35 Burst results for "Alzheimer's Disease"

How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:21 min | 3 months ago

How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

"We start with the, the warning signs of Alzheimer's. What's what's an actual warning sign? And what is actual related to normal aging? Which is actually having this conversation with our friends. Last night, really good friend has a tendency to do about 15 things at once, and can't seem to remember what she's doing. And I think I know for because it hasn't changed in fifteen years that that's just life is and not paying attention. So we're can we start there? Sure. So, you know, there's certainly as we get older and our brain shrinks, we start off some capacity, some cognitive capacity that is, you know, considered the normal aging process, but you know, in today's day and age, we really give very little leeway for that just to remind people, you know, our grandparents, you know, in the 1960s, 70s 80s as they got older, they became senile and that word is really fallen out of favor. So we don't really talk so much about senility as the diagnosis or excuse for having, you know, poor memory or or function. It's not to say that the dog. Not any change that occurs with aging but we really won't get towards. Is there more of a problem. And when we start thinking about dementia, which is the big umbrella term that we think about and, and Alzheimer's disease being the most, common one, there has to be memory loss. So that's a that's, that's a symptom and assigned really, that has to be there. And then there has to be some sort of dysfunction in other what we call spheres of cognition, and probably the easiest one that to talk about is something called executive functioning. So when you go see a neurologist Thursday, we are you know, you're going to be asked questions about who does the who does the bills at home? What are what are the what are the what's the capacity to pay the bills and somebody who may be paid bills forever in their adult life? And all of a sudden now a spouse or a child has to double-check. There's late payments. There's overdrawn on a checking accounts things like that is the ability to sort of have this high-level executive wage. Ocean is a is really a sign that there's something perhaps going on, much more than just. Oh, I can't remember that

Alzheimer's Disease Dementia
Tony Bennett Cancels Fall and Winter Touring Dates in 2021

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Tony Bennett Cancels Fall and Winter Touring Dates in 2021

"Legendary singer Tony Bennett is retiring from live performances if you were hoping to see Tony Bennett perform in person your opportunity may have passed the ninety five year old Grammy winner had canceled his upcoming twenty twenty one tour because of the cobit nineteen pandemic and now his son tells reporters Bennett won't be going on the road again Bennett had concerts planned in the northeast Arizona Oklahoma and Canada despite being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease but those dates won't be rescheduled earlier this month Bennett had teamed up with lady Gaga for two nights at new York's Radio City Music Hall the shows were filmed for broadcast at a later date and these may be the final live performances of his seventy year career I'm Jackie Quinn

Tony Bennett Bennett Alzheimer's Disease Grammy Oklahoma Arizona Canada Lady Gaga Radio City Music Hall New York Jackie Quinn
Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"I want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that you've designed. Let's give a little bit of context around this. What was that trial trying to look bad. And what answers came from it. Yeah great point so way back in two thousand eleven we were looking at root causes as as you well know root cause medicine is critical and so we were looking at root causes of cognitive decline in two thousand eleven. We proposed the first comprehensive trial for people with mci or alzheimer's. And let me. just digress. For one moment to say this concept of mci mild cognitive impairment has really hurt people and the field when you say that someone has mild cognitive impairment that is like saying they have mildly metastatic cancer. It is a late stage of the process. Typically they've had the underlying pathophysiology for fifteen or twenty years before they're getting a diagnosis of mci and then about each year. About ten percent of those people will convert to full on alzheimer's which is a which is the end stage of really. What is the alzheimer's pathophysiology and just pause there for a second. If you could rename that right come up with a different term just to show people the severity in the weight that comes with data. Is there any thoughts of what you would wanna call that absolutely so there are four stages you a symptomatic subject of cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's what they should be called is pre alzheimer's. That's the that's the A symptomatic period. Subjective is early stage. alzheimer's disease what we call. mild mild. Cognitive impairment is advanced stage alzheimer's disease. And what we currently call. Alzheimer's disease is final stage

Alzheimer's Disease MCI Metastatic Cancer Youtube Alzheimer's Pathophysiology
Approval of New Alzheimer's Drug Could See Surge in Blood Tests

Science Magazine Podcast

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Approval of New Alzheimer's Drug Could See Surge in Blood Tests

"Last year about six million people in the us. We're living with alzheimer's disease and by twenty sixty that number could be as many as fourteen million people living with the disease. There's no cure and it's not easy to tell if someone has it from symptoms alone. The testing for alzheimer's is invasive and resource and pensive staff writer. Kelly servic is here to discuss. How testing the blood for alzheimer's might facilitate new treatments and new research. Hi kelly hi sarah alright. So this is kinda spurred on by the approval of a potential treatment for alzheimer's disease. I'm not going to say the name of the struggle. I'm going to leave that to you. It's very long but it's really put a spotlight on this issue of testing for the disease in the blood. Why is that first of all. Fda really surprised a lot of people by approving this drug called kanye mab marketed as as you home for alzheimer's and that that approval was special. Not just because there hasn't been an alzheimer's drug approved in more than a decade but also because this is the first approved drug that aims to actually interfere with the underlying disease process and slow the progression of disease and the reason that that is shaken. Things up is that essentially a lot of older people with memory problems. Who did not see care. Did not seek an alzheimer's diagnosis before. Might do so now that there is an available treatment. And what they would do to get screened would be what get speidel. Fluid take it out so diagnosing. Alzheimer's is really complicated. There other neurological conditions that can cause dementia and an older people a lot of other factors. That might contribute to their memory. Problems and as a result really confirming alzheimer's diagnosis requires waiting to get assessed by a specialist and be assured as you can be either getting a pet scan which is expensive. And there aren't a ton of pet scanners in this country or spinal tap so that your spinal fluid can be analyzed for certain

Alzheimer's Kelly Servic Kelly Hi Sarah Alzheimer's Drug Alzheimer's Diagnosis Speidel FDA United States Dementia
Biogen Shares Down 7%

News, Traffic and Weather

00:17 sec | 4 months ago

Biogen Shares Down 7%

"Today. That's after United Health Group said it needed more time to determine its coverage policy for the biotech companies recently approved $56,000 Alzheimer's disease, drug addled film that's expected to raise costs for the U. S government's Medicare program. It's official. The Emerald

United Health Group Alzheimer's Disease U. S Government
Top Benefits of a Ketogenic Lifestyle

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:07 min | 5 months ago

Top Benefits of a Ketogenic Lifestyle

"Chronic sugar burning mode when their sugar burners they're producing a lot of metabolic waste that's damaging their cells and very little energy. it's energy inefficient. We want to create metabolic flexibility. Where we have the ability to not only use sugar. We need to but really to use fat or key tunes as an energy source. And there's nothing better for that than the ketogenic diet and lifestyle and so the top benefits number one reducing really. Stabilizing your blood sugar. So reducing it and then balancing it at a really good point and what does that do. That's going to give you better. Mental emotional stability one of the worst things we can do for. Our body has have blood sugar imbalances. We eat a meal blood. Sugar jumps way up then it crashes down. Our body produces the hormone called insulin. Insulin take sugar out of the bloodstream. Puts into the cells when it does that it also triggers inflammation and we have elevated insulin. It stores fat so we actually are unable to burn fat for fuel. We actually have storing fat so a ketogenic diet and lifestyle helps balance your blood. Sugar helps improve your mental emotional state and helps your body become more resilient to stress test. Really the second benefit is this resiliency to stress and mental emotional balance the third benefit as it reduces inflammation in your body so we burned sugar. We produce a ton of oxidative stress and free radicals and when that happens we allot of inflammation and that inflammation tears down major tissues barbati and ultimately over time leads the development of chronic disease whether it's chronic pain in our body whether it's organs that are malfunctioning. Wonder it's our brain losing our memory if it's brain fog early on or depression. These are inflammatory. Conditions long-term it ends up being something like dementia alzheimer's disease in our brains. So we gotta make sure reducing implementation ketogenic diet and lifestyle really really good. At doing exactly that k- the fourth big thing is

Chronic Disease Dementia Alzheimer's Disease Depression
FDA Trims Use of Contentious Alzheimer's Drug Amid Backlash

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

FDA Trims Use of Contentious Alzheimer's Drug Amid Backlash

"Federal health regulators are putting new limits on the recommended use of a controversial new Alzheimer's drugs a month after proving add you helm for patients with Alzheimer's disease the food and drug administration approved new labeling that the drug is appropriate for patients with mild symptoms or early stage Alzheimer's noting it hasn't been studied in patients with more advanced disease the change was to help eliminate confusion among doctors about who should be taking the medicine add to home hasn't been shown to reverse or significantly slow Alzheimer's disease but the FDA says its ability to reduce clumps of plaque in the brain is likely to slow dementia many experts are skeptical and three of FDA's outside advisers resigned over the drugs recent approval Jackie Quinn Washington

Alzheimer's Disease Mild Symptoms FDA Confusion Dementia Jackie Quinn Washington
FDA Grants Accelerated Approval for Alzheimer's Drug

The Readout Loud

01:25 min | 5 months ago

FDA Grants Accelerated Approval for Alzheimer's Drug

"So what would this pike. Sp if it didn't start with an update on adam damian's favorite drug guys. There's more news on that front this week. Catch us up right so the hot off. The presses aspect came out just thursday morning which is that. The fda restricted the label for which you helm is approved basically advising doctors to prescribe the drug solely to patients who mostly matched the population in which it was studied in face retrials this. I mean the implications of this we can. We can kind of talk about but you know one of the shocking things really probably to me. The most shocking thing on the day that agile home was approved was the breadth of the fda's label. The drug was indicated for anyone with alzheimer's disease at any stage of the disease regardless of what their sort of brain biology was. And as we know this drug is meant to clear out plaques from the brain that purported to contribute to the advanced alzheimer's and so that label was was fairly galling honestly and so the fda mostly walking it back to what people had expected for those people who even expected approval. was interesting. I feel like it might have fewer implications for the way the drug is actually used. Because i think that physicians indefinitely biogen were thinking that that it would only go to to this narrower group of patients but maybe just has more more implications for our fixation on the fda and what is going on there.

Adam Damian Alzheimer's FDA Biogen
How Insulin Resistance Destroys Your Brain and Promotes Alzheimers

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:10 min | 6 months ago

How Insulin Resistance Destroys Your Brain and Promotes Alzheimers

"Dr ben beckmann. Welcome back to the podcast. It's an honor to have you here again brother. Oh man i'm delighted. We had such a good time the first time that we thought why not do it again. I'm glad to be here. Why not do it again and we have a whole new topic. There's gonna be some overlaps with the other interview that we did and for anybody who didn't listen. Check out the show notes. We'll talk about some of those topics again here. But today's conversation diving into the topics of alzheimer's dementia cognitive decline even brain fog and lack of focus in how to understand how the brain works and what fuel sources run and what fuel sources potentially harm it. So i want to just jump right in. You know we've spent. I don't know the exact number. It's in the billions of dollars of money spent on alzheimer's and cognitive decline based drugs and for the most part even very centrist in western medicine. tell you we've gotten very little from it and on top of that. There's millions of people around the globe that are still suffering from these chronic diseases and the ones that aren't suffering. They're well on their way to getting it and alzheimer's and dementia are one of the most of diseases even scarier on a lot of national surveys. Then even cancer. So i'd love to start off big picture with the billions that we spent with the hundreds of thousands of people that are interested in this topic paying attention to it thousands of researchers. What are we missing when it comes to this conversation. Yeah to there's no question we need to shift the paradigm to use a worn out cliche. Perhaps but we. We've been classically looking at alzheimer's disease the same way now for decades which is that. It's really a disease of two problems. In the brain one is the accumulation of these amyloid beta peptides or these plaques. They're called in the other one. Is these Neurofibrillary tangles that the neurons which ought to be You have a clear. Direct structure are getting messy. The problem with those To identifiers well is one. they're hard to identify. Those are only things you can identify. Essentially post

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Ben Beckmann Dementia Cancer
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

07:37 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"Speak to that i'll start. I think we have defined here for ending We have two phases. The first phases is the engineering generation. As i said Looks like it's going to be launched. A successful will really meshes success. By how that's taken up by the near dejected disease can use again initial Looks good let's see. We will transition into harare data generation efforts. I could save out being its rights. ideas we're looking at the moment largely under baseline conditions. But is you know. Newer generation doesn't really happen in. A vacuum mayor has other influences such as aging and other known genetic effect. So it would be really interesting. I think to start to trying to degrade some of those non genetic effects into some of these models. I think it'd be really interesting to look at how cells interact with each other but obviously those bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger projects. So we'll have to see how far he get this writing over different ideas. But it's something said with thinking about discussing at this plane and michael via other things were thinking scale. Yeah i think there's two thousand and one of the things. I i'm proud about for the way that we've structured any so far is that this can act as a framework core platform you can for other groups potentially engineer other mutations that might fall outside ideology and so berg initiative has funded some additional mutations in some neuro developmental disorders. Sap is funded. Some additional mutations for parkinson's disease don't necessarily help dementia on and they're all using this parental. I guess he line that india's characterize well and the distribution will also be through jacks and so i hope that as other groups become interested in. This won't be one off things where academician can asking you. Make my favorite mutation. I don't think that that's what we're looking at. But if there are other initiatives that would benefit from using a well characterized. i guess. Line a really robust editing and qc pipeline distribution network those are potential partnerships that. I wouldn't be surprised. If jack's and work and i would be interested in helping coordinator facilitate so. That's the first thing in terms of whether this is expanded beyond eighty r d. I hope that it is. I think that looks like there's some promising evidence that it is taken up by some other groups and the second thing is just expand upon what mark mentions for phase two of the foundational data sets generation. We've picked a very easy to generate neuron mall by over expression of transcription factor nerve. John to is extremely reliable and robust. And we've chosen several different readouts that we think are show ready. These are general approaches. Transcript to'mix in wholesale radio. Mix with some more adventurous microscopy. Basically two types of functional genomics but only one level more adventurous. We've already working. Our academic groups were applying at scale indie. So we think that all of these techniques will generate data that will be useful but we recognize. There's many other things that we're not looking at here. So you're not yet explored metabolism profiles of what occurring these were looking at neurons and yet we know that gloria lane incredibly important role in his mark says cell cell interactions are obviously or foreigner agenda disorders and some had proposed or annoyed tight models could be cloud these go beyond the mandate of what we intend to this initial phase two. We really want to generate data. We don't wanna get too caught up in technique. The stop by ready to scale across nearly a thousand cell lines so we're being somewhat conservative but hopefully using tools at our informative formative about early changes happen solve algae but again. I think that this might enable additional large-scale efforts. Potentially even house was in card. Were done in collaboration with other groups outside Potentially request level series of lines. We would be happy to engage in this kinds of partnerships about tucker's while it's great. I'm very excited and looking forward to see the projects that on not even in face do offering and then beyond what what comes out of at one last question which is not literally did it addendum fund. Wish that i ask on my guests so if you will not assign this what would are underneath proficient. Have been with mike. Batt is a hard question. Because i feel like a lot of us. Who go into academia. Do this because we almost couldn't envision ourselves doing anything else and i know that there are amazing. Scientists for instance climb k. Two or also unbelievable artists on the side. I have to say that a bit of a science nerd. I think about this when i go to bed. I think about this in the shower. This is my life. I loved this. I would have a hard time envisioning myself. Doing something else. Inexact terrified of retirement. Probably for that reason hit a half a great answer for. I would do if i were doing research leading a team. I love this with every aas my body maybe after Diamond you could sign designs for guys to keep it going. Keep talking about it at least as you don't have to likely absence. What about you. My view of exchanged over the last year with the pandemic she took. Michael knows this month with family moved to florida temporarily. 'cause we could because we will come home right Has made the idea of just kind of sitting around the bush Maybe i bear will find the second career and will always think. Secretly admired the performing. god's icy crucial and play guitar. A little bit as well. So i don't know maybe i'll sit on a beach somewhere with an acoustic guitar. And just see if i can get a few dollars. Superior know nothing to headline at toes or anything but yet coking. I like to cook as well but i. I don't know that the skill set is different right heating and cooling down and hopefully at the end. You guessed that people appreciate and hope you'll be sharing that as like you're doing with your son lines so yeah looking forward to see what comes out of your second career. Whenever that happens we probably need parkas. Follow on that but yeah thank you so much both of you for taking the time today. I really appreciate the stock. And i know the light so i am sure listeners will do thanks for listening to crisper cuts invite you to check out the blog. The bench for more great crisper content. Please send us any feedback. You have by contacting twitter and if you want to join it as a guest on our podcast. Email us at crisper cuts at scenario dot. Com crisper cuts is a scientific podcast bicycle. Produced by kevin bobby additional production by resonate recordings or cover. Art is by jeff. Thanks for listening..

Michael kevin bobby twitter florida last year jeff mike both today scenario dot. Com John two thousand one two phases first phases second career second thing india michael two types
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

03:56 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"The associated quality control data for those lines and then put in a request. Hopefully with a very very easy to use click. Mta is our goal so that investigators can really efficiently request. These lines in the mishandled by jets has a long history of distributing reagents community for example the mice very efficiently. Very high quality very quickly. And so we're partnering with them for this. They're so good. At distribution addition to genome engineering skills. That is great. Finglas gaustad not serving networks. Everyone would definitely be looking forward to that. Mike you had mentioned recent paper. And i've seen that just went indie game out. I think it came out in a few days after that. You had fourteen Lines looking at atkinson's right. So is that also going to be. I also looking to make that available.

Mike fourteen Lines atkinson few days after
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

08:02 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"Control the follows yet and just to give you an example of this only over the past year. Has the field recognized that there can be on target mutations deletions that mimic what appears to be a homeless at a where one of the oh contains the variance engineered baron because of the way oftentimes has bi gene. Clones appears that it has same edit that you converted a wild type two home as i need mind but naturopathy there was a large deletion. Prevented primer binding. therefore that delete delete wasn't seen on sanger sequencing. That's something we didn't even know about until recently and it scares me to think about how many lines are in use right now by loud that have tremendous types because they actually deleted sometimes multi kilobits region in one of the Full so we are exhaustively going through unless as one example of the quality control replying on the tail. End of all this to double check to make sure that these lines happen. Think that they have and not anything else. I'm so just some of the. Qc this being done. In addition to sanger sanger re-based carry typing g. Ban carry texting for the the clones veteran cold genome sequencing berkeley clones of saturday. And we're generating a really citing you tool though is actually a tool proposed by bill. Scarves are partnering jazz call revert and that's gonna be something we do in the future watch taking mutant line and then crab that mutation back to the wild genus with the notion that if anything happened during editing that maybe even listen. Qc that we should build a fall because we were mon- should look like the parental on edited wild type line in regards to the phenotype that was asking investigator and so it might be very very. We're calling these trio says were true. Set would be composed of the parental line. The line and then investigator do experiments just three salons to ask their phenotype actually related to the mutation. Not something else that happened. The entity and expansion process. So i think the that kind of death of quality control is really hard to achieve with an academic group because it takes a long time in a cost a lot money and investigators obviously wanting to get to experimentation quickly as they can so waiting another year to do this if you see make us additional control on it just isn't something that's really feasible for most groups with a very well organized project like indie with the appropriate extra partners. Who were the expert doing all the sudden including doing. Qc that's all. The answer is well. I think that's something that we can do. that before. was just really difficult to roll out yet. I think the other thing about standard of standardization is is an interesting question right. I don't think we want the site. This is the only way you could use. Pse cells in scientific knowledge matt ryan. There's lots of space to people to do. I mean we were talking about from about the alternate routes of having a patient derived line and control. I think still valid. I really really really impulsion. Experiments still need to be done. Said none of this is not to take anything away from anyone else is doing what it is hosted hopefully will do is provide a sort of reference sat that other To with some confidence so an example of this is we all know you got not just see lined up. The simply will not differentiate while it won't go very well it'll spontaneously differentiate or will populate won't lineage another you know. There are thoughts of why occurs past reprogram of the reprogrammed procedure. But it does. Have we really want to know we. We've made some reasonably substantial efforts to know that the lines that which using cam principal cell types in the system unlocked shoot then allow people to get the line got protocol we used it. Replicate in dara rob and so i think doxa standardization is really helpful for the show because the no does it behave in the way that it does blended was i generated and that's really helpful. I think to know that you have seen adrift in the line. Over time as quired. Psalms much mutation fix about nature so how does put really good lines. We've kept an eye on the quality. release into the public space though. Continue to behaviors. We expect and i will say that. We've not simply refer ryan's should be able to provide. Will dr nation protocols updater delight lobby benchmark napa. One of the exciting aspects of this project is that not only. is it Escape but that it will actually benefit the community where everyone will have access to these sidelines. Which have all undergone qc and so. They can just forward their research by getting these headlines. I was curious about. What is the timeline for. Since the face to is to lender progress. What is the nine for bundy's would be available for the community to use hate to over. Promise what i can say. Is that the majority of the lines of the first frontal background in terms of Months have now been generated and validated with sanger sequencing. But we are waiting on all of those quality control assays before we are able to them. Release those lines generally to the public. So we're very excited by the fact that it appears we successfully edited these and so it should be soon. But i'm i'm wary about giving us precise date on this just because we we don't know until we get the quality control back and phase it differently on alexa. What would be your viscous. Denial venue one these to be out at feasibly ready. Let's not do promise anyone like. This is the data will be available. But what would you pistol fun early. Twenty twenty two. okay. I think so. I think so. We've spat eighteen months on the so far so we're into past affairs year anniversary but this we've made love progress. I think the end of twenty twenty one into twenty twenty two. We should have good sets of lines People at points will also stop to generate some these associated date to set a plan. As i mentioned earlier. Things are a seek in the like the we can then set out next couple of years. Not so expectation so far. We've been pretty alt-right despite a global pandemic so somewhat confident that we'll be able to do it. What are the other things that goes into. This is generating a robust distribution system for the lines because the vials of the edited lines aren't the ones that we'll be sending out to investigators that cloned free trans going. Have to grow out additional rounds quality control done and then we have to be able to have an easy way for investigators to identify which lines are useful for their research and request us. And that's all being done through a very generous grant from Initiative directly to jackson research laboratories to fund the development of a really nice website. Investigators can see what's been made assess.

eighteen months saturday Scarves three salons Psalms one example twenty Twenty twenty two ryan first next couple of years One double twenty twenty one jackson research bundy two home one past year alexa
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"Impulsivity. What we want to do is get away from. The extreme are just described where one lot the hugely intensive effort one g and generates a small series of reagents that useful. It doesn't go beyond that. And so the concept. Generally of cod secretive is to go big to go across diseases. Were discussing earlier but also to apply to allergies are ready yet. An etiquette scale so crisp. Now i would say it's really matured in the in the time that just the time that i've been looking at it. I'm from something that was good but required a lot of thinking of africa to something why you got multiple tools. You government's pro proteins. You can now synthesize guides efficient use faction protocols and really be scaled up a belt out so i think thoughts or ability to do this at scale the other thing that i think we've learned and speak to this. While is how critical it walls to have a set of working with us and so we've had settled on this so we have jackson. Bob archery with has simply go. We vote i'm all doing. Some edits and keeping that organized on track.

Bob africa jackson one
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

07:09 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"And so and so what. We call the disease usually. It's something to the history of found. Why the symptoms Tomiko something about pathology. Perhaps but that isn't necessarily what Is telling us that viljoen tonga's they're actually. Groups are more similar than the names. We used discussed. The diseases might indicate and lapped me is the is the genesis of date right so stop worrying about the jeans coal while the phenotype cicle of diseases are a stock thinking about at scale across all of them and the only way to do that in a very rigorous quite is to stop from a consistent reference while behave lines as you say michael put an old we can get into the line and look at the moral equivalent were using the same sets of readouts and see whether fina types of cellular level match up with what we think as uses disease labels a much suspicion as the will see some really results. That's really great mark. There's a saying actually medicine that the pathologist always has the final word and sometimes i'm wondering how we should change to. Maybe the geneticists always has final word and one of the reasons here is that we're starting to see that in sonic some pets. Were pretty lousy. Predicting what the actual underlying gene or pathologies presence in that given patient with its cena's husband actually alzheimer's may be a great example of this if people used to think that alzheimer's was defined by the presence of Implants and neurofibrillary tangles. But now we realized that. Four percent of patients with alzheimer's disease pathologically confirmed alzheimer's disease also have aggregates of this other preachy. Tv forty-three and tv forty-three has been classically associated with a different subset of neurogenesis orders. A my gladys flores from temple dementia and now. We realize that. A lot of alzheimer's patients also have louis by foliage which was traditionally thought of as another disease. So here we have this half logic mixture admixture of different pathologies going on in the same patient oftentimes and received One on clinical pathologic diagnosis. We now recognize that some of these genes implicated one. Disease can also change your risk of another scenery completely. Different disease one. Classic gene is Which has been historically associated with the frontal temporal metro and is now being seen in jiahua studies alzheimer's and i think that this really drives home. The point that our goal is really to try to find. Mecca disease mechanisms that are going to lead to treatments for patients and this artificial silent of diseases as i think sometimes hindered progress and inter cross fertilization between feels and so india's one project that can potentially help break down some of those barriers and potentially seat new ideas intentionally drive new therapies because of his design. Because it's truly cross-cutting nature to i read the paper. It was just so fascinating to see. I mean not. Just the number of genes that have been edited to make these lines but also Just that that are these main number of under bhutto's and maybe not even to wanting disease some overlap across new originated of diseases so it totally warrants projected that scale one of the things that you mentioned before michael was that there wasn't awesome not to look into this before are there. It hadn't been done. So what was the main challenge was largely related to anything has been deliberately of crisper off improved the chances of making models this and maybe just speak with this technology has done for the food. Might just kicked us over to marc. Because i think there's chew things that happened. I think the time is ripe technologically to do this. Because of real advancements in stem cell biology cultures whilst christopher has been but actually i think that maybe the bigger hurdle has been how to organize and fund such a project like this. That doesn't really fall into something. That a single academic lab would do something that sometimes hasn't necessarily worked so under under traditional extramural funding mechanism so mark. I wonder if this might be an opportunity for you to talk a little. Bit more about the cipher. Alzheimer's really dimensions. Maybe it's role in terms of enabling projects lady for. Yes show a little bit context here so so we started thinking about doing things like this in my academic lab. I would say about four or five years ago. When crisper was really starting to get more readily accessible. We made a series of vice agenda. Lions football particularly. Listen which would be kind to decrypt belly heavily and it took wall incredibly hardworking scientist. I would say about three years. Make voting to jenny lines. We just published. I of very small journal stem cell research the small radical in general. And you know tomorrow things. We found out locked away where it's actually really hard to some at summaries. He summer it's hard to make sure that you don't have off-target fats. It's hard to make sure the estimate by acquisition of crimson regions. You can very easily very easily half what looks like homicide gazeta whereas in fact what you've done this vetted vulnerably whilst the others you get lost At the locus itself. And so this we stumbled along with. We got there yeah. I'm not saying it's not possible. But it was a low effort to just g six zoom out a little bit too windy of what's happening here. So is my commission. We very fortunate to be associated with center for outlets related dementia which is new as a buyer h to really address. The outsiders related dimensions a gum. Today want the biggest reasons people die in the next century am currently cardiovascular. Disease cancer appropriately. Gal i thought it is. We look at how the population stretching west in particular is actually now. Look i will say as an aside. It's not just west of hemisphere is also true globally outside. Mrs predicted today. The number one thing that people die with win old age and so it was appropriate. My view recognize that. We need to do something about this. And so the. Us congress been money to dan. I budget for dementia. The define what is and within the intramural program. We came up with this idea that we have a center that was really dedicated to outsides. But it matches.

congress Today today next century tomorrow michael Four percent one christopher five years ago marc Tomiko india one project Lions Alzheimer single academic lab three years dan crimson
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"Lots of researched sounds great and since you mentioned the indirect can continue with. You spoke about it a little bit but can you elaborate on. What exactly is indie. Sure chime in with additional solve. Probably sweep these together as he can. Maybe get a little more history about a program structure in how sits with other efforts at the nih. Surreally the concept of india's that usually at the beginning of a project involves i kissed sees to study the effect of mutation on on biology. Usually that product starts in academic lab where the group will either team a line from patients or they'll generate you want them selves in that process. Take a year or longer sometimes. Things can go sideways especially if a group isn't doing their engineer so it's a pretty.

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

CRISPR Cuts

02:43 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on CRISPR Cuts

"Welcome everyone in today's episode of crispell guts. We have with us to unite scientists. Dr mark cookson and dr michael ward both of them working neuroscience. And they've collaborated on this amazing indie project for alzheimer's related dementias that we've talked about in the podcast later so first of all. Let me welcome both of you. Thank you for joining us today here. Absolutely let's be tagged with introduction or botas. Could you tell us about your professional background than what your group Maybe not with mark. Yes show so. I did buy back in the uk quite a long time ago now. And i'd say it was working on cultured astra site. So i've always had this interest in using apology to dress neuroscience problems over the years that's grown into an interesting human. Genetics initially actually in genetics. And the more recently in pockets and related disorders main tools that we use in the laboratory mixture of high content molecular approaches like sequencing. We do sinema models that i think increasingly rpg season. I guess he's been modified have been raised about bone of the cell biology that we do nowadays gig. Mike maybe you can go. Knicks sure so i'm neurologist at the nih and actually did my fellowship in behavioral neurology which is a subset of neurology focuses on patients with nerve disorders. So here clinic. I see patients with these disorders oftentimes. Who have familiar mutations. And my lab that i also right here focuses on the basic mechanisms. How those mutation strike sees so we've gravitated toward some cells as model. Study the cell biology of these gene. Mutations because we can differentiate stem cells to almost any disease relevant subtypes ranging from ron's to clear to also and has been a super powerful tool because now yet crispin husayn engineering. One can either take a cell from patients in the making nice. Check troll by crafty or like what would be doing indie project introducing disease associated mutations into a stance align to create perfectly matched ice genyk series site husband affect upstream salt allergy. So it's been a really really thing to both academic lab focus on these mechanisms in the with mar we this initiative. It's going to generate these tools. Data sets off think is gonna enable.

Mike mark cookson mark both today uk crispell guts michael ward Knicks first dr time
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:55 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Since you mention it and you get very quick idea on what rapamycin as we last spoke more bearish more bullish and why i'm a bowl. Does coin rapa hands so what is right by the way i mean i know i know what the diamond diamonds thing but what does it. Where did it come from no idea. No idea where diamond hands comes from. Okay did i missed that somewhere in my my immune econ classes. No i don't think so. So what is rapamycin. Rapamycin is a drug that is a naturally occurring anti fungal agent made by a bacteria that was discovered on easter island back in the nineteen sixties otherwise known as rapa nui right. Rapanui is the correct name for easter island and the bacteria streptomyces hydra scopus which was discovered there by a group of explorers explorers. Maybe the wrong word but people doing sort of medical prospecting a group from montreal. Believe in call nine hundred sixty six. They took a bunch of soil and dirt back from rapanui to the lab in montreal where it's sort of sat there unattended to about five years. A chemist stoop chemists by the name of surrender. Seagal right lamb yeah. He started legal. No and no ponytail so surrendered some really interesting. Chemistry isolated the compound and noticed. It had these really remarkable properties which was it was the most potent antifungal he ever seen or the world had ever seen. Frankly at the time as his son aged tells the story who have gotten to know a little bit. He felt he had basically come onto the biggest blockbuster cure for athlete's foot the world was ever going to know and right about that time the company he worked for closed. Its montreal headquarters. Actually laid people off ordered the destruction of all non-viable compounds and shipped him off to new jersey. In one of the greatest acts of scientific fortuity he did not follow orders and he instead stuck said rapamycin into a little mini freezer that he and his family transported to their new home in new jersey. They kept it in the freezer for many years. Until ultimately another drug company purchased the company he worked for and the new management said. Hey anybody working on anything interesting. He said i'm working on this thing interesting that i haven't looked at in a few years. And they said bring it out. Must've been interesting lawyer. conversation fist. On the not following orders dinner so out came rapamycin which he named mason and mason is typically the the suffix. I guess that we use her. What's the what's the second part of a workout sucks for antimicrobial agents and of course rapa tribute to the rapa. Nui like a zoo throw mason. Correct it quickly became clear that this had remarkable anti proliferative properties so it could stop things from proliferating so that was obviously a big just fungi and in particular it was very effective at making a certain type of lymphocyte which is a white type of white blood cell not proliferate and then basically went down the path eventually pfizer then bought amorous which was the company that bought his previous company whose name i don't even remember at this point. Pfizer ended up pursuing this and it was fda approved in nineteen ninety nine for treatment of organ transplantation so patients that have an organ transplant. Transplanted have to be put on a really heavy regimen of drugs to suppress a part of their immune system called the cellular immune system. That will attack foreign organ. That's what is that called. Host graft not graft versus host is actually when the organ usually. It's in the case of lymphoma or leukemia when someone has a bone marrow transplant and the the graft what they've been transplanted host is. This is this is really host versus graft but traditional sort of rejection actually did a really cool podcast on the topic of transplantation. History with a guy named chris on de and it's i mean i know this subject well but having a discussion with chris really opened my eyes to just what a beautiful story it is. And what. The big breakthroughs were with drug development. And how you know at one point. It was all you could give. People was present his own. And you couldn't save anybody and then you had other drugs like cyclosporin. That were introduced. But then you get into this third generation of amazing drugs like rapamycin that took organ preservation to to a higher level. Now you're not swapping kidneys. How do you know well at least not since the last time you sold one tijuana settle a bat but why would you take rapamycin. I'm skipping ahead. A little bit yes. Let's skip ahead so so ninety nine. This drug comes on the market. For organ rejection and about twelve years later a study gets published by rich miller randy strong colleagues as part of what's called the interventions testing program or the it p which is an amazing nih funded program that tests molecules. That are believed to have a shot at enhancing longevity and it does so in her really really rigorous way probably the most rigorous way we can test small animals of interviewed. Rich miller as well. Probably one of my favorite podcasts. In terms of like nerdy out on all of the molecules it can potentially impact longevity and rapamycin was in many ways the poster child for the it p. program because first of all it's hard to get anything to live longer second of all when they were making the formulation for the rapamycin to feed the mice and these were very special mice. These were not your typical crappy lab mice that have no bearing whatsoever to real animals. These are very special type of mice. That are much more akin to real animals and that's very important distinction between what happens in ninety nine percent of miles research which is almost in applicable to humans. And it's why so many drugs that get tested in these b six mice and things like that show some marker of success and they become wild failures beyond the mice. But this was different. They had trouble getting the formulation to work and by the time they finally did the mice were like twenty months old. Which means they're almost at the end of their life. They're like seventy year old sixty five year old mice and they contemplated just scrapping the experiment but they were like screw it. Let's just run it late. So they started feeding the treatment group with rapamycin and the placebo group. Get to continue eating their regular chow. Because it was oral administration yes rapamycin was mixed into their chow. And lo and behold the rapamycin group despite initiating treatment so late in life had a staggering improvement in lifespan. There's been so many it. Ps that have replicated this. I don't wanna misquoted. But some of the effective like a seventeen or nineteen percent improvement in the males or females and eleven to twelve percent in the males and remember the atp use a very rigorous way of assessing this. Which is they're taking a look at total life not just remaining life. It's an even higher bar to clear. How much lifespan. Along gatien happens of course went and repeated. The study administering the dose when they were younger and saw an even greater response. This has been repeated over and over and over again and to my knowledge there is not a single animal. Study that has tested this hypothesis. That has not found on a result..

montreal eleven chris new jersey seventeen nineteen percent Pfizer nineteen sixties twelve percent seventy year old sixty five year old easter island third generation about five years ninety nine percent of miles about twelve years later ninety nine twenty months old second single animal
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

09:52 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Of them but stability is the ability to safely transfer load from the outside world to the body and vice versa. Which sounds sort of like a asaf explanation. An analogy that i really like using is that of a race car versus a streetcar. So what makes race cars. So unique is that why by the way a race car. That's got half. The power of a streetcar will still knock it. Socks off on a track is because the chassis tires of the race car are constructed in such a way that every bit of that power is making it to the road so the analogy like to think of is that the tires of race car like our feet and stability really does begin with the feet and most people myself included when i was starting had horrible appropriate -ception with our feet. We don't really know how to load our feet correctly and a lot of that comes from the fact that we wear shoes all day. Your hands in your feet are actually very similar and if you think about what you can do with your hands how easily you can move them around. Spread your fingers sense pressure in different areas. Most people can't do that with their feet and that comes to bite you so as you think about how it moves up the sort of chain a very common problem is which accounts for probably more of the injuries that people experience is this pattern where the pelvis is tilted forward. The ribs are flared up. The erector spinal muscles in the back are sort of locked short. Meaning they're locked in concentric load and hamstrings are locked long. So they're locked in e centric load. Yeah tell someone who's quite lean from a body. Fat perspective can still look like a pot belly plus rise but that anterior pelvic till which actually so. You've asked me a question. I think i can answer this with. There are really two things. I'm excited about that. Pertained to exercise and go down this path and then we'll come back to the other one. What's the ideology of that position. Which i was the king of that position. It's probably aetiology like where did what drives that. Why would a person show up with that posture of ribs. Flared up pelvis tilted forward back tight hamstrings tight and long besides wearing six inches the letter hills which i never war. I wear them sometimes. But i don't often wear them. You're in good company. Grew vernal so it probably starts with lousy respiration and. I'm not exactly sure why. That's the case but i think somewhere along the way we stop breathing correctly into our abdomen. Instead of breathing the way we should breathe. Which is the diaphragm. Should go down. The abdomen should come out. The pelvis should actually fill with pressure. We tend to breathe using so. That's the those are the primary muscles of respiration diaphragm. We start using accessory muscles like the pack in the pack minor and we kind of lift chest up there a very common pattern of respiration. And i think it's that lifting of the chest that is what's bringing the ribcage up and when that happens the body is a little bit out of balance meaning your center of mass shifts forward and the body senses that in an effort to prevent you from falling forward. It's basically tightening those erector spinal muscles. It's pulling you into balance again but in doing so. It's creating this downstream problem in the hamstrings. Which is they're locking. And if there's another thing i've become really obsessed with its hamstring control which is different from hamstring strength. Lot of people myself included can have very strong hamstrings. I used to have incredibly strong hamstrings if you put me on a machine and made me do something in isolation them is. Simple exercise demonstrate. This which beth lewis had me do for the first time maybe two and a half or three years ago was laying on your back with your knees up and your feet down. So you're sort of in a back position knees up feet on the surface of the ground and without letting your back tilt into a huge dome underneath a while keeping your lower back flat. Can you with one leg whole very very hard back to your butt and feel your hamstring tents so that is a very specific manner of recruiting hamstring strength. And believe it or not. I couldn't do that while keeping my back down. I would arch like a cat if i tried to do that. There are many more of these types of exercises but it was through this type of very deliberate starting on my back and then learning to do hamstring recruitment while standing and well feeling pressure in my feet that really allowed me to get back to dead lifting with a feeling of safety that i'd never really experience because i used to dead lift so heavy when i was young and basically got away with using my back to dead lift which is obviously not what you wanna do and then i just started having nagging injuries as i got older. So by the time. I was in my mid forties. I'm dead lifting and it's like oh my si joint would bug me. And after i finish my back would just feel tight. Age sort of exposes is your deficiencies. And eventually everybody's going to pay a price for this. Some people do these things naturally better than others. So i think there are some people who can kind of go their entire life lifting heavy weights without having to pay much attention to this stuff. But i certainly wasn't one of them. Does that type of training that you're describing that progression starting back from the foundation fundamentals. Does that have particular name. There are a couple of different schools of thought that have been implemented into this training one of them being dynamic neuromuscular stabilization or dns which is heavily focused on this ability to find the breath and generate abdominal pressure so creating a cylinder inside the abdomen as opposed to like an upside down triangle. Where you have some pressure appear but none down here and then another school of thought. That's been heavily influential. Here is been something called pasta restoration institute or pri. That's really the one that has focused on this idea of. How do you correct. What from the side looks like this right. You know sort of held us down ribs up. And how do you fix that position and again. It's it's hard because it requires fixing everything from the feet to the neck. How much of a contributor if at all do you think extended sitting as to that configuration m- with the flared ribs up and anterior pelvic. Tell if any. I think it probably is an probably for a couple of reasons. You have to think about it as the positive and the negative right. So one drawback of sitting is that you're not active. It's simply the removal of active time. That is a problem. And i think the other problem with sitting is it is simply harder to generate intra abdominal pressure. And it's easier to just rely on these accessory movements of respirator to lift up. So i think i've said this once before like if i could bizarre for a day you know i'd go back to kids when they're in school and have them standing desks or squatting. Those would be your two positions right. So you either your squatting to do work or you're standing to do work with sitting in the types of chairs that we sit in. I think i have an idea for a complimentary short podcast for you which is just called czar for a day. Five minute five minute commandments. From zar attiyah yup more barefoot time with my first two kids. I wasn't so aware of this when were young and now with my youngest. Who's almost four. I studied this guy like he's the master. His movement patterns are simply unbelievable. Which of course all four year olds should be. I just never noticed it. Before but the manner in which he moves and lifts himself and reaches for things and sits around it's incredible it is such a spectacle the behold he spend more time watching your children and that's dns is modeled on exactly that right. Dns basically says it. It grew out of something called the prague school in czechoslovakia which was originally looking at ways to take children with cerebral palsy. And teach them how to move again by realizing that what c. p. had robbed them of was a lot of the developmental movement patterns that occur in the first two years of life and once they started to realize you could actually take these kids and retrain their neurologic system to do things in a more functional way that you could actually do this as a form of rehab and then ultimately a former pre hab which is sort of how i like to think of it. Now i've seen. I don't know how much of this is public. But incredible results from a trainer also world record holder or former world record holder and olympic weightlifting. Jersey gregorek working with a number of clients or patients with cerebral palsy using very incremental movement rehabilitation training. I mean the before and after differences are staggering. I mean i speak to probably ignorance of cerebral palsy but just never was even within my conceptual schema that that would be possible to very exciting to see so speaking of exciting. Oh so the other thing on exercise to get back to your question about the metabolic stuff is about three years ago. I was becoming more and more interested in this idea of zone to training which has a very technical.

six inches Five minute czechoslovakia first two years five minute four year pasta restoration institute one beth lewis one leg first two kids two things two positions four three years ago first time mid forties two and a half gregorek Jersey
FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

"The food and drug administration approved the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly twenty years but there were doubts the drug is from Biogen magic can amount which is now could be marketed as and you held the FDA approved the drug saying it was based on results that seems reasonably likely to benefit Alzheimer's patients Dr Maria Correo is chief science officer with the Alzheimer's association this therapy slows the progression of the disease because it addresses the underlying biology one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's which is amyloid plaques therapy usually manages symptoms of Alzheimer's like insomnia or anxiety FDA advisor Dr Caleb Alexander said no to the drug's approval he said the agency has regulatory standards based on evidence but in this case he thinks the product get a pass at Donahue Washington

Alzheimer's FDA Dr Maria Correo Alzheimer's Association Biogen Dr Caleb Alexander Insomnia Washington
First New Drug for Alzheimer's in 20 Years Approved by FDA

AP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 6 months ago

First New Drug for Alzheimer's in 20 Years Approved by FDA

"And Drug Administration approved the first drug they say may help slow Alzheimer's disease. It's a surprise decision. The FDA is independent advisor said the treatment hadn't been shown to help treat Alzheimer's. The drug from Biogen is the first new Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years, The

Alzheimer's Drug Administration FDA Biogen Alzheimer's Treatment
Alzheimer’s Drug From Biogen Wins US Approval

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Alzheimer’s Drug From Biogen Wins US Approval

"Service prices as we're seeing activity picking up Biogen has received approval for its controversial Alzheimer's disease, their appeal landmark decision that stands to dramatically change treatment for the debilitating brain condition. Bijan shares up now by 40.2%. Japan's A Sigh is working with Bijan on the Alzheimer's drug. It's a TRS are also surgeon today.

Alzheimer's Disease Biogen Bijan Alzheimer's Drug Japan
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Specializes in alzheimer's disease clinical research along with the diagnosis and treatment of patients with a d. And other memory disorders. She's an active member in the memory disorder community and i actually met her through our shared interest in a nonprofit that you may have heard of hilarity for charity in this episode. We talked about a number of things. Obviously her background and what drew her into a field. That many people don't necessarily think of geriatric psychiatry as a field pertaining to alzheimer's disease. We talk a lot about the clinical diagnosis of alzheimer's disease which actually is still somewhat elusive. And while it's easier to make the diagnosis today than say twenty years ago. It's still far from perfect diagnosis. And a number of other things need to be ruled out. We get into a pretty good discussion around the pharmacotherapy pipeline. There are at this time over a hundred drugs in the regulatory pipeline for testing. And we get into a discussion of where they are in that phase and what they're targeting. We discuss specifically a drug called out of canada mob. Which is a monoclonal antibody directed at amyloid beta. And at the time of this podcast. It is very tenuously awaiting. Fda approval a decision that should be rendered on june seventh. This is a very important moment for the research community because if approved it would be the first drug approved both as a monoclonal antibody and secondly as a drug that is a disease modifying drug as opposed to a symptom based drug which is currently. All we have in the quiver. We conclude the discussion by talking about what it means to age in a healthy way. And i think this is the part that probably has the broadest application. Because even if you don't develop alzheimer's disease you will age. That is inevitable and the insights that amanda provides here are going to be valuable for everyone. I certainly feel that way myself so without further delay. Please enjoy my conversation with dr. Amanda thank you so much for making time to chat with me today from the first time i heard you speak. I knew i wanted to have you on the podcast. You probably don't even remember when that was do you..

june seventh amanda Amanda twenty years ago dr. first drug first time over a hundred drugs both today amyloid beta Fda canada secondly
FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

The Readout Loud

02:09 min | 6 months ago

FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

"Today. I think really take this week on reading. The the fda tea leaves of drug approved ability. We'll thank you. Say but yeah. I think you know we are basically on the eve of what is expected to be. This momentous decision by the fda on canyon have the controversial alzheimer's disease treatment from biogen and because there isn't really much to do in terms of trying to predict that decision. There isn't much information to pick apart. I think people you know resort to to what we all would which is maybe not quite tinfoil hat but we look at whatever evidence there is and try to construct a take and so for months. I think there's been this. Focus especially in the investor community on parsing each individual. Fda decision for clues as to some sort of like meta take on how the agency is thinking about new drugs. Yeah i mean you know. There's this idea right like you know is the fda being more conservative would drag approvals. Is it being more flexible. Which approvals right and it has come to feel a little bit absurd so if there's a run of as there were a few months ago surprising decisions whether it be Rejections or you know. Advisory committee hearings called where they weren't previously expected then. Suddenly the vibe is oh well. They're really cracking down. And then recently we had to Drug approvals in consecutive weeks. That came through. Let's say favorably to the drug companies and sort of undramatically so then the vibes us the fda in fact. They've kind of taken their foot off the brake when it comes to this and i think you know everybody probably knows this. But the is comprised of thousands of people And even the drug review arm is separated into individual fiefdoms focused on you know different aspects of biology and science and types of drugs etc and each one has its own internal politics. Each one has its own personnel changes in its own kind of regulatory philosophy. It's different between cancer than it is from neuroscience for example and so i guess it's one of those things where reading these tea leaves has kind of maybe run out of clues to offer us and maybe we should all just kind of respected. It's a giant organization and we are on the outside of it.

FDA Alzheimer's Disease Biogen Advisory Committee Cancer
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

Breaking Biotech

04:44 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

"The therapy could be off the shelf. Which helps compared to other cell based therapies especially ones in melanoma and one company that i'm gonna touch on in these few slides i o vance that has seen some issues lately but that is not an off the shelf therapy and therefore revenue might be a better option for patients that have melanoma so some upcoming stuff. And i'm not gonna go through. The details of the therapy may save that for an additional video but replica in is going to do a data update on their lead programs during a virtual investor event on june third. Twenty twenty one. And i see this as a major opportunity. And the two indications there primarily focusing on now one is in anti pd one failed melanoma therapy and here estimate around ten thousand patients per year. And then they're also looking at another skin cancer where this around seven thousand to twenty eight thousand patients per year and if you estimate that the cost is going to be something like one hundred and fifty thousand dollars per patient per year you can imagine. The total addressable market is pretty high now. The companies also looking at other indications are looking at non small cell lung cancer which is a very large patient population. And you can see all the readouts that they're going to have in twenty twenty one so for me. I see this a lot of potential in this year especially and i'm took a position. The stock was trading at around thirty bucks and in a similar way. They kind of remind me of vans. Because they were also looking at indications in melanoma and some of these other cancers and vance his peak market cap after they released their pivotal data was around seven billion dollars and with rep unit. Only around one point eight. I see there being a lot of especially in a company. That's shown that their treatments do work in early trials. So for me. I think it makes sense to take a position and i'm going to hold probably through twenty twenty one so that i can see some of this. Initial data come out and then we can reassess after that but for their melanoma indication. They recently met with the fda in order to plan what they're pivotal studies going to look like so. I do see that. Reprimand is a pretty interesting company. And we're gonna see a lot of on june third hopefully and with that. I want to touch on the upcoming catalyst that we can expect to see and so we saw on terminal the x. Is really wrong terminal where a novus should have the checkmark but moving on a cheek. We're gonna see data coming up soon. Happy on his well. Alex college forty molecular therapies. Their lockup expiration is coming up. So i am not going to be holding that sock. I'm probably going to be looking to pick them up. After that lockup expires why mt x. In q two of this year coming up they should see some data and parkinson's disease. And then i also mentioned that g. t. Oh we're going to see some kobe. Nineteen data and. I don't have time to get into this company but it is trading relatively close to cash and..

Nineteen data june third two indications one hundred and fifty thousand twenty twenty one this year around seven billion dollars twenty eight thousand patients around seven thousand one company Reprimand around thirty bucks Twenty twenty one around ten thousand patients p mt x. around one point eight one molecular therapies Alex college forty patient per year
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

Breaking Biotech

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

"I did wanna make note of is one called humanity. Therapeutics ticker symbol. Why mt ex. And they're trading at around one hundred and fifty five million dollar mark cat and they have sixty six million dollars in cash now. He tweeted on friday or so that i took a position in the company because they're about to release some phase one data in parkinson's disease so their main drug that they're looking at here is called whitey x seven seven three nine and it's a blood brain barrier penetration. St royal koei desaturate inhibitor. And what this does is it. Prevents protein aggregation of a protein called. Alpha sign clan and alpha sign clan has been associated with alzheimer's disease parkinson's disease so presumably if we can inhibit the aggregates that are caused by alpha signed clan. We might be able to improve conditions such as parkinson's disease such as alzheimer's disease so the company is very early in their clinical development. They released some early data in phase. One they done a single sending dose a multiple as sending dose trials in healthy volunteers. And they've been able to show that they get target engagement as well as the safety profile. That is amenable to patients. But what we're about to see here is in mid two thousand twenty one. We're gonna get phase one b data and this is an actual parkinson's disease patients so if they can show that there's some kind of efficacy outcome that is positive for parkinson's disease. We could see a similar move that a novus showed us in the last few weeks given the company's trading at around one hundred fifty five million market cap and they also have sixty six million bucks in cash. The details of the city can be found. Here i look at this is kind of a long shot but the risk is relatively low. You can expect in general that if a company's main asset is gonna fail they're going to trade probably close to cash unless there's other assets they can prop it up so we see downside here around sixty six million dollars market cap but the upside. We could see something similar to either notice or catava scientists and for me. I think the risk reward definitely favors along position so for that reason. I'm going to take one. And i think it'll be interesting to see what happens the last cns. Rita that i want to talk about is bygones educate at paducah day which is going to be on june seventh and this one is going to be pretty amazing. It's going to affect the whole xp to some capacity and. i really can't wait. The advisory committee that looked at all of the information for advocating voted overwhelmingly against approval. This is november twenty twenty. But if we look at the briefing documents at the fda shared it was pretty clear to everyone. Mostly everyone that the fda wants to prove..

Rita november twenty twenty friday sixty six million dollars june seventh around one hundred fifty five paducah day sixty six million bucks One around sixty six million dolla phase one b around one hundred and fifty f twenty one mid two thousand last few weeks one seven seven three nine parkinson single novus
Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

"Life. Jack Hanna has Alzheimer's disease. In a letter posted by the Columbus Sue, the Hana family says his diagnosis was has progressed quickly over the last few months. His family made the announcement yesterday. Hannah is well known for his live animal demonstrations on late night talk shows. He retired last year. The animal lovers daughters. Say he still has a great sense of humor and still wears his khakis at home. Jack Hanna's into the Wild airs Saturdays at 11 in the morning on Wish TV. It's 5 39 cicadas air set

Alzheimer's Disease Columbus Sue Jack Hanna Hannah
Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

Breaking Biotech

05:38 min | 9 months ago

Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

"The first company. I wanted to touch on is news from july lilly and they're huge company. Say like a large mega cap at one hundred and eighty three billion dollars and what they recently presented was the full data set from their molecule demand in alzheimer's disease. And this is a phase two trial looking at this antibody that targets a specific epoch on the amyloid beta approaching and this episode is only visible in established plaques. Now i don't want to belabor the point about the amyloid hypothesis which i've done in previous videos. Suffice to say that a number of different molecules have been attempted in this indication in specifically the mechanism of reducing amyloid plaques. And they've all failed and what we're seeing here is that in this multi center randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. That donna had a significant is what they're showing here in the air score but not a very profound impact on cognition and so they looked at this primary outcome the air score and this is a combination of the as well as the ads. Ads and so eight ask cogs general measure of cognition whereas the ads. I is a measure of activities of daily living. So they did a combined score with that and demanded mobs improvement led to a p value of point zero four so technically significant. But i'm not sure that if they replicated the stayed in a face. Three trout necessarily be positive. It is an interesting thing because when you look at the actual aid. S cog thirteen score. We don't see any significant change. It is better in indiana but not by a significant margin and then the mse score is basically no difference between the two so this is another data point to suggest that perhaps the amyloid beta hypothesis isn't one that these companies should be looking at and the last thing i wanted to show here. Is that the one thing that they do. See a significant change in the amount of amyloid in the brain and so the pet scan here to show that the dynamic treated group has a significant reduction in the amount of amyloid plaque in the brain compared to placebo. So the drug is able to reduce the emily beta plaques. But it's not able to improve cognition really as much as you would expect given the effect is there so i wanted to bring this up because there is an upcoming. Pdf date for biogen's advocating mob and this is going to be a huge movie for the stock and it was originally supposed to be in march but it was delayed until june seventh of this year. So keep your eyes on that. I don't know if i'm going to make any position on it. I think that the fda should not approve it given the results from the advisory committee but given that the so many is on this pdf. I feel like there's a chance at the fda could overlook that and end up approving drug. So it's definitely jairo word. Play and i would treat it as such and proceed likewise so that is eli lilly. I wanna quickly move on to another company in the alzheimer's face called novus and i touched on them in my previous video and what we heard in the last week was that they announced positive face to data and this is interim data showing the nbs for one or another name for the molecule is positive in improved speed and coordination in parkinson's patients. And this is a twenty five day treatment. Nine patients were in the treatment group and five or in the placebo and on the announcement of this data. I think the stock was trading around one hundred fifty maybe two hundred million dollars market valuation and went up to around two fifty three hundred before settling around two hundred and fifty million dollar market cap so big move up in the stock and i'll tell you the data. The ceo explained that the study was power to investigate a difference of twenty to twenty five percent in biomarker levels not to demonstrate efficacy making this data that much more significant so to provide some context. And why i think this is interesting. Is that i in my previous video. Didn't really seem to bullish on a novus and the reason for this is that it reminds me very closely other types of amyloid beta drugs because this drug reduces app the precursor protein to amyloid beta. So my rationale is that if they're targeting the same emily data pathway. Given that there's been so many molecules that have failed previously targeting that pathway. I don't expect that this one is going to be any different now. Having said that. I decided to take a position because we've seen over and over again. That companies have been able to spin face to data in a positive way that leads to these big increases in the sock even though in phase three there's an eventual failure so i decided to take a position in stock and i have been rewarded handsomely so far and i'm going to hold on to see the rest of the phase two data so to get the actual data here in one test that measures the speed of execution. The results were statistically significant. P equals zero point zero four showing that while parkinson's disease patients are slow in coding. Boxes met with an s four. Zero one improves their performance. In these same patients other test that measures coordination showed an improvement in their movements and was almost statistically significant peak will s- appoint zero seven. Then they say in all end. Es up tests performed the placebo group either stayed the same or performed worse than at baseline instead the a b s four zero one group either stayed the same perform better than at baseline and as we know. Md s up drs is a specific tasks that measures severity and progression of the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease Jairo Lilly FDA Biogen Donna Indiana Eli Lilly NBS
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 9 months ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:45 min | 10 months ago

Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

"Heireann droop wrote here host of the green podcasts. When it comes down to what we're made of so much of it is about food. Food literally builds us brick by brick cell-by-cell that means what we eat provides. The building blocks that make up the entire body which means unfortunately for a lot of people. They're made up of junk. Our poor food choices gravely impact our brain health resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed illness prone and more overweight than ever before my guest on today's minneapolis owed doctors. David and austin pearl mutter and shawn stevenson talked to us about how our health our relationships and even our thinking have been damaged by our western processed food diet. They discuss how our lifestyles and diet. Impact our brain function and our ability to make good choices as well as how we interact and show up for our relationships. Let's listen in starting with my interviews with doctors. David and austin parameter. I want to read a passage from the book. Our are being gravely manipulated resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed distressful illness prone and overweight than ever before. So we talked about those two aspects which is how do we help and support people to actually make these decisions and implement change in their life to achieve to achieve whatever goal that they wanna focus on. But let's start off with what is actually hijacking. Our brand that. It makes it difficult to do. So can you describe the landscape landscape and the state of threats that our brains are under today. Sure we'll start with one of the most important and probably most straightforward of the its food. We need food. We need to eat food to keep going. But what is it that we're putting into our bodies. A recent study showed that sixty eight percent of the foods that people eat and buy in. The store have added sugar. We know sugar isn't really a good thing for us but the question has to be. What is it doing to our thinking. What is it doing to our brains and is the question that i think were now able to answer but we haven't been looking into nearly enough. What is sugar doing to our brains. Will sugar fosters inflammation which listeners know is not good for the body. Chronic inflammation has been implicated in variety of problems. Things like heart disease. Things like alzheimer's disease. What we're understanding now is that inflammation this process that sugar up regulates changes are thinking. So let's let that sink in. It's not that it changes are thinking in the long run. It changes are thinking right now. Inflammation has been shown in several recent trials to bias our decision making towards short-term impulsive thinking so to put that into context if you're eating a diet that increases inflammation you're going to make more short term or decisions like eating diet that increases inflammation choosing the wrong foods to be eating and that transcends just diet it gets into other things if you're somebody who struggles with all nine shopping. Now you have a diet. that increases inflammation. You're going to be picking the short term reward and that means your your shopping. Cart might be filling up online with things that you don't need so again. Food is one of those entry points. It's something that has been made incredibly palatable over the years and while that means it might taste good. We need to appreciate that. It is activating these circuits within our bodies within our brains that are making our decisions more impulsive more short term oriented and in the big picture taking us away from the decisions that will lead us to health and will lead us to happiness and let me add Before we move on from food and because it is It is a very important topic because we recognize that in a simplistic model there to areas of the brain. That are involved in decision. Making the prefrontal cortex which is the more advanced area. If i may and the more primitive if i may amid della and you know there's a balance between the two we tend to With inflammation unfortunately have more input from the primitive and magdala and as such are decisions are not really looking at the future as opposed if we can reconnect to the prefrontal cortex and that is the area of the brain that allows us to participate in a process of thinking of the long term consequences of our actions today s to be more empathetic. It allows us to be more compassionate has to tamp down this sense of us versus them. That comes from the amid bella. So we're trying to reconnect to the prefrontal. Cortex and in a as per our discussion of food and inflammation inflammation absolutely threatens that connection and i have to say that A thought came to me this morning while in the shower some of my best thoughts come to me and shower and having read the new york times this morning they had an interesting article about what's going on in brazil with reference to deforestation the amazon. Not a good thing. I think most people would agree with that but that said what has happened to the thought process around the globe. is influenced by the globalization of the western pro inflammatory diet. That as this western diet a finds its way to every corner of the globe. It's changing how people across our planet think and behave

Austin Pearl Mutter Shawn Stevenson Austin Parameter Alzheimer's Disease David Minneapolis Chronic Inflammation Heart Disease Inflammation Inflammation Della New York Times Brazil Amazon
2 Atlanta police officers fired over use of force during protest, back on job

Clark Howard

00:40 sec | 10 months ago

2 Atlanta police officers fired over use of force during protest, back on job

"Their jobs after being captured on video using a stun gun and the forcible arrest of two college students last May should be given back pay for the time that they were out, lawyer Lance Lynn Rousseau says. Atlanta's civil service Sport finds police investigators Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter were wrongly fired without an investigation over alleged excessive force while arresting tonight a pilgrim in Masaya Young. They are feeling vindicated. They are anxious to get back to work, and Lou Russo contends when they are investigated, they will be cleared. It's unclear whether this decision affects the officers. Criminal charges. Fulton County's new D A just turned those cases over to the state Veronica Waters. 95.5 WSB Tony Bennett has Alzheimer's disease. The

Lance Lynn Rousseau Ivory Streeter Mark Gardner Lou Russo Masaya Atlanta Fulton County Veronica Waters Tony Bennett Alzheimer's Disease
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"In this mini episode, , I speak with Dr David Perimeter Dr, , Lisa, , Mosconi Dr Dale, Br , Edison about why Alzheimer's is a preventable disease and the lifestyle factors that can set the stage for Alzheimer's years from. Now, . , we also talk about this disticts of Alzheimer's disease and its impact on women, , and what you can do today today to prevent cognitive decline in the future. . Let's listen in starting with interview with Dr. . David Pearl Mutter, , a board certified neurologist and four-time New York. . Times bestselling author, , we do know that a for the most part Alzheimer's is a preventable disease. . This is a disease costing Americans two hundred and thirty billion dollars affecting five point four million of us. . That is dramatically exploding in terms of its incidence and prevalence globally, , and yet you know the notion that our lifestyle choices are not relevant is it does take my breath away. . You know it's all about living a life that is less inflammatory and that certainly transcends are narrative as it relates to Alzheimer's but. . Involves Parkinson's and involves coronary artery disease diabetes and cancer, , and all of the chronic degenerative conditions, , and you know what really is so very important and I think sort of stands in our way of getting this information to really have traction is the time table that this is effective over for example, , you tell somebody wear your seatbelt that'll be good for you. . They get in a car accident they're wearing their seat belt and they say, , Hey, , I get it that worked yesterday I was in that accident worked. . But the inflammation issues that are relevant in terms of causing the brain to degenerate or narrowing the coronary arteries. . These are issues that are beginning to take shape ten, , twenty, , thirty years prior to actual disease manifestation, , and therefore it makes it very challenging for the consumer to connect those dots. . Let me give you an example. . <hes>. . In the journal Neurology, , which is arguably one of our most well respected neurology journals on the planet period viewed. . There was an interesting study that was published and it measured in a group of several thousand individuals who were in their forties and fifties. . At the time it measured markers in their blood of inflammation and the study then came back and looked at the same group of individuals twenty four years later, , the study again was just. . And what it found was really quite remarkable. . There was very direct relationship between risk for developing Alzheimer's disease and having had higher measurement of blood inflammatory markers twenty four years ago. . So what does it say? ? It says that if you? ? Elevated Markers of inflammation in your blood today, , you are setting the stage for Alzheimer's years from now and so that your lifestyle choices today whether you choose to eat low carb high carb high fat low-fat whether you choose said integrity vs physical activity the amount of sleep that you get. . Hopefully that is restorative the amount of stress in your life, , etc. . these are all extremely important variables. . Which you have control that clearly are connected to your brains Dini. . This is not live your life come what may and we have a pill for you. . If you're suddenly cognitively impaired is the other story. . The story is that you make lifestyle choices today that will dramatically impact how your brain works to three decades from now

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Dr. David Pearl Mutter Neurology Br Edison Dale Parkinson New York Times
"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

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"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on Caregiving Challenges and Solutions

"Onto the caregiving challenges and solutions. podcast your source for expert advice on caring for our elders. I'm your host Maria we see Today's Marie getting a new series on Alzheimer's disease and slightly that you know someone living with Alzheimer's or someone who is caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease you're are abused insists from the Alzheimer's Association in two thousand Thirteen fifteen point five million valley members of friends provided seventeen point seven billion hours of unsafe care those with Alzheimer's and other dimensions care valued at over two hundred and twenty billion dollars nearly sixteen percent of Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers rate emotional stress of caregiving as I berry is more than one third reports symptoms of depression because Alzheimer's affects so many people and it's not just the person living with the disease but also their family members and caregivers I wanted to devote a few episodes to this important topic I guess today is him you worked in the Field Jerry College as a lecturer at professional for thirty years she holds a masters degree in Gerontology and a bachelors and says geology cal state fullerton. She is a program in education specialist with Alzheimer's Orange County or she is responsible for developing and present nineteen programs in education or families and professionals throughout the community additionally she.

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on WGN Radio

"With Alzheimer's disease. And now with WGN neighborhood news. Here's Kim Gordon. Wizards in the country will be on Chicago's near west side, Saturday, the Sturm pro circuit championship will take place at the bottom lounge forty players will compete for over fifteen thousand dollars in cash and prizes. The doors open to the public at five. There will be an acoustic performance by Ed Robertson with the bare naked ladies at nine. I'm kim. Gordon would neighborhood news brought to you by wintrust Chicago's community, banks WGN sports. Here's Mark karmic. Blackhawks did what they had to do last night. Which was get a win. They took out the Buffalo Sabres five four did take a shootout out. The Blackhawks do get two points still nine points back of the playoffs with both the Dallas Stars and Minnesota wild winning. The Dallas Stars are up next. Take it day by day here. We learned from the game tonight tomorrow. Dallas get ourselves ready and. Then bring it better after that is Patrick Kane who had to assist last night passing. Steve Larmer moving into fourth all time when the Blackhawks all-time pointless Cain with nine hundred and twenty four point six thirty our pre game tomorrow, seven o'clock the puck drop college basketball. It's a big day. Forleo all of the Missouri valley conference tournament getting going Valparaiso is the opponent twelve five the tip their Bradley and action Illinois state southern Illinois in action as well baseball yesterday. The White Sox scored nine runs and it'd beat the brewers nine to five to Anderson was two for three oh on Mocatta one for three sitting three eighty one on spring cubs. Lost to the rocky seven five in hall of fame pitcher, Tom Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia. He will retire from public. Life. Seaver is seventy four years old. I'm are Carmen WGN sports. Rocking. You take it for granted. And so you can't do it anymore. I'm Jillian, and I was only twenty two in my life changed forever..

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"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer disease" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"You if they don't know what they clinical picture was they won't be able to say that this was what they referred to as a probable Alzheimer's disease. So when they see this act of the same pathology, and there's no heavy, and so did that did ration- they just they acknowledged that brain as possible Alzheimer's disease. So these created a circular definition to be cleared to close the loop on that analogy with heart disease. You would have to know that there are cases where patients have significant dementia that by all other metrics is consistent with Alzheimer's dementia. Not Lewy body or something else. And there is an absence of amyloid beta deposition, and what percentage approximately I know it's hard to know these things because we don't always get top-seed's. But in in your experience, what percentage of patients who die with? Or from Alzheimer's disease that his late onset? Do not have the distal pathologic features of Emily beta, they might iota the of patients that are the acknowledged as Alzheimer's disease. Pro Bowl timers sees when they die have the same level is not that they don't have because he's saying age related their position the same levels of all the patients are compatible age, and the only reason that they are label of Alzheimer's is because they had the dementia. The pathology cannot really tell them about of you gave these two pathologies blind to the medical diagnosis clinical examination. They won't be able to tell apar- which are the ones are actually demented them, which are not if you do it in a match there is a large the job better realty in pathologies are not quantitative. But the only is. An approximation you look at only a few sections through the court fix, and they gave us Orden proportion of the findings are found that you see as categories, but even when I have done this personally in two thousand one we baligian the journal narrow signs on his study where we use brains from people die from Alzheimer's, the main difference from my stall from what's been done before is that we were able to thing brains. We only have few hours after they individuals had thought I would gold very small plus Morton interval, and I was able to do these by collaborating with the institute in Arizona is a CD goals sunseed, the Aries ONA, and they have a sunset the health center, which actually ascribes to these amyloid than their dangle ideas. But what? With the would them was we were we traveled why bitches student we collected brains, controlled brains and brain so people have that diabled Simon's some of them we were able to collect them fresh right there, and were you and your team also blinded to the circumstances of the death prior to the autopsies being performed. No, what we did is weak elected all the brains, and they were is section then into pieces and these were frozen, and then one sample would remain there. I see I see everything in parallel. Yeah. Would be she appeared Walston and once the samples were cheap they were coded. But when we were there. No, we knew when somebody die because I had up all would be what certify they were dead. So that we could immediately. But when the pair wise results were evaluated the. Valuate tour was blind to the clinical circumstances of the patient's death. Yes. While we did in that study was we were not only interesting just looking at amyloid Blake's and narrow favourite tangles been Deng. We were interested in seeing is there any biochemical change that could account for these so-called Hypo metabolism this decrease in energy metabolism that is seeing early in. At sei, is it generally, well, regarded bring it back to some of your earlier work in pet. I assume it is generally agreed upon the patients who are in the stages of cognitive decline. Have Hypo functioning metabolism? So their pet scans show less glucose uptake in the brain that Jenrette acknowledged and not only if the pet.

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