intended to be. Does that make sense? Yes. There was one plant here. Twenty six years ago that some. People before I bought this place planted and I'm still. I'm still a ratting in this year. It was it was a ground cover this year. I think it almost eight the house. And the it's. Tonia. Oh Yeah Tuna however that Chameleon plant that's a nightmare. That's actually one of the most popular stories on my website ever is one of us visited from Google searches is about can I get? How can I get rid of? You know how can I kill this plant still full fill fold on Mare plant? Yeah. We've mentioned it before it is nightmare plant but but the draining macaroni him by comparison, it only exists in the places I, put it in though I started with a few plants I now have large expanses of it. It means that I don't have to weed. Those beds as often nearly evergreen even here in zone five B and you know it just does a really good We'd suppressing kind of a job. But then there's like the Lambda Strom. which wants to take over the earth and. So. Forth. So then you're you participated in its takeover. Bid And so. There's lots of things and we should say, of course, the disclaimer as ever. What is invasive in one place or becoming invasive is again, the temperature shift the the weather the climate shifts is. Is Not, the same as in another place something may self. So in Georgia that doesn't self so in Michigan and In the neighborhood yeah. Depending on soil types and exactly. There's so many things that you can grow like your angelic. I cannot grow that right for you that. COMES UP YEAH so. So I mean, the classic things that

Northeast Dolan North West Fido Studios Moishe Tonia Google Georgia Michigan
"amadeus" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm Naomi Moon Welcome to classics for. Kids. . . Let's start this show off with a bang. . You. . Know how? ? When a certain kind of music catches on whether it's rap or jazz or Latino suddenly you hear it all over well, , all over Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries you would have heard Turkish flavored music like this marked by Ludwik von Beethoven. . A very reasonable question would be if Beethoven was German, , what was he doing writing Turkish music? ? The Sultan who ruled Turkey used to have a very select group of guards called Jan Aseries, , actually, , jams areas, , what the Turkish term for new army sounded like to European ears like most armies. . The Janice series had a band and since this was a Turkish army, , the Janice every band used Turkish instruments like bass drums, , triangles, , and cymbals when the Sultan of Turkey since January, , bands to Europe people went nuts over the exotic sound of those instruments hey, , couldn't get enough of Turkish. Music. . . European composers knowing what their audiences wanted to hear started writing. . Turkish. . Sounding pieces and even set some of those pieces in Turkey This is the overture to Mozart's opera the abduction from the Seraglio. . Seraglio. . Was the Turkish Sultan's palace a palace which he kept US sizable Harem of wives. . Plural. . Very poor. . Mozart wasn't the only composer to set an opera in Turkey German composer. . Carl Maria. . Von Vaber did to and he even gave his opera a Turkish name. . Abu Hassan. . And Turkish sounds crept into orchestra music too. . For Instance Haydn's symphony number one. . Kendrick. . <music>. . Since people associated the sound of drums, , triangles and cymbals with Turkish army bands that Haydn symphony came to be known as the Military Symphony. . The best symbols in the world are still made by the same family that made them in Haydn's day the Zil jains, , the name zillion is Turkish for symbol maker a Turkish Sultan gave it to the first symbol maker in the family almost four centuries ago today zillions live in Massachusetts where they make the symbols you here in rock bands and symphony orchestras. . That's from Wellington's victory by Beethoven. . After. . The FAD for January music died down the cymbals bass drums and triangles didn't go back to Turkey those instruments. . Oh, , their place in today's orchestras and bands to the eighteenth century European craze for Turkish music of all the composer's latched onto the sound of the January band I think Beethoven did it best? ? My favorite bit of January music is tucked into the middle of the last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. . <music>. . That Sound is a controversy soon, , the lowest pitched woodwind instrument there is it's acting almost like a bass drum. . Back when January music was popular, , you could buy a piano equipped with a special. . January pedal by thumping down on it, , you could accompany yourself with your own personal triangle and drums percussion section. . Unfortunately today, , those pianos are only found in museums when both amodio Mozart composed his Turkish Rondo he managed to get the piano to imitate Janice drums even without a special pedal. . That's Mozart's Turkish Rondo. . Now that you know about the Turkish part to find out what a Rondo is, , join me next time for classics for kids.

Ludwik von Beethoven Turkey Turkish army Mozart Haydn Seraglio Janice Europe Military Symphony Jan Aseries US Von Vaber Abu Hassan Naomi Lewin Carl Maria Massachusetts Kendrick Cincinnati Tim Lender Wellington
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

Classics for Kids

05:39 min | 8 months ago

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

"I'm Naomi Moon Welcome to classics for. Kids. Let's start this show off with a bang. You. Know how? When a certain kind of music catches on whether it's rap or jazz or Latino suddenly you hear it all over well, all over Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries you would have heard Turkish flavored music like this marked by Ludwik von Beethoven. A very reasonable question would be if Beethoven was German, what was he doing writing Turkish music? The Sultan who ruled Turkey used to have a very select group of guards called Jan Aseries, actually, jams areas, what the Turkish term for new army sounded like to European ears like most armies. The Janice series had a band and since this was a Turkish army, the Janice every band used Turkish instruments like bass drums, triangles, and cymbals when the Sultan of Turkey since January, bands to Europe people went nuts over the exotic sound of those instruments hey, couldn't get enough of Turkish. Music. European composers knowing what their audiences wanted to hear started writing. Turkish. Sounding pieces and even set some of those pieces in Turkey This is the overture to Mozart's opera the abduction from the Seraglio. Seraglio. Was the Turkish Sultan's palace a palace which he kept US sizable Harem of wives. Plural. Very poor. Mozart wasn't the only composer to set an opera in Turkey German composer. Carl Maria. Von Vaber did to and he even gave his opera a Turkish name. Abu Hassan. And Turkish sounds crept into orchestra music too. For Instance Haydn's symphony number one. Kendrick. Since people associated the sound of drums, triangles and cymbals with Turkish army bands that Haydn symphony came to be known as the Military Symphony. The best symbols in the world are still made by the same family that made them in Haydn's day the Zil jains, the name zillion is Turkish for symbol maker a Turkish Sultan gave it to the first symbol maker in the family almost four centuries ago today zillions live in Massachusetts where they make the symbols you here in rock bands and symphony orchestras. That's from Wellington's victory by Beethoven. After. The FAD for January music died down the cymbals bass drums and triangles didn't go back to Turkey those instruments. Oh, their place in today's orchestras and bands to the eighteenth century European craze for Turkish music of all the composer's latched onto the sound of the January band I think Beethoven did it best? My favorite bit of January music is tucked into the middle of the last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. That Sound is a controversy soon, the lowest pitched woodwind instrument there is it's acting almost like a bass drum. Back when January music was popular, you could buy a piano equipped with a special. January pedal by thumping down on it, you could accompany yourself with your own personal triangle and drums percussion section. Unfortunately today, those pianos are only found in museums when both amodio Mozart composed his Turkish Rondo he managed to get the piano to imitate Janice drums even without a special pedal. That's Mozart's Turkish Rondo. Now that you know about the Turkish part to find out what a Rondo is, join me next time for classics for kids.

Ludwik Von Beethoven Turkey Turkish Army Mozart Haydn Janice Europe Military Symphony Seraglio Naomi Moon United States Von Vaber Abu Hassan Carl Maria Jan Aseries Massachusetts Kendrick Wellington
Mozart's Operas

Classics for Kids

05:43 min | 8 months ago

Mozart's Operas

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi. Lewin. Both Con Amadeus Mozart wrote more beautiful music in his not quite thirty five year lifetime than a lot of composers who lived a lot longer one kind of music that fascinated Mozart from the time he was a kid was opera. Mozart I. said he wanted to write an opera when he was eight and when he was twelve, he did up through the very last year of his life. He continued composing operas. An opera is a stage work with costumes and sets that also includes music singing as an important part of the drama instead of speaking their lines, the characters sing them. Italy. Was the country where opera got its start. So Italian was the fashionable language for writing operas even in German speaking Austria where Mozart lived. But Go to kind of opera that's related to our Broadway musical. It's called the Zing Spiel a play with singing Austrians who didn't speak Italian could understand because it was in German just like in American musical theater, there are spoken lines that move the plot along but when the characters want to let you know what they're feeling, they sing about it or August. I have two favorite Mozart operas one in each language not city Figo Godot is Italian for the marriage of Figaro. This opera is based on a very famous, very revolutionary play about a servant Figaro who outsmarts his royal master. Since, there was still plenty of royalty around when the play was written. It was pretty daring. Some kings wouldn't allow it to be performed. At the beginning of the Opera Figaro is busy measuring his new bedroom, you can hear him counting five, ten, twenty in. Italian of course. Susannah the woman Figaro's going to marry tries to interrupt. She wants him to look at her bridal veil. You can hear in Mozart's music how hard it is forces Emma to get Figaro's attention. Figaro has some Great Arias or Solos in the opera when one of the characters is sent to the army and doesn't want to go figaro things about what it will be like ticked rate in his pants, he closed for a uniform and then marched to the mud. Nine. and. My other Mozart favorite is the magic flute heat Salva Fluid a Germans ing. SPIEL. In the magic flute, the Queen of the night represents evil dark forces and Rostro represents light and truth. It's brilliant how Mozart shows the contrast between them by having the Queen of the night fast loud and very high. While rostro music is slow deliberate and very. The. Most, fun character in the magic flute is Papa Gay No. The Bird Catcher I even named a cat after him. Papa John is always looking for a wife when he finds one, her name turns out to be Papa Gain A-, and they sing a wonderful using their names to investigate the birds he catches. Wish, I had time to play you more music from Mozart operas next week a kind of music so. In Mozart's bay that classical composers latched onto it to

Con Amadeus Mozart Figaro Papa John Lewin Italy Susannah Emma
"amadeus" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:32 min | 8 months ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello I'm Naomi Lewin welcome to. Classics for kids. Think of the most brilliant talented kid. You know maybe somebody in your class now imagine if that person couldn't be in class because starting at the age of five he or she was off performing for presidents, kings queens all sorts of world leaders. Well, that's what it was like to be both gung. Amadeus Mozart. Mozart was born in Salzburg Austria where his father leopold was a violinist and composer when Mozart junior was three, he climbed up to the keyboard and just started playing. That's when Mozart senior realized he had a genius on his hands. So he started the touring Mozart show he took his son both gun and his daughter Nano on the road to perform for royalty they went all over Europe. Sometimes staying away from home for years at a stretch everyone was amazed at how well the children played and especially at how well little both gone could improvise. That is makeup music on the spot using whatever tune they gave him. Votes, are composed his first piece when he was five had his first music published when he was seven and wrote his first opera at the age of twelve he was a Whiz at the keyboard and the violin most of Mozart's concertos for those instruments here for himself to play. Lose Friends with the best musicians of the day. So he wrote Concertos for their instruments to, for instance the French Horn. One friend played a newfangled instrument that Mozart. Loved the clarinet. A Concerts that he and other people put on Mozart wrote symphonies. And for celebrations he wrote serenade. When he worked for the Prince Archbishop of Salzburg the man who also employed his father Mozart composed religious music. Having, toured all over Europe as a child Mozart did not want to stay in Salzburg working for the Prince Archbishop when he grew up even though that's put his father wanted. So he moved to the big city of Vienna, which was full of music theatre and opera in Vienna Mozart married Constanza Vaber. He'd actually fallen in love with her older sister I and he tried to find steady work that he thought was worthy of how talented he was. Mozart had a hard time as an adult. He couldn't get over being a child prodigy the very talented kid back. Then grownup musicians were considered servants by the nobles who hired them, but kings and empresses had made a huge fuss over Mozart when he performed for them as a child so he didn't think of himself as a servant. He also never learned how to manage money. He couldn't resist the urge to buy new clothes or a piano or a billiard table whatever he wanted. Mozart. Died just before his thirty fifth birthday. It's amazing. How much incredibly beautiful music he wrote in such a short time. What you heard is just the tip of the iceberg I haven't even mentioned his operas and that's because I'm saving them for next week..

Amadeus Mozart Prince Archbishop of Salzburg Europe Naomi Lewin Salzburg Austria Salzburg Constanza Vaber Vienna French Horn leopold
About Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Classics for Kids

05:18 min | 8 months ago

About Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

"Hello I'm Naomi Lewin welcome to. Classics for kids. Think of the most brilliant talented kid. You know maybe somebody in your class now imagine if that person couldn't be in class because starting at the age of five he or she was off performing for presidents, kings queens all sorts of world leaders. Well, that's what it was like to be both gung. Amadeus Mozart. Mozart was born in Salzburg Austria where his father leopold was a violinist and composer when Mozart junior was three, he climbed up to the keyboard and just started playing. That's when Mozart senior realized he had a genius on his hands. So he started the touring Mozart show he took his son both gun and his daughter Nano on the road to perform for royalty they went all over Europe. Sometimes staying away from home for years at a stretch everyone was amazed at how well the children played and especially at how well little both gone could improvise. That is makeup music on the spot using whatever tune they gave him. Votes, are composed his first piece when he was five had his first music published when he was seven and wrote his first opera at the age of twelve he was a Whiz at the keyboard and the violin most of Mozart's concertos for those instruments here for himself to play. Lose Friends with the best musicians of the day. So he wrote Concertos for their instruments to, for instance the French Horn. One friend played a newfangled instrument that Mozart. Loved the clarinet. A Concerts that he and other people put on Mozart wrote symphonies. And for celebrations he wrote serenade. When he worked for the Prince Archbishop of Salzburg the man who also employed his father Mozart composed religious music. Having, toured all over Europe as a child Mozart did not want to stay in Salzburg working for the Prince Archbishop when he grew up even though that's put his father wanted. So he moved to the big city of Vienna, which was full of music theatre and opera in Vienna Mozart married Constanza Vaber. He'd actually fallen in love with her older sister I and he tried to find steady work that he thought was worthy of how talented he was. Mozart had a hard time as an adult. He couldn't get over being a child prodigy the very talented kid back. Then grownup musicians were considered servants by the nobles who hired them, but kings and empresses had made a huge fuss over Mozart when he performed for them as a child so he didn't think of himself as a servant. He also never learned how to manage money. He couldn't resist the urge to buy new clothes or a piano or a billiard table whatever he wanted. Mozart. Died just before his thirty fifth birthday. It's amazing. How much incredibly beautiful music he wrote in such a short

Amadeus Mozart Prince Archbishop Of Salzburg Europe Naomi Lewin Salzburg Austria Salzburg Constanza Vaber Vienna French Horn Leopold
The Digital Transformation Journey: Challenges & Considerations

CCC Talks

01:52 min | 1 year ago

The Digital Transformation Journey: Challenges & Considerations

"Name is Ken. Wilson I've been in it for over twenty years and really cut my teeth and the client server world. So I've been around quite a long time since really the late nineties and I've been working at hospitality technology for really over fifteen years with a particular focus on systems over the last several years. I've really been helping Amadeus hospitality sunset. A lot of the legacy products yet really move those customers off of about thirty nine of them to our newer cloud based products and really mark. I can assure you that is quite an undertaking There's a lot going on there and it's hand not. I've also been running. Our property management systems operations team from topic so great wealth of experience. There you've seen from the traditional side of it now into digital and cloud and everything in between as you said moving a lot of systems from the older what we now call legacy into. This new cloud world is as well now. I'm looking at the Amadeus. It group You know in its own words helping to connect over one point. Five billion people year to local traveler providers in over one hundred ninety countries. That's a lot of people. A lot of countries on a lot of travel trips was interested in the industry that you're in how important now is cloud and digital technologies in sustaining this type and level of business today and enter the future all mark. I. I work with our hospitality business unit which really focuses on hospitality technology with some of the largest hotel companies in the world. We're offering technology services to assist hoteliers in all areas of Patel operations

Amadeus KEN Wilson Patel
The Problem with Changing Seats on Air Canada

Dots, Lines & Destinations

01:10 min | 1 year ago

The Problem with Changing Seats on Air Canada

"Can we talk about Air Canada? It for sure so for those. Who Don't know you have to pay for a seat on Air Canada if you don't book one of their more expensive fares and I paid for a seat because I'm not going to get stuck in the middle seat on the Trans Con on Thursday and I decided I wanted to change that seat to a seat that price. The exact same as well paid. They want to charge again for the same seat. Does it refund after? Doesn't tell you says we want to charge you. Whatever amount so I'M NOT GONNA pay them to change to a seat? The exact same. You know you might. It does the same thing right. Really how can we not figure this out if a will be? It's because they don't go back and check your record if you've paid for the previous seat assignment cash. So united does it. If you've been calmed and economy plus on united you'd think the same value. See you again but you do terrible. Yeah it's makes a really like frustrating experience and this is after the armistice conover. Yeah Yeah exactly. So they're spending millions of dollars a year on Amadeus and this is what they get

Air Canada Amadeus
"amadeus" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"Talk to you that In the Cathedral being a city there his coffin mozarts inserts little coffee in silence. uh-huh music do high music bursts out over the mall. I'm great bass dead. Requiem mass for both gum. Boats are composed rose by his devoted. I'm totally without patrons. We couldn't keep doing the shows. We put out every single Tuesday. We need money now either as you now or you don't Stanzi. The opinions expressed a now playing or those of the individual host and may not reflect the opinion of in Gaza Media Inc.. What you in Qatar discussed? What His Majesty things then Guns Immediate Inc is not affiliated with the motion pictures reviewed or otherwise referred to here in? It's not a question of like metastatic the decrees tavern all movie clips and music included in this podcast are the intellectual property of the respective copyright holders they are included here for the purpose of review and no infringement is intended the mall license I allow you the more you take now playing. PODCAST is exclusive trademark of in Gaza Media Inc and may not be used without the express written permission of in Gaza Media Inc.. All rights reserved the game. I don't want to pay any more penalty now. Playing is been guns in Media Production Copyright Right Twenty twenty and no part of this show may be reproduced repurpose or redistributed without the written permission of in Gaza Media Inc.. All rights reserved is it over guys.

Gaza Media Inc Guns Immediate Inc Twenty twenty Qatar Stanzi
'Purple Rain,' and 'She's Gotta Have It' added to National Film Registry

Donna and Steve

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

'Purple Rain,' and 'She's Gotta Have It' added to National Film Registry

"It was announced today that purple rain Amadeus she's gotta have it in clerks are among the latest cinematic treasures collected for the library of Congress's national film registry under the terms of the national film preservation act the librarian of Congress each year names twenty five motion pictures to the National Film Registry that are quote culturally historically or aesthetically significant the film's also must be at least ten years old the twenty nineteen selections span a century of filmmaking and bring the number of films in the registry to seven hundred and

Congress Librarian Of Congress Ten Years
'Purple Rain,' added to National Film Registry

Charlie Parker

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

'Purple Rain,' added to National Film Registry

"Famous movies music movies like purple rain and coal miners daughter are being inducted into the National Film Registry twenty five films and all will be inducted today for historic preservation by the library of Congress many of this year's inductees have a musical theme like the Mostar movie Amadeus in Martin Scorsese's concert film the last waltz other famous films added to the registry this year include platoon clerks and

Congress Martin Scorsese
"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Why tell me that if he didn't want me to praise him with music why implant the desire in my body and then denied the talent so how did these questions Rosen you from watching this movie how do they continue to shape your life as you were watching it over and over again I mean how 'cause I mean this was you were in your twenties when I saw it and you know it's been decades since like not not the age you she's ninety five no yeah I'm just so curious as to how these questions kept popping up in your life and what you learned from the salary character well first of all that Clark Complex and that a love and desire to be good can animate even the worst behaviors and I do think there's something about this movie it has implanted in me a compassionate and perhaps the gift of being able to see complexity I think all human hearts can see complexity but this movie is very morally complex think I've voted in a way of devoted my life to staying in those kinds of questions which of salaries questions when you think about the whole range of questions that that he was just raging about which which of those questions really lived and live for you as someone who one of the worst parts of me is comparing myself to other people oh dear so I really relate to him on that front you know the idea of being a patient in Saint Mediocrity spoke to me and the idea that God could still use you if you are mediocre branch preach sister Billy Wright and what how did you come to know that I mean I don't think I know it still still learning who is still make the mistake of comparison right of still looking at someone and saying will that they're clearly being used by God right there that that is what I should be doing and then looking at myself with that harsh critical lens and I think that's the really beautiful thing that celery bodies is showing us what can in happen you can end up in a mad house yes completely devoid of faith and love in God and from God because we're so active I because because so much free each other but celery earned his experience and so do we all are we ask you to reflect along with us about how movies have Changed Your Life We loved Nicky Hunt shared with us in one thousand nine hundred seven I saw the movie all over me and the painful dramatic love relationship between the teenage girls validated my experience with my best friend in high school not only was my experience validated but I also have piffling that I could like men and women and I did not have to choose until I saw this movie I had not realized that I had submerged caged whole section of myself my whole life opened up in so many wonderful and amazing ways after seeing this movie thank you Nikki for sharing your story with us and we'd love to keep hearing from review so send us your reflections on being dot org forward slash TMC 'em letter what do you think it means the last scenes of that movie or him walking down the corridor in this madhouse If I remember correctly he's going around saying I absolve you I absolve you as he's walking down that corridor and then we hear Mozart's laugh from one last time how do you interpret that what in the arc of his his journey what an interesting question I had always I've always experienced that seen as a bit of a toss off that that in the end salary has simply given to his the the lust he talks about earlier in the movie The lust of his revenge and his depravity basically I see that as a submission to one way of understanding his story because remember earlier in the movie when he speaks to the priest Sawyer expressed concern that people think he killed Mozart even the movie actually opens with a confession so I think he he's unsure even in himself the extent to which he caused Mozart's demise and I just see the and as a sort of capitulation to the inner story that he caused it that he's just embracing this this depraved idea of himself which let's face it as an option for all of us the fact that it has grand elements I'm the patron saint I absolve you does not rescue it from this deep sadness at the heart of that what must be that experience for this character see I took it as being him voicing what he hoped God would say to him do you think yeah I think so because I think especially in that conversation like you pointed out we experience the movie through flashbacks from his point of view as he's telling the the priest and I feel like toward the end he's come to see the preseason say very much but the things that he does say leave enough of an impact on him um where he can maybe look at himself in a kind of maybe even the way that God looks at him this new kind of new found God and so I think about him walking through that card door and saying this to all these people who have been cast out by society and he's going around saying I absolve you to all of them and I think he's getting himself I think you might be a universalist this is very optimistic interpretation right here of my toaster at last I would love to think that was true I don't a little too positive well girl you're you you keep your interpretation yeah zone.

"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"When I think about the movie Amadeus the first thing I think about is his laughter the laughter of the govern your tongue out how did forgive Me Majesty increase sits down sally says do you know who I am you'll know who I am difference and the priest says are they offer me your confession yeah because his experiences that in fact all men are not gods now Bomb bump bump Audubon bump bump bump up and part of it.

sally
Amadeus  Sue Phillips

This Movie Changed Me

10:55 min | 1 year ago

Amadeus Sue Phillips

"Govern your tongue out how did forgive Me Majesty increase sits down sally says do you know who I am you'll know who I am difference and the priest says are they offer me your confession yeah because his experiences that in fact all men are not gods now

Sally
"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"So what memories came up for you well thinking back to when I watched it and it was in the late eighties these were the Reagan years I was a young college student and I was so curious about who I was in the war world and what was my place in it and also as a queer kid who was just really coming out this movie gave shape to the questions that that were in me that I didn't know how to give voice to questions about the nature of of meaning of what it means to be here men of why bad things happen in the world all these like rich now I know to name them theological questions but couldn't have at the time and there's a way in which Casale Yaris such specific engagement with God gave me God shape if you will to those questions but also if you think about the the cultural narrative of the eighties being a gay kid a word incidentally which I did not think anything to do with me strangely enough because this was the days of the moral majority and just grotesque public words about what home analogy is in West so this so I knew there was something fishy about the way people talked about God because the context in which I heard reflections on what was supposedly in my life more so obviously not right yeah it actually raised it gave me the permission to ask questions about who got is because I knew that people were saying about God could not possibly be true so I was very curious on that level while my father prayed Ernest to protect coppers would often secretly respraying boy could think of me a great composer let me celebrate Your glory Buzek and be celebrated myself make me famous through the world make me emotion social after I die people speak my name forever with love for what I wrote in return I will give you my checks to be industry Militant every hour of my life so when I saw I was trying to remember I was probably ten or eleven and my father who plays classical guitar it was important for him that my brother night learning a mint in so I had been in piano for many years at this point I think at least five years for five years and I was not good I was not a great piano player still playing the same beginners songs but like I didn't know that I wasn't good until I saw Amadeus and I was like oh I suck not just not gonNa let me really bad so hard but what's fascinating in re watching this movie now at the age of thirty six and having not seen it since that time is what a different experience I had watching it when I watched it with my dad and he had seen it before and he was making fun of the characters Hallier anytime salary would be you really hurt or you know just indignant over Mozart's genius he really felt himself I mean he just laughed at him like all my memories of the movie or who my father kind of laughing at his character and it really shaped the way I viewed leary and watching it now I was crying at certain points watching this man and his frustration heartache over not having the ability to I'm not just be a genius but almost to speak for God because that's the thing that comes through so beautifully in the movie there's always repetition of he feels that God chose it's art and God meant didn't choose him as a result right there's like direct comparison there are these lines that he says said all ever wanted is to sing to God he gave me that longing and then made me mute why if you didn't want me to praise him with music why implant the desire like a lusted my body and then deny me the talent there it is I mean this is essential human question yeah and that's why I love this movie so much is if you so many of the questions at the heart of this movie are the questions that most of us have what does it mean to be good yeah what is it like to believe in God if if we believe that God has a hand in human history and therefore creates our successes and is the author of failures what does this mean when we experience what every human experiences namely failures and yeah that is really a devastating theology at the heart of Amadeus and of course by theology I mean how do we think about ultimate meaning and value and the purpose behind it and in this case obviously salaries Sarah Sally area has very grim notion of who got is even though there's also a devotional heart to it that is so compelling so by the time we see him actually at the at the start of the film almost the opening scene after the title sequence remember that Amadeus takes place entirely as a flashback in the context of a pastoral encounter between the priest and salary in an insane asylum exactly and at the very start all men are equal in God's eyes it doesn't matter all men are equal in God's eyes and solitary sits up and says RV hi can totally identify with that why do why are some people successful and others not why do why are some folks given obstacles and others not am I responsible for the chip in my life these are questions that I don't know about you but these live in my life and certainly especially lived in my life at this earlier age of reconciling who I thought I was can you recall no melody of mine was the most famous composer in Europe I wrote forty operas what about this.

five years
"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"amadeus" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"It's important to remember that I'm adapts is a fictional account of Mozart's last life and here he is portrayed as a playboy eccentric over the top dramatic kind of queen and a lot of ways and he takes command of every room he's in he's incredibly young and he's also a genius and then this is the thing you get a sense of throughout the whole movie is the genius that Mozart carries within his fingertips and in his rain and just in the way that he thinks about music and that it comes to him without any effort it seems twenty minutes twenty minutes of continuous music no representatives tire only opera can do this in play more than one person speaks at the same time it's just noise no one can understand a word but with opera with music with music you can have twenty individuals all talking at the same time it's not noise it's a perfect harmony music is not the issue here no one should talent it should judgment of literature inquest surely you can choose more elevated themes elevated elevated what does that mean elevated I am fantastic tait with all of these elevated things all dead legends come on now be honest which one of you wouldn't rather listen to his hairdressers than Hercules or ratios or orpheus people so often visit they shit marble eighty I'm involved Kerr Man I assure you my music is not Mozart rival is salary played by F Murray Abraham salary is an established composer and a man of deep faith but he doesn't have the raw talent Mozart has any is it and this makes salary incredibly jealous scheming petty but more importantly he feels betrayed by God how could bless someone like Mozart with that kind of talent was actually beyond belief they were first and only drafts music they showed no corrections of any kind.

Mozart Murray Abraham twenty minutes
Music May Orchestrate Better Brain Connectivity in Preterm Infants

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Music May Orchestrate Better Brain Connectivity in Preterm Infants

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata fifteen million babies are born prematurely, every year worldwide in some cases, the early births can be life threatening or cause developmental issues. They have more attention deficit difficulties. They can have a higher risk of having autism, and in general, sort of socio emotional regulation issues, patriot who appear attrition and neonatologist at the university hospital of Geneva now she and her colleagues have evidence that a simple tool could help those Preterm babies brains develop music. But before you queue, the Amadeus, I felt about multifold. This is very complex musical structure, and I could hardly magin that such a immature brain would be able to fully capture the complexity of Mozart, so instead, she recruited the harpist Andrea's, vol- inviter, who worked with neonatal nurses to determine which sounds would most stimulate infants brains. He then composed the suite of three eight minute long tracks, which the nurses played twenty Preterm babies using wireless headphones embedded in little baby caps. Each baby heard five tracks a week for about six weeks on average then hoops team used MRI's to visualize activity in the baby's brain's, and what they found was that premiums who listen to tunes had brain networks, that more closely resembled, those of full term babies compared to their counterparts who didn't get the treatment, the music listeners had greater connectivity among brain regions, such as areas involved in sensory and higher. Order cognitive functioning, indicating that music listening might have enduring effects on brain development. The details are in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences. Of course, many questions still remain. I'll watch dilation to that was stimulation, given the right way would be much better. If it was. Something more lively than the recorded music was too simple. Or could it be more complex, but hoop? He said, one thing parents can already do his sing to their children. Plus, she said it doesn't really matter if you can carry it too. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd University Hospital Of Geneva National Academy Of Sciences Christopher Don Andrea Sixty Seconds Three Eight Minute Six Weeks
The Final Moments of 'The Marriage of Figaro' On A 12-Hour Loop

The Frame

14:32 min | 2 years ago

The Final Moments of 'The Marriage of Figaro' On A 12-Hour Loop

"Today, who would get what in the forty four million dollar Harvey Weinstein settlement proposal, plus an Icelandic artists celebrates the experimental fluxes art movement by looping, the final aria of the marriage of Figaro for twelve straight hours, really what I I'm trying to achieve is to like make this part of an opera with is not structure, like stop being narrative and make like a sculpture painting. Plus, I'll talk without reporter, jewelry Finkel who's trying to break down gallery walls by having artists. Tell us about the piece of art that inspired them. The most stay tuned for the frame. There's a forty four million dollar tentative settlement in the civil portion of the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct case, the Wall Street Journal broke the story, I called reporter, Karen Ramey in the journal's newsroom and Astor how they wind up with forty four million forty four million comes from months and months of pretty contentious negotiations over what women should be paid, how they should be paid, and who should pay it right in a dozen mediation sessions that I guess got pretty ugly. Yeah, they did get ugly, because there were a lot of competing interests at play here, there were women who said they were victims and should be compensated. And a lot of these are these are women who filed lawsuits. They're also insurance companies the New York attorney general's office, which filed its own civil rights lawsuit about employment conditions against both Harvey Weinstein and his company, and we should be very clear here. This is not just a settlement that involves Harvey Weinstein. Absolutely. There's quite a few women who sued Harvey Weinstein. But some of these same women including a proposed class action suit sued board, members, former officers and directors executives and all kinds of people who surrounded Harvey Weinstein saying that they knew about his alleged behavior and enabled it. And so this proposed settlement also would end any legal proceedings for all those other defendants. Adam Harris, who is Bob. Weinstein's lawyer announced the. Settlement saying, we now have an economic agreement in principle. That is supported by the plaintiffs is though, this settlement, what the plane is had hoped for even close. I think the point is to say play deaths. I mean, particularly the class of women who say they were abused by Mr. Weinstein had hoped for way, way, more money. And so in a way, this is a little bit of a disappointment. The breakdown goes, it's forty four million of proposed thirty million goes to the plaintiffs fourteen million goes to pay legal fees. How is that thirty million going to be broken up? Do we know? So I, I do want to say this is still tentative, it's a sort of proposed agreement, and some of these details are still being worked out, but we know that, that thirty would include money that would go to women to former Weinstein company employees and then also studio creditors. And Mr. Weinstein's, former studio is going to bankruptcy right now. And so this process is also to. Resolve some claims in bankruptcy. And then I would assume for the for the plaintiffs who alleged sexual harassment that it would be a sliding scale based on the severity of the harassment. Again, these details are still being ironed out. But the way these things typically work is there would be some sort of special master, or person, sort of, in charge of awarding appropriate amounts of money to different people who apply to get money from the victims fund, and in exchange agreed to either drop their lawsuit or not file on, where's the forty four million coming from insurance companies are paying all of it. You can buy insurance to cover illegal acts. Well, it's complicated. These are sort of these broad employment policies and what they're actually covering is defense costs. And so it's defense costs, not just for Harvey, but also for the directors and officers, those are the former executives former board members at. Once seen studio and women have sued them alleging that they sort of facilitated Harvey's behavior. Does Weinstein admit any guilt in this forty four million dollar proposed settlement. He does not it's important to mention, though to that there's a criminal case against Weinstein in Manhattan, and this is not impact the criminal case in any way. If you read the comments section in any of the newspaper stories about this. A lot of people are saying, V, Weinstein just bought himself out of jail. But no, this is this is the civil part of the of the suits against him. Not the criminal parts. Yes. This is only civil suits. There's a lot of dome, but they are all civil and criminal charges. They're still there. He's expected to go to trial and September when they pick a jury for this trial. Are they ever going to be able to find a juror who, who doesn't know that? There was a forty four million dollar settlement. They're probably going sort of, to answer that question, more broadly. They're going to have trouble finding juror who's not aware. Harvey weinstein. But that's okay. What they're at the end of the day. What they'll need to look for is people who sort of haven't made up their mind about Harvey, or people who say that they can be fair and only listen to the evidence at trial and not include in their thought process. All these other things I've read in the news, what's the next step for the settlement. Well, it's not final. There are further discussions coming up between all the parties. So they need to sort of they need to hammer out these last minute details. See if they can all agree on them, and my understanding is that settlement will also have to be approved by judge grin Remy reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Karen, thanks very much. Great. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. Coming up on the frame and artist who's looping the last aria of the marriage of Figaro for twelve hours John horn asked why stay wins. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Rabi? What happens when you take a few moments from Mozart's, the marriage of Figaro and play it over and over and over audiences are gonna find out Saturday at downtown L, A's, red cat theater, when Iceland artist Ragnar Carson presents, bliss, a twelve hour loop of the final moments of the opera, it's part of the Fluxus festival hosted by the LA fill and the Getty research institute in honor of the experimental fluxes art, movement of the nineteen sixties John Horne caught a rehearsal yesterday. Well, part of a rehearsal at red cat and ask Hartson how directing bliss compares to directing the whole opera is a very different approach. I mean when you're doing the monitor figure into doing the whole production, rehearsing the music, and like plot plot that that cetera, cetera, totally but but laying here here would would just just the working working with with this this musical musical part. part. Really, what I I'm trying to achieve is to like to kind of make this part of an opera, which is not structure, like stop being not and make like sculpture painting. But you just like walk in the member and see. And then just walk out again. And maybe check it out again. But, you know, it's always the same like a painting on the wall. But, but twelve hours. Yeah. So with the audience experiences it in a different way to the performance as well. Does it become something different for them through repetition about what it is? They're doing. Is it more like muscle memory? Is it become less about character? How is the performers mind change because the audiences mind is definitely changed. Yeah. Also a performer like what I really like doing it's really just sink into the music. And the lyrics and the situation it stops being about. Like you know what is happening now in the Oprah just like you just this. for for twelve twelve hours, hours, a a new new But singing, singing, then, again this this league beautiful beautiful you're there music music is is almost almost starts starts to to become become white white noise, noise, you you just just don't don't realize realize you're you're singing singing anymore anymore and and you you don't don't hear hear anymore, anymore, but but you're you're doing doing it it anyway anyway and just thinking about sandwiches or something. And why this particular part of the opera because this is a aria about forgiveness. It's an aria where a man has done some very bad things or tried to do some very bad things and hasn't completely succeeded. But he's had bad intentions, and he is forgiven because the person who is forgiving him is, I think she says it better than he is. Why is that idea of what happens in this story, so important to recognize and to repeat about what it saying about forgiveness and reconciliation? I'm so in. All of this part of the opera, for so many like multi layered reasons is also like it's also written by Lawrence of the bounty and, and Volker, Amadeus Mozart than like, you know, it's, it's time like modalities being created this letter at the time when I'm Medicare is becoming a Medica the friends of Lucien and whatnot. And then the comes to this Oprah about just pleasure and lust and. Then there's this moment of forgiveness and then like reconciliation. But also it's ironic. They're saying they forgive each other. But, you know that the authors are not really forgiving each other, and nobody is happy forever after that's what I love about this part of, like, it's kind of one of my favorite parts of like the whole idea of like western art, because it's so multi layered complicated that it's like you can feel, but it was really written tongue in cheek. But it's so beautiful that you cry. I always imagine most of this, like really in teak, but, like, it's so Bill, Paul. You have been interested in repetition a lot in your art. Does this story change the more times you see it? Do you start seeing the story in a different way as an audience member? The more times you see it. Maybe if you have a multi nation, I think, so. But, like I myself I don't really have a multi-nation, I just see the same thing over over again, and kind of sort of become spill Diffley mundane for me. But some people, I know who have imagination start seeing different things. And also, I think that is important in this piece in all, and all our pieces that I make that it's, it's really belongs to the viewer to what the viewer feels. And how does repetition change with viewer experiences as opposed to just looking at something once leaving the room. What is the repeat viewing do in terms of how we interpreter see something or hear something repetition is like it's such Woodley important thing in Kotor, and like in all cultures we always use repetition to make things. Holy like. Every religion has repetition of its core. And of course, we feel the, the security of repetition. And I'm just really interested in seeing therapeutic things like stuck in this repetition, then they stop becoming narrative, and traumatic and they just become sculptural, and it's almost as you can look at the from from all sides. We're talking with Ragnar Cureton about his staging of bliss. You have performed in this piece as well. What is the mindset that gets you through a performance at what point are you kind of losing focus? How you stay focused. How do you make sure that through the twelve hours of performance that you are able to do your work repeatedly without falling apart? I never have any like the special method for it because the funny thing is like petrol is always like this Hato thing, we're going to do this, twelve hours put like everybody has a job and they just do the repetitive thing for hours and hours. And so this is not. So far away from a regular job. But it's it's like you just go just go to it like I was like a working McDonalds. You're like I just gotta do it. Now I'm just on job. So that's kind of the mindset I have. But, but it's a it's a job, I really love a I just enjoy every moment of it, although sometimes I'm bored. The bottom is, it's almost like a relief in our modern times to be bored. It's just like just, just the idea of, we're going to perform this, and I'm just going to be doing nothing but this for twelve hours, it's really like. It's like the idea of some kind of occasion, like no will decisions about anything for twelve hours, we're on radio so we can't really picture what it is that audiences will see. But how would you describe the set in the costumes res- production told Todd cliche, like the rococo very Ricco, Cova very much of the Petiot to classical staging. And I just really liked clinical staging. I just love the idea of like painted sats and stuff like that. And to the performance get to eat and drink today. Leave stage. Are they snacking onstage? How do you make sure that they have enough energy to keep going? And I guess including that or the people who are playing the music we just bring food and snacks to the states.

Harvey Weinstein Figaro Weinstein Company Wall Street Journal Reporter Karen Ramey Adam Harris New York Finkel Harassment Astor Attorney Ricco Getty Research Institute John Rabi Mcdonalds Hartson
Best music commands for Alexa and co.

Talking Tech

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Best music commands for Alexa and co.

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. Create and publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform, go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's w I x dot com in stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of special offer for talking tech listeners. Okay. Friendly warning talking tech bands. I am talking once again about the personal speakers made by Amazon and Google and Apple's personal assistant. I will be saying their words out loud. So you might wanna mute their microphones before we go any further. Okay. Folks. I have a question that I just ask Alexa. I said, hey, what music should I listen to how about exploring some music from on shell depot a popular classical artist. I think you'll like no, thank you. Would you like to listen to something by the Oscar Peterson trio Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or James Taylor? Oscar Peterson trio please here's an album. You might like now that was fun. Wasn't it Amazon's personal sin just got chatty? With me, that's kind of unusual and something that we have seen. But you know, today, we're talking about music commands for personal assistance. Google will not chat with you. And neither will Siri. But Amazon does a pretty nice job of being your personal DJ. And at times like you heard there concern out pretty well. The key is knowing what to ask and refining your request until it gets it. Right. Once you're there, you are in better shape than a radio DJ because you really are way more likely to hear music that you like let's go over some of the commands that are pretty cool. I told you about what music should I listen to which just for the heck of it. Hey, Siri what music? Should I listen to? Here's some great music. You may have never heard. That wasn't the command. Hey, google. What music should I listen to I can search for popular music, new music or any kind of music in other words, it couldn't answer the question. Here's some other good commands that you should know play music. I like they all do this pretty well for Siri. It will only do it. If you subscribe to apple music Siri will only do it. If you subscribe, apple music, Google defaults to YouTube music, which is ad supported and Amazon will give prime members free limited Amazon prime music. Mike experience was Amazon did a better job of playing music that I liked if you ask a question like play the latest Ariana GRANDE album, shuffled all of them get it right on the first request. If you try having fun with lyrics of believe belieber, not is not very good at it. But Siri and Alexa. Our instance. Hey, Siri play the song that goes tell me something girl. Shallow by lady Gaga and Bradley. Super. So when I ask that question that Google got it wrong three times, it got it right on the fourth attempt. Same thing. When I use the phrase, you know, what I want in what I need baby. That's of course, by Cardi B and Bruno Mars from the song, please me Google decided I wanted to listen to respect by Irit, the Franklin the query play some happy music. Google plays the song happy by Pharrell Williams. That wasn't really what I had mind. Alexa in Syria. Actually, give me some happy music the play music. I haven't listened to in a while is a really weird request because Google plays a song never heard my life. It's if there hadn't been you by Billy dean, while I've asked this question to Amazon speaker over ten times in every time they respond with a syrupy ditty by the late. John Denver somebody. I never listened to never wanna listen to. And they don't even offer me a second opinion and apple response by choosing attract I've never heard of called. It's not you. It's not me by b Miller and. Six black. That is a weird request play a song. Listen to less Friday, Amazon. Does that really well Google plays a song that I didn't play last Friday or the week before or whatever? And apple plays me song. I also didn't listen to overall Amazon does a way better job than Google or apple when it comes to music if you're willing to ask for specific play this song play this album play this title play this playlist. They all do it. Well, but some of the detailed questions Amazon is winning this race hands down. What is your experience listeners? What are you finding with the personal systems when it comes to music? Let's talk about it on Twitter. I'm Jefferson Graham, you've been listening to talking tech look for me on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham, I'll be back at you tomorrow with another quick hit from the world of tech. Thanks for listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. Have a business idea you're ready to grow or a story. You're ready to share? But not quite sure how wicks can help with that wicks allows you to build a professional website any way you want start from scratch or choose from over five hundred sophisticated templates, and customization is a breeze. You can push the limits of web design without spending hours on coating easily. Personalize your site with hundreds of design features like galleries video backgrounds and custom forms wicks is the most technologically advanced website building platform available. No wonder over one hundred forty million people are already users build a website if your very own with wicks today for free, and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code talking you'll get ten percent off any premium plan with wicks premium plans, you get more storage, a free domain for a year and much much more. That's wicks dot com code talking for ten percent off any premium plan.

Google Amazon Wicks Apple Alexa Siri Twitter Oscar Peterson Jefferson Graham Personal Assistant Lady Gaga Billy Dean John Denver Pharrell Williams Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart James Taylor
"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

"Push back against efforts to pass stricter gun control laws as indiana public broadcasting's lauren chapman reports they fear their right to bear arms is threatened at the indiana statehouse progun protesters weren't allowed onto statehouse property begun friendly legislature is a gun free zone protesters instead crowded on a wide sidewalk in front of the steps listening to lawmakers and advocates one speaker was gary oh he's the president of the indiana chapter of three percent a pro gun network he says in order to protect gun rights it's these smaller conservative groups have to come together if we can't unify with the second amendment then we'll never be able to unify with anything these simultaneous protests were organized by a new grassroots group called the national constitutional coalition of patriotic americans for npr news i'm more in chapman in indianapolis you're listening to npr news in washington filmmaker milosz foreman has died at the age of eighty six and bears bob mondello reports the director of one flew over the cuckoo's nest and amadeus emigrated from eastern europe at the height of the cold war and he brought with them a distinctive sensibility having grown up in what was then communist czechoslovakia milosz foreman hated tyrants and in one flew over the cuckoo's nest he created one for audiences to hate softspoken but monstrous nurse ratchet to mcmurphy doesn't want to take his medication orally i'm sure we can arrange the he can have it some other way but i don't think you'd like it mister mcmurphy give a cuckoo's nest one the big five oscars best picture director actor actress and screenplay forman's later films also tended to center on power struggles amadeus musical biography that won eight oscars also ragtime the people vs larry flint and the musical hair bob mondello npr news washington a storm system stretching from the gulf coast to the great lakes has buffeted the central us with heavy snow winds rain and hail up to eighteen inches of snow had parts of northern wisconsin with winds up to fifty five miles an hour.

Forman Larry Flint Foreman Czechoslovakia Amadeus Washington NPR Lauren Chapman Indiana Wisconsin President Trump Europe Director Bob Mondello Milosz Foreman Indianapolis Chapman Eighteen Inches
Rock royalty ready for Hall

NPR News Now

00:59 min | 3 years ago

Rock royalty ready for Hall

"Bon jovi the cars and four first time nominees including nina simone were inducted saturday night in the rock and roll hall of fame in cleveland dire straits the moody blues and sister rosetta therapy also earned the prestigious honor czech filmmaker milos forman whose american movies one flew over the cuckoo's nest and amadeus won a deluge of academy awards including best director oscars died saturday he was eighty six and nineteen seventy five cuckoo's nest captured every major oscar at that year's academy awards the first film to do so since nineteen thirty four's it happened one night i'm jim hawk npr news in washington support for this npr podcast and the following message come from trans union your credit health is so much more than a score that's why they help you stay on top of it protected and understand it get your report and more at trans union dot com slash npr.

Cleveland Milos Forman Academy Awards Oscar Bon Jovi Nina Simone Amadeus Director Jim Hawk Washington NPR
"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

NPR News Now

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"Cuckoo's Nest," "Amadeus" director Milos Forman dies at 86

"And several other books on gun laws we used to have people go to school with guns we had rifle teams in high schools nobody killed their classmates this is relatively new or win says he believes the second amendment is under attack he says the problem lies not with the nra but with the state of mental health in the us for npr news i'm bridget dowd in phoenix the republican led kentucky state house of representatives today at opted a pair of resolutions condemning governor matt bevin for telling reporters friday the teacher the recent teacher strikes over pay and education funding left children vulnerable to using drugs or being sexually or physically abused because he says there was no one home to watch them today's resolution calls bevan's comments beyond the pale and no one state representative has called for his resignation the nba playoffs are underway today at last check the washington wizards down to the raptors the rafters lead one eleven to one zero four this is n pr the world health organization is launching a campaign to immunize nearly a billion people in twenty seven african countries against yellow fever the goal of the who unicef and other agencies is to eliminate outbreaks of the disease in a region considered at high risk the yellow fever virus is endemic in tropical parts of the continent and its regular circulated between mosquitoes and monkeys and outbreak two years ago in angola killed more than four hundred people and significantly depleted go global vaccine stock supplies filmmaker milosz form and has died at the age of eighty six and peers bob mondello reports the director of one flew over the cuckoo's nest and alma aldea's emigrated from eastern europe at the height of the cold war and he brought with him a distinctive sensibility having grown up in what was then communist czechoslovakia milosz foreman hated tyrants and in one flew over the cuckoo's nest he created one for audiences to hate softspoken but monstrous nurse ratchet.

Alma Aldea Foreman Czechoslovakia Washington NBA Kentucky Phoenix NPR Europe Director Bob Mondello Angola State Representative Bevan Matt Bevin Bridget Dowd United States NRA
"amadeus" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"amadeus" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"And i wanted to be which was hard hard hard look you remember in phnom in a mmss do you remember fausto sang brought me amadeo's as fares it in the movie amadeus tsa in amadeus the uh the the character that f murray abraham played solitary he was he was like oh he was an okay composer and he knew he would never be great but he and he didn't think that that was the he didn't he didn't really believe that that was the the ultimate curse of his life the ultimate curse of his life was that he was that god which he believed bin gave him the desire to be a great composer but not the ability so why the fox would you give me the desire and not the ability either give me the ability or fuck off right and i like solidary bring it back to my my you could analogy length for i i just didn't understand why i was given such a desire to be an athlete when spor literally more very theme loved hockey lead the flyers sav a loved the flyers fraud street police around them he may be able to frustrate boys were were were before me but i was of the era of pelley limburg ron and a you're on hostile audience off i went to ron hextall's first game against the edmonton oilers with a thrill and that was a thrill and i became an analysis arrival the flyers and oilers big time yeah big time i became an instant uh flyers fan you fly netanel huge yeah you know it's funny i've been living out here now for.

amadeo murray abraham bin fraud edmonton oilers fausto hockey ron hextall oilers