35 Burst results for "Alzheimer's Disease"

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

06:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Tubular bells. However, in people with Alzheimer's Disease The proteins are MIS folded causing the two bills to collapse. With, the aggregation of MIS folded proteins the collapsed micro tubular become tangled at neurons are unable to build and recycled proteins. This eventually leads to cell death. This is what caused the neurofibrillary tangles that a lowest Alzheimer's saw in nineteen Oh six. If only doctors could figure out why these structures and their underlying proteins were abnormal in the first place. Then maybe they could stop Alzheimer's from happening but I there was another missing piece of the Alzheimer Puzzle that needed solving. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, a biochemist named Dr George Gleaner and his colleague Dr Cain Wong identified the main protein component of the plaques that Lowest Alzheimer wants discovered for the first time doctors understood the material that was keeping the cells from communicating. It's something called Beta, amyloid Proteins Glenn, and his team wanted to know where these Beta amyloid came from. After weeks of investigation, they discovered that Beta amyloid were once part of the bodies larger protein strand called amyloid precursor protein. We'll call them. For Short, AP's are. Trans Membrane proteins that happened to be present in the neuron cells near the synapse where all of the neurotransmitters or the brain's messengers are sent back and forth to communicate think of it like a cargo ship full of supplies traveling across the ocean from New York London New York is the first neuron. The ship is their neuro transmitter and the ocean is the synapse. Each neurotransmitter needs to make across the synapse or in this case, the Ocean to get a message or signal to its destination. Scientists are still unclear what function APP serves but some theorize it helps informing these synapses or at least maintaining them. In a normal brain, the APP gets cut very specifically into three chunks by small enzymes. This process helps the protein dissolve into the Inter cellular fluid of the body. However, in someone with Alzheimer's, there's a problem. One of the sections of the AP is chopped off in the wrong spot meaning you have one normal size piece, one abnormally large section and a smaller segment that middle section. Now, slightly longer than it should be becomes the Beta amyloid and as gleaners team continued their research, they discovered that it was highly toxic. That's because Beta amyloid are configured in such a way that it becomes easy for them to clump together. Think of them like, Legos, they have the perfect bill to easily snap in place after enough time has passed and more of these Beta amyloid bungee up. There are classified as Beta, amyloid plaques, and sure enough these proteins, Gung Cup, the synapses making it impossible for neurotransmitters to communicate. It's kind of like the ocean or the synapse is being polluted with a whole bunch of oil or trash or in this case, the Beta amyloid it then makes it harder for the boats or the neurotransmitters to travel across the ocean and when the neurotransmitters are in working the neurons or say New York and London can't get their critical messages. This discovery by Glenn and his team at UC San Diego lead to something called the amyloid cascade hypothesis. In this theory researchers believed that at a certain point, another Beta amyloid accumulates in the synapses to reach a devastating tipping point kind of like an unstoppable oil spill when the triggers the onset of Alzheimer's symptoms however, researchers have found that blacks don't just derive all at once they build up for decades starting sometimes as early as age thirty or forty. This means that. While gene wilder and Glen Campbell reliving perfectly normal lives, their brains might have been slowly leaking this toxic substance into their synapses. It made it more and more impossible for ships or neurotransmitters to get across the ocean, and instead they sink and die. Now the neurons are left without any information they start dying as well, and the cognitive ability of patient gradually dies with them in the cases of Glen Campbell, gene. Wilder this win their first serious symptoms started to show up. In Campbell, it could have been undisputedly when he forgot the lyrics to some of his famous songs that he performed hundreds of times for wilder it was getting the name of a movie he was in or his outburst likely caused by his confusion unfortunately many doctors of thought that once this process starts, there's no way to stop the decline no way to plug the devastating oil spill but researchers like Glenn are searching for ways to halt and potentially reverse the build up of these Beta amyloid 's before they gone cup the minds ocean. Fortunately, there are a few hopeful signs on the horizon just where the lead though is anyone's guess. Coming we'll discuss current Alzheimer's treatments. This episode is brought to you by hub spot. You have a lot of great ideas ideas to reach new audiences, create better content and improve your systems, and you understand that you need to move quickly on these ideas to create the best possible experience for your customers and grow your business. So it's time to leave that clunky complex and time consuming cms in the past where it belongs an upgrade to. CMS Hub no more waiting days for an update feeling like you're site is outdated or worrying about security cms hub from hub spot has all the features you need built right in. So developers and marketers can work in harmony. So if you're next great idea involves an engaging dynamic and secure website. Let's cms hub take the pain out of managing your software. So you can get back to what you do best. Customers learn more about cms hub at hub spot, dot com slash spotify. Now back to the story..

Alzheimer gene wilder Glen Campbell AP New York Glenn Alzheimer's Disease spotify Gung Cup Dr George Gleaner UC San Diego Dr Cain Wong London
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

06:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Ability even sugary treats can become a thing of the past in the end. It's our memories that stand the test of time precious minutes spent with loved ones, birthdays, weddings, and babies being born high and low moments that shaped who we are deep down inside. But there's one neurological condition able to rob people of all. These treasures Alzheimer's disease psychiatrist and neuropathologist a Lowest Alzheimer I documented the disease in one thousand, nine, hundred, six, today five, million Americans suffer from the onus and over one hundred thousand of these patients die every year disease related complications aside from the emotional toll the financial cost of Alzheimer's can be devastating to families according to the Centers for Disease Control total costs in the US related to. The care of someone with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia equalled around two hundred and seventy seven, billion dollars in two thousand eighteen to hear that a loved one has Alzheimer's is something no one wants to experience, but it's relatively common an estimated five hundred thousand Americans will be diagnosed with the disease this year and the road to that diagnosis can be one of the hardest parts. It certainly was Glen Campbell and accomplished country singer with plenty of music left to give the whole world recognized Campbell is one of the best selling country crooners to come out of the Sixties and seventies his infallible guitar skills had taken him all over the globe where he performed for thousands each night. But by his late sixties, Campbell's family noticed he was no longer his sharp witted self. One afternoon his teenage daughter Ashley, had a few friends over. They were watching the Lord of the rings in the Campbell's Home Theater. When Campbell popped in to check on them, he made some friendly Chit Chat and asked what movie they were watching. Ashley told him in Campbell nodded satisfied. Then he laughed just a few minutes later Campbell came back to ask the same question Ashley likely chalked it up to her father's eccentricities. But this time he was serious and confused it happened one more time before the end of the night. Ashley was bewildered by her father's behavior but she figured he was just having a bad day. He was getting older after all these things could happen from time to time but months later Campbell's wife Kim experienced something more frightening Campbell was looking for a tool kit and Kim mentioned it was in the garage Kim's husband just stared at her blankly the garage. Campbell didn't know what let alone wear. That was Kim was rattled. How could he have forgotten something as simple as that and fortunately it wasn't the last time. Doctors. Say One of the first signs of Alzheimer's disease is a general sense of forgetfulness and that's not something simple like forgetting where you left your keys or an appointment slipping your mind that kind of forgetfulness works a bit different from Alzheimer's thoughts are first encoded in our brains is something called working memories. Think of this stage as a sketch pad. It's temporary only necessary for quick functions like where did I leave my cell phone when our brain deems the memory important enough and when the memory is attended too often enough the brain will then encoded into a long term memory. So it goes from a sketch to a final painting hanging in the new normal moments of forgetfulness are caused by something frequently referred to as a memory lapse which. Happens when we're not paying good enough attention to something or when we haven't access to certain memory in a very long time. Say you walk in the door of your apartment did night you turn on the lights, put your things down and focus your attention on dinner. You aren't recording the sketch of where you said everything down because your brain was focused on another task like what temperature to set the oven at researchers say that early signs of Alzheimer's are far more troubling than an ordinary memory lapse instead they're a lot like the ones we saw in Campbell's case when a patient with Alzheimer's loses their keys. Typically turn up on a dresser or table instead they appear in unexplained locations like the refrigerator and when they're found a patient might immediately forget the next step like what those keys Goto essentially that painting that once hung in the Louvre. The one that says keys don't belong in. Now seems to be missing it's a big problem, but ultimately, it all comes down to tiny neurons. Neurons are the Messenger cells of the human body when memories are created in a healthy mind, they form unique pathways between certain neurons and when we go back to access these memories, these neurons off in very similar patterns when compared to the patterns observed during the memories initial recording these pathways and firing patterns becomes stronger. The more we access that memory they're also stronger if the moment was significant to. US? That's why we find ourselves reliving many of these same memories especially things that were special or tragic in our past. One of the first things to go in Alzheimer's patients are their short term memories and that's because those neuron pathways are still patchy dirt roads. They're not as frequently traveled as long term memories which are more like highways. It's for this same reason that patients also experience mood swings. These changes in behavior are typically brought on by the frustration and confusion of disappearing memories as well as by the general difficulty that many patients have in making sense of their surroundings. This was the case with acclaimed actor gene wilder wilder was a comic genius known for his Quick Timing and Quirky screen presence in films like Willie Wonka and the chocolate factory offscreen people knew him as a sweet mild mannered guy but around the time.

Glen Campbell Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ashley Kim Centers for Disease Control US gene wilder wilder Home Theater Willie Wonka
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Glen Campbell had a storied musical career beginning with his heyday in the late nineteen sixties and Seventies. He'd won six grammy awards by two thousand seventeen and had sold over fifty million country music records worldwide in two thousand four, he was entering the twilight years of his life the eight year old was ready to slow down and spend more time with his. Family but he wasn't quite ready to stop making new music however, something about the artist seemed off for one. He was becoming increasingly dependent on his wife Kim and his train of thought often derailed stopping mid conversation to recall something. He just said then one day out of the blue cameras. Kim what a garage was after being told to look for something there. At first, she thought her husband was kidding. They had lived in the house for almost a decade, but then Kim realized he was serious. It was slip-ups like these the terrified Campbell's family in two thousand eleven. Kim finally took her husband to see a doctor from the world renowned Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota to diagnose the problem. The Campbell's met with neurologist Dr Ronald Petersen a few tests later, Peterson gave them some of the worst news imaginable Glenn was suffering from Alzheimer's disease. What's more he was deteriorating fast all of his music his memories moments spent with his family would soon slip away and modern medicine was still struggling to find a cure that could stop it. When.

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

07:33 min | 3 weeks ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"When our bodies fail, we trust doctors diagnose the problem but medicine isn't always an exact science. Sometimes, it's a guessing game with life or death stakes. This is medical mysteries a podcast original I'm Ali and I'm Richard every Tuesday will look at the strangest real life medical cases in history and the experts who raced against the clock to solve them. As we follow these high intensity stories will explore medical research that might solve the puzzle. Next week in partout will analyze all the evidence and try to find an answer. You can find episodes of medical mysteries and all other park cast originals for free. On spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream medical mysteries for free on spotify, just open the APP and type medical mysteries in the search bar. This is the first of two episodes on Alzheimer's disease, a degenerative neurological condition responsible for about one hundred and twenty thousand American deaths in two, thousand, seventeen, it symptoms include memory, loss, agitation, and changes in personality. This week, we'll explore the history of the disease and meet the man who discovered it next week we'll examine doctors efforts to cure or treat the condition. We'll also explore the state of Alzheimer's disease, today and speculate on what the future holds. We have all that and more coming up stay with. US. In nineteen o one Doctor Lois, Alzheimer was the director of the psychiatric wing for the Institution for the mentally ill and epileptic patients in Frankfurt Germany. He worked as a neuropathologist meaning he studied diseases of the nervous system a lois was one of the. Advocates for a change in how mental health conditions were treated. In the late eighteen hundreds, most patients in western psychiatric facilities faced appalling conditions unlike today most doctors didn't try to diagnose mental health conditions, they treated all their patients, the same way, and they didn't take the time to identify and distinguish between the different conditions involving the brain such as bipolar disorder and dementia. All patients live together in the same wards few God better because they didn't receive specialized treatment they spend hours in restraints even if they weren't violent overworked staff beat their patients, psychiatrists experimented on them without consent asylums were brutal but many doctors didn't see any point in improving their conditions. They couldn't even agree on whether neurologic or mental health conditions could be treated. there. Were two prevailing schools of thought regarding the origins of Mental Disorders Sigmund Freud thought mental illnesses were purely psychological meaning. They were all in the patient's head. He treated his clients with psychotherapy. A form of therapy were patients discussed their problems to understand the underlying emotional issues but lois had a keen interest in anatomy. He believed there must be a biological cause for psychiatric ailments. If he could find what caused the condition, he might be able to treat it with medicine or surgery. In eighteen fifty seven German surgeon Friedrich. Von S Mark and his partner Peter Villers Yesen found a biological cause for neurologic condition called general theres's. Peres. Caused wild mood swings, forgetfulness and difficulty speaking. Some doctors called it general paralysis of the insane s mark and villers looked at their patients. Clinical histories they discovered that many were diagnosed with syphilis us before their parisa symptoms appeared syphilis is a sexually transmitted bacterial infection. It initially causes a non painful sores or ulcers on a patient's genitals. Later, symptoms can include fatigue weight loss and muscle pain among other elements after a few weeks. These symptoms usually clear up on their own some patients assumed the syphilis had cured itself, but the bacteria still lingered in their bodies as patients got older, some might have suffered from memory loss confusion and aggression for years. Doctors had assumed that people with paralysis were faking it or weak willed but s mark. Yes and demonstrated otherwise Paribas patients suffered from a real disease with a physical cause. And if physicians could find a cure for syphilis, they thought they could also prevent Aparicio's inspired by such recent discoveries. A Lowest Alzheimer wanted to find biological causes for other cognitive or mental health conditions. But he needed a place to do his work in peace and safety. He wouldn't get very far in his research if his colleagues were torturing or beating their patients. Ordinary asylums were likely to make their residence even sicker and complicate a Lewis's research. The facility in Frankfurt where the lowest worked was different. When a lowest was hired, it was run by a man named email sealy who pushed the boundaries of psychiatric patient care. Believed in a progressive form of therapy based on the teachings of psychiatrist John. Connolly like Lois Connolly believe that mental health conditions were an illness and just as doctor would treat of bodily disease with medicine connolly believed psychiatrists could remedy apparent emotional disorders with compassion and care. Furthermore he believed different symptoms should receive different treatments with the right support. People could overcome their conditions. Pra Connolly's recommendations, the Frankfurt facility had gardens and communal spaces. AIDS hosted activities to keep residents engaged and entertained while restraints and sedatives were used on patients. They were a last resort only for people who posed a danger to themselves or others c-o-l-l-i-e-r and his staff talked with patients while walking through the facility or gave them relaxing massages to calm them down. They believed a positive environment was more beneficial than a hostile one while the conditions were in perfect Augusta deter couldn't have ended up in a better hospital at the time she was checked into the Frankfurt for. Months of declining mental health at first. She forgot small things like where she left cooking ingredients or a book. But her condition got worse with each passing month. She had trouble sleeping and grew paranoid once she accused her husband Carl of cheating on her but her claims were unfounded. The accusation left Carl Shaken. They always loved and trusted one another Augusta would never let suspicion get the better of her it felt like his wife was slipping away in front of him at times she forgot where she was or who he was. It got so bad that Carl feared to leave her home alone he couldn't take care.

syphilis Lois Connolly Frankfurt Doctor Lois Alzheimer's disease Carl Shaken spotify Peter Villers Yesen Augusta Alzheimer partout Sigmund Freud US Ali Frankfurt Germany Peres difficulty speaking Richard partner
Hope for Herpes Cure

The Naked Scientists

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Hope for Herpes Cure

"Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away. And this works does it you can actually demonstrate that serve you chop up the virus then canola comeback yeah, exactly. So the study that we did was in mice mice get this sleeping form of the herpes just like we do and then we can go in and we use a a something. We call a vector, a different virus that carries these scissors to those same neurons and when it does that it starts cutting up the virus and then we can measure after. Our therapy how much of that sleeping form is actually left in the mice treated and what we saw as we eliminated well over ninety percent of that virus, and if we could translate that into human beings is likely to prevent lesions in Alzheimer's disease transmission to other people and all the things that we actually worry about how did you get the virus that was the Trojan horse that carried in the molecular scissors? How did you get that into the nerve cells in these animals? Well. That was a really important part of our study is understanding the best way to get the scissors where they need to be. We used another virus added. Associated Virus. Almost, all have it never causes any disease. We basically changed that to carry these scissors for us just injected into the bloodstream, and once it's in the blood, it actually goes in and actually find those nerve cells and introduces the scissors. It sounds like the woman who swallowed a fly and then swallowed spider to eat the flying, and we all know how that story ends because you're basically giving someone a virus to treat viruses this safe. This particular virus specter that was used called ADN. Associated Virus is probably the leading factor that's being used for many many types of gene therapy now, and there's several approved products out there in the EU and the United States that use adn associated virus or av to deliver different types of gene therapy, and so we're taking something that's quite proven to be safe modifying it slightly for our needs and then using it to try to cure an infection where we've simply not had any hope for cure in the past. You've been looking at herpes simplex virus. This causes cold sores and it also causes genital disease. But this is one member of a big family viruses that'll will work in a similar sort of way things like visa, the Vars, chickenpox and shingles in people unlucky enough to have that. Do you think you could prevent a person from succumbing to shingles by the same technique? The shingles virus actually goes into very similar nerve cells and acts a lot like herpes simplex, and so we can actually think about using the same therapy for that viruses. Well, we're also very actively looking at viruses that are similar but not herpes viruses in particular hepatitis B., and we have some really exciting results there where we can do very similar things. We're likely to see success there and maybe another viruses as well.

Herpes Genital Disease United States Brian Infections Keith Jerem Alzheimer's Disease EU Vars
The state of Alzheimer Disease in America

Second Opinion

03:37 min | Last month

The state of Alzheimer Disease in America

"Is sixty five and her daughter just moved in to help care for her Jan is forgetful emotional. She can't concentrate. She's lost her sense of direction and she can no longer be independent. There are several causes of dementia but the most common is Alzheimer's disease which affects six, million Americans sixty, five and older and a significant group of people under the age of sixty five. And as our population ages, the number of people with Alzheimer's dementia is growing larger each year there is a high likelihood that Jan has Alzheimer's type dementia because her sister and her mother also have it. Doctors do have some tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, the most commonly used or brief oral cognitive tests to test memory and logic. These are the sorts of tests. President trump probably took where one of the items ask people to remember five objects at fifteen minutes. These tests do a pretty good job of separating those with frank dementia from those with normal thinking but they. Don't help separate out people with mild cognitive impairment from those with normal cognition. Doctors can also use imaging studies like pet scans, spinal taps, or emery scans with more accurate but are expensive invasive, and not always available will report this week published in Jama suggests a new simple blood test may be accurate inexpensive and may soon be widely available according to the study the. New Test promises to be able to detect the disease decades before memory problems begin but the problem is that testing for disease for which there is no or only very poor treatments raise some important ethical issues. It would be one thing if patients could start treatment early or even take a medicine to prevent the disease, but this is not the case yet we have. Several prescription drugs and some over the counter supplements. But the very best they can offer is a slight slowing disease progression and even that is of questionable significance to patients. So the value of a test that identifies a condition early, that is before the onset of symptoms comes in allowing patients who wished to know whether they will develop this disease to plan their lives accordingly. They might make very different life choices. If they know, their final years will be impacted by Alzheimer's disease. The test also has the potential of helping doctors differentiate dementia caused by Alzheimer's from other types of dementia and medical conditions, which may be more amenable to effective treatments. and New drugs do come along which are promising. The test will also help researchers identify those people likely to develop the disease so that the drugs intended to prevent or treat the disease can be studied early in the course of the illness this new test is unlikely to make any difference to Jan but her daughter's already thinking about whether she wants a blood test that can tell her what may be in her

Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Donald Trump President Trump Jama
Flu, Pneumonia Vaccinations Tied to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Dementia

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:47 sec | Last month

Flu, Pneumonia Vaccinations Tied to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Dementia

"To To know know study study suggests suggests an an even even stronger stronger reason reason to to get get an an annual annual flu flu shot. shot. And And it's it's probably probably not not the the reason reason you you think think Yes, Yes, it it is is really really important important to to get get a a flu flu shot, shot, especially especially this this year, year, where the pandemic raging alongside the yearly fall flu season, But new studies say there is evidence getting flu shots and also pneumonia. Vaccines may protect against Alzheimer's disease and especially multiple that over time, Dr Heather Snyder with the Alzheimer's Association that is really Individuals that had vaccination in individuals that were over the age of 65 were in a 10 year period between the age of 65 75. No one has yet knows why. There seems to be an association between flu and pneumonia, vaccines and a reduction in risk for Alzheimer's.

FLU Pneumonia Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Dr Heather Snyder
Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease

WBBM Evening News

00:40 sec | Last month

Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease

"To a blood test for Alzheimer's disease. A blood test study was led by Dr Oscar Hanson of Lund University in Sweden. This test actually shows all some seas early on, so also when you only have very minor memory problems, it's very accurate, but the test is on ly for patients showing signs of the disease. I don't think this blood test should be used for screening off healthy individuals. In recent years that we don't have any therapy today that stops slows down by disease in healthy individual. The testing identified people with Alzheimer's versus no dementia or other types of fit with accuracy ranging from 89 to 98%. I'm Shelly Adler,

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Oscar Hanson Alzheimer Shelly Adler Lund University Sweden
Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:40 sec | Last month

Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

"Scientists are getting closer to a blood test for Alzheimer's disease. The blood test study was led by Dr Oscar Hanson of Lund University in Sweden. Test actually shows all some seas early on. So also when you only have very minor memory problems, it's their accurate But the test is on ly for patients showing signs of the disease. I don't think this blood test abuse for screening off healthy individuals and recently is that we don't have any therapy today. That stops slows down the disease in healthy individual. The testing identified people with Alzheimer's versus no dementia or other types of fit with accuracy ranging from 89 to

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Oscar Hanson Alzheimer Lund University Sweden
Scientists Get Closer to Blood Test for Alzheimer's Disease

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | Last month

Scientists Get Closer to Blood Test for Alzheimer's Disease

"May be a simple, reliable way to help family doctors diagnosed Most common form of dementia. Researchers say an experimental blood test was able to distinguish people with Alzheimer's disease from those without it In several studies. The accuracy range from 89 to 98% although the test still needs more validation. Several companies air developing these tests, which measure a protein that damages the brains of people with the disease back with sports, coming up in two minutes on

Alzheimer's Disease
Wife takes dishwashing job at nursing home to visit husband with Alzheimer's

American Medicine Today

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Wife takes dishwashing job at nursing home to visit husband with Alzheimer's

"In Jacksonville, unable to visit her husband in his nursing home, took a job there so she could visit with him. Mary Daniel told news Channel eight in Tampa that she had gone almost four months without seeing her husband, Steve, who has early onset Alzheimer's disease, and his health had taken a bad turn. She now works as a dishwasher and gets to spend a couple of hours a day with her husband

Mary Daniel Alzheimer's Disease Jacksonville Tampa Steve
Actinium Pharma's Transformative Radiation Treatment

Breaking Biotech

04:50 min | 3 months ago

Actinium Pharma's Transformative Radiation Treatment

"So today. We're GONNA talk about a couple of things. COUPLE UPDATES we've seen in the last couple of weeks related to Jin Amarin, as well as Kerio farm that we heard today and I'm recording this on the twenty second of June. And, then the main story today we're GONNA, talk about actinium pharmaceuticals, and I think if everything goes well with them. They could be a big play now. This weird stuff around the stocks or we're GONNA touch a little bit on that, but I think that if the data continues to look as good as it has so far, they could really make a big change in the targeted radiation space, so we'll touch a little bit on that as well. But. Yeah, for me on a personal note. It's it's been busy. Things are kind of getting back to normal here. In San Diego, a lot of businesses have been opening up. So I've noticed that actually have a bit more of a social life now, so that's definitely been entertaining. Take me away from the market's a little bit, but you know I'm here today to talk about some awesome biotech company so with that. Let's get into it. And the first piece of news I wanted to touch on is biogenic and what we heard. Is that biogen's Tech Videira pen? Five one four was ruled invalid us. District, judge, and they closed Friday at two seventy one, and they did see a little bit more of a dip this week. As we've dealt with this already with Amarin we're hearing that Bison does plan on filing an appeal, but that appeal process can. Can take up to a year, but what's different here is that we're actually expecting at risk launch, so mylan has made it clear. Myelin the company sued by John. Over this patent made it clear that they're aiming for a November sixteenth approval day for Generic Tech. FIDORA, and they have already filed an da with the FDA which is the normal process by which a generic company has to get their medicine approved. By, June did kind of expect this to some capacity because they did launch a competing drug to tech Videira, called vulgarity and a little bit of a better safety profile, and they launched this just in case, the tech texture patent battle did go south because I believe there's other lawsuits coming up against this patent, but biogen launched Romerike parity in the hopes that they'll be able to shift the revenue. They've been getting from. Tech Fidora onto American and then maintain this juggernaut status since tech for their is their biggest selling medication, and it's about four billion dollars. Dollars per year they generate in this medicine, so they're going to hope to replace that with something and the loss of this patent protection means the generics are gonNA. Come on the market pretty soon and when I did mine. Alice's using a model that I had created. If I have the tech revenue, their stock price would go down to run to thirty, so I think what's going on here is investors are pricing in the potential of America to take a lot of that revenue from Tech Videira, which would help Jin, either that or the odds of winning? Winning an appeal are there so the stock is pricing in some upside? Despite the loss they suffered, and the other thing that's going on with biogen is they are planning to file the advocating B-. Be La in two three, twenty twenty and advocate the indication being Alzheimer's disease, which is a very very big patient population, so I think there is also some support for the stock given that biding could potentially get an Alzheimer's drug approved. If not late issue than early next year and I know there's a lot of controversy over the added Keenum data I think. Think personally. It's a coin flip whether or not the FDA is going to approve it. I think the the date is very shady and it shouldn't be approved, but strange things happened with the FDA before, so it is possible that they could lobby the FDA enough to get it approved the next company, and wanted to touch on is Amarin and just a little piece of news that we heard. Is that Amarin settled with the generic company called appetites, Apex Appetites, and this settlement would keep them from launching a CPA generic until August ninth of twenty twenty nine. And I saw a lot of excitement around this just because the logic being that if apex fought that ammon was going to lose the appeal, they wouldn't bother going through the motion to do the Selman agreement keeping Aptex from going to the mark until twenty, twenty nine. But, if I were to think about it logically, I assume that the lawyers between Amarin and APP attacks have been in discussions for months by now and that the failure of Amer to defend its patents just happened to go against Amarin APTEX was not expecting that, so they ended up filing the settlement agreement anyway, but I think that if Amazon is not successful in their appeal process I imagine appetites, April tax is going to be able to file a generic before this twenty twenty nine days, so to me this neither a positive thing, negative thing, but you know I'm still holding all my shares and will look forward to that appeal decision coming up later this year.

Jin Amarin FDA Amarin America Amarin Aptex Tech Videira Kerio San Diego Videira Twenty Twenty Alzheimer Ammon John Alice Alzheimer's Disease Amer Selman Amazon
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 3 months ago

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"This healthcare podcast is sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient CARE I. I School of Medicine is leading Indiana University's burst grand challenge, the precision health initiative with bold goals to cure multiple myeloma, triple, negative breast, cancer and charts coma, and prevent type, two diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Jim Welcome. Thanks for for having me.

Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Indiana Multiple Myeloma Alzheimer's Disease
Study: More Berries, Apples, Tea May Have Protective Benefits Against Alzheimer's

Invite Health

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Study: More Berries, Apples, Tea May Have Protective Benefits Against Alzheimer's

"By the way another study just came out drinking great actually point according to more berries apples and he may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's really interesting study this from a Jean Mayer human nutrition research center on aging that's up at Tufts University it's a great place to read research for they looked at almost thirty thousand action they looked at almost three thousand people age fifty or older on the phone for twenty years and if they had a lot of apples each month a lot of berries like blueberries and blackberries strawberries and if they had a lot of T. I cut their risk strongly about charmers disease and other related dimensions like late dementia and Lewy body dementia now here's the thing they said she specifically green tea in the study this is according to Dr as raw she store shoe store Dr as rishi star read the study he's up at tufts in open borders he said T. specifically green tea and berries are good sources of the slab in which so there really is brain protection here if you drink green tea what she you cut your risk of Alzheimer's let me see if I could find if you drank tea you cut way back on your risk of Alzheimer's people who didn't drink green tea or eat berries have twice the risk or eat apples had twice the risk of Alzheimer's disease so when you do not agree to you're also

Alzheimer Tufts University Jean Mayer Alzheimer's Disease
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 4 months ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Treatments from Gilead and Regeneron Move Forward in Battle Against COVID-19!

Breaking Biotech

12:21 min | 4 months ago

Treatments from Gilead and Regeneron Move Forward in Battle Against COVID-19!

"Some glad to be back and have a good show for everybody. We're GONNA talk about a few interesting companies. That had some good readouts this past little while as well as ones that are upcoming. So we're going to start by talking about axiom. Therapeutics and their readout in Alzheimer's Disease Agitation. Or then GonNa move on and talk about Gilead add in all the updates. We saw their Endesa of your trials. Never GonNa talk about another company. That has some. Kobe related. Work going on which is regeneration. And I usually don't talk about mid large-cap biotech but regenerate is is an interesting one. Especially because I've touched on their main compound lia in previous videos so I thought I'd do kind of a deeper look into them and we're GonNa talk about that in big detail so with that. Let's just get ready to it. And the first topic I want to mention is acts on therapeutics so their company that saw a huge runup in twenty nineteen with the development of their drug. Axs Zero Five. Which is a combination of Dextrathoraphan and Wellbutrin and they've already seen positive readouts in major depressive disorder with this compound as well as a couple of other ones and they saw mixed results with treatment resistant depression. But I think they're going to move forward with some trials any way to confirm that data but what they also wanted to to look ad. And this is the data that in presenting here is the effect of access zero five in Alzheimer's Disease Agitation so one of the symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease is this agitate that comes along with it and it occurs in around seventy percent of all patients so that works out to six million people in the USA. So it's a pretty huge indication in one that I didn't really look at in serious capacity before I took a position because it was originally planned for that treatment resistant depression but I think the stock had a lot of potential. Besides that so. We saw a readout this week. That showed a significant improvement in this. Cma I total score in patients treated with excess zero five compared to both be appropriate riches or placebo and view pro free on its own. Didn't have a substantial effect on Alzheimer's Disease Agitation. It was only when it was mixed with desperate dextrathoraphan in excess zero five that it saw this improvement so this is very beneficial for the song. I think it opened on that day you know upwards of one hundred and change and then it fell back down. I think it closed this week at ninety but very positive for the company and they need to discuss with the FDA how they're going to move forward and whether or not this is GonNa be considered a pivotal trial for them so we might see some insights in their Q. One earnings call which is taking place on. May eighth but is definitely impressive for the company and this molecule is going to be a huge revenue driver for them once they get those filings through and get approval. So that's excellent therapeutics and I'm still holding onto the thirty shares that I bought so let's talk about Gilead and their drugs death severe. That's been investigated right now for the treatment of Cova Nineteen and the importance around rim of your has less to do with Gillian specifically and more to do with how it's going to be implemented in the hospital system and prevent them from being overburdened as states kinda revamp up their economies again because if from desktop here has an effect in it lowers the time in which patients need to be in the hospital. The chances of the hospital system being overburden reduces substantially since we can you know get these patients in and get them out quicker. So that's why remm desperately is so important and we saw originally that Gilead published a study with regards to the compassionate use only remedy severe and that was only a single arm study. That didn't have really great conclusions to be drawn from but since then we've seen results from four studies and I'm GonNa talk about these in some detail because we heard that Dr Bounty announced that there were significant results in that they're going to move forward and approve rendez severe for Cova Nineteen and we also heard on Friday that trump is going to announce the approved use of reinvest fear for this so the four studies that we got results for our this China study that was published in the Lancet and this was an underpowered study so they weren't able to find patients who enroll in this study so they just took the data can the study published in The Lancet. The next one is this. Niaid study that was also a randomized placebo controlled trial and then there were two phase threes. That Julia did call the simple studies. And this is to compare the ten day treatment versus the five day treatment and the reason why they did this I believe is because they don't really have the commercial capacity to produce unlimited rendez severe. So if they can show that the treatment of as severe works just as well with a five day treatment they can save more doses for more patients. Let's first talk about the China study which was published in the Lancet a little while ago and this was a randomized placebo controlled trial in Severe Cova nineteen patients and just to note that this was underpowered. Despite the fact that they did statistics on it there weren't enough patients to really get the power that they were looking for from the outset. And what we see here is that patients treated with Rendez. Aveer were more likely to die if you look at this. Kaplan Meier curve and the hazard ratio was one point two three. Which means that. If you were treated with reservoir you had kind of a twenty. Three percent increased risk of dying the other attract that. I'm showing here is the viral load. So one thing that I was hopeful to see is that Rendez released had an effect on viral loads and the one thing to note though. Is that these samples were taken only from the news. Affairs in the oral faring. So that's kind of your nose area and your throat but not your lungs. So there's a chance that there would have been a significant difference if swabs were taken or if they did some kind of leverage to get samples from the lung and see whether or not rendell spearheaded effect on viral loads. In in that capacity the study also looked at length of hospital. Stay in that was also not significant in this study although the safety was actually okay. So that's one positive outcome from all this but given that this study was underpowered. We need to take these results with a grain of salt. But it's not super encouraging. That REMM has no profound effect in these patients specifically but they also went ahead and did this. Niaid study so we look at bat study. They looked at one thousand sixty three patients and these were hospitalized. Kobe nineteen patients so still in the severe range. And here's what the press release said preliminary results indicate that patients who received rendez severe. Had A thirty one percent faster time to recovery than those who received Placebo and the P value here is less than point zero zero one specifically the median time to recovery was eleven days for patients treated with severe compared with fifteen days for those who received. Placebo results also suggested a survival benefit with a mortality rate of eighty percent for the group receiving Rendez severe versus eleven point six percent for the Placebo Group and the P value here was point zero five nine so this is the study that I think Dr Found. She was referring to saying that there was a significant benefit to rendez severe treatment. And I definitely see a benefit if this is the difference in the time to recovery. The survival didn't have a significant effect. But even if there isn't a significant survival benefit if there is a benefit to the time to recovery. I still think that is profound and we'll be able to help the burdening of the hospital system. Which is what I was referring to earlier in talk so we still haven't seen a lot of details in this. Study some stuff that I'd love to see. Our viral loads led to look at the safety to see more details in in the effects. Endesa there had so. We don't really know exactly what's going on. But this is the study that I think the. Us government is looking at to say whether or not it is a drug with an effect that will be rolled out in the country and it looks like that's going to happen even before we are going to see the details of that study but it is what it is and then the last studies. I wanted to talk about. Are these simple studies from Gilead and this is an open label trial that looked at a five day treatment or attend day treatment and the results are that the study demonstrated that patients receiving a ten day treatment course of Amdex aveer achieved similar improvement in clinical status compared with those taking five treatment course and the odds ratio here is point seven five with a ninety five percent confidence interval of point. Five one to one point one two on day fourteen so this is good news. It shows that they only need to treat rim desperate for five days and it's GonNa be not significantly different than they treated with ten days and we've been seeing a lot about Gilead having around a million doses of rendez severe before the end of the year so given that only five day treatment is needed. They're going to be able to save rim desperate for more patients. And that's a good thing because like I said I don't think Gilead expected at the beginning of the year have to roll out the commercialization of severe. But they're gonNA have to do that. Some capacity and in this way can be able to save some doses for a lot more people and I I put a little note here about the safety so breathe three or higher liver enzyme. Lt Elevations occurred in seven point. Three percent of patients with three percent of patients discontinuing rimmed as severe treatment due to elevated liver tests. So this is kind of a negative thing that is going to affect a decent number of patients because I think a lot of the comber abilities of Cova nineteen patients are issues related to their liver

Gilead Alzheimer's Disease Rendez Cova Severe Cova Niaid The Lancet Amdex Aveer Placebo Group FDA Kobe China Dextrathoraphan Aveer Kaplan Meier United States Julia Rendell Dr Bounty
Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies

"Earl graves senior who championed black businesses as the founder of the first African American magazine focusing on black entrepreneurs has died he was eighty five his son said graves died Monday after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease grave launched his magazine black enterprise back in nineteen seventy he later said his aim was to educate inspire and uplift his readers while showing them how to thrive professionally and

Founder African American Magazine Black Enterprise Earl Graves Alzheimer's Disease
Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies

KCBS Radio Overnight News

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Earl Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine, dies

"Earl graves senior has died he championed black businesses as the founder of the first African American magazine focusing on black entrepreneurs grades suffered from Alzheimer's disease he launched black enterprise in nineteen seventy he later said that his name was to educate inspire and uplift as readers while showing them how to thrive professionally and economically Earl graves senior was eighty

Founder African American Magazine Earl Graves Alzheimer's Disease
Coronavirus Latest: Former Philadelphia Eagles Kicker Tom Dempsey Dies At 73 After Battle With COVID-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Coronavirus Latest: Former Philadelphia Eagles Kicker Tom Dempsey Dies At 73 After Battle With COVID-19

"Starting off in the NFL former saints kicker Tom Dempsey who famously made a sixty three yard field goal against the lions back in November of nineteen seventy has died due to complications from the corona virus Dempsey was seventy three had also been battling Alzheimer's disease and dementia he also could for the eagles rams bills and then Houston Oilers what made Dempsey sixty three yard field goal even more memorable he did so without toes on his right kicking foot with the modified shoe he kicked with on display at the pro football hall of

Tom Dempsey Lions Houston Oilers NFL Alzheimer's Disease Eagles Football
Biotech Pipeline Updates

Breaking Biotech

08:22 min | 6 months ago

Biotech Pipeline Updates

"We're in the middle of the cove in nineteen pandemic is continuing the escalate in California here. We're doing okay. The shelter in place seems to be Instituted in personally in San Diego we've seen the beaches and parks officially closed so that continues to escalate. But you know I'm doing okay out here things. Aren't that bad. As of now the situation does seem to be getting worse. And we're GONNA talk about that a little bit and I also want to talk about a few pipeline updates that we heard from some pretty cool company. So let's start with that and the first company wants to talk about is cassava sciences ticker symbol. Save A for those. Who Don't know but I did do a video on them. Maybe three or four years ago maybe two months and were waiting for their face to be dated. Come Out and this is a twenty eight day trial with their drug. Pti One to five. That is supposed to change the course of the disease in Alzheimer's patients so will we heard a pipeline update and their CEO said that their clinical program show no signs of slowing down. This is good. I think a lot of people weren't concerned in general all biotech virus. It really does get out of hand and trying about SARS cove to it could really interfere with regular clinical trials. Say Half the patients get the virus and have to undergo treatment for flu. That's not ideal when you're trying to just look at eight control and test groups so anyway related to cassava. Apparently their clinical programs are not slowing down and their fees to be trial completed patient enrollment as well as dosing and this is as a march twenty twenty and they mentioned that there were no safety issues found a good thing and then they also said that the company expects to announce top line results approximately mid year twenty twenty and then they also announced that they're going to initiate a one year open label study of the drug. So if this happens to not work out you know. There is a chance that the drug could affect patients in one year's time in case the Twentieth Day treatment isn't quite enough so the details of the trial. Definitely check out my older video on that. I I took a position in the fives that believe in. I think the companies now trading in the threes so I might add a little bit to the position because I did only start scaling in and really looking forward to seeing this readout here in mid twenty twenty because if it is positive the stock it increased substantially so. That's what I'm betting on here. So let's move on. Dvd TECHNOLOGY TICKER SYMBOL DVD. There a allergy company that is kind of competitor to immune even though some people would not consider them necessarily competitors because one obviously is much less effective than the other so the issue with DVD. Tea Is that their skin patch vice skin product. It is less effective than amiens. Oral immunotherapy of the benefit of that is that there are significantly fewer side effects but the issue is the FDA really wants to see that there is efficacy benefit to patients taking this drug or this therapy in order to improve the product. So we saw that Amien got FDA APPROVAL. Finally and that was nice to see and the concerns. There were that the product does have some side effects associated with it. D- On the other hand does not have many side effects but they do happen to have a lack of advocacy so what happened is the FDA identified questions regarding the efficacy of its biologics license application for vice skin peanut in patients with peanut allergy as a result the allergenic. Products Advisory Committee a PAC meeting to discuss. The bialy will no longer take place as previously scheduled so this led to a big drop in the stock and DVD's struggled off and on dealing with the FDA that's manufacturing issues last year. Maybe year more than that. I don't quite remember but I am concerned. This and I don't think it's worth buying the dip. Necessarily if they're able to show efficacy. It's going to be a real problem now. They do have some data coming out soon. That could show. That product does have more efficacy than their other. Trials showed. So if you're looking for a high risk play could do that. I am interested in space. This oral or skin related allergy desensitization. Keeping my both companies and they have taken a big hit in this recent downturn. We've had someone beekeeping my out on them all right. The next company I want to touch on is Viking Therapeutics. And it's been a long time since I talked about them. They are a company that has been Kinda slow too bad but they might have the best in class drug for Nash. It's a thyroid. Receptor Beta agonists. That does really well in lowering liver fat. So the news that we got is that their board is authorized a stock repurchase program whereby the company can repurchase up to fifty million dollars in stock over two years and this came as the market was really coming down. And I'm Kinda surprised because oftentimes these small biotech companies really struggled to raise cash because stock prices so depressed as it's being sold off for some reason. Viking has decided that it's more important for them to kind of artificially increase the stock price by doing a share buyback so as of December twentieth nineteen. They had two hundred fifty seven point six million dollars in cash. They are presenting data from their twenty eighteen trials at conferences which seems like kind of a waste of resources to me and we've really seen the data digested. I don't know what they think they're gonNA get by presenting that data. It's one thing to kind of present the updated data. But we don't really have much of that so for me. This is kind of a strange move and I would much rather than us that fifty million dollars towards anything else that would either increase the likelihood of their pipeline candidates being developed. Or you know hiring people that are good at developing Nash candidates but instead they're just buying back stock so this is not a very encouraging. Move to me. We're we're still in the midst of this case to be trial and we're waiting for that data but one thing. I wanted to notice that I looked at the clinical trials dot gov symbol for for their trial and it looks like the primary outcome is actually twelve week. Mri Data and analyzing liber fat content. The trial started in November twenty nineteen. So this actually a chance that we could see this data in the next six months or so at least before the under twenty twenty. So I'm Kinda keep in mind that and for that reason. I'm not selling any of the Stock. I have even taken quite a hit in the position. The secondary endpoint for this trial is fifty two week resolution of CFO hepatitis. The histology that's the actual biopsy of liver where they're actually going to be able to score it and evaluate. You know whether or not Nash has been resolved to some capacity given the metrics that the FDA wants them to look at but the endpoint. We're going to see. Is this twelve week. Mri data deliver fat content. And we can be pretty confident. That liver fat is going to go down. The patients in this trial are biopsy confirmed. Nash patients so the Bar is raised a little bit higher than their face to a trial. That was just done using. Nfl D. patients which is a milder form. Before you get to Nash Fatty Liver Disease Problems. So that's where Viking the last company. I WanNa talk to you before we get to. Our highlighted story is excellent therapeutics and we heard that they are accelerating the trial completion for a excess zero five typo there in Alzheimer's Disease Agitation to Q. Two rather than Q. Three Twenty Twenty. I hadn't really talked about the disease agitation trial because I think it's their lesser important one. I'm much more excited about the treatment resistant. Depression read out. That should be happening in the next week or so. And there's also going to be read out for x zero seven in migraine. Those are going to be really big moves for the stock and now we can just add another one in Q. Two we're going to see this Alzheimer's Disease Agitation. Xm Is the ticket for axiom. It's been all over the place throughout this whole downturn in the market and I have taken another position or a kind of double down with what I had because I kind of bought it at the top but I do think that they have a good chance of seeing a positive outlook in t already resistant depression and if it is positive. I think it'll be a big mover for the stock because physicians really struggled to treat already so this would be huge for them. So that's kind of where we're at with axiom and I'm looking forward to the date in the next little

Nash FDA Alzheimer's Disease San Diego Three Twenty Twenty Alzheimer California Depression Twentieth Day Amiens Viking Therapeutics XM Fatty Liver Amien Viking CEO PAC Advisory Committee CFO
Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:26 min | 6 months ago

Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

"Kind of an eerie juxtaposition out the window and unfair days outside when we can go outside right now unfolding beauty and innocence. You know tiny bulbs plump Little Buds and the headlines. Hourly and daily so You know I wanted to backtrack about what gardening means tests and sort of what brought us to it. What brought you. How long have you been gardening since I was very young house was a teenager and I started with indoor plants and got really turned on and then when I went to college in Rhode Island I was kind of close to Danielson Connecticut which is where low Geez is and you know I was thinking about all this stuff and I think that shopping has a lot to do with my acquisitive NECE and interest in? You know seeing the new plant finding new plant thing will there? Also incredible and shopping online is something you can do now so really well. So you're GONNA be spending some money and when you you said you were a teenager and so forth. What did it besides these sort of amassing a collection? That sort of instinct. That you apparently had Was there some other escapism or something else that brought you to it or you know. I don't know I don't want to project too. I mean I can tell you mine but I just you know I don't know I I know I have a need to nurture and I just love. It's so exciting to see you know. It seems like slow-motion in most cases but to see a plant grow and thrive or something from seed that sometimes. That's pretty fast and from sea to in your case edibles. It's a miracle and to participate in that it it. I'm thinking how heartwarming it is. And that's it's you know it's a boost. Then it makes you. It makes you think about tomorrow. Yeah Yeah I mean for me. I was in my twenties and I mean you know the story most of my listeners. Know Story You know as my twenties. My father had died the next year. My mother was forty. Nine was diagnosed with early onset. Alzheimer's disease I don't even think they called it that at that time but that was the idea and so there. I was called home for my to cover my widowed mother and that unfolded this strange time in my young life and I was close to home to stay close to home during the day. I had a job at night. Someone else came and care for her at night. And what are you GONNA do? I mean as I say you can only watch so much daytime. Tv When you're twenty four twenty five years old and so I got a garden book. As someone gave me Crockett's victory garden and I would seem sad expression. Victory Gardens seems appropriate right now and I you know and I just started doing the stuff in it like I started going to the local garden center and whatever it said I just bought those seeds or that plant or just did these crazy experiments and obviously killed most of the things in the early going. You know I didn't know what I was doing. But that was my entree was during a very dark time and my my younger life So it's been a refuge for me You know number of times it seen me through. I have often said my gardens has saved me many times so I find I'm thinking of spending more time outside because I can't go at the moment And all of my vents. I'm sure like yours have been postponed at least through. May and I'm sure through June and whatever as well Are you thinking of doing more are you? I'm trying to assign myself some projects things I've put off because usually I have garden visitors and I can't make a mess and leave the mess there for weeks while I you know do a Jew Be Greenwich Ovation or something. I'm thinking well. This is the time Margaret. Nobody's coming right well. We we already talked about me shopping. I haven't really gotten that into that but I probably will usually I shop for something because I see something and then I track it down online and then that leads me. Oh they have a minimum order. Oh and then there's five plants and you only wanted one and then there's shipping savings if you buy forty nine dollars for the plant's not that. I've ever done that but I it's almost time for me to spruce up the house plans and that's something. I can do something I should do. You know do a house plant Rehab. I every day I run to light cart to see who's changed or what seed has sprouted. Miracle never tired of that miracle so there there's that Planted some perennials. Yesterday that came in the mail and they were dormant. How so that's happening already in? That's going to continue. I got a Beirut Cherry tree that I'm growing pot I don't know why right well but whatever gets you through. I mean I think right so you said I loved. You said WHO's changed. You went to the light cart To look at your all your little babysit who. You didn't say what she said. Who and I think of them. The same way to plants are not some inanimate objects some it right. You know I think of them as as as who not one but so you said House Plant Rehab. So this is a time for that and we have time. 'cause we're home and we have time to notice and we can. That's a good suggestion for me. Because a lot of years. I get so hectic. Try and get ready for the open gardens. I don't do my repotting of those house plants on their way out the door for the summer or do you know what I mean. I skip it. So that's a really good one when they're on their way out which is late usually mid. May and wouldn't it be great to for me to clean the leaves with a sponge and a little couple of drops dish soap in accord of warm water? And just clean off the dust but also some of them get a little city mole alden. There's all sorts of insects that can actually be removed with a sponge in a tiny bit of soap and water so The things that have ever removed most of the house plants and things that have firm leaves like citrus and Camelia. If you grow things like that and philodendron which you can go anywhere some philodendron. I put my hand under the leaf than just rub the top brush sponging were almost everything comes right off. The plants look so much better and then they say thank you. Yeah Yeah 'cause I mean. Spending a winter indoors is not really their thing. And all that unseen dust that moves around in the air with The heating system when heating systems on in any house right. And you find that fine dust like my clive is all have that by this time of year and they need a nice Tending you so you have you have a Camelia You Grow Hoyas don't you? I I do. There's one at the kitchen window and luckily that's very close the kitchen sink because the plant small enough. It'll go right in the kitchen sink and get washed off there or you have the climate as you. Probably take him to the shower. Yeah I do I do but Yeah but the hoyas. I've never grown them. I've grown them somehow as needed greenhouse. And well we can talk about what they are. They used to be part of the milkweed family but I think they've separated them now but they're semi succulent. They have thick leaves. They're pretty slow growing except in the spring when they kind of shoot. I have one wonderful one called Hoya Carey. I and I started with one leaf in a pot and it stayed that way for about five years. Want an apart- many years ago and then all of a sudden it just exploded a now. It's a very big viney plant. I have it on a a wreath circle. You know stuck in this well. It's a long story but I wound round and round and it has beautiful flowers when it blooms in the summer and it has heart shaped leaves. I have another one that has purple flowers. They don't flower very often. And it's important not to trim eight trim where the flowers come because it blooms on Spurs Kinda like an apple tree and it'll bloom over and over again on the same spurs so you have to not cut those dead head so to speak to the flowers and their fragrance almost all of them and if you do cut it or it will bleed white. Latex like a lot of succulents and milkweed male creates right. Right right

House Plant Rehab Camelia Victory Gardens Rhode Island Danielson Connecticut Spurs Alzheimer's Disease Hoya Carey Crockett Margaret Beirut
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:46 min | 7 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"<Music> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> we are quite <Speech_Telephony_Male> confident <Speech_Music_Male> that as <Speech_Telephony_Male> we move through <Speech_Telephony_Male> these <SpeakerChange> clinical trials <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Silence> there will be <Music> benefits <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> to the patients. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> And what's <Speech_Music_Male> the development <Speech_Telephony_Male> path forward in <Silence> time <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> so the phase <Speech_Telephony_Male> one trial should <Speech_Telephony_Male> meet out in October? <Speech_Telephony_Male> That's our <Speech_Music_Male> goal <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Telephony_Male> for after <Speech_Telephony_Male> that in Alzheimer's <Speech_Telephony_Male> Disease Assuming <Speech_Telephony_Male> we have a positive <Speech_Telephony_Male> trial in <Speech_Telephony_Male> twenty twenty one. <Speech_Music_Male> We would expect <Speech_Telephony_Male> to be <SpeakerChange> initiating <Speech_Telephony_Male> the face trial. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> But you know. The drug <Speech_Telephony_Male> has <SpeakerChange> Houston's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> beyond <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Alzheimer's <Silence> disease and <Speech_Music_Male> Nerdy <Speech_Telephony_Male> Genitive Diseases. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Just last week <Speech_Telephony_Male> we received notification <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> that we received <Speech_Telephony_Male> a five hundred <Speech_Telephony_Male> thousand dollar <Speech_Music_Male> grant <Speech_Telephony_Male> from the L. S. foundation <Speech_Telephony_Male> to <Silence> <Advertisement> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Study <Speech_Music_Male> of the drug <Speech_Telephony_Male> in preclinical <Speech_Telephony_Male> models. Ls <Speech_Telephony_Male> which <Speech_Telephony_Male> is you know. Devastating <Speech_Music_Male> disease <Speech_Music_Male> and then the purpose <Speech_Telephony_Male> of that funding is <Speech_Telephony_Male> to prepare us <Speech_Telephony_Male> for a clinical <Speech_Telephony_Male> trial in the future. <Speech_Telephony_Male> We have <Speech_Music_Male> had <Speech_Telephony_Male> funding from N. J. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Fox <SpeakerChange> foundation <Speech_Male> past <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> For Parkinson's <Speech_Telephony_Male> Disease Research. <Speech_Telephony_Male> This drug <SpeakerChange> has a very <Speech_Telephony_Male> interesting applications <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and Parkinson's <Silence> <Advertisement> disease <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> and we would hope to <Speech_Telephony_Male> be able to <Speech_Telephony_Male> pursue <Speech_Telephony_Male> Parkinson's disease <Speech_Telephony_Male> studies <Speech_Telephony_Male> in the future. <Speech_Music_Male> So we <Speech_Telephony_Male> believe the future <Speech_Telephony_Male> is right for this <Speech_Music_Male> drug in <Speech_Music_Male> the neurologic diseases. <Speech_Telephony_Male> The first <Speech_Music_Male> you know the first <Speech_Telephony_Male> data and <Speech_Telephony_Male> man. We'll be <Speech_Telephony_Male> in Alzheimer's <Speech_Telephony_Male> disease <Speech_Music_Male> but by <Speech_Telephony_Male> no means. Will that be <Speech_Telephony_Male> the last? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> You look down <Silence> the road. Do you think this. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> As we've seen in cancer <Speech_Telephony_Male> with combination <Speech_Male> therapies that <Silence> this might be <Speech_Telephony_Male> an important <Speech_Telephony_Male> part of a combination <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> approach to treating. <Speech_Telephony_Male> These are <Silence> <Advertisement> logical <SpeakerChange> conditions. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Yeah I think that's a very <Speech_Telephony_Male> insightful. Comment <Speech_Telephony_Male> You <Silence> <Advertisement> know. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> These are <Speech_Telephony_Male> complex diseases. <Speech_Telephony_Male> We don't <Speech_Telephony_Male> see any silver <Speech_Telephony_Male> bullets out there <Speech_Telephony_Male> for the most part. <Speech_Telephony_Male> You know we <Speech_Telephony_Male> think if you look at how <Speech_Telephony_Male> cardiovascular <Speech_Male> disease cancer <Speech_Telephony_Male> many <Speech_Telephony_Male> diseases are treated. <Speech_Telephony_Male> They're treated <Speech_Telephony_Male> with combination <Speech_Male> therapy. <Speech_Telephony_Male> And we believe <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> that. Actually <Speech_Telephony_Male> that will be the same <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> for Alzheimer's <Silence> disease. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> We <Speech_Telephony_Male> think that we <Speech_Telephony_Male> are well positioned <Speech_Telephony_Male> for that because <Music> <Advertisement> almost <Speech_Telephony_Male> any mechanism. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Telephony_Male> attribute <Speech_Telephony_Male> to Alzheimer's <Speech_Music_Male> disease whether <Music>

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:55 min | 7 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Thank you it's a pleasure to be here. I am telling you more about what we're doing. Well we're GONNA talk about Indian Duro inflammation and your efforts to target this as a way to slow or halt the progression of Cognitive and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Let's start with Alzheimer's disease itself though I'm sure most listeners have some familiarity with the condition. But perhaps you can begin with how. The disease manifests itself in progresses. And what's the prognosis for patients today? So thank you the Alzheimer's Disease. Everyone is very familiar with the problems with cognitive decline. That is that people begin to get a little forgetful again to Do things like get lost. When they go out to the grocery store or as the disease progresses they may not remember Loved ones when they need them. This is you know the popular view of of dimension and cognitive decline. And then you know it's mild at first and everybody thinks it's amusing. But as the disease progresses it actually can become so severe that the person becomes a Husk of their from self little interaction with the outside world or people around them. But there's another side outside them people forget about and that is the neuropsychiatric symptoms that is to say see Often the first manifestations of the disease before the cognitive decline becomes difficult to manage our problems such as sleep disorders. Depression hallucinations apathy. An aggression or aggressiveness. And in fact the most common reason someone takes a loved one to the two physician. Where the diagnosis or the suspicion about Alzheimer's was entertained. Is for one of these neuropsychiatric syndromes. Because they can really Complicate the the patient's interaction with those around him and the bottom line is patients with Alzheimer's. He's asked the down the slippery slope require. You know help. They require care. They require caregiver to really give much of their time to Take care of the Karen feeding and safety of a loved one. So it's a difficult thing for everybody Unfortunately it's often difficult diagnosed early. We'll put it this way since. There's no effective therapies. There is little incentive diagnosis early. That will change. We believe in the future and it's also impossible to know how quickly someone's GonNa slide from mild to moderate to severe. There's I guarantee you the everyone goes through these phases that some people may take ten years makes people making five years. Some people may take twenty years. So it's a downhill slope but everyone slides down the hill at a different rate. How big a problem does Alzheimer's represent so. There's ways of three ways to look at it as far as the actual number of patients the number that the Alzheimer's Association figures. There's five point eight million people with Alzheimer's disease in the United States. And if you had dementia which is basically the same kind of cognitive decline but navy for reasons other than For reasons other than they don't have the amyloid pathology. There's probably about another two million or so so you're talking you know million patients or so which may not sound to be a lot. But the impact of those eight million patients on their families and caregivers dramatic so for every person with Alzheimer's and there's at least one other patient that affected that as the caregiver and there's a whole set of associated care giver and the economic impact and the economic costs of caring for patients with Alzheimer's Disease. Far outstrips any other disease in the country. That is we pay more for caring for Alzheimer's Disease Patients than we do for cancer patients. Then we do for patients with cardiovascular the psychiatric disease it is a huge problem and remember. It's an age related problem. That is the biggest. Risk factor for developing Alzheimer's Disease Is Progressive Age. And as you know the Nami of key. Baby boomers is rapidly approaching the age of risk. That is once you know. You're north of Seventy. The risk goes up demonstrably and one in three patients. Older than ninety has some form of dementia. So you know the more of us that get into that those you know the eighties and nineties the more patient or the more of us are going to have evidence of dementia and we need to prop. We need a solution to the problem. Not only are we going to need? Effective medicines to help potentially slow the problem. We're GONNA need the infrastructure in place. Physicians and clinic systems to help care for the patient. And we're going to need places for these people.

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer Alzheimer's Association Depression Karen United States cancer
Health Benefits: What to Do With Fresh Turmeric Root

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:09 min | 7 months ago

Health Benefits: What to Do With Fresh Turmeric Root

"Turmeric is all the rage these days its purported health benefits and most of us are familiar with turmeric as a brilliant orange powder used in Indian and southeast Asian cooking. It's one of the primary ingredients in curry powder and now lately golden milk a sort of Spicy Turmeric T. is trending in everyone's instagram. Feed from a culinary perspective. Turmeric adds a spicy warmth and a vivid huge food on the health. Front it's big claim to fame. Is The anti inflammatory properties. It's even being studied as a natural hedge against Alzheimer's Disease Ground. Turmeric has long been a staple in my spice cabinet but a few weeks ago I came across some fresh turmeric. In the produce section of my regular grocery store it looks a little bit like ginger root. Or if you're in a more ghoulish frame of mind a little bit like large insect larvae although it took me a little while and some orange stained fingers to figure out what to do with it. I am now a hardcore fan. The flavor of fresh turmeric is much different than the powder turmeric. You may be used to both have a warm pungent flavor. That's unlike any other spice I can think of. But the fresh root is brighter more aromatic and a bit less bitter than the powdered form. If you've ever had anything made with curry powder than you've had turmeric but it can be hard to separate the flavor of the turmeric from all those other strong flavors in curry. If Curry is the only place you've ever encountered turmeric. It's really fun to experience the spice on its own and experiment with other combinations. Because it's got such a strong flavour. Turmeric tends to work well with other strong spices. Try combining it with other warm spices like ginger cardamom and cinnamon or you can take it any more savory direction. By combining it with cumin coriander mustard and black pepper use these jazzy spice blends to perk up foods that are milder in flavour. Things like lentils dried beans potatoes and other root vegetables rice and other grains and yes milk

Curry Alzheimer's Disease
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

05:09 min | 11 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

"<MUSIC> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> National Speaker <Speech_Music_Female> and author of the Cookbook <Speech_Music_Female> think outside <Speech_Music_Female> the blender <Speech_Music_Female> great tasting <Speech_Music_Female> and healthy <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> my guest is Larry <Speech_Music_Female> Fleischman <Speech_Music_Female> Larry and <Speech_Music_Female> his wife Linda will <Speech_Music_Female> be married fifty <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> thing about <Speech_Music_Female> their journey welcome <Speech_Music_Female> Larry <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> when <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but I was <Speech_Music_Male> in denial <Speech_Music_Male> and <Advertisement> things <Speech_Music_Male> were going okay <Speech_Music_Male> she she <Speech_Music_Male> retired <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> we went along <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <hes> <Speech_Male> my son <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> Matt <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Awed really <Speech_Music_Male> in two thousand <Speech_Music_Male> eleven <Speech_Music_Male> and <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Music_Male> went <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and then eventually <Speech_Male> we we <Speech_Music_Male> got tested <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> agenda also <Speech_Music_Male> her intellect <Speech_Music_Male> she <Speech_Male> was a <Speech_Music_Male> possibly <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ah <Speech_Male> eventually <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> her PCP <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> DR <Speech_Music_Male> hough <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Things <Speech_Music_Male> progressed <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> that when <Speech_Music_Female> I got <Speech_Music_Female> that diagnosis <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> unbidden <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Music_Male> upset <Advertisement> about it <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> but <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> if <Advertisement> you don't <Speech_Male> you'll be Mush <Speech_Music_Male> and two <Speech_Music_Male> years your brain will <Speech_Music_Male> be motioned to yourself <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> Alzheimer's <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> support <Speech_Music_Male> group <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Dron <Speech_Music_Male> taking care <Speech_Music_Male> of their parents <Speech_Music_Male> and I <Speech_Music_Male> was a spouse to <Speech_Music_Male> near my <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> there <Speech_Music_Male> were a lot of spouses <Speech_Music_Male> and so <Speech_Music_Male> I learned <Speech_Male> a great <Speech_Male> deal and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> no <Speech_Music_Male> I could not <Speech_Music_Male> have survived without <Speech_Music_Male> it <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> screaming <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> yelling <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> profanity <Speech_Music_Male> which he never <Speech_Music_Male> used <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> twenty <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> early <Speech_Music_Male> no late <Speech_Music_Male> twenty eighteen <Speech_Music_Male> but didn't <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> then her <Speech_Music_Male> neurologist Dr <Speech_Music_Male> Skinner recommended <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> this large <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> she was mobile <Speech_Music_Male> at that time <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> they weren't <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> who <SpeakerChange> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

"Onto the caregiving challenges and solutions. podcast your source for expert advice on caring for our elders. I'm your host Maria we see Today's Marie getting a new series on Alzheimer's disease and slightly that you know someone living with Alzheimer's or someone who is caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease you're are abused insists from the Alzheimer's Association in two thousand Thirteen fifteen point five million valley members of friends provided seventeen point seven billion hours of unsafe care those with Alzheimer's and other dimensions care valued at over two hundred and twenty billion dollars nearly sixteen percent of Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers rate emotional stress of caregiving as I berry is more than one third reports symptoms of depression because Alzheimer's affects so many people and it's not just the person living with the disease but also their family members and caregivers I wanted to devote a few episodes to this important topic I guess today is him you worked in the Field Jerry College as a lecturer at professional for thirty years she holds a masters degree in Gerontology and a bachelors and says geology cal state fullerton. She is a program in education specialist with Alzheimer's Orange County or she is responsible for developing and present nineteen programs in education or families and professionals throughout the community additionally she.

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"You're not active you're rescues increase if you're active see if you'll you'll whiskies more normal say keeping busy active you wait till cholesterol blood pressure things keeping sexually integrated as well it's waiting boston will you're doing here and roadrunner on the right is hype hopefully with differing are risk of alzheimer's disease cages jumps from from alzheimer's research uk thanks very much for joining us now to finish at times the question of the week on healed yard has been searching for an answer to this vital question from mark is it possible how so many blood transfusions you'll your blood type change is an interesting question we put it to a foreign policy he didn't think was possible christian evan said you need a bone marrow transplant change of blood type so we asked to subject give up from the university of cambridge a blood cells divide eating to read some white sell tickets photo bledsoe's carrying identity coddle itself is made up of different proteins or sugar colby's look groups the most important and one in blood groups into one carried by the red cells and he can you'll be combine to give someone a blood transfusion they tried to much the blue group of the red cells in the new blood with the red cells in the patient split so it gets tight aimed to someone who has taipei built in that body this is simple on otherwise a new blood cells will be destroyed very quickly by the patient's immune system and calls a really serious reaction but unimagined see you might not have a big fat put a hand in hospital emergency powers and surgical theaters will have access to emergency look backs that can be accessed very quickly for people who are bleeding any blood urgency and this is over blobs do open up group it's the most common booth cells can be given to both nations are headed they should who was group eight and a very big bleed after delivering her baby she had to have seventy six packs of blow over period of eight hours most of those were group each fact replenishes about hopefully to real blows and another there's a lot of rich five inches of love these patient basically led the whole blood volume seven times of by the time the bleed was under control she had led all a student aid cells and she only had a trump yourselves so we basically changed public rick but that changed only temporary over the phone rings three to four weeks the trump cheese osas gradually dissipated and replaced by a run nudie produced eight so that situation is very different from people who have regular and the slow transfusion for example when they had leukemia that we see jewish free packs of reptiles every two to three weeks into his cases we might do blobs i do not replace the whole blood for him several times over so to answer your question and can we change their blood group is trump fusion yes we can but only in a very rare emergency situation thanks that cedric is always tend to be positive about these things next time will be answering a question from alex i have several friends with huskies he claim that the fix the dough protects them not only from the cold but also from a hot summers dies well could this possibly be true well well if you think you know they say you could email chris at the naked scientists dot com find it on facebook's tweet and they could scientists oh you come joined the debate on our foreign naked scientists dot com slash form and that's it for this week thanks very much the other murphy who put the program together and to be sure to join us next time we'll be exploring the question of whether we're all living in the matrix weightlifting late that is on computer simulation somehow we predict the weather tomorrow and climate change nick century models of house cells and tissues work and even

eight hours five inches three weeks four weeks
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Ten which is people will forgive me for that meal for whatever i felt deliver on is there a recipe for success and this there is the devil lies and the detail so a good excuse acknowledges that things went wrong you didn't act esther shift on oklahoma hams festival i'm sorry so bit of an apology and then i i'm sorry should have done so acknowledged this you you're knowledged issue what comes next and then you say but z intention on which i act it where intention of something like you're plan for action that one what's morally adequate and the reason why it's failed to work was because of some unforeseen circumstances something beyond your control so i thought very basic knowledge when i see about about and then she could do better but you know there will be next time kerry old well now i know i'm i'm better warned us the helps make excuses to my my when i talked to the future important thank you very much let's play in this league and she's published a paper on making golden excuses and why we do it in the general philosophy and public affairs go take a look like you it's time now to delve into the mailbox messages that you've been sending into it and we've had from reuven array he says hi chris i heard you mentioned the other day but because of pluto's elliptical orbit it sometimes closer to the sun the net choon is not being the case is it possible that she completes i will collide so you're swinging i could there be a planet tree pile up announcer fortunately is no and the reason for this is wall street's it's true the police i does have this elliptical orbit which means that a certain points in its two hundred and forty eight year old bit around the side of the system which is how long it takes the starting position go or around and come back restarted it is actually inside these bit of neptune acsi for about twenty years during that time but the thing the pluto does in addition to going around the sun along with other planets in a flood plain stretching out in the sun is the cliche goes up and down on his little bit a bit as well and this has the effect actually when it's actually within these little bits of neptune it's going up so it's always above when she would be solo the two might cross palms ashley ever gonna be on a collision course 'cause we're just gonna be wiped off next year and also there's what we call gravitational residents going on now she takes about a hundred and sixty odious around the side of the system so it's doing three laps forever to lapse of pluto does that how effective actually accelerate single decelerating each the bodies respectively so they can never get to mold and about two and a half billion kilometers of each other so they never gonna crush anyway so there's two good reasons why they're gonna be there indefinitely so they could be reassured you're gonna be ratio plans you pile up that great the naked scientists podcast congress is produced in association with spitfire cost effective voice internet's and the engineering services uk businesses find out how spitfire and empower your company.

billion kilometers forty eight year twenty years
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"You if they don't know what they clinical picture was they won't be able to say that this was what they referred to as a probable Alzheimer's disease. So when they see this act of the same pathology, and there's no heavy, and so did that did ration- they just they acknowledged that brain as possible Alzheimer's disease. So these created a circular definition to be cleared to close the loop on that analogy with heart disease. You would have to know that there are cases where patients have significant dementia that by all other metrics is consistent with Alzheimer's dementia. Not Lewy body or something else. And there is an absence of amyloid beta deposition, and what percentage approximately I know it's hard to know these things because we don't always get top-seed's. But in in your experience, what percentage of patients who die with? Or from Alzheimer's disease that his late onset? Do not have the distal pathologic features of Emily beta, they might iota the of patients that are the acknowledged as Alzheimer's disease. Pro Bowl timers sees when they die have the same level is not that they don't have because he's saying age related their position the same levels of all the patients are compatible age, and the only reason that they are label of Alzheimer's is because they had the dementia. The pathology cannot really tell them about of you gave these two pathologies blind to the medical diagnosis clinical examination. They won't be able to tell apar- which are the ones are actually demented them, which are not if you do it in a match there is a large the job better realty in pathologies are not quantitative. But the only is. An approximation you look at only a few sections through the court fix, and they gave us Orden proportion of the findings are found that you see as categories, but even when I have done this personally in two thousand one we baligian the journal narrow signs on his study where we use brains from people die from Alzheimer's, the main difference from my stall from what's been done before is that we were able to thing brains. We only have few hours after they individuals had thought I would gold very small plus Morton interval, and I was able to do these by collaborating with the institute in Arizona is a CD goals sunseed, the Aries ONA, and they have a sunset the health center, which actually ascribes to these amyloid than their dangle ideas. But what? With the would them was we were we traveled why bitches student we collected brains, controlled brains and brain so people have that diabled Simon's some of them we were able to collect them fresh right there, and were you and your team also blinded to the circumstances of the death prior to the autopsies being performed. No, what we did is weak elected all the brains, and they were is section then into pieces and these were frozen, and then one sample would remain there. I see I see everything in parallel. Yeah. Would be she appeared Walston and once the samples were cheap they were coded. But when we were there. No, we knew when somebody die because I had up all would be what certify they were dead. So that we could immediately. But when the pair wise results were evaluated the. Valuate tour was blind to the clinical circumstances of the patient's death. Yes. While we did in that study was we were not only interesting just looking at amyloid Blake's and narrow favourite tangles been Deng. We were interested in seeing is there any biochemical change that could account for these so-called Hypo metabolism this decrease in energy metabolism that is seeing early in. At sei, is it generally, well, regarded bring it back to some of your earlier work in pet. I assume it is generally agreed upon the patients who are in the stages of cognitive decline. Have Hypo functioning metabolism? So their pet scans show less glucose uptake in the brain that Jenrette acknowledged and not only if the pet.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Arizona apar Walston Jenrette Simon Blake Deng
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"But typically their first symptoms are currying in the forties and fifties. They are often women. They are often April four, negative, although not always there, certainly people are able before positive who have this as you mentioned, they often have the low zinc, and then they typically present in a non amnesic way. Interestingly, unless they are homos Aus for e four in which case they do. The present typically with an amnesty presentation, but the ones who are for negative, typically present with problems as I mentioned earlier executive dysfunction. So I always ask people, are you having trouble organizing things? We had one person, for example, who was known for her tremendous organizing capability in as she started to to get the problem. She's just lost that she could not organize things that she could do before. It's a very common complaint, or as I said, people will say, oh, I can't calculate a tip anymore, or I can't pay the bills anymore. Anything that is math related or visual perception or word finding things like that. I, you mentioned April four times. Can you talk a little bit about just for for people listening and watching? You know what? April before is and it's it's, it's a gene right? And and so why, why? It plays a major role in Alzheimer's disease. So April Leipold protein is a really fascinating story. And of course, a professor Robert Bailey discovered this decades ago and it has turned out to be the most important should network risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, seventy. Five million Americans have a single copy of April four. And when I say that what I mean by that is everybody has two copies of either two, three or four and the most common one is three so common for people to be three, three as an example, however, about a quarter of the population. So about seventy five million Americans are have one copy of Abeille four and. That's actually the primordial one. It's the one that was present for about ninety six percent of hominids evolution. If you look at a chimp for example, it does not have a four, but the hominids do and still about twenty five percent of population today then about seven million Americans have two copies, so they're homos Avis for April four. Now if you have zero copy..

Alzheimer's disease executive Robert Bailey professor twenty five percent ninety six percent
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"In addition, there are people we call type four who have more of a vascular component and then type five, which is more of a traumatic component, but they're really both related to these other ones. It's really about, do you have inflammation? Are you fighting something off? Do you have trophy support? And are you exposed to. Specific toxins. Well, and so. All of these different types of subtypes of Alzheimer's disease. They all sort of have some of the same thing machine pathological features like amyloid beta plaques, tau tangles, right between all of them all have amyloid plaques. They all have by definition tau tangles blood, the presentation can be different. Now, there are some overlaps the type ones and the type two's are typically amnesic presentations, more common with abo four, and that's true for the type one point fives as well. The type threes. The toxic ones are quite different. They often present with anonyme nesic presentation. It's executive dysfunction problems with calculation problem with visual perception, problems with word, finding so-called primary progressive, a Faiza, all of these things. They are really by parietal presentations as opposed to buy temporal presentations essentially. So these are. Have often been called cortisol presentations which have been noted for years by people like professor Mario Mendez to be typical in younger presentations of Alzheimer's and often in April four negative individuals. I think also read one in your paper where you did this metabolic profiling. There was very prominent zinc deficiency in that. Yes. So for reasons that we don't entirely understand yet many of the people with type three, the toxic subtype have low serum, zinc high copper, zinc ratios and low triglycerides to low triglycerides may turn out to be related to Malibu option. We don't know for sure yet, but we don't really understand why the people often have these low copper zinc ratios. What does that mean? The coppers. What? By copper's in Gratiot. Low zinc. Yeah. So as you know, copper and zinc actually are competitive. For example, in there. Absorption. And so too much of one actually is often associated with two little of another untypically in our society. As you know, most of us are deficient in zinc there actually about a billion people on earth is the estimate for zinc deficiency. It's a very common problem because if you have poor gastric acidity, which is common as we age, if you're taking is for for GERD, if you're taking something for for reflux, you won't absorb the zinc very well. If you have copper piping, which most of us do the copper will often compete with zinc. And so many people have a little too much copper and a little bit too little zinc. And in fact, it was noted over thirty years ago that people with high copper, zinc ratios tended to have dementia more than those with normal copper, zinc ratios. Wow. Says this, had this have something to do with it. I know there's like. Over what three hundred, five hundred different enzymes in the body that requires zinc, right? So this copper then bind to those enzymes and then sort of mess up the function or is that like the theory? So no, the the theory is that copper is, you know, a copper is a generator of free radicals. It is copper is can act like iron. In that sense. It has a free electron in the orbital, which does not occur with zinc. So in general, as you indicated in these various enzymes in its hundreds, just as you said, it is an important structural component and it has a very specific architecture with the enzymes that it served. So it is a is a structural thing in general in copper to my knowledge doesn't actually replace that. But for example, zinc is important in many things that are related to cognitive decline. It's important in diabetes. It's important in functioning of insulin. It's important, of course, in the trophy activity of insult. On and on and on. It's important in immune responses, so actually has many effects that are related to cognition. So may even just be a biomarker for something underlying going on right in this Pat in toxic insult type of Alzheimer's disease. You're talking about. It's something to keep in mind when you see that, especially if the person presents these people tend to be very distinctive. The people who have type three. So they tend to be young and we see them in their late forties mid-fifties very commonly. We've seen him as late as starting their first symptoms in the mid sixties..

zinc deficiency Alzheimer's disease inflammation Alzheimer Gratiot GERD cortisol Mario Mendez executive reflux professor thirty years
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Treat mild cognitive dementia and Alzheimer's disease. So thank you so much Dale having me here at your place. Thanks very much Rhonda. So maybe we can start a little bit by just talking about some of the. Characteristics and pathological distinguishing features of Alzheimer's disease, and maybe what you were thoughts are what can cause Alzheimer's disease leads to it. Right. So. It's a good point because cognitive decline, very common and Alzheimer's is the most common cause of cognitive decline ultimately dementia. And by definition, this means that you have amyloid plaques in the brain and FOSS four elated tau tangles. So those those are the two main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's. But as you can see, that doesn't tell you why you've got it. It just is something you look at the rain, and of course you can get something that looks virtually identical without the Loyd and you can get amyloid without the cognitive decline. So it's a marker, but it's an imperfect one. Yeah, that's a really good point. You brought up and do you have any thoughts on why? There are some people that do have amyloid plaques in their brain that aren't really demented and some others that just don't seem to handle it? Yeah, it's a great point. So here's the thing that the. The whole world is turning upside down. Now when it comes to our understanding of Alzheimer's, it's been over one hundred years. Of course going back to Ellis Alzheimer's publications back in one thousand nine hundred sixty one thousand nine hundred seven, and there hasn't been a good understanding of this disease. And of course amyloid has been for years vilified and there's no question it. It is a neuro toxin. It does have toxic effects. The surprise has been that this is also a protectant. It's actually something that is made by your brain when you have specific insults. And for example, professor Rudy Tanzi and professor Robert Moyer at Harvard too few years ago show that it is an anti microbial. It also is professor Ashley Bush showed a number of years ago. It's actually quite a good binder of dive Valent metals like copper, zinc and things like that iron. And we showed a number of years ago. It is also. Response to a reduction in traffic support. So you actually get a change in signaling. So there are multiple different insults and metabolic changes that lead the brain to produce this stuff. And so I think there's been confusion because it's clear that when you produce it, you're at this increased risk for having a degenerative process. But as you indicated, there are many people that produce it and they successfully are protecting themselves. They don't actually have. The downsizing was often been stated, is those who then have inflammation on top of that seemed to be the ones that do worse. And that's a very general idea. But really it is a, it is a set of things, and we identified in published a number of years ago, thirty six different factors all contribute this, but they actually break down into just a couple of categories. So any sort of pathogens anything that's giving you inflammation, whether you have it because you have a leaky gut or because you have PG. Vallis in your brain or because you have beryllium of Lyme disease or you've been exposed to specific fungi, things like that. All of these things can engender that response. And in fact, we think more and more of amyloid as being like, napalm, you got the bad guys coming across the border. So you're now going to put down stuff that kills the bad guys the napalm. But in so doing, you're now going to reduce your air soil, you're now living in a smaller country, and that's exactly what's going on in the brain. You are downsizing the overall network. So that's what we call type one or inflammatory or hot Alzheimer's, and I should mention I, it turns out IRA Veda physicians from thousands of years ago, recognized dementia that was related to something that was hot, that was abnormally ultimately inflammatory as well as that that was related to dry us, which is what we call type two. Where you have decreased trophy support. It can be nerve growth factor. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, Estra dial.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ellis Alzheimer professor Dale Rudy Tanzi Ashley Bush Robert Moyer Harvard one hundred years
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Otherwise, if one wants to Dell deeper there for our longest moments there are multiple instruments that can be built into a battery to do to go very very sensitive and nitty gritty and the memory tests. For instance, could be either a story read out loud a story packed with details. And then later tell me as much as you remember, and it's not easy. No, an or giving an individual ten or fifteen words exposure to these words several times. So they can learn them and then sometime later. Can you remember any of the words, I gave you, and that's that's why we find memory loss. What is your research focused on specifically high focus on imaging and genetic biomarkers? I've always done that over the last fifteen years, but even more recently now, I have focused on early onset Alzheimer's, the ones that affects the varying that affects patients that are younger than sixty five. I lead a national study called longitudinal early onset, Alzheimer's disease study or leads. We have seventeen institutions are dissipating fifteen sites across the country and wear enrolling individuals who are either cognitively impaired or conch deli normal ages forty to sixty four and we are collecting a host of information really clinical cognitive MRI amyloid tau pets, they imaging modalities. I was talking about we do blood. We do DNA so genetics. We do. Lumbar punctures and we follow along to be able to determine the rate of progression. And and other things about this unique cohort that is affected so early and will, of course, thirty four unknown genes and tap into novel biomarkers that can help us define this part of the disease better. But also potentially will be applicable to all of else Heimer disease in general, no funds kind of work the national suits in AJ. Okay. And so I mean, all of that is interesting from the sense. And it's you thinking about this will be more useful to help diagnose or do. You think that this will help drive treatment a lot of the work that you do. So both. We would like I where starting with an observational study. The study will run for twenty four months that means three visits baseline month money twenty four we will determine the rate of progression of those various I told you there are some variants that are more often associated with Earl. Early onset soul will be able to really define the disease variants better. And then we will have all these individuals plus more that are being referred to us ready for a trial. And if an individual is this young, you can imagine that they really don't have other pathology going on. So there is not much vascular disease. There are no not many other diseases affecting the body or the brain. They're pretty healthy the old they have is Alzheimer's. So that makes makes this cohort ideal for clinical trials. There is no noise from anything else that's going on. And the other kind of sad fact why they're a really great candidates for trials has that indecent visuals the diseases, really aggressive and progresses fast. And actually, that's what I wanted to ask next. So a typical course of Alzheimer's from diagnosis. How does it progress and how quickly so first individual center a memo? Sorry, only affected stage or memory, plus some other domains, we call it where there though functionally intact they can drive a car pay their bills, and that state is called mild cognitive impairment it can last few years. Those Ota unfortunate to develop dementia will progress you a stage where they can no longer drive or pay their bills or assemble tax records, all of these kind of things, and that is when we diagnose dementia and from the diagnosis of dementia to death, usually it's a to twelve years. That's seems like a pretty long time still. So how do people usually live at that stage today? Stay at home with help today to facilities. The might be able to better care for them. Is there or what else happens, I suppose on depends on the case and the family many individual stay at home in are taken care by family members..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Dell Earl twenty four months fifteen years twelve years
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education research in. Patient care today. We're gonna be talking about Alzheimer's disease in our guest is Liana Apostol ova who is in a row gised at school of medicine, and she's got some fancy titles, which I'm going to let her describe because she can do it much better than me. So please tell us a little bit about yourself. And my name is leeann Apostol ova in. I'm a professor at of neurology Indiana University and the Barbara in peer bag guard professor of Alzheimer's disease, research, great, I wanna start almost at the beginning. Because I I think that there's a general curiosity about Alzheimer's disease. And everybody sort of knows what it is. But people don't really know what it is. So if you had to explain to just someone off the street what what is Alzheimer's disease? How would you put it Alzheimer's disease is the most common disorder affecting cognition among the elderly? Okay. It's a common disease among those who are seventy and eighty year old although there are variants of it that affect people much much younger. It starts typically with memory loss at s-. Usually forgetfulness about recent events or information that was already presented so that the individual repeats asking the same questions repeats, this retails the same stories that kind of forgetful nece, rather than why where did I leave my keys, or what do they come in this room for which happens to all of us? Also, we often have people complaining about forgetting people's names that also is not exactly the same thing. It's more information that has been provided and it's completely lost. But not something like a personal name rather where we going or when is this event going to occur or the event already happened. But I have no recollection who was there in that even Islas there. So what causes it? Well, it's still under research the exact precise mechanism that Alzheimer's comes about. But it's wildly. Believed that a protein cold amyloid builds up in the brain beyond the levels that the body can officiant -ly take care of. And once this protein becomes elevated either overproduced or not clear dispatced has started depositing in the brain. And it's very toxic to the brain cells the areas that are affected I in. Most vulnerable are really those areas that take care of memory, but as the disease progresses, eventually many other cognitive aspects and and aspects of daily life become affected such as attention concentration ability for somebody to find their way or to express their thoughts and really operate independently in day to day living. So that seems like a pretty specific thing amyloid protein being deposited. So can other things mimic this or make cognition or the way that we think are the way. The remember look the same in. The elderly or anyone else or is it really just amyloid protein deposits in Alzheimer's. I mean can other prostes mimic that absolutely many other processes can mimic that which is why it's important for people with memory loss to come to the neurologist to us for an expert opinion, evaluation and advice and the workup will constitute of clinical and cognitive testing. And also brain scans and laboratory markers that are important to distinguish Alzheimer's from other diseases that can mimic the Stipe of condition. So there are ways that we can detect that there's amyloid protein being deposited in larger amounts at that through scans through lab tests. Yes, most certainly there are we do have both. We do we've always had a lumbar puncture, which is taking away some of the fluid that Bates the brain through the procedure conducted a lower back in sending that to announce side laboratory that can determine the levels of amyloid and the second. Alzheimer's protein, coal tau. The other more modern way is to image the brain inject, the radio ligon or a contrast. I that can label or bind to amyloid protein in the brain. And we can visualize it, and that has been already FDA approved the food and Drug administration has reviewed and determined it safe for clinical use the problem is that we still don't have insurance coverage. So is that how most cases of Alzheimer's are diagnosed today, or or is a lot of it's instilled on clinically where we give tests of condition intestine memory. And then assume that it's most likely to be Alzheimer's. How did they are most people getting laboratory tests or other tests like that so old people who come to us, especially Austin Rajasthan?.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease leeann Apostol Liana Apostol Indiana school of medicine professor FDA neurology Indiana University Islas Bates Barbara eighty year