35 Burst results for "Alzheimers"

All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

The Ultimate Health Podcast

01:59 min | 4 d ago

All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

"We know that diseases are inflammatory diseases. Practically every disease is a disease of inflammation at the cellular level. The cell is on fire. So it just depends. Is it a brain cell or a kidney. Cell is a gasoline or kerosene. But it's always a fire. So that's inflammation so. The goal is to live in anti-inflammatory life with all of what that means and it takes a long time to really dial that down completely for an individual but you just get started. Professor fasano and his team published this year. He said and this is the quote on the the title of the article. These guys don't exaggerate. You know because people would love to take him down and say look with this guy cena but he's so careful. in his language. The title of his article all disease begins in the parentheses leaky gut. All disease begins in the leaky gut. Well what about alzheimer's all disease. What about rheumatoid arthritis all dizzy. What m s ought psoriasis eczema. Migraines all disease begins in the leaky gut and this is what they're teaching our cutting edge physicians at the top medical school in the country. Right now is that there are five pillars in the development of all chronic inflammatory diseases and if your listeners understand that there are five picture that this is the big kahuna concept. If you understand this concept than all of the information that you pick up in podcast like yours or in books that you read like mine or in summits and things you're able to compartmentalize that information into one of the five pillars so that you can hold it because there's so much information our world today we get overwhelmed really easily

Professor Fasano Alzheimer's Psoriasis Eczema Cena Rheumatoid Arthritis Migraines
Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:34 sec | Last week

Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

"Life. Jack Hanna has Alzheimer's disease. In a letter posted by the Columbus Sue, the Hana family says his diagnosis was has progressed quickly over the last few months. His family made the announcement yesterday. Hannah is well known for his live animal demonstrations on late night talk shows. He retired last year. The animal lovers daughters. Say he still has a great sense of humor and still wears his khakis at home. Jack Hanna's into the Wild airs Saturdays at 11 in the morning on Wish TV. It's 5 39 cicadas air set

Alzheimer's Disease Columbus Sue Jack Hanna Hannah
The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

BBC World Service

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

"Hidden. Many are elderly in their seventies there in these camps because they're accused of being witches, But their voices can now be heard on a new album called I Forgot. Now, who I used to Be sad about that. I love Dublin Bay when my whole but one of the women have never played music or written songs before they were recorded by award winning record producer Ian Brennan and his wife, Maria Elena, Omaha's a deli. But Elena herself has a personal connection to witch hunting, which will get into in a moment. But first Marlena joins us from her home in Italy. Welcome. Oh, thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Marlena. How did these women and they are primarily women Get to these camps? Well, these women are a poor there as early they have been kicked out off their land by younger relatives who are very attracted to buy their land. And that land is all. They own a S. O. This women are very vulnerable. You know, they suffer from physical mental in the Caesar, such as Alzheimer's agility. Misshapen limbs, blindness and they are completely exploited that they're stripped off their dignity, their turned into a monster there literally stripped off their own land. So these women are accused of being which is what is being a witch mean in West Africa. Being a witch is a being a person that can cause harm to your cropper that can cause a stability, which is our accused off doing harm to families. And you know, Westerners often

Ian Brennan Marlena Joins Dublin Bay Maria Elena Elena Marlena Alzheimer's Agility Omaha Italy West Africa
Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

Breaking Biotech

05:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

"The first company. I wanted to touch on is news from july lilly and they're huge company. Say like a large mega cap at one hundred and eighty three billion dollars and what they recently presented was the full data set from their molecule demand in alzheimer's disease. And this is a phase two trial looking at this antibody that targets a specific epoch on the amyloid beta approaching and this episode is only visible in established plaques. Now i don't want to belabor the point about the amyloid hypothesis which i've done in previous videos. Suffice to say that a number of different molecules have been attempted in this indication in specifically the mechanism of reducing amyloid plaques. And they've all failed and what we're seeing here is that in this multi center randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. That donna had a significant is what they're showing here in the air score but not a very profound impact on cognition and so they looked at this primary outcome the air score and this is a combination of the as well as the ads. Ads and so eight ask cogs general measure of cognition whereas the ads. I is a measure of activities of daily living. So they did a combined score with that and demanded mobs improvement led to a p value of point zero four so technically significant. But i'm not sure that if they replicated the stayed in a face. Three trout necessarily be positive. It is an interesting thing because when you look at the actual aid. S cog thirteen score. We don't see any significant change. It is better in indiana but not by a significant margin and then the mse score is basically no difference between the two so this is another data point to suggest that perhaps the amyloid beta hypothesis isn't one that these companies should be looking at and the last thing i wanted to show here. Is that the one thing that they do. See a significant change in the amount of amyloid in the brain and so the pet scan here to show that the dynamic treated group has a significant reduction in the amount of amyloid plaque in the brain compared to placebo. So the drug is able to reduce the emily beta plaques. But it's not able to improve cognition really as much as you would expect given the effect is there so i wanted to bring this up because there is an upcoming. Pdf date for biogen's advocating mob and this is going to be a huge movie for the stock and it was originally supposed to be in march but it was delayed until june seventh of this year. So keep your eyes on that. I don't know if i'm going to make any position on it. I think that the fda should not approve it given the results from the advisory committee but given that the so many is on this pdf. I feel like there's a chance at the fda could overlook that and end up approving drug. So it's definitely jairo word. Play and i would treat it as such and proceed likewise so that is eli lilly. I wanna quickly move on to another company in the alzheimer's face called novus and i touched on them in my previous video and what we heard in the last week was that they announced positive face to data and this is interim data showing the nbs for one or another name for the molecule is positive in improved speed and coordination in parkinson's patients. And this is a twenty five day treatment. Nine patients were in the treatment group and five or in the placebo and on the announcement of this data. I think the stock was trading around one hundred fifty maybe two hundred million dollars market valuation and went up to around two fifty three hundred before settling around two hundred and fifty million dollar market cap so big move up in the stock and i'll tell you the data. The ceo explained that the study was power to investigate a difference of twenty to twenty five percent in biomarker levels not to demonstrate efficacy making this data that much more significant so to provide some context. And why i think this is interesting. Is that i in my previous video. Didn't really seem to bullish on a novus and the reason for this is that it reminds me very closely other types of amyloid beta drugs because this drug reduces app the precursor protein to amyloid beta. So my rationale is that if they're targeting the same emily data pathway. Given that there's been so many molecules that have failed previously targeting that pathway. I don't expect that this one is going to be any different now. Having said that. I decided to take a position because we've seen over and over again. That companies have been able to spin face to data in a positive way that leads to these big increases in the sock even though in phase three there's an eventual failure so i decided to take a position in stock and i have been rewarded handsomely so far and i'm going to hold on to see the rest of the phase two data so to get the actual data here in one test that measures the speed of execution. The results were statistically significant. P equals zero point zero four showing that while parkinson's disease patients are slow in coding. Boxes met with an s four. Zero one improves their performance. In these same patients other test that measures coordination showed an improvement in their movements and was almost statistically significant peak will s- appoint zero seven. Then they say in all end. Es up tests performed the placebo group either stayed the same or performed worse than at baseline instead the a b s four zero one group either stayed the same perform better than at baseline and as we know. Md s up drs is a specific tasks that measures severity and progression of the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease Jairo Lilly FDA Biogen Donna Indiana Eli Lilly NBS
Alzheimers Caregivers Are Sending You Encouragement Today

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Alzheimers Caregivers Are Sending You Encouragement Today

"With me. Today is Cameron Crawford. She is a care home placement expert a long-distance caregiver, and we're going to talk a little bit about both of those topics. We're also mostly going to focus on encouraging caregivers today. So thank you for joining me Cameron. Thank you for having me. So why don't you give the listeners your bio so that I don't mess it all up. My name's Karen Crawford. I live in Colorado right outside Denver my mom. On was diagnosed with Alzheimer's about twelve years ago. I'm very much the sandwich generation. I remember when I got the film called that we thought she might off all timers. I was at my preschoolers soccer game. And so I'm coming from both ends in realize I'm in fact, I call it more of a panini press sandwich generation because a lot of pressure on both sides. I literally cried the force first four years. I was just devastated. I adore my mom. She's this beautiful Steel Magnolias from Texas and I would fly down every six to eight weeks and just kind of help out going the doctor's appointments hoping thought processes in place. Well prior caregivers or she would fly up and stay with me for six or eight weeks and and I was just sad I was sad, I would look at my other friends and Ed. No one else was going through the same thing because my mom was pretty young when she was diagnosed and I would just totally have Mom Envy or I hear somebody's mom flying into Palm with the kids and I just thought my mom can't do that. I have no expectation for my mom. All I can do is help her

Cameron Crawford Karen Crawford Alzheimer's Cameron Denver Colorado Soccer Texas ED
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | 3 weeks ago

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
Marketing Guys: What Makes Them Click with VIP Guest Elias Crum & Mark van Horik

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen

07:24 min | Last month

Marketing Guys: What Makes Them Click with VIP Guest Elias Crum & Mark van Horik

"Walk me do incredible talents. Who see the world differently but have fallen thread. Come together and what's the value. Each one of you bring who make marketing guys the school concept in your business his stocked with you and then martin short short. Show us so Mark mark will jump in. I know him so Absolutely so Yes can i met a couple of years ago through a mutual friend and colleague introduced me to mark She's no longer a colleague actually but You know markelle has decided to The that our little corporation works pretty well. And i think he he is a very enthusiastic about it. We met i think free four years ago And mark had a background in marketing founded marketing guys ten years ago. This is our tenth anniversary this year. So hopefully we can celebrate and take the team somewhere. Fly somewhere one once covid. The as let's say been reduced a little more the the thing you know you're asking what do you at what. What's your specific Value what i tend to say is that i like to create stuff from from scratch. I liked to create something from nothing so start. Businesses start from scratch when there is virtually nothing so i i have made like a career. That is a little upside down. I started at a very big company. Royal telecoms kp and we had like thirty thirty. Five thousand people are at the time and then moved to access for all which is an isp service provider during the dotcom boom the first boom and they had like three hundred employees and then i ended up at the ram mobile data where i had the pleasure of setting up an office in the us and we had like one hundred people Before i started in two thousand eleven thinking like you know i. I'd like to start something on my own. And before i knew it we were ten people and my wife was telling me to to move out of out of the house. Because she didn't like all the men and women on the on the dining table anymore you know. She wanted us to move into offices. And you know that's that's a long story short and then you know. That's that's the thing i i really liked to do is make something out of nothing. It's always easy to have an idea ideas that easy The execution than i like to think you know. What kind of ideas can i move into something into a business. An idea without a business value is just. Stay a hobby right. So if you don't have a business model behind it if you don't know how to make money on it And it shouldn't be you know. Making money is not is never a purpose but you know as you have to make money in order to have a a living attitude to have a know a a business that matters so that's insured by answer mart. Wash s a. What would you add to that. And also you tell me little big evolve. Marketing guys us. Alzheimer's plus nine democracy were the doesn't need another branding companies buck. The border does need marketing guys. Because you guys a unique unique and adamovich so tell me little bit about your role. And what's unique niche marketing guides in the states. I was always interested in technology Got a marketing backgrounds but always did something with technology. All since nineteen ninety-five something like that and When i met elias We were talking about a marketing technology. And he actually said well. How do you to join us. And and pick that marketing technology part. What i in in two thousand ten. I had the choice. Doing something with that. Was something completely new in those days or go with another technology part and that was clouds. I chose for cloud and abuts in two thousand seventeen Indeed fi that mutual contact. I had a chat with the end and we came up this marketing technology part and And he said we'll how would you like to join us and and bring that to the next level. That sounds great. why don't they. I didn't was very interested in a everage marketing company but with allies at so. Of course this is interesting because now the got this intersection between marketing technology and and that can make really a difference and and stand out and it is indeed the whole marketing technology. Part that sets up parts set us apart from from the rest There are a zillion marketing agencies. All full service or whatever you wanna call them. There are just a few mark tech agencies. And i think that the marketing guys are really especially in the netherlands. We're we're we're expanding to western europe and so as that we won't be really on the four four end of everything. What's with marketing technology. That's the reason why we also set up the mark and technology both costs and that's great five. This bulk causing. You should know that also charging you meet a lot of interesting people but you see and hear all these passions of of how you can use technology to help people to help companies and i think that that's something that allies and i share is really the urge to help companies really to succeed that. That's also what we then. We help companies succeeds in by using the right technology. And there are zillion tools. I think that There are about seven thousand eight thousand. I'm not sure about that elias. What the counting does this moment. Slowly thousand nine thousand at the moment and sifting through the and really getting finding the gems and and and using them to help your customers really. That's one of the great things marketing technology. You're using text off to make your marketing more personal more geared to people and it's that combination and it's making it. Yeah well that's the paradox. Using technology to become more human. And that's what really and therefore the marketing guys is really because otherwise we could have been denmark tech agency or something like that. No where the guys you know where people were human. Nothing relate to us.

Mark Mark Markelle Royal Telecoms Martin Elias Mark Alzheimer United States The Netherlands Europe Denmark
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | Last month

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | Last month

Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

"So. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved. Ones in your opinion like know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. I think a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of duty and which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista But also will be trying to do is using technology to support give keg. It's and a big audubon is gonna be a mental health technology so for example of mental health apps identity being used recently going to help with distribution bags. A lot of k gives also busy. just hanso. faux would they would is essentially a fulltime job. The have undergone find that you and i knew mental health apps imitation Love people appear gives won't have time to the studies. Things is important. We proactive in exclaiming walls amphion to help whether they are specialist tools. Okay games on. Otherwise i'm helping distribute them so that people off themselves as well as often careful. Yeah like. I've experienced a little bit today. You have the best laid plans for you know you got you to the list for the day and then you get up at breakfast time. Something blows up your morning. Pretty much caregiving goes. You know you think okay. Well i'll take my mom to the doctor or we'll go to the park or whatever and then you know they have a different idea or they're having a bad day and i do think that as my generation in you you must be a must be one of the old millennials. Right tracy four identified makes me millennials. Yeah you're in the middle. So i'm gen-x i'll be when this episode comes out. I'll be fifty four. I got a birthday at a week. I think yes a week. And it's like irrelevant is about this time and one of the things that i have found with a podcast which obviously is technology. Is that a lot of caregivers. They're older and they're just clueless. Even run across people that are about my age. There was a gal my the showed up. She needed a support group like now today and so she showed up his back in the old days. When you could meet in person. She showed up to my support group from twenty miles away from my old hometown. And i said oh. I've got the perfect solution for you. My podcast and i'm china's show her and of course. I have an iphone and android phone. So i was having troubles because i'm not familiar with that. And she has. Oh do those things anyway. And i'm like it would really help you because i talked to lake fantastic people and she just blew me off like whatever i. I don't have time to think about a podcast mike. It's the easiest way to get advice and information so i'm hoping as we you know. Move through my generation your generation that it won't be sent a challenge to use technology to support our caregiving needs and is your focus with the charity mostly on mental health apps no not specifically but focuses on technology. I saw the empty We can distribute technology broadly cheaply and it also is ideas. My day job. This is my specialty network can understand how whips we can for. Relatively low costs distributed. Old bills will put k gives in touch with the right technology. That's going to help them. So the impact probably won't be as great as for example to support group but the impact can be brewed. Sir podcast princeton's what you mappin fantastic you all of this information or these impact trees from his love of people. Don't know about the concept you're describing. I think we push push the different types of boulder available essentially build towns. You just saw people. I should have a fax. You know how did you decide. Well tell me about okay. Well we've talked kind. Roundabout it into the forget me not charity. Tell me tell me about what you're doing to raise awareness and hopefully raise money to get all this fantastic stuff happening so. The game plan is actually road from portugal and europe and contents of europe to french guiana. Which is in sacramento. So we're gonna grow across the atlantic ocean. Agony essentially almost three thousand eight hundred miles and be three of us in the boats. We will beat a fist people. Whoever this particular passage we hope to break the record for being the fastest revenue which should be a fifty days so the pippa says two of the raised fist. Nine of capital will not to be phones onto defense Yes that's the game

Alzheimer's Society Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Mansell BEN Facebook Tracy Sir Podcast Princeton Mappin China Boulder Europe Guiana Portugal Atlantic Ocean Sacramento
Forget Me Knot,  A Journey to Support Caregivers

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | Last month

Forget Me Knot, A Journey to Support Caregivers

"So with me today. All the way from way across the pond is johnny ball. He is with the forget me not charity. It is designed to end the silent suffering of dementia caregivers mostly in the uk. But i'm sure we can expand a little bit someday. So thanks for joining me johnny. So your mom took care of your dad for many years tell me about your dad and your caregiving journey. Yes so my dad. Got fronted dimension when i was full team. Mac i mean we didn't know initially kinda very subtle onset sir some stuff assigns. Some sort of an ocd behavior and habits ejaculated needs to have sort of started coming in and we. We weren't really sure what is meant. Probably when i was seventeen means fooling diagnosed and definitely before at the age tom shanklin saddam was now twenty years ago so he had yes hunts and and then he had to mention until two years ago when he passed away and and the majority of that time he lived at home. My mum and it was just because my sister. Self we guns university on my other system rather Back ceremony on singlehandedly. Careful for him. Full probably nolan probably fifteen years until it's long time i mean as nearly law tougher laws on sarah and tools variants He was to be introspective scare him. You're amazing awesome. But even then i mean did doesn't end full primary care as you know grown same every single day. She still you know she can go on holiday. She just went down and look at the data. even she wasn't enough to all the time she loves him. Most of the to worry. Also vistas right in terms of you always concerned a well-being the and worrying if it comes to bowl of marrying a happy state of mind and that's all still there. Yeah so that was. Conical happens is really back about seeing my mum's dedication. How tough was even though. She handled it incredibly news so stoic. Yeah it was. That serve inspired this inside this expedition. Maturity stop so. How's she doing now. she's doing well. Yeah crazy agree raw. She's she goes now. I'd say sure exactly now so that it was To two hundred years ago died. Since then i guess she suggested completely to new life. Ace i suppose the even though she's a stephanie very different way of living and in some sense of relief. I suppose it's still transitions dara. It's interesting because you still have guilt. Like i know especially now with the holidays coming. There's just times when i think you know. I tried so hard with my mom and like christmas. Two thousand nineteen. Our city. park is full of christmas. Trees that are decorated with different organizations or businesses. Some of them just decorate 'em however they want some decorate them with the theme like one of them was basically a pizza christmas tree so all. The decorations looked like slices of pepperoni slices of pizza. Which is kind of not super christmas. But it was very cute. I took her there because it was bright. It was outside it. You know i thought. Oh she'll love this and it was just like she was like clueless and it was and she was honoring. I think she was having a bad day. And it's hard knowing. That was her last christmas. We did have a really good lunch on the twenty third of december and then everything went to hell after that. So there's interestingly enough you still have like these guilt feelings. Like i should have done more could have done more and it takes a while to get through those i think so. It's i'm i'm finding that with myself and other caregivers that are in my position. So if you guys are experiencing that it's pretty normal which is frustrating. But there it is so. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved ones. In your opinion like you know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. i think. Give a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of gt Which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista

Johnny Ball Tom Shanklin Saddam Dementia Johnny Nolan Dara Alzheimer's Society Sarah Alzheimer's Association UK Stephanie Alzheimer's Mansell Facebook BEN
Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

Breaking Biotech

03:47 min | Last month

Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

"The first thing. I want to mention of course is what we're really dealing with here when we're looking at specifically companies in the next generation space. Now i'm going to belabor the slight even less than i did last time basically for good phase three data. I feel it'd be good. Expect a company trade between at a minimum really of ten to twenty billion dollars market cap and for companies. That are kind of earlier in the pipeline. I would say they've shown some good phase one b or some good early phase two a data. We can expect them to trade around at one billion dollar market cap and that seems to be the case so far and there's obviously tons of information that we can use to say whether or not they should be trading at a higher value or a lower value than that. But that's generally what i'm going into this with and using the data that's available out there. You can really make your own assessment. What you think is a fair value for some of these companies but anyway just to show this slide quickly because we need to know what we're dealing with here so keep all that in mind as we look at the market cap of these different companies. Today and the first company. I want to touch on. Is a company called aspira. Fire ticker symbol. Ha they closed on friday. The fifth at nineteen dollars and eighteen cents a share giving them a market cap of seven hundred million dollars they're q. Three twenty twenty net loss was eight point five million dollars and they had a q. Three twenty twenty current assets of two hundred thirty two million dollars and then they also didn't offering in february of this year adding another hundred three million dollars to their balance sheet their q. Three twenty twenty current liabilities. Sit an eight million dollars and to give some background of the company they went. Ipo in september of two thousand twenty at seventeen dollars per share so they're not trading it too much of a premium for matt but for anybody looking to take a position in the short term. I do want to remind you that. The lockup occurs on march seventeenth and an additional twelve million shares. That were previously locked up from the ipo are now going to be added to the flow. Which is at twenty three point. Seven million dollars today. so companies. That had this lockup expiration. I caution against taking a long position in only because the dilution. That's going to occur after the lockup is going to put some pressure on the stock price so keep that in mind but the company is looking at commercializing an asset that targets the hypothesis that growth factor pathway also known as the met receptor. And they're doing this to try and treat different. Cns disorders so there specifically using compound called a t h one zero seven and this was previously known as andy x one. Zero one. seven if you're looking in the literature and they're trying to treat alzheimer's and parkinson's disease but this and then they also a small molecule version of this where they're going to be looking at neuropsychiatric disorders like depression. And there's some benefits to using a small molecule version verses the other version using a t h zero one seven. But i'm not going to focus on that. I'm really just kinda talk about the molecule. That's going to be treated for alzheimer's and parkinson's disease and before we do that though i did want focus a little bit on event related potential and a touchdown this on a couple other episodes but i wanted to go a little bit more in depth because the main readout that a fire is focusing on is this p three hundred data point and so what event related potential is a quick primer. It's a q. Eeg measurement but it's a functional version of that so a lot of companies will show a q. e. e. g. measurement of just baseline brain activity. And what this does is it. Just measures brain electrical activity and q. E. e. g. sanford quantitative electro So the baseline measurement is useful. I guess but what's more impactful is actually do a sensory event which is a better surrogate for actual cognitive ability.

Aspira Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Matt Andy Depression Sanford
test

Menace 2 Society Podcast

01:40 min | Last month

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"Is kind of a pain. Sometimes if you're just trying to listen so this is a mash up. Some of its talking about the al washington turning down tennessee job. Talk about torrents gibson. What happened to him. And the metoo movement and how he was really victim to the metoo movement and also to unbelievable stories about the recruitment of torrance gibson so awesome stories and then at the end of this if you are a patriot subscriber for two dollars and ninety nine cents. You're listener you get to listen to full episodes on patriot dot com forward slash minutes sports. We have the full call in show so this is over an hour long show. I think it's almost two hours long so plenty of content. You got to kill two hours to listen to me talk. I guess if that's that's what you wanna do so check it out. Let me know looking for feedback. Go on apple podcast. Give us a five star review if you could or just shoot me a message on twitter. Anything really patriot. If you're a subscriber what you think what you think about the direction. We're heading what you think we could enhance and grow one two more things kind of clean house. We're doing a charity. March madness square box thing. So check it out on twitter. If you're on it's already on there for one hundred bucks you get entered you get a square. If the in that square plays in all sixty three of the march madness games and every round the money you win goes up up to the final. The the national game. If you hit the last two numbers of both scores you win a thousand dollars. Half of that money going to go to my grandfather's charity. The early jean. Bruce charitable benefits which goes to alzheimer's research. So check that out. And also if you're into gambling check out our minutes. Two picks on twitter patriot dot com forward slash. Mets two picks almost hit seventy percent on college basketball up. Like one hundred. Seventy eight units crazy. So if you're

Al Washington Torrance Gibson Gibson Tennessee Twitter Apple Alzheimer's Bruce Mets Basketball
Johnson & Johnson begins shipping single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:49 sec | Last month

Johnson & Johnson begins shipping single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

"It is roll out time for America's third weapon against Cove in 19 after the CDC authorized Johnson and Johnson single dose vaccine for emergency use and adults 18 and older the company's shipping out nearly four million doses of the vaccine with a goal of 100 Million By June, Johnson and Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky spoke about it with Bloomberg's David Weston. We've got a safe got ineffective. Single shot vaccine that could be refrigerated using very standard procedures, and that's going to be available right here in the United States, the tune of 100 million doses by June of this year, he says, What normally would take 5 to 7 years has taken 5 to 7 months, and he believes these new types of vaccine technologies they're gonna have broad applications for things like cancer, Alzheimer's or other diseases.

Johnson Johnson Ceo Alex Gorsky David Weston CDC United States Bloomberg Alzheimer's Cancer
Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:45 min | 2 months ago

Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

"Heireann droop wrote here host of the green podcasts. When it comes down to what we're made of so much of it is about food. Food literally builds us brick by brick cell-by-cell that means what we eat provides. The building blocks that make up the entire body which means unfortunately for a lot of people. They're made up of junk. Our poor food choices gravely impact our brain health resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed illness prone and more overweight than ever before my guest on today's minneapolis owed doctors. David and austin pearl mutter and shawn stevenson talked to us about how our health our relationships and even our thinking have been damaged by our western processed food diet. They discuss how our lifestyles and diet. Impact our brain function and our ability to make good choices as well as how we interact and show up for our relationships. Let's listen in starting with my interviews with doctors. David and austin parameter. I want to read a passage from the book. Our are being gravely manipulated resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed distressful illness prone and overweight than ever before. So we talked about those two aspects which is how do we help and support people to actually make these decisions and implement change in their life to achieve to achieve whatever goal that they wanna focus on. But let's start off with what is actually hijacking. Our brand that. It makes it difficult to do. So can you describe the landscape landscape and the state of threats that our brains are under today. Sure we'll start with one of the most important and probably most straightforward of the its food. We need food. We need to eat food to keep going. But what is it that we're putting into our bodies. A recent study showed that sixty eight percent of the foods that people eat and buy in. The store have added sugar. We know sugar isn't really a good thing for us but the question has to be. What is it doing to our thinking. What is it doing to our brains and is the question that i think were now able to answer but we haven't been looking into nearly enough. What is sugar doing to our brains. Will sugar fosters inflammation which listeners know is not good for the body. Chronic inflammation has been implicated in variety of problems. Things like heart disease. Things like alzheimer's disease. What we're understanding now is that inflammation this process that sugar up regulates changes are thinking. So let's let that sink in. It's not that it changes are thinking in the long run. It changes are thinking right now. Inflammation has been shown in several recent trials to bias our decision making towards short-term impulsive thinking so to put that into context if you're eating a diet that increases inflammation you're going to make more short term or decisions like eating diet that increases inflammation choosing the wrong foods to be eating and that transcends just diet it gets into other things if you're somebody who struggles with all nine shopping. Now you have a diet. that increases inflammation. You're going to be picking the short term reward and that means your your shopping. Cart might be filling up online with things that you don't need so again. Food is one of those entry points. It's something that has been made incredibly palatable over the years and while that means it might taste good. We need to appreciate that. It is activating these circuits within our bodies within our brains that are making our decisions more impulsive more short term oriented and in the big picture taking us away from the decisions that will lead us to health and will lead us to happiness and let me add Before we move on from food and because it is It is a very important topic because we recognize that in a simplistic model there to areas of the brain. That are involved in decision. Making the prefrontal cortex which is the more advanced area. If i may and the more primitive if i may amid della and you know there's a balance between the two we tend to With inflammation unfortunately have more input from the primitive and magdala and as such are decisions are not really looking at the future as opposed if we can reconnect to the prefrontal cortex and that is the area of the brain that allows us to participate in a process of thinking of the long term consequences of our actions today s to be more empathetic. It allows us to be more compassionate has to tamp down this sense of us versus them. That comes from the amid bella. So we're trying to reconnect to the prefrontal. Cortex and in a as per our discussion of food and inflammation inflammation absolutely threatens that connection and i have to say that A thought came to me this morning while in the shower some of my best thoughts come to me and shower and having read the new york times this morning they had an interesting article about what's going on in brazil with reference to deforestation the amazon. Not a good thing. I think most people would agree with that but that said what has happened to the thought process around the globe. is influenced by the globalization of the western pro inflammatory diet. That as this western diet a finds its way to every corner of the globe. It's changing how people across our planet think and behave

Austin Pearl Mutter Shawn Stevenson Austin Parameter Alzheimer's Disease David Minneapolis Chronic Inflammation Heart Disease Inflammation Inflammation Della New York Times Brazil Amazon
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

06:00 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Changing the timing of his medication helped a ton. and then with bob. It's the narrative you know. So don't ask me if this is like what really made the difference but we told him that our dog rocco who's obsessed with him is older and he's not doing well because he's not getting enough sleep and that if we can get rocker asleep more he's going to do so much better and what's happening. Bob is when he hears you out of your room. He wakes up. So if you can stay in your room. Because if bob stays in his room he continues to sleep. He hasn't just sit there he like. He lays back down and he sleeps. So maybe it's the narrative. I don't know foodwise were just really increasing. Anything that helps cognition mc t oil the supplements that were giving him thankfully allow. The supplements are available in gummy form. Because he didn't want pills he suspicious of that you know we can give them to one pill a day and he's really suspicious of it so the gums are great because of just be like. Hey bob you just finished your lunch. You want to have a snack or you wanna have your dessert. And he's like sure so he does. That's awesome those things. Men certainly. I've done my research on gumy's and there are certain nutrients do not absorb as well via gummy. And then there's some nutrients that actually absorb better with a gummy. But the point is that's our only option and that's another thing. People are so quick to go. Like you shouldn't be giving gumy's they're not as effective. Yeah i know but it's more effective the nothing. Can you tell how annoyed. Am with people who are like no it alls i know people. Meanwhile but it just like when you're in it every day and people like i know you you're just like please please please. I'll ask if i wanted your opinion on this. Do you think we really hadn't considered a better way to give them to him. This is the most effective way. Because it's the only way right now. We can get him to take these nutrients so all right. Anyways i digress. That's been super helpful. So doing healthy fats doing the right timing of food doing the timing of nutrients yes. We're doing melatonin. yes we're doing. You know natural supplements that aid in sleep. Yes we're doing. Cbd doing cbd a gummy forum which is awesome. Because thank god for my soul cd. We're going through those things like crazy. They're gumy's are awesome Bob loves them. And so that's where we're at this week. Thank you for all the questions and concerns. I am trying to keep these updates as much about britain. I and what's going on with bob and try not to involve the rest of the family too much but just please know that they are involved just because i'm not talking about them. I'm really just kind of doing that. Out of respect but everyone is involved in everyone is on the same page. That's remarkable and the reason why raw the same pages because we talk to each other and we communicate and we're patients am yes we all have times where we've disagreed or had a different idea of what was best or that happens. This is really really a common thing. When families are dealing with this see a rift created to see old wounds come up to see people's unsolved unprocessed traumas from the past resurface in moments. Like these which is why. I always telling you guys go to therapy because all your is gonna come up later is going to come up in your next marriage your next relationship. You're next difficult time. These things come up so if you're just trying to press everything down suvival mode. That's great for you but if you really love your friends and family members and you don't wanna be that person do some therapy and work through your past traumas and work through your past pain. I don't care what age you are all going to come back up again. It does and it's a hard thing to have to live with all your life and you don't have to so you know. Get a therapist. I think that's a really another powerful theme in our family is everyone has done or irregularly i should say everyone but like you know a lot of us have and that is what allows you to not take things personal. If you don't sort through your own things everything feels personal. And you're always in survival mode as just so nice to be in a place where you're like. I know this is impersonal. I know we can work through this. I know we can find a solution. And i'm sorry it's so much easier to apologize when you've worked through your own things and i just see so many families and i've been hearing from them from you guys like reaching out to me and telling me like these crazy scenarios there just sad because the pain from the current situation is bringing up all the pain from the past. And that's a bummer. Because it's painful enough. You know what i'm saying. And thank you for giving me this opportunity to chat with you and keep you updated if you want minute to minute. Follow me on instagram stories. I guess it's like a reality. Tv show people are like. I need more bob. I need to see what's going on with bob today and i appreciate that and i know he does and thank you for those of you have reached out who had them as a coach era. A student of his. And i appreciate you helping me bring awareness to the fight against alzheimer's because we got to be able to solve this alzheimer's and dementia by the way i'll do an episode or maybe i'll talk about next friday the difference between alzheimer's and dementia but just to cut to the chase. Alzheimer's is a form of dementia. But it's a disease and other forms if you just have dementia. It might not be a disease. It might be symptoms from other conditions or other things that have happened. Like you've had a stroke and you could have dementia. You could have a brain injury and have dementia but alzheimer's is a form of dementia. But it is in fact a disease all right guys. I love you seriously. You mean the world me. Thanks for letting me do this. I'll talk to you soon. Oh hey let's chat about this inside the podcast group. Okay so you just go to facebook and search pod squad and we can chat. They're also brock..

today next friday facebook instagram one pill a day Bob this week britain bob alzheimer dementia
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"So this was an interesting week. The first part of it was really hard because bob was super sleep-deprived and it meant seeing him in a way that we were like okay so he's taken a turn and he's gotten much worse he's a further stage along the maybe what we thought we were like when a couple of days where we were like okay. So he's getting worse. These are bad days and then miraculously the very next day. He got like so much better. And that's just the disease and a couple of other things. It's a management of lifestyle and so much of watching this and keeping a journal tracking what he's eating tracking. What supplements were giving him tracking his sleep his activity what we're doing with him each day. Those things really do matter so much and it gives me great joy knowing that i mean our bodies and our brains like not just about bob but like our bodies and our brains are so finely tuned that if we do the right things if we treat them the right way if we pay attention. We can have optimal performance. This isn't just about him. It's like to me it's like. Wow i have to be more in tune in less lackadaisical. About like yeah. I guess that was good enough sleep. Yeah i guess pretty well. I think i took most of my supplements like it's making me realize what a humongous difference. It makes the fine details so let me share with you. What i mean by that so we had a couple of days where it was just so sad. I'm just going to be honest and tell you like. I was very weepy for a couple of days. Because i was looking at him. Not weepy for myself. Not we'd be burgess feeling so sorry for bob just like my heart was breaking because he is at a stage where he's aware that something's not right and fill those couple of days where he was really bad he. He was emotional. He was hallucinating however when he was hallucinating. He was aware that he was hallucinating. And he was apologetic and he's up so sorry a messing everything up aren't because my brain my brain So dumb you know. Like he doesn't know what it is but he knows his brain isn't working. This is probably a really horrible analogy. But have you ever like had a little too much to drink and like hits you very suddenly and you like dang it and like there's this moment just before you're like really tips. You're really drunk where you're like. Oh dang it oh shoot. it's come oh no. I had one too many drinks right. And you're trying to pull yourself back and you just know it's inevitable and it's this weird feeling where you're like. Oh man i messed up. I messed up dang it now just gotta suffer through right. I just feel like he's sometimes at that stage so we had a couple of days or a really bad really emotional. He was super confused. I mean just cognition was really gone zero short term memory and when i say short term like he just was repeating the same question literally thirty seconds later and couldn't remember anyone's names and just really anxious and the worst part of all was he looked so scared as is really wide and they just get the scared child like look that is so foreign to see in a man who was so powerful and a patriarch. So i hated that. And i made me really weepy. I just felt for him so much but that also inspired me to go. You know balls to the wall with my research and fine tuning in just like okay. What else can we do. What is why is it so bad these last couple of days and obviously sleep. We knew that had a lot to do with it and stress. But how do we improve this. Like what can we do. And you just have to keep trying and trying and trying and trying so knock on wood. The last three days have been in sane in a good way okay last night. No joke don't even understand this. He got nine hours asleep and he's different person. He's joking. he knows names. He is active. He's being cocky himself obviously. He's still struggles to find certain words and sometimes things do and don't make sense. It's not like he's got his memory back but you see more of him and he's not anxious and he's not nervous and he's not scared and that's awesome so nine hours sleep that's huge. So what do we do. We are experimenting with the timing of his medication. I'm sorry i can't remember. The name awarded taking right. Now i wanna say shoot wellbutrin maybe yeah a starter dose of wellbutrin and. We've decided that we were giving it to him. Maybe too late so he being too earlier in the day and thank you so much for everybody. Who's reaching out with suggestions. I really do appreciate. It can also sometimes be like really overwhelming can event for a second. Okay good if i get one more message from someone who's like my father in law had complete reversal of alzheimer's by we rubbed essential oils on his temples. Like okay. I'm just going to let that go no you didn't you know and if you did then you might want to tell the whole medical community that you have found the cure to alzheimer's because they get to a certain stage where there is no one who has completely reverse it. After they reached the stage not one person now. There are certainly been people who've had a reversal meeting like a lessening of symptoms. A slowing of the progression. And there's some great books on that but it just drives me crazy when people say stuff like that. Because i'm like you know what i pray to. You're not peddling your stuff to someone and giving them false hopes because it's just not possible like everything helps but like there's anyways i digress. Changing the timing of his medication helped a ton. and then with bob. It's the narrative you know. So don't ask me if this is like what really made the difference but we told him that our dog rocco who's obsessed with him is older and he's not doing well because he's not getting

Lean first episode next day each day first part fridays bob
The Alzheimers Chronicles

The Chalene Show

06:02 min | 2 months ago

The Alzheimers Chronicles

"So this was an interesting week. The first part of it was really hard because bob was super sleep-deprived and it meant seeing him in a way that we were like okay so he's taken a turn and he's gotten much worse he's a further stage along the maybe what we thought we were like when a couple of days where we were like okay. So he's getting worse. These are bad days and then miraculously the very next day. He got like so much better. And that's just the disease and a couple of other things. It's a management of lifestyle and so much of watching this and keeping a journal tracking what he's eating tracking. What supplements were giving him tracking his sleep his activity what we're doing with him each day. Those things really do matter so much and it gives me great joy knowing that i mean our bodies and our brains like not just about bob but like our bodies and our brains are so finely tuned that if we do the right things if we treat them the right way if we pay attention. We can have optimal performance. This isn't just about him. It's like to me it's like. Wow i have to be more in tune in less lackadaisical. About like yeah. I guess that was good enough sleep. Yeah i guess pretty well. I think i took most of my supplements like it's making me realize what a humongous difference. It makes the fine details so let me share with you. What i mean by that so we had a couple of days where it was just so sad. I'm just going to be honest and tell you like. I was very weepy for a couple of days. Because i was looking at him. Not weepy for myself. Not we'd be burgess feeling so sorry for bob just like my heart was breaking because he is at a stage where he's aware that something's not right and fill those couple of days where he was really bad he. He was emotional. He was hallucinating however when he was hallucinating. He was aware that he was hallucinating. And he was apologetic and he's up so sorry a messing everything up aren't because my brain my brain So dumb you know. Like he doesn't know what it is but he knows his brain isn't working. This is probably a really horrible analogy. But have you ever like had a little too much to drink and like hits you very suddenly and you like dang it and like there's this moment just before you're like really tips. You're really drunk where you're like. Oh dang it oh shoot. it's come oh no. I had one too many drinks right. And you're trying to pull yourself back and you just know it's inevitable and it's this weird feeling where you're like. Oh man i messed up. I messed up dang it now just gotta suffer through right. I just feel like he's sometimes at that stage so we had a couple of days or a really bad really emotional. He was super confused. I mean just cognition was really gone zero short term memory and when i say short term like he just was repeating the same question literally thirty seconds later and couldn't remember anyone's names and just really anxious and the worst part of all was he looked so scared as is really wide and they just get the scared child like look that is so foreign to see in a man who was so powerful and a patriarch. So i hated that. And i made me really weepy. I just felt for him so much but that also inspired me to go. You know balls to the wall with my research and fine tuning in just like okay. What else can we do. What is why is it so bad these last couple of days and obviously sleep. We knew that had a lot to do with it and stress. But how do we improve this. Like what can we do. And you just have to keep trying and trying and trying and trying so knock on wood. The last three days have been in sane in a good way okay last night. No joke don't even understand this. He got nine hours asleep and he's different person. He's joking. he knows names. He is active. He's being cocky himself obviously. He's still struggles to find certain words and sometimes things do and don't make sense. It's not like he's got his memory back but you see more of him and he's not anxious and he's not nervous and he's not scared and that's awesome so nine hours sleep that's huge. So what do we do. We are experimenting with the timing of his medication. I'm sorry i can't remember. The name awarded taking right. Now i wanna say shoot wellbutrin maybe yeah a starter dose of wellbutrin and. We've decided that we were giving it to him. Maybe too late so he being too earlier in the day and thank you so much for everybody. Who's reaching out with suggestions. I really do appreciate. It can also sometimes be like really overwhelming can event for a second. Okay good if i get one more message from someone who's like my father in law had complete reversal of alzheimer's by we rubbed essential oils on his temples. Like okay. I'm just going to let that go no you didn't you know and if you did then you might want to tell the whole medical community that you have found the cure to alzheimer's because they get to a certain stage where there is no one who has completely reverse it. After they reached the stage not one person now. There are certainly been people who've had a reversal meeting like a lessening of symptoms. A slowing of the progression. And there's some great books on that but it just drives me crazy when people say stuff like that. Because i'm like you know what i pray to. You're not peddling your stuff to someone and giving them false hopes because it's just not possible like everything helps but like there's anyways i digress. Changing the timing of his medication helped a ton. and then with bob. It's the narrative you know. So don't ask me if this is like what really made the difference but we told him that our dog rocco who's obsessed with him is older and he's not doing well because he's not getting

BOB Burgess Alzheimer Rocco
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Bodies and our brains are so finely tuned that if we do the right things if we treat them the right way if we pay attention. We can have optimal performance. This isn't just about him. It's like to me it's like. Wow i have to be more in tune in less lackadaisical. About like yeah. I guess that was good enough sleep. Yeah i guess pretty well. I think i took most of my supplements like it's making me realize what a humongous difference. It makes the fine details so let me share with you. What i mean by that so we had a couple of days where it was just so sad. I'm just going to be honest and tell you like. I was very weepy for a couple of days. Because i was looking at him. Not weepy for myself. Not we'd be burgess feeling so sorry for bob just like my heart was breaking because he is at a stage where he's aware that something's not right and fill those couple of days where he was really bad he. He was emotional. He was hallucinating however when he was hallucinating. He was aware that he was hallucinating. And he was apologetic and he's up so sorry a messing everything up aren't because my brain my brain So dumb you know. Like he doesn't know what it is but he knows his brain isn't working. This is probably a really horrible analogy. But have you ever like had a little too much to drink and like hits you very suddenly and you like dang it and like there's this moment just before you're like really tips. You're really drunk where you're like. Oh dang it oh shoot. it's come oh no. I had one too many drinks right. And you're trying to pull yourself back and you just know it's inevitable and it's this weird feeling where you're like. Oh man i messed up..

couple of days one too many drinks days couple
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"What is going on. Hey thanks so much for joining me on the show. Lean and i'm recording this from the interior of my car heading back from the gym and this is an update. This is an update on what's going on in our lives. With regard to alzheimer's this is something i've been doing and i don't know how long i'll do it for. It's my personal pursuit really on fridays. It's way for me to kind of make sense of things to vent to share ideas to connect with you guys because a lot of you have parents who are boomers and or your caring for someone or it's just so prevalent that i'm really connecting with so many view not just alzheimer's but with regard to dementia or parkinson's or parents in general who you end up. It's just such a weird thing. It's such a strange beautiful but also very sad journey. And thank you for being honest with me if you're feel like your little behind. This is the first episode. You've caught if you look in the show notes you'll see that we put links back dated from kind of some of the. Just bring up the speed right so you could know the order to listen things if you want to do that. Otherwise it's jumping where we are all right here. We go so this was an interesting week. The first part of it was really hard because bob was super sleep-deprived and it meant seeing him in a way that we were like okay so he's taken a turn and he's gotten much worse he's a further stage along the maybe what we thought we were like when a couple of days where we were like okay. So he's getting worse. These are bad days and then miraculously the very next day. He got like so much better. And that's just the disease and a couple of other things. It's a management of lifestyle and so much of watching this and keeping a journal tracking what he's eating tracking. What supplements were giving him tracking his sleep his activity what we're doing with him each day. Those things really do matter so much and it gives me great joy knowing that i mean our bodies and our brains like not just about bob but like our.

Lean first episode next day each day first part fridays bob
interview With Anna Gunn

The Candid Frame

04:14 min | 2 months ago

interview With Anna Gunn

"Over the years. It's been my pleasure to showcase talented photographers of alzheimer's and at different stages of their careers each his provided some wonderful insight into what it means to be a photographer along with sharing the stories of their work and careers. Some photographers have worked. Hard to create and nurture a community photographers. Like aline. smithson of the lines craft blog one of those areas of the miami screw photography festival. And george nabet you of the evening with a masters series have created spaces for photographers to grow. Learn and thrive and a gun has also done. This is the founder of the puerto photography festival that happens annually in portugal though the pandemic led to the cancellation of the event last year and still managed to create a rare opportunity for photographers to get together and collaborate with mansion is an international collection of thirteen female photographers. We found creative ways of interpreting their experiences through covid nineteen the resulting work. The way it showcased online is a wonderful example of innovation and moving beyond limitations. This is ivorian ex and welcome back to the candidate for him So glad you reached out to me in started in and told me about the project. I love glimpses of positivity during these these dark times. Tell us about this. Because i i seen a lot of projects that have revolved around this period of time. But i thought this was really unique. Any take on on it tino. I've i don't even know where to start with this project because it's it's such an aviation In searching for away because obviously the last time we spoke with about festival so in having to move everything around. I think everybody has this. There's no getting around that you've had to move some way shape or form and trying to move around and find a place where that might live in some way shape or form. I've had tested a lot of software. In order to save. We could make that live online and it really couldn't i was searching and it just couldn't but in my searches. I saw a lot of people who were creative in this time. And that project state put them on online galleries and i could see the creativity. That are coming out with with amazing. But i kind of wanted to see what a group off if i say it. It is a demographic of photographers could come up with and the women that i chose. I chose it. Take you to deal with female photographers. Because i remember reading an article. I think back in february last year. That said that the coronavirus was killing. Feminism. and that was strong hemline with that. That seems a bit strong to me. Come on guardian newspaper that has that real anna erect the stats ended. It was horrifying to read. Because they stated that women in work were earning less than men and so in a household that was locked down with the men would take precedence over the female of the house. The female would have through golf to their kids and survey korea would put on hold and it listed these horrible things and in february of two say look dated someone yet that seems rather and blame on. I'll put that away. And as he progressed a kind of sold that was really true. And in the year. I was contacted by photography's many of which was struggling to find a new way in

Alzheimer's George Nabet Smithson Aline Portugal Tino Miami Anna Korea Golf
Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

"Marty Schottenheimer one two hundred regular season games with four NFL teams his family said through a spokesman that he died last night at a hospice in North Carolina Schottenheimer was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in twenty fourteen he was the eighth winningest coach in NFL history in twenty one seasons with Cleveland Kansas city Washington and San Diego but he was just five and thirteen in the postseason his success was rooted in Marty ball a conservative approach that featured a strong running game and tough defense I'm showing up later

Marty Schottenheimer Alzheimer's NFL Schottenheimer North Carolina Kansas City Cleveland San Diego Washington Marty
BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:24 min | 2 months ago

BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

"Suit. Today may not looking with thirty eight or centers every time that we are the change so having their kind of a big picture that they can in the federal candidate may influence levin affecting human body looking on the older to get first of all. Give me the tools to ask wished and then the question is are starting to emerging. Of course it's everything is that they did just chemistry and that still in then so having these abilities in these tools first of all change our been away. Many many many scientists physicians collaborations companies approach means. Just that the doing each experiment but they know nothing about the molecules using. Can i purify in with him. I don't know the those music In these open the door for me last year to enter to many different angles of different illnesses and diseases using candidates. You know the best thing. Neuro physician in the world approaching means today the doing this experiment. They need you with me. You're not saying you know this is this is all and we've you know so more and more and more may lab change the way you i researched talking to grow in. There was things so out there. Light with a patient. You know epilepsy or a sleep disorders or in two zero zero there on the on the patient instead just i want to do the understand now the reason. Why can't this effect in which compound how to improve so the roof from allow of six seven students to a level forty five plow which have different groups. I have a group of chemists doing analysis everything every group to doing cancer biology and we can talk about the perfume one every doing a research around neuro. Degenerative diseases like alzheimer's epilepsy. The order In every group. That's working how kennedy's affect the immune system few types of small small think about in small. But it's not be groups. It's individual the doing other things in the last five years in other big project that we did. We crane to big data database in israel on the patient. So in the last five years every cannabis in being bigness. Again there is you know there is a probes to be a small country despite for your board does day and but there is benefit that everybody knows everybody. And everybody's working together. So until last year we had just eight authorize globals just eight greenhouse is easier to work with them to follow up to every candidates. Be every a cannabis They ever product. The patient can get go through my lap. I analyzed all defeated candidates in a in there on the other side. We follow up on on the patient. How it's affecting so does it died improve. Sleep mainly kind of sign of and which i don't call it side effect. If you have a problem of saying oh slipping improving scooping. It's not your scientific. But we we measure that in which we started to to bring that to bed. Get into completed to try to match. Which type of cannabis in which profile of candidates affecting which illnesses in what

Levin Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Epilepsy Epilepsy Kennedy Cancer Israel
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

06:30 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"You seriously. I don't even know what to tell you. It's like better than a birthday card. But anyways britain. I went away for my wasn't we went away for work happened to fall on my birthday. People like you would work on your birthday. I'm like yeah because to me every day feels like a celebration. I just feel so lucky to do it. I get to do and like i really didn't do anything on my birthday. I've always felt that way. That's my mom's day. So i sent her flowers and you know anyways i wanted to do something that i really enjoyed. And we were invited to speak at eight couples retreat. Thank you to chris lori harder. It was a couples retreat for entrepreneurs. And i'm like oh. My gosh is my favorite in my favorite city. We could snowboard if there's some snow and with some of my favorite people talking about my favorite thing entrepreneurship and relationships in marriage. Let's do it so that was awesome now in order for us to leave. We had my mother-in-law fly in to help. Take care bob. And of course brett's brother rob is here locally and so between the two of them and brought to for a little bit so bob had lots of great attention and and also the consistency of being able to keep them at our house which is taken some time to get used to it for him now. I know many of you have asked about. You know his wife. Debbie and if you listen to podcasts you know the whole story but just to kind of give you the cliff house. Just he's a different person around her and going through. This has been incredibly incredibly hard on debbie. And i'm bob Both of them like physically emotionally draining. Just not good and we just knew like in order to help. Both of them thrive We needed to do our best to you. Know provide kind of a step in and that's hard because there's just hard i'm not going into the whole thing is just. It's just hard so debbie was here and a lot of you said like how to bob. Respond was interesting. it wasn't like it wasn't like super surprise. It was almost like he didn't know how long she been gone for. And that's kind of common in the stage. They can't Estimate time so you can tell him something is going to be doing in two days even though it's really like two months and you also don't want to tell him something you're doing three days from now because he'll obsess about it and ask you over and over and over and over just you. Just don't tell them what you're doing until you're doing it pretty much and So anyways that went well and it was nice for britain to get away. And that's kind of our plan right now. We're trying to sort all this out because you know you've been listening Brett dad and mom moved to colorado not too many months ago and now. It seems that bob is going to be here. So then what debbie by yourself colorado. What do they do with that house like. It's you know listen. Life is messy but everything can be figured out and it's easier if you just communicate number one and number two you have empathy. You have to have empathy so many family members not in this situation but it's not uncommon for families to just splinter in the season because one thinks they're doing more and this one thinks they're paying more in this one has different priorities and and feels judged and you know. I've seen this happen in other families and it's just not pretty and we are really trying to take the approach that we're gonna get this right but we're really trying to take the approach that it is an everyone doesn't equal part. It duchess now how this works. You know we happen to be in a season right now where were going to step up and be able to do. Spend more time with bob. And he's living with us but that's not to say it will change down the road and it's just i don't know i remember when my mom was in the situation with her own mother and how you know one sibling does this and another sibling. Does that in people compare and do more and you do less and it just. Who does that help frigging nobody. I always think if you have to do more whether it's in a situation like this or in your relationship or at work or in the world if you do more it's because god gave you more and more is expected of you. A lot of people on this planet do more than a lot of other people. But it's like nothing to complain about an and compare. Its you've been given a gift in when when much has been given much is expected. I'm sure i blew that cope. But you know what i'm saying. I just think that if you're going through this and you have a family member who is caring for another family member. I think you should just praise them reach out and ask them you know. What can i do to help. Or maybe send them some money or some flowers or card just acknowledging their work and and if it's if you're the caretaker and you have somebody in your family who's helping financially let them know how much that means just just we have to appreciate each other for what we can do anything other than that is. Just it's pointless like to judge each other and to point fingers or to say you should be doing it this way or that way. You just don't know you don't know what someone's capable of. You don't know what tools they have or don't have and so being anything other than loving and understanding just pointless because you're not going to change people. Okay so brenton. I got away i think things are i feel calmer. I think brett feels calmer those first couple of weeks. I felt like we had a newborn in the house. Like i think we were overly protective if that makes sense like when we were just like okay. I'm eat. how how. How much did he drink. Okay let let me measure. How many ounces of water you drink like we're just like i don't know like kind of wine you. I bring baby home. And i don't know when we brought home you know. I just remember driving in the car in the back seat holding his head even though he had like a car seat perfectly held.

colorado two two months brenton bob two days Both Brett chris lori harder Debbie three days brett rob first couple of weeks one sibling eight couples 's too many months ago money each
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"All that kind of make sense of it so thanks for being here. Let's do it well. I know last week's episode was really emotional. And i just from so many. I feel bad. Because i know some of you. You're really you know you are not prepared to be crying. That hard many of you were just crying because you hear me crying and Thanks for letting me do that. I i just want you to know like the real deal. And i post videos and updates about bob my stories and i really try to make sure it's dignified so you can see his essence you can see how awesome he is but also not to like sugar coat it and pretend that it doesn't happen. I just couldn't find you know me. I'm a researcher. And as soon as we found out. I was diagnosed with alzheimer's in two thousand sixteen i went into research mode and i found all the books and i found a few youtube series but there just aren't many and there weren't many where could actually watch the person who had alzheimers to to know what you would could expect at this stage bob's at stage late five i think To say because some days he seems a lot better and seems like early five and some days seems like late five but anyways i couldn't find any videos of someone at stage i found like one and so in my mind. I thought it would look a lot different. I thought i just didn't know it would still be so lovely that you get these little moments of their personality these moments of joy and funny things that you know sometimes humor's like spot freaking on and sometimes he's cocky and and then sometimes he can't remember what a fork is so it's weird and i just know that i really appreciated.

last week youtube two bob early five late five alzheimers thousand sixteen
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:48 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

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Tomorrow first daughter taylor
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Don't know if my kids are going to play quarterback. I don't know if they'll win to win it with all of us in mice your your son just wanted with all of us. He goes dude. I can't even imagine doing in the next year. We went out with all of us again but we won state like i can't. I can't top that that senior year. Appreciated that so much. That last six games i like zoo was like i just took it all in because i knew what was coming. I knew it was coming so i've kind of known this was happening for a long. You know what i mean. Just yeah. He's her missing stuff i mean. When do you think he started taking omega. He's never even taken omega. Three are living with us. Yeah i've got immoral omegas everyday. He so i've been taking omegas for five years six seven eight years so i mean i've been taking this stuff so i mean look at him like seventy five so mcguire was eighty three so mike. If it's in my dna to get it and maybe get an eighty four. Eighty five eighty five will sail my grandkids born with stereo early. Can't worry about that. I gotta worry about making sure. My life is our life is finding us. That's all i care. I really do is bag as i was at gambling. I really good at investing. I know what i'm doing. I know what i'm doing. We've multiplayer money so fast. So it's like. I was spending and have fun and keep getting healthy but as best i can you know. Do the little things in test. I should probably do a spec in three or four years is just how. I'm.

five years three four years next year six games six Three eighty Eighty five eight years mcguire eighty five seven seventy five eighty three mike four
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

02:09 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"And he goes. Yeah probably but i mean he had to have some help like we probably did have some help and then he told me how beautiful it made the ocean that he goes you. Just keep so clean. You just look so good today. You just keep it so nice like we'll thank you. I'm so now. I'm taking credit for the clean ocean in front of our house but every day he just is super complimentary no matter what i ask him to do because i'm always asking him to do like little cleaning things because that's part of his essence that's part of what he loved to juice. Stay busy so he probably thinks frigging slave-driver because on mccabe you wanna vacuum this. Do you mind wiping this down. Even thirty been wiped down because he's like yes absolutely. I got give it to me because he wants to be helpful. And that's what makes them thrive into. Many people just allow their alzheimer's family members to just sit and i understand. Sometimes you don't have the ability. The know how the resources the time to keep them motivated and active but if he can some great books i referred to them in there in the show. Notes are creating moments joy speaking alzheimer's the thirty six hour day. And there's a great series on youtube called care blazers. Yeah that's a really good serious to you. Anyways this next pieces from brittany kind of talking about where we are today after two weeks of full-time care and again like i said. I think it's harder on brett but if you listen to this you're going to hear me getting pretty weepy and it isn't because it's hard on me. It's because it just. I cry openly. When i am moved in. This man moves me. And i feel so blessed by god that we have this time. I don't know how long it will be. I don't know what will change tomorrow. But this has been a godsend all right here. We go Slow go by. That's true. But i have the memories with them. I'm good with those. I know that i'm taking care of somebody. That's not him like..

tomorrow today thirty youtube thirty six hour brittany two weeks brett alzheimer
"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

07:34 min | 2 months ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"I've been struggling like shea talk about this on the show like i always talk about whatever it is going through an i hyper focus on whatever it is ongoing through and try to talk about it in such a way that i can serve my audience whether it's me figuring out my gut health how to fix my brain recovering from orthodoxy. Look i i talk about what it is. I bent through. Because i believe in god's purpose in not my purpose but his and the things that we go through i believe once we've got on the other side of it we're supposed to teach from it and so i can't say that we're on the other side of this but there's already been some lessons that i really wanna share with you and and if i can be honest i just i need a place to talk about this and i don't know of social media is the place but i think fridays it strikes me. I'd like to share what we're going through. Because i know many of you have. Parents who are boomers and baby boomers are being ravished by dementia and alzheimer's they call it type prediabetes because it literally is that common now. There is alzheimer's that is more prevalent. If you carry one or both genes and then there is alzheimer's dementia that continues to increase and we believe in large part due to lifestyle due to exposure to toxins. Toxins like glyphosate. My father-in-law has won the genes for alzheimer's. His father started really declining from alzheimer's. At around age eighty-five baba's seventy five and he's at stage five already so his hit much earlier and much quicker. He spent forty five years on football fields and we know that football fields and especially public schools have been saturated with glyphosate also known as roundup weed killer. It's my personal belief that had to have contributed to his decline. Had to anyways my podcasts. A ben some of them recorded in my car. And that's because it's just a little more difficult to record in my home. At the moment given our current circumstances you might hear a tv on the background right now. Bob really really enjoys. This is so funny watching old interviews of himself like mesmerized. We can put on a football game. He's kind of into golf if we play an old interview of him he just sits forward and he laughs and sometimes he knows it's him and sometimes they'll say things like i'd say the that guy right there that guy right. They're smart and he doesn't know it's him. I don't think if you're curious like what. Bob was like just a few years ago when he was coaching. My son brock. I'm gonna put a link to a really cool interview that the two of them did together on youtube. I'll put a link to that in our show notes. Because i think you're to want to know this guy i believe is life has purpose. I believe that we were for some reason. Meant to be here. Obviously godwin have this all stars to align in such a way that we're able to spend this time with him we he's been here now for two weeks so i wanna play for you a recording. I don't even know brand new. I was recording. I wasn't planning on talking about the situation. We were talking about something else. And i just kept recording and he got really real and raw and i just wanna share with you. Because i think it's life. And i know many of you are going to this or have been through this and you'll be able to relate but in just two weeks time i have such a deep profound appreciation for any and all caregivers at can't imagine what this is like. If it's your spouse. I feel like that would be a thousand times harder than if it's a parent. I don't know he's not my biological father's my father in law but he feels like my father but i just have so much more of an appreciation for what my mother-in-law went through and she's doing well thank you for those of you who have asked and you know she's living in another state at the moment but we're trying to figure that out every day what he wants changes every day his mood. His energy needs what he will amount changes every hour. So it's a lot you've got to be on in brittany. were talking about. How much makes us feel kind of the way we did when we had small children. Where you can never relax. You're always on. You're always on high alert. You don't sleep soundly because you're listening to hear if they're crying and you can't close an eye because they might wander off. They might do something that they don't know could hurt them. And that's kind of the stage that he's in but he's also at a stage where he wants to be engaged but that whatever you're doing usually lasts about ten or fifteen minutes so you you have to constantly be coming up with new things new activities new ways to stimulate new ways to keep them motivated and and that's it's full time and it's incredibly rewarding. What's interesting is. I know this is probably harder. I'm brett emotionally. But i've become the emotional one in a sappy. Oh my god. I love him so much kind of way like i can't think of him and not start. Crying is not a sadness. I just think he's oh you know. It reminds me of one of my uncles. Who died of parkinson's and we heard that when he was a young man he was really scary. Had mean temper and people feared him and he was known to get fistfights and he was just kind of like a scary dude. By the time. I was old enough to have recollection of him. He was already starting to have signs of parkinson's and he was gentle and he was quiet and he was sweet. He was so so sweet. And i remember all of my relatives saying he wasn't like that as a young man. He was like a scary dude. And that's what everyone tells me about bob. Now i met bob when i was twenty one years old and yeah he was. I guess a very intimidating character. But i was never intimidated by him. I thought he was look like an older version of my husband. And i've never been intimidated by anyone. So i wasn't intimidated by him. I think we shared a mutual respect for each other because of that and my respect for him grew every single time i met a young woman who would say. Had your father in law for this class or this class. Every young woman ever met said he was so respectful and gave me so much confidence and belief in myself and he was so kind to me and and every young man i've ever met because he's coach thousands and thousands of players. They all say assuming. Oh he kicked my ass. He taught me how to be a man. He didn't care who you were. How good of a player you were if you weren't for the team is for self centered. Don't let the door hit you in the rear end on the way out. He didn't care. He wanted people to stand together with their team and be good upstanding role models. He didn't have any patients for talking back or he was completely intolerant. For egos and any of that stuff. And so he really taught young men to be young men and there was zero tolerance for anything but the best behavior and he was just a real sweetie and softy with all the women and the girls and he's still that way it's crazy out with him living with us he just. It's he compliments everything that i do. The other day. I showed him a rainbow and he looked up at the sky and he said who did that and i said god.

forty five years thousands two two weeks youtube one bob fifteen minutes Bob both genes twenty one years old seventy five thousands of players about ten fridays few years ago around age eighty-five stage five single time parkinson
"alzheimers" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"With swallowing drinking and eating or going to be a problem too so swallowing becomes an issue issue. The brain is not sending those signals to tell the body. What to do there is a lot that has to happen for food to be eaten? You know the brains gotTa say first of all all. I'm hungry. The brain quit sending that signal but if the signal does happen then the brains gotta say pick up the fork. Put it in the mashed potatoes. SCOOP THEM UP. Put put the mashed potatoes in the mail. Chew swallow get it down the right pipe but not the wrong pipes and we don't choke to death swallowing and drinking become a problem in in eating not sleeping well or sleeping all the time. We just see that I can tell you my mom's slip slip slip a lot. Thank you if I had to choose now. I know if I had to choose And we don't get to choose. It's not up to us to decide but sleeping many hours a day. I think is easier for those in late stage Alzheimer's than not sleeping well not sleeping leads to another host problems that we don't win. We don't need increased problems with communication occasion. You'll hear things like I abba. ABBA ABBA ABBA ABBA awhile. I want you to get get get get in your like you won't want and can I get what they can't get their thoughts together. They these folks are more likely to experience infections and ammonia Nia on those chances for those things increase drastically infections especially urinary tract infections any type of invasions if they have a fall in. These is tearing the skin more likely to have infections because that pneumonia is a huge problem with votes. In the late stage of Alzheimer's in fact many of our folks will pass away because of pneumonia. In sometimes. That's put on their district. You'll get they die because of ammonia but really what they died was Alzheimer's that caused the body to be more success susceptible to them having pneumonia so it was really Alzheimer's that killed him and pneumonia was just an of a side. Perfect of that. They are definitely more likely to wonder if they are that kind of person who walks. We see some folks with a late stage. Alzheimer's as I've mentioned you just lay around all the time in sleep in some people that just walk and walk in walk in walk in walk in walk and you think sit down in those folks are definitely more likely to to try to open the door not necessarily because they want to wander. But it's a door in a DOORKNOB and I do remember how to do that so they opened the door and they will sometimes. It's very innocent thing but obviously that can lead to problems increased agitation and depression. That is very hard to deal with. The agitation is very difficult difficult because they are. They're not happy and they're not happy with you and they're not happy lives and they're not happy with what you're offering in their anger and they're liable to push you aside and say dirty words and that's hard to deal with and depression is hard to deal with. You're going to see some depression. I would say everybody dealing with late stage Alzheimer's because they are declining in to some degree are folks always know that and then no interest in activities obviously that is true no interest in activities because they know that they can't function the way they showed in it's causing them to just WanNa pull within themselves. It's a sad. It's a sad time of life but it can still be a good time of life we can still bring to our folks love in happiness and joy in music and funny stories and and I tell you one of the best things you can do is play that video and tell on Youtube of the daddy ripping a piece of paper in front of the baby and the baby be laughing. Every time daddy rips a piece of paper it just cracks me up in it will crack up your eyes with dementia. I know I've done it a bunch. Well that just clears up. Maybe a little bit about the different indifferences in the various stages of Alzheimer's. I'm here to answer your questions. You can email me and my email is carol at. Let's Talk Dementia Dot Org. Now I'm sitting here looking at myself in this screen and for those of you who watch it on Youtube use hat are on the podcast. You'll have to hear my description of got these white spots. Thought I just had this cream put on my face. As opposed to get rid of wrinkles in it did really well but I should have touched up my makeup before came on this show. I kinda look like a got got we're going on. Why didn't buy the cream? It was outrageously expensive but yes. I'll just be a wrinkle girl. I hope you you guys have a good day blessings miles.

Alzheimer Ta pneumonia Youtube depression
"alzheimers" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"Let's talk dementia. Here's your host bestselling author Carol. Well hello hello everybody and welcome to. Let's talk dementia. I'm glad that you're here today. We're GONNA talk about the symptoms of the three stages of dementia specifically Alzheimer's Type Dementia. I break it down into three stages early mid and late in depending on where you're reading the information who who is teaching the class you may hear in six or seven stages on Mystique snow who I highly regard as being the go-to person for dementia education. Yeah but don't forget about me in that journey to okay but she talks about The various stages in regards to different stones with Ruby diamond the Pearl so But May I just do early mid invite and it seems to work good in my brain so with early stage Alzheimer's the person can still function independently. They may still drive or work or cook or participate in social activities and they may still pay their own bills maintain their yard in their home and they may dress themselves also appropriately but eventually we see problems that might include not dressing appropriately for the occasion or the event failing to take bad. Ask incontinence that ability to know when you need to go potty problems remembering what they have just read. You might see someone who reads quite a lighten always has suddenly not able to finish a book because they pick it up and they can't remember what they last read so they start over losing or misplacing. Thanks now that's not the kind of thing where you go. Does anybody know where my glasses are. And the whole time they're on top of your head but finding your glasses in the freezer her now. That's just a little strange trouble planning organizing Now for some folks. That's always been a problem as he had to to keep that in mind Mama could organize squat. I swear she could. I made her a filing system and I made a file. It said things Vero wants to keep just random things in a look back in the filing system some six eight months later and she had put every single thing in that Bile Mama. Why's Your Bank statement and all all these various things in this one file? She's because I was things I wanted to keep and I knew that when you got here you would follow it correctly for me so I could not use this trouble. Planning organizing organizing as a symptom for Mama because she could never do it but it can be for other people trouble remembering names now if that is the only symptom and Stage are symptom of a stage of Alzheimer's than let me tell you. I am in bad shape because I yeah I can not remember names. I gotTA write them down. I've got to assimilate them with something that will help me remember who they are. And that's a good thing to to do I tell folks. My name is Carol. My husband's Mike and Mike Lynch Carol where the Brady Bunch that was the mom and dad on the Brady Bunch and they can remember who we are. So I try to simulate names that way but we get to the point that we just cannot remember names that is something to be aware of failure to attend social events or go to work worker. Church or group meetings are things we should do and actually enjoy doing. We'll see folks forget to go problems with numbers especially especially in regards to money. We start seeing folks buying everything. There is to sail on the Internet and on the television and donate to every charity. But they forget to pay for the long term care insurance or the power bill in speaking of which long term care insurance life insurance health insurance. You need to notify all of these people that as a backup for my loved one. If they don't pay please notify me and I will pay on their behalf because the last thing you want to do is find out that your mom failed to pay on that long term care insurance paid on it for forty five years now that she needs it three months ago she quit paying for it in how you need it. Don't let did that happen. So have some kind of backup plan in place with the company that they will notify you. Payments have been made mid-stage Alzheimer's. You're we're GONNA see. The symptoms are more evident in they might include refusing to bay not just forgetting to but just refusing debate problems expressing their thoughts. Aw they'll start a thought or or an opinion and they can't get through it. They can't remember all the details to get through problems completing in common tasks like cooking or making the bed or laundry or shopping. And you'll come and see things half done because they could. They started needed it but they couldn't finish it now. I've been in the homes of a lot of people and I'm GonNa tell you a lot of Turkey's at that problem. You just need to get some stuff done. But again that autographs forgetfulness of events about one's own life things that relate directly to that person they okay forget and that may be things that they were going to do or things. They have recently participated him. They don't remember Moody. nece think about your teenage night girl. Oh my goodness I do. Remember those days of Moody Nece with that Little Turkey. And we see this. In the midst of Alzheimer's withdrawal are folks will withdraw because they realize they haven't issued. They realize life is complicated in their scare again. Problems with numbers in the checking account. Can't checks will bounce can't remember addresses or phone numbers that they've always known and of course in our world today who memorize phone numbers anymore. We we just don't We don't we don't memorize email addresses. We just typing in Bang it pops up on our phones but for your loved one. They probably only have remembered phone numbers for a long time especially their own and they can't recall it space in time. Become a problem. You know where I am. Where in the world I am where in this town I am? In what year is it so they may not realize that they are in the city that they've always been been and on and that. This building is their house and they may think that it's nineteen sixty eight time and space become a problem problems choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion. They will dress inappropriately and not even realize that they've got on flip flops in a tank top in their six inches. She's of snow on the ground. Those won't go together in their mind. Incontinence Aboul in bladder. They have lost the ability to control the bowel and bladder. And it's a big problem. Boom problems with safe sleeping personality changes aggression depression delusions and wandering begins can become a risk factor. Not everyone wanders. There are folks who goes through every stage of Alzheimer's and do not wonder it's just not part of their personality is not something they've done. I know a lady right now that I was talking to her son about should she go to memory care and I said do you think your mom's a wondrous that she might open the door and walk down. The road does not know where she is. He said honey. My Mama don't get up to cheer for nobody now. That's probably a good assign that she won't will not be wonder but it is not always a definitive conclusion. That could be made. Sometimes those folks who really they were very lethargic and just lied around. You know we're couch. Potatoes will suddenly decide. It's time to get up and go somewhere and out the door. They go so you have to be aware of that and then with late stage Alzheimer's which is what I am most Familiar with right now. Because it's just in my brain. My mom having passed away from late stage Alzheimer's May thirty first of a two thousand nineteen. So it's been seven months since Mama passing on miss that little woman so much but I think about what life was like for her. The the symptoms become. I'm very severe and constant care is needed for everything. There is nothing that goes on in their lives that they do not need someone with them to make sure that it happens in Bay that it happens safely so here are few symptoms of late stage. Alzheimer's they include the twenty four hour care. That's it's needed. No memory all recent events. They cannot remember breakfasts at lunchtime. They cannot remember lunch at dinnertime. They cannot remember who you you are in the cannot remember who they are so they no longer able to recognize loved ones. They look in the mirror and they see somebody and they don't even recognize that it's them because in their mind they're probably twenty years. Old In here is an eighty year old grey headed woman. Who is that in the mirror problems with swallowing following and drinking and eating? Well obviously if we're having problems.

Alzheimer Mama Mike Lynch Carol Turkey Moody Nece Vero Moody.
"alzheimers" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

15:34 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"I'm just Oh camp react to that definitely. Yeah because it's not going to do anybody any good if you're getting upset with them over stuff stuff. They can't control so they're going to give yourself a a worse worse outcome. If you react negatively yes yes. Oh your book started with you. Basically started keeping a journal of your travels Yes yes In twenty fourteen George was diagnosed with dementia. And I have always spend one for freedom and actually when we got married instead our wedding vows. Yes I said if you get sick I'm not gonNA hang out in. You cannot laugh though the wedding vows even because we both been married before we all snow that sometimes things don't work out and we were very scared. I told him if you get sick you start acting crazy. If you start getting need to me. I'd not around hang around so when he got diagnosis. I was really wondering. Am I gonNA stick to this. I'm I going to be able to stick remiss and and then the one big fear was a financial aspect. He was my adspend. We had saved up money for retirement. But if you get in a nursing home which is the normal trajectory for this disease like what's going to happen then what's going to happen to me if I survived him So I was thinking about divorce and I mentioned it to him any crimes. I wait until our fortieth wedding anniversary. Please I I started to plan a fortieth wedding anniversary trip and Ruth to road trip then so that was that in the beginning of the blog doc was to keep our family and friends informed about where we were and what we were out June and then it just for your fortieth anniversary. You'd plan. This was it a cross country trip. You know we're going to go up and see We live in Florida. So we're going up to visit family and friends in Wisconsin Johnson and then we were going to go over to Idaho to a truck rally. That's beautiful trail in Oregon Oregon. Idaho they have it every year we had never been and so you're just throw excited to do that. And then we just visited different bike trails along the way. 'cause as we like to bike tour by Visit Different people and we ended up with a house set in Colorado. which was I stayed there for about three weeks? Long this ten thousand mile trip take in. We spent the three months on the road number. Yeah in one hundred days that sounds I could days right now. I've in the road. Dad Come back raspberries therapeutic. So this first road trip was in two thousand fourteen or two thousand fifteen Diet lime sorry. He was diagnosed in Twenty Fifteen We took the road trip and Twenty Sixteen Left in May and got back in September. Yeah yeah and it was great. It was we had a lot of fun As I was doing the blog keeping people informed genuinely funny things would happen in ragged. Just write about it. A symptom started increasing on the trip. And I started talking a little bit. About what what we were experiencing and And as I went along people were courage to be open to be opened than that. I would help a lot of people by being open telling our story so I continue to do so is to continue to talk about dealing with surprise. Incontinence continents Just the silence you know he was my partner my life partner mind friend. An illness conversation here Yanic received so some of their ooh so his progressed fairly quickly. Them yes He was diagnosed with Cathedra. Sample lists to pressure hydrocephalus which is cooling off on the brain and spinal food snapping reabsorbed. The normal circulation is if it goes up ministries reabsorbed back down when this wasn't being reabsorbed And and usually the solution to that is putting tap in the brain draining. The fluid avidan spinal tap in. It didn't improve his cognitive abilities so then decided not to proceed with that brain surgery. Uh We've been on this journey with my mom for close to twenty years so I'm always fascinated. Oh Yeah I'm kind of done their days when I'm done and more now we're dealing with scattered growth next to one kidney that I believe is sending mixed signals to her brain because sometimes she we feel the urge to use the restroom gotta go now and then when you get her in the bathroom. She doesn't know why she's there which that's super frustrating. And then Dan does this week. The Care Staff told me that she'd had an accident in the dining room. And I'm like okay. I mean we I did buy the pull pull ups just because it seemed like it was about the right time but all that happened overnight up until may the beginning of May of this year twenty nineteen. Her physical self was fine. Her brain is shots made her visual processing is terrible. All so she's Sh- watches her feet when she walks any change in terrain. Visually like puddle. Wet Pavement Shadows on the pavement. It's like treacherous. Yeah so I know I take her out for Lil Adventures. We love she loves. I go with LOVES TO WATCH CHILDREN MY SISTER and my niece who is almost fourteen eighteen. They take her out. I'm not I haven't probed. As to what activities. They do with her because they can't be too much different than what we do. But but having the Middle Grandchild with her helps my mom too so almost twenty eight so she doesn't go with we twenty years that yeah. That was something when I heard stories like that. I was just like I can't do this I I can't I don't Wanna I wanNA hear fortunate. Yeah when I hear people say things like why am I gonNA keep mom at home forever. Or I'M GONNA keep my spouse and home you know I'm like you need to really understand that this could be a a decade longer. I mean it's really now how hard it is until they get into the later stages like my mom at this point when I show up on Mondays to visit because of this whatever they have not told me what this growth is. They're worried about something. Canals which to me is far less of a problem than the one that seems to be causing issues and I show up about talk about two o'clock on Monday after meeting and almost every time in the last four to six weeks. She's been in a state date of distress undress. Very just you know it's like she opens the door and the stress. Just Mike and I think it's because she's losing control over her bladder. Feels like she's losing control. You know I'm wet and I pick her clothes and they're not wet so it's like okay but she's feeling that so it's it's not easy and then it takes twenty minutes to get her re dressed in shoes back on in reassured and calmed down. And it's like you're taking them somewhere. It's twenty minutes extra half the plan just to get out the door and then getting in and out of the car is is a challenge for her because with the visual processing being shot if you know like we fling one foot it over the threshold of the car. It's kind of scoot in or I have crappy knees. Sometimes I turn my back to the seat sit down fling my feet in. And if she turns her back to the seat she doesn't know it's there so then it's like you know city it's like sitting without knowing if there's a chair behind behind you it's scaring now and understanding that helps a lot but you know it's still like you just want to pick perfect linger into the car. You want to get it done because you have a life to you know if you wanted to get back to. Could we stop with all his the drama in troubles and stress too so we can go to the park and watch kids. That's what you like to do and I like to do things that make you happy. So can we get to that part art. Yeah it's it's interesting. Let's was interested in talking to you because I'm like this. Gal traveled around the country with her husband. Worth I busy was there earlier stages and that's one thing I saw on your website yet. You have the thirty six hour day and I. It was one of the first books that I was recommended to read. And I picked that up and started reading it in a going. He doesn't follow this pattern. inaugur sending this symptom vessels the mess up in the early stages like his way down here in some places way up here another it. Just you didn't follow the pattern so I got frustrated with spoken. Never finished I found him kind of depressing but Stephanie uplifting the one that I like is dementia with dignity. I talked to her and unfortunately her name's slipped my mind if they cornish is the last last name I talked to local. I heard that creating moments of joy is also a really good off. Aw Chicken to the lifting because it's focusing on those moments of joy trying to create for your mind by pointing around the car maybe there's something closer to home that you wouldn't have to put her in a car for a check with the staff and see anybody out. There got that visiting doctor physician just just makes sense. Doesn't it ever be a physician that would visit nursing homes for people with memory laws. Were you're mobility Stephen. Because she had through her health insurance which she has health insurance queen of England couldn't afford She's extremely lucky that way. So are we. She threw her insurance insurance. She gets an annual like home visit. And so this nurse. Practitioner came on Monday afternoon and did all the basics. Blood pressure the height weight. Talk to her which is funny and just kind of the general kind of make. Sure you're breathing. He'll hello and the very next day the staff was telling me they thought mom had a bladder infection. And that's We've gone from this nurse. Practitioner thinking everything was great to this growth next her kidney that they would like me to do a third ultrasound on Mike please. Talker wasn't happy when I told him I'm out of town right now which you knew and when I get back I don't have half for David to to devote to devote to alter sound and he's like oh we'll take that long like shoot. Don't have a clue buddy. Yeah you're easy younger doctor. And I'm educating him on what. It's like to be a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer's because it's not easy. Ah She's at the stage where she uses mostly the wrong words and she sometimes knows it so she gets frustrating to stop talking talking so that doesn't help doctors and they'll ask her questions and she'll just randomly answer with something and then I have to say not again. That's fiction whatever it's like I feel bad because it's like nope nope back now. I feel like the negative. Nellie over in the corner going Nope nope that's ally nope. nope fake That was oppressed reading to win right around within home in the visiting Dr Company be asking her questions. He wouldn't even let me know when he was gonna be visited so I wouldn't even be there. We just ask her her questions in except those answers rounder record was also information should. She didn't remember she had heart from cheated. Now you're crazy. The thing that kills me and I'm an advocate with the Alzheimer's Association. Legislative advocate part among the legislative advocacy consent team. There that's the proper way to call it and it frustrates me. That and I don't know if this just because is nobody's ever thought of it or hippo violations. But it's like when you open my mother's chart it should be right. There advanced alzheimers to daughter his. Tell them yeah well and it just but we went for a blood test and I explained to the Gal we checked in Dan and I and there was nobody in the waiting room so I might. Oh this is good. We'll have to wait and I just said I'm just letting you know. My mom does not wait. Patiently Ages Advanced Alzheimer's she does not wait patiently. You know we can go outside or something if there's a delay and she's kind of looked at me like oh are we didn't. We didn't wait. I'm not sure she. She was very young. I'm not sure I'm not sure. It clicked in her mind what I was trying to tell. You're trying to be a little bit discreet. Although my mom thinks I'm her.

"alzheimers" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"Um chapter to life at the bottom if we treat science like zero sum game and place the amyloid hypothesis is at the top as winner then it follows that everything else must be to varying degrees the losers the virus or infectious agent theory in New York by molecular neurobiologist Ruth Sake Gut specially rough treatment I had a very naive idea that everybody inserts were brothers and sisters and Taylor which idea I'm some people are like that but they're fairly rare but I've certainly enormous enjoyed working in science I think the intellectual stimulus is is terrific is just that the practical side is not always very terrific in fact it can sometimes be quite awful so what let her go from naive idealistic scientists into a hardened skeptic it all started when she began researching Alzheimer's in the night eighteen eighties. This is Sharon Begley from stat news again so it's sake was a pioneer of the infectious agent a hypothesis of Alzheimer's and she did this work Gosh more than a quarter century ago it was not definitive but it was certainly suggestive but friendly onset there was already an Alzheimer's theory hierarchy remember amyloid is king following that was the towel hypothesis and pretty much any other theory was regarded with skepticism just something so new because that the very suspect when we tried to submit a paper on this and we had a great many refusals and disappointments and people saying so well more or less saying it's robbery still rooted sake submitted her research findings to science journals for years and years in science being published in journals is one of the main ways that you get your ideas heard by other scientists if you don't get your into journalists they might as well not exist I can't remember Hamad journalists we try but we certainly tried several all of which fused it and not for good reason but mostly on the grounds that it was artifact to was just ridiculous and couldn't be possibly true until we found Taylor medical virology which was a medium quality journal the other way to get your idea side into the science community is by giving talks at conferences this this was also an uphill battle for it sake in two thousand and four ruth he'd sake try to give a talk at the big annual Alzheimer's conference I told that it apparently a huge battle to let them agree even to my giving a talk for ten minutes those ten minutes were thanks to George Perry a neuroscientist editor of the Journal of Alzheimer's He's also a prominent critic of the amyloid Night Botha's the only time I was ever on the program committee I fought to get her spot on the program which of course was one of many other timid it talks and therefore attended by relatively small number of people. Although remember one person very nice some person stood up and said really people should be taking paying attention to this really is potentially very important gratified cheered by what he said then because it was so unusual to have that attitude getting published only second tier journals now getting to talk references experiencing hostility conferences these all had trickled down consequence it made it hard to get funding for research it's secure embers one particular early frustrating rejection they said we hadn't done any animal work we should totally true we hadn't the regionals that particular organization we'd applied two three years earlier to do animal work and they turned it down with very very nasty referees comments that was really in a way quite ironic the sort of thing is happened in you can imagine that makes one feel rather bitter about it she tried to get funding and was rejected time after time after time and that's bad enough but honestly I would have to say that jet the decision of journals high profile journals to reject her paper is the decision of meeting organizers not to give her a speaking slot those are the sort of things that send a message thank message especially younger researchers that's kind of a fringe idea and guess what people don't succeed in science by pursuing fringe ideas so people did not pursue it so that went on for years and years and it was quite dreadful because ceremony as I got was from small organizations who are interested willing to try something new all cases from companies who want to some experiments done but if nearly always resort supply of the funding and the difficult guessing publications was a vicious circle because the fewer papers you produced this chance you had of getting anything being of people so you know just self perpetuating situation self perpetuating situation that's Horton and not just from the point of view of Ruth Sakis theory but for science as a whole research needs competing ideas if you have them all stuck in a loop somewhere where they can never get heard you risk missing something important Rachel Neva and Nikos rockies are two scientists who contributed the amyloid hypothesis they discover the AP creating gene so hardy discover the mutation but they discovered the gene it turns out that after doing more research they changed their minds about the amyloid hypothesis so even people who were involved in the amyloid hypothesis subsequently with more research said you know what amyloid has something to do with this disease that's incontrovertible but it is not the right drug target and when they tried I to Sir deviate from that the mainstream view they really really struggled Rachel neave had a contact at the National institutes of health they give the line sure of funding for Alzheimer's research and this is what the contract told her her contact at the National Institutes of Health said look regardless of what study you actually want to do even if it has nothing to do with amyloid just you know make up something to suggest that it has that it's at least amyloid adjacent as we say these days so that the the panel that decides whether or not to fund US A study will be more likely to say yes to it in an email Rachel Neef told as she quit the feel of Alzheimer's eleven years ago out of quote discuss with the amyloid files domination of the feel Nikos Reebok is is still in the field but he's critical of it I shall bought the the amyloid theory was tested every scientific fury must be tested having said that the NIH that really the money out should also as I mentioned before put some more support to alternative theories and I think that that was one point what are the system failed he's also changed his mind about the amyloid hypothesis show of course it would be to my advantage to for amyloid to be very important but but shown it became clear that there were a lot of facts and biblical evidence refuting or going against the hypothesis that I'm alive is the main cause of the new genera Asian which causes Alzheimer's disease you you could have benefited from the Iowa hypothesis exactly yes of course but I could not go against mine I thought that would be dishonest and once he started focusing on other theories getting funding was much harder he ultimately got funding but he didn't like the message that sent out to young scientists he described a number of junior scientists who worked in his lab who saw what he went through struggling to get funding for anything other than amyloid and who said you know what we don't need this we're GONNA go study Parkinson's disease we're GONNA go study the blood brain barrier ah important as Alzheimer's is in addition to everything else you have to struggle to do as a scientist we just don't need to fight this they just very very dominant force so then you ask you know these smart people left the field if if they had remained within the Alzheimer ars research community might be might be further along than we are that's obviously unanswerable but you know you have to think maybe we would be George Perry is a neuroscientist who got it sake that ten minutes speaking slot and he's one of the amyloid theories most vocal critics he's written a couple of papers comparing the Manila. The amyloid theory to religious fervor amyloid became like religious phenomenon cult-like and much like happened you know five hundred years ago during Galileo Copernicus time in which the Earth was thought to be the center of the universe and and if you if you reacted against that you were attacked.

Alzheimer Journal of Alzheimer Taylor Sharon Begley New York George Perry Galileo Copernicus Night Botha robbery ruth editor Hamad ten minutes five hundred years two three years eleven years
"alzheimers" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"Not The news anybody was looking for this morning from lily putting out the results of a face retrial of its Alzheimer's drugs swollen knees it did not meet the goals of that study ARRATE Alzheimer's drug development is unfortunately extremely high including at least nine late stage clinical trial failures over the last decade high it's all powered by the Science History Institute this is the second chapter of a two part series on Alzheimer's disease in part one I took off my official distillation had and put on my Alexis the person hat I shared some pretty personal stuff with you all about what it was like to take care of my father had dementia impart to I'm putting back on my Alexis the host of this podcast hat and let me Oh you I've learned some things that I didn't know or think about or frankly care about when I was actually living through Alzheimer's research took off thirty years ago but it seemed one disappointment after another our producer Rico Hernandez reported this whole series and he and I are going to tell you this part of the Lori together there's been hundreds of clinical trials research costs in the billions and yet twenty years later there are zero drugs to treat the actual also Elsa Hammers deceased there are four approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease but none of them affect the actual biology the disease and none of them bring any benefits to patients after few months on the medication it's important to say that the brain is very very difficult in any brain disease is therefore extremely difficult that Sharon Begley she's a senior writer for stat news a publication that covers the biotech in industry after one high profile failure and March twenty nineteen she started making phone calls to scientists to figure out why why are all of these very well respected very highly capitalised companies continuing to bring forth compounds into phase one trial space to and then the very very expensive phase threes and they simply don't work I mean how much bad luck can there be and that's when a number of research pictures. They said in Alzheimer's disease more than any disorder that they're aware of a particular USCIS has just dominated the field in a way that they had never seen before in this episode we're GonNa find out why there have been so many failures we I know that the road to scientific discovery can be messy but as we learned and you may be surprised to find out it can even be unscientific as it turns out once researchers adopt a hypothesis they run with it and that can leave very little room for alternative ideas the establishment apps the theory and anyone who doesn't fit the mold gets cut chapter one everyone loves a winner Alzheimer's disease guided saying more than a century ago from Dr Alzheimer He Observed Patient Office August theater at an asylum in Germany and saw that she had Lucy ends in memory loss after he did an autopsy nineteen o six he stained tissue so for brain and noticed sticky plaques and tangles these to Margaret's have become the whole marks of the disease ever since but after Alzheimer's discovery no one really cared about this new disease not until decades later in the late nineteen seventy dis when scientists started considering the disease a public health problem and not just a side effect of being old it's been called the disease of the century and it is the fourth largest cause of death in the United States doctors do not know what causes Alzheimer's Disease Nor how to cure it nor even treated scientists set off on a race and the goal was simple find a hypothesis that could explain the disease which could then lead to the ultimate price a blockbuster drug that would cure it Stanley prisoner is enrolled studies Alzheimer's and this is the way he sees the competition in science unlike basketball or football or baseball there's always another year passes and you have another chance to be I you when you come in second in science it's like coming in one thousand or one million or whatever you know it doesn't make any difference here either I or your or your last in science as in sports everyone loves a winner and for good reason to today we live in a world mostly eradicated smallpox rinderpest yaws polio all because someone or a group of someone's discovered a cure the research for US as we know it today all started around the same time in the nineteen eighties nineties prisoner himself theorized that infectious protein scripted the brain in a similar way see that Mao cow disease does his theory did not get traction another theory called Tau hypothesis focus on the tangles one of the two markers that Dr Alice Alzheimer's I observe and their several Alzheimer's theories out there but in this episode you're going to hear US talk a lot about two theories the amyloid apotheosis which has been winning the race since the beginning and what's called the virus or infectious agent hypothesis one of the many losers the virus or infectious agent hypothesis says that the herpes virus the one that causes colts in your mouth and the one that the majority of adults have lives on your and certain genes can activate the virus thereby causing Alzheimer's for the past thirty years theories like priante towel and virus at this sees all took a back seat to the big Kahuna in Alzheimer's research the amyloid hypothesis to understand what this hypothesis says. You GotTa know a little bit about how the brain works rigo take it away okay so inside our brains are very important cells called neurons they're the basic working unit of the brain they process and transmit information throughout it there are other types of cells that clear waste away from your brain in keep the neurons healthy and this is the amyloid hypothesis jumps in it says that floating around the neurons are a bunch of proteins one of them is called the amyloid precursor protein or a P P doc which does well we're not exactly sure actually but that APP generates a smaller protein called Beta amyloid in healthy the Beta amyloid gets flushed out but in people with Alzheimer's they become sticky and accumulate outside the neurons those plaques are toxic to neurons and the intially kill them in the early nineteen nineties. Everyone was talking about Alzheimer's The amyloid hypothesis it had cement its place as king among the Alzheimer's Theories Emily became a buzzword here is a clip from the PBS Newshour from one thousand nine hundred one where does extra a Beta amyloid come from why are some people have more of it in their brains this is still a matter of investigation but the amyloid precursor protein itself is produced an influenced by a gene that regulates it and one of the theories is There is a mutation in this gene that improperly instructs the amyloid precursor protein such that it abnormal early produces the Beta amyloid protein which in turn causes damage to two nerve cells John Hardy was the genetic SUV founder mutation in the gene they were just talking about in the news hour he thought that mutation must be causing the production of amyloid in Alzheimer's patients hold it for the amyloid by focuses that's how I felt it on a big cuts how everybody else folks it. The referee definitely called it even though still so early in the game the result was that the amyloid hypothesis became the clear winner the following year John Hardy wrote an article that clean his theory of how Alzheimer's born it goes something like this over time the buildup of which is a critical mass. I cascade that caused inflammation and the formation of tangles neurons start to die off and this is what Causes Alzheimers let me just say that when I wrote the article choose cold the amyloid cascade offices I wrote over a weekend literally without thinking I mean I've really rugged it over a weekend I'm submitted on the Monday or Tuesday after starting to write on the Friday it was never modified we just said to in to my amazement it was accepted immediately you know I didn't intend it to be have a the idea to to me it was like the Ten Commandments handed to Moses should be carved in stone everyone should you did forever in a day I think I if I told when I wrote it I would was ridiculous never the less the amyloid hypothesis was taken as Gospel and for the next thirty years team amyloid gets all the funding all the attention all the resources meanwhile other hypotheses team virus lose out.

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer Alzheimers John Hardy Alexis Sharon Begley Science History Institute Elsa Hammers Rico Hernandez USCIS Lori producer official writer Moses PBS Emily founder thirty years
"alzheimers" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"Roll years we've learned how to diagnose alzheimer's in people who are living got amazing ways of doing near imagine new highly um cutting edge uh functional imaging the pets can do look at dose saw accumulation of that abnormal poked proteins in the brain so i think cd research would be heading towards that direction i think we've already started to look into that aspect ravi might be able to identify sh people who water risk for seekie by using the sauna advanced nurburging techniques is there it leaked prediction between cb seek out ours yes there has been you know d b i has always been considered as a risk factor for alzheimer's so i trained in alzheimer's nb always make sure that be asked whether or not this from a head injury on now on our two thousand sixteen um i did my own independent study r a few see us de bariloche fact of de uh a sorry assistant doubts physician and um i a part of the research are being alzheimer's also we ask the question is job you know people who had uh you know who where'd already diagnosed with alzheimers after the died based on the autopsy finding all we went back and ask the question and said didn't have it had injury and if so because of the head to drink two to have a faster progression in the dementia and darby she got some signals suggesting that that might be true.

alzheimers
"alzheimers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"If i was diagnosed with alzheimers my have a great life i don't want to die but if i go get a diagnosis vow time roussy i want to be able to die with joy and dignity and grace francis thank you so much for for bringing that up and for calling in maureen speak to that francis's point that there are no websites that there are no positives here well i i think um this caller brings up several issues and um i think that it's important to know that everyone experiences this differently and and again jerry talks about and i've heard this many times using a kind of freedom that some people like uh experience and and it's very real it's not fantasy it's not delusion it's uh uh i really i want to do what i can do and what i wanted to do that that that is definitely one reaction there are also people that um that do become um very depressed especially if they've known people that have had this and no the future and they um can feel like i'd rather and my life i think the issue that that's brought up here is that the issue of is that he is that even an option for people and their only a couple of state now that where where one is is able to do that so i think that's another that's another issue but it's important to remember that this disease is expressed in many different ways and one person's experience can't be generalised to everyone else's i think this is also true about the anger issue um that's part of the narrative of of alzheimer's that's out in in our culture and everyone does not experience aggressiveness and and that kind of violence and yet that's what that's what we think about and we almost live in anticipation of it and the more.

alzheimers francis jerry