36 Burst results for "Alzheimer"

Fresh "Alzheimer" from Deminski and Doyle

Deminski and Doyle

01:10 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh "Alzheimer" from Deminski and Doyle

"Our stories to learn more. A message from the Alzheimer's Association and the Ad Council Rio eight. Now New Jersey one A 1.5 instant weather way are diving into the final weekend of February with umbrellas at the ready. It is a generally wet forecast for the weekend, but I think you'll still find pockets of dry weather to enjoy some fresh air along the way this evening. Looks good will see increasing clouds tonight and then showers arrived late this evening as low temperatures dipped into the mid thirties. Now in northwestern New Jersey, there will probably be some snow is this storm system get started tomorrow morning. Up to an inch of accumulation is possible there. The rest of the state just rain. From morning to mid day tomorrow, and then we'll dry out in the afternoon. It would be mild, with highs ranging from the mid forties to the north to the mid fifties to the south. More raindrops likely on Sunday throughout the daytime hours as high settle in the upper forties and then one final round of rain showers Monday morning. We'll see highs around 50 on Monday, but then turning windy and colder. Into Monday night from the Edison heating and cooling Weather desk. I'm chief meteorologist and zero Jersey City 44. Degrees Hackettstown, 40 to Perth Amboy, 53, New Jersey One of 1.5 is your covert 19 vaccination information station. Go to n j 115 dot com slash coronavirus to find out how you can make an appointment and for a list of vaccination sites in your area on Lee it n j 115 dot com slash coronavirus. Jersey, one on 1.5 our own radio station in New York, not Philadelphia. Proud to be New Jersey. Janey, one of one point New Jersey time. Time is 3 10 with dim Inskeep and Doyle on Bill Doyle and I'm Jeff Tyminski, 1 802 831 on 1.5. It's a Friday prizes will be going out the door on the six o'clock hour tonight we will be doing her end of the week game. Um, you do your insurance card on your phone? I do know. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Now, how does that work like you've got it? You've got a.

Jeff Tyminski Bill Doyle New York Alzheimer's Association Monday Morning Philadelphia Sunday Tomorrow Morning Doyle Mid Fifties New Jersey Jersey Monday Night Monday Mid Forties Mid Thirties February Jersey City Tonight Northwestern New Jersey
Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:45 min | Last week

Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

"Heireann droop wrote here host of the green podcasts. When it comes down to what we're made of so much of it is about food. Food literally builds us brick by brick cell-by-cell that means what we eat provides. The building blocks that make up the entire body which means unfortunately for a lot of people. They're made up of junk. Our poor food choices gravely impact our brain health resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed illness prone and more overweight than ever before my guest on today's minneapolis owed doctors. David and austin pearl mutter and shawn stevenson talked to us about how our health our relationships and even our thinking have been damaged by our western processed food diet. They discuss how our lifestyles and diet. Impact our brain function and our ability to make good choices as well as how we interact and show up for our relationships. Let's listen in starting with my interviews with doctors. David and austin parameter. I want to read a passage from the book. Our are being gravely manipulated resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed distressful illness prone and overweight than ever before. So we talked about those two aspects which is how do we help and support people to actually make these decisions and implement change in their life to achieve to achieve whatever goal that they wanna focus on. But let's start off with what is actually hijacking. Our brand that. It makes it difficult to do. So can you describe the landscape landscape and the state of threats that our brains are under today. Sure we'll start with one of the most important and probably most straightforward of the its food. We need food. We need to eat food to keep going. But what is it that we're putting into our bodies. A recent study showed that sixty eight percent of the foods that people eat and buy in. The store have added sugar. We know sugar isn't really a good thing for us but the question has to be. What is it doing to our thinking. What is it doing to our brains and is the question that i think were now able to answer but we haven't been looking into nearly enough. What is sugar doing to our brains. Will sugar fosters inflammation which listeners know is not good for the body. Chronic inflammation has been implicated in variety of problems. Things like heart disease. Things like alzheimer's disease. What we're understanding now is that inflammation this process that sugar up regulates changes are thinking. So let's let that sink in. It's not that it changes are thinking in the long run. It changes are thinking right now. Inflammation has been shown in several recent trials to bias our decision making towards short-term impulsive thinking so to put that into context if you're eating a diet that increases inflammation you're going to make more short term or decisions like eating diet that increases inflammation choosing the wrong foods to be eating and that transcends just diet it gets into other things if you're somebody who struggles with all nine shopping. Now you have a diet. that increases inflammation. You're going to be picking the short term reward and that means your your shopping. Cart might be filling up online with things that you don't need so again. Food is one of those entry points. It's something that has been made incredibly palatable over the years and while that means it might taste good. We need to appreciate that. It is activating these circuits within our bodies within our brains that are making our decisions more impulsive more short term oriented and in the big picture taking us away from the decisions that will lead us to health and will lead us to happiness and let me add Before we move on from food and because it is It is a very important topic because we recognize that in a simplistic model there to areas of the brain. That are involved in decision. Making the prefrontal cortex which is the more advanced area. If i may and the more primitive if i may amid della and you know there's a balance between the two we tend to With inflammation unfortunately have more input from the primitive and magdala and as such are decisions are not really looking at the future as opposed if we can reconnect to the prefrontal cortex and that is the area of the brain that allows us to participate in a process of thinking of the long term consequences of our actions today s to be more empathetic. It allows us to be more compassionate has to tamp down this sense of us versus them. That comes from the amid bella. So we're trying to reconnect to the prefrontal. Cortex and in a as per our discussion of food and inflammation inflammation absolutely threatens that connection and i have to say that A thought came to me this morning while in the shower some of my best thoughts come to me and shower and having read the new york times this morning they had an interesting article about what's going on in brazil with reference to deforestation the amazon. Not a good thing. I think most people would agree with that but that said what has happened to the thought process around the globe. is influenced by the globalization of the western pro inflammatory diet. That as this western diet a finds its way to every corner of the globe. It's changing how people across our planet think and behave

Austin Pearl Mutter Shawn Stevenson Austin Parameter Alzheimer's Disease David Minneapolis Chronic Inflammation Heart Disease Inflammation Inflammation Della New York Times Brazil Amazon
The Alzheimers Chronicles

The Chalene Show

06:02 min | 2 weeks ago

The Alzheimers Chronicles

"So this was an interesting week. The first part of it was really hard because bob was super sleep-deprived and it meant seeing him in a way that we were like okay so he's taken a turn and he's gotten much worse he's a further stage along the maybe what we thought we were like when a couple of days where we were like okay. So he's getting worse. These are bad days and then miraculously the very next day. He got like so much better. And that's just the disease and a couple of other things. It's a management of lifestyle and so much of watching this and keeping a journal tracking what he's eating tracking. What supplements were giving him tracking his sleep his activity what we're doing with him each day. Those things really do matter so much and it gives me great joy knowing that i mean our bodies and our brains like not just about bob but like our bodies and our brains are so finely tuned that if we do the right things if we treat them the right way if we pay attention. We can have optimal performance. This isn't just about him. It's like to me it's like. Wow i have to be more in tune in less lackadaisical. About like yeah. I guess that was good enough sleep. Yeah i guess pretty well. I think i took most of my supplements like it's making me realize what a humongous difference. It makes the fine details so let me share with you. What i mean by that so we had a couple of days where it was just so sad. I'm just going to be honest and tell you like. I was very weepy for a couple of days. Because i was looking at him. Not weepy for myself. Not we'd be burgess feeling so sorry for bob just like my heart was breaking because he is at a stage where he's aware that something's not right and fill those couple of days where he was really bad he. He was emotional. He was hallucinating however when he was hallucinating. He was aware that he was hallucinating. And he was apologetic and he's up so sorry a messing everything up aren't because my brain my brain So dumb you know. Like he doesn't know what it is but he knows his brain isn't working. This is probably a really horrible analogy. But have you ever like had a little too much to drink and like hits you very suddenly and you like dang it and like there's this moment just before you're like really tips. You're really drunk where you're like. Oh dang it oh shoot. it's come oh no. I had one too many drinks right. And you're trying to pull yourself back and you just know it's inevitable and it's this weird feeling where you're like. Oh man i messed up. I messed up dang it now just gotta suffer through right. I just feel like he's sometimes at that stage so we had a couple of days or a really bad really emotional. He was super confused. I mean just cognition was really gone zero short term memory and when i say short term like he just was repeating the same question literally thirty seconds later and couldn't remember anyone's names and just really anxious and the worst part of all was he looked so scared as is really wide and they just get the scared child like look that is so foreign to see in a man who was so powerful and a patriarch. So i hated that. And i made me really weepy. I just felt for him so much but that also inspired me to go. You know balls to the wall with my research and fine tuning in just like okay. What else can we do. What is why is it so bad these last couple of days and obviously sleep. We knew that had a lot to do with it and stress. But how do we improve this. Like what can we do. And you just have to keep trying and trying and trying and trying so knock on wood. The last three days have been in sane in a good way okay last night. No joke don't even understand this. He got nine hours asleep and he's different person. He's joking. he knows names. He is active. He's being cocky himself obviously. He's still struggles to find certain words and sometimes things do and don't make sense. It's not like he's got his memory back but you see more of him and he's not anxious and he's not nervous and he's not scared and that's awesome so nine hours sleep that's huge. So what do we do. We are experimenting with the timing of his medication. I'm sorry i can't remember. The name awarded taking right. Now i wanna say shoot wellbutrin maybe yeah a starter dose of wellbutrin and. We've decided that we were giving it to him. Maybe too late so he being too earlier in the day and thank you so much for everybody. Who's reaching out with suggestions. I really do appreciate. It can also sometimes be like really overwhelming can event for a second. Okay good if i get one more message from someone who's like my father in law had complete reversal of alzheimer's by we rubbed essential oils on his temples. Like okay. I'm just going to let that go no you didn't you know and if you did then you might want to tell the whole medical community that you have found the cure to alzheimer's because they get to a certain stage where there is no one who has completely reverse it. After they reached the stage not one person now. There are certainly been people who've had a reversal meeting like a lessening of symptoms. A slowing of the progression. And there's some great books on that but it just drives me crazy when people say stuff like that. Because i'm like you know what i pray to. You're not peddling your stuff to someone and giving them false hopes because it's just not possible like everything helps but like there's anyways i digress. Changing the timing of his medication helped a ton. and then with bob. It's the narrative you know. So don't ask me if this is like what really made the difference but we told him that our dog rocco who's obsessed with him is older and he's not doing well because he's not getting

BOB Burgess Alzheimer Rocco
Iconic NFL coach Marty Schottenheimer dies at 77

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Iconic NFL coach Marty Schottenheimer dies at 77

"Former Chargers coach. Passed away. Marty Schottenheimer 1 200 Games is a coach in the NFL is final Head coaching Stop was with the Chargers, where his team's had a 47 and 33 record from 2000 to 2006, and he was named NFL coach of the year in 2004. His teams 12 a F C West titles, Schottenheimer succumbed to Alzheimer's, his wife telling ESPN by part's easy My part's just loving him and taking care of him. His heart is the hard part because he can't do everything the way he has to do it. Schottenheimer was 77 years of age. His son, Brian, is an assistant coach of Jacksonville After serving as the offensive coordinator at Seattle the last

Chargers Marty Schottenheimer NFL Alzheimer's Schottenheimer Espn Brian Jacksonville Seattle
interview With Anna Gunn

The Candid Frame

04:14 min | 2 weeks ago

interview With Anna Gunn

"Over the years. It's been my pleasure to showcase talented photographers of alzheimer's and at different stages of their careers each his provided some wonderful insight into what it means to be a photographer along with sharing the stories of their work and careers. Some photographers have worked. Hard to create and nurture a community photographers. Like aline. smithson of the lines craft blog one of those areas of the miami screw photography festival. And george nabet you of the evening with a masters series have created spaces for photographers to grow. Learn and thrive and a gun has also done. This is the founder of the puerto photography festival that happens annually in portugal though the pandemic led to the cancellation of the event last year and still managed to create a rare opportunity for photographers to get together and collaborate with mansion is an international collection of thirteen female photographers. We found creative ways of interpreting their experiences through covid nineteen the resulting work. The way it showcased online is a wonderful example of innovation and moving beyond limitations. This is ivorian ex and welcome back to the candidate for him So glad you reached out to me in started in and told me about the project. I love glimpses of positivity during these these dark times. Tell us about this. Because i i seen a lot of projects that have revolved around this period of time. But i thought this was really unique. Any take on on it tino. I've i don't even know where to start with this project because it's it's such an aviation In searching for away because obviously the last time we spoke with about festival so in having to move everything around. I think everybody has this. There's no getting around that you've had to move some way shape or form and trying to move around and find a place where that might live in some way shape or form. I've had tested a lot of software. In order to save. We could make that live online and it really couldn't i was searching and it just couldn't but in my searches. I saw a lot of people who were creative in this time. And that project state put them on online galleries and i could see the creativity. That are coming out with with amazing. But i kind of wanted to see what a group off if i say it. It is a demographic of photographers could come up with and the women that i chose. I chose it. Take you to deal with female photographers. Because i remember reading an article. I think back in february last year. That said that the coronavirus was killing. Feminism. and that was strong hemline with that. That seems a bit strong to me. Come on guardian newspaper that has that real anna erect the stats ended. It was horrifying to read. Because they stated that women in work were earning less than men and so in a household that was locked down with the men would take precedence over the female of the house. The female would have through golf to their kids and survey korea would put on hold and it listed these horrible things and in february of two say look dated someone yet that seems rather and blame on. I'll put that away. And as he progressed a kind of sold that was really true. And in the year. I was contacted by photography's many of which was struggling to find a new way in

Alzheimer's George Nabet Smithson Aline Portugal Tino Miami Anna Korea Golf
Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

Paul Murnane

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

"Alzheimer's. He's a thon the all time list with 200 wins that is 200 regular season wins. He coached four teams and took three of them to the playoffs. Getting 23 a F C championship games. But never a Super Bowl is first NFL job was actually with the Giants is linebackers coach in the mid seventies. He also served as the Giants defensive coordinator for one season. Marty Schottenheimer was 77. Other NFL news NFL dot coms reporting The chief's quarterback Patrick Mahomes, will have surgery

Alzheimer's Giants NFL Super Bowl Marty Schottenheimer Patrick Mahomes
Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Marty Schottenheimer, NFL coach with 200 wins, dies at 77

"Marty Schottenheimer one two hundred regular season games with four NFL teams his family said through a spokesman that he died last night at a hospice in North Carolina Schottenheimer was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in twenty fourteen he was the eighth winningest coach in NFL history in twenty one seasons with Cleveland Kansas city Washington and San Diego but he was just five and thirteen in the postseason his success was rooted in Marty ball a conservative approach that featured a strong running game and tough defense I'm showing up later

Marty Schottenheimer Alzheimer's NFL Schottenheimer North Carolina Kansas City Cleveland San Diego Washington Marty
BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:24 min | 2 weeks ago

BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

"Suit. Today may not looking with thirty eight or centers every time that we are the change so having their kind of a big picture that they can in the federal candidate may influence levin affecting human body looking on the older to get first of all. Give me the tools to ask wished and then the question is are starting to emerging. Of course it's everything is that they did just chemistry and that still in then so having these abilities in these tools first of all change our been away. Many many many scientists physicians collaborations companies approach means. Just that the doing each experiment but they know nothing about the molecules using. Can i purify in with him. I don't know the those music In these open the door for me last year to enter to many different angles of different illnesses and diseases using candidates. You know the best thing. Neuro physician in the world approaching means today the doing this experiment. They need you with me. You're not saying you know this is this is all and we've you know so more and more and more may lab change the way you i researched talking to grow in. There was things so out there. Light with a patient. You know epilepsy or a sleep disorders or in two zero zero there on the on the patient instead just i want to do the understand now the reason. Why can't this effect in which compound how to improve so the roof from allow of six seven students to a level forty five plow which have different groups. I have a group of chemists doing analysis everything every group to doing cancer biology and we can talk about the perfume one every doing a research around neuro. Degenerative diseases like alzheimer's epilepsy. The order In every group. That's working how kennedy's affect the immune system few types of small small think about in small. But it's not be groups. It's individual the doing other things in the last five years in other big project that we did. We crane to big data database in israel on the patient. So in the last five years every cannabis in being bigness. Again there is you know there is a probes to be a small country despite for your board does day and but there is benefit that everybody knows everybody. And everybody's working together. So until last year we had just eight authorize globals just eight greenhouse is easier to work with them to follow up to every candidates. Be every a cannabis They ever product. The patient can get go through my lap. I analyzed all defeated candidates in a in there on the other side. We follow up on on the patient. How it's affecting so does it died improve. Sleep mainly kind of sign of and which i don't call it side effect. If you have a problem of saying oh slipping improving scooping. It's not your scientific. But we we measure that in which we started to to bring that to bed. Get into completed to try to match. Which type of cannabis in which profile of candidates affecting which illnesses in what

Levin Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Epilepsy Epilepsy Kennedy Cancer Israel
Has the Reddit brigade found a new target?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Has the Reddit brigade found a new target?

"Wines. Have the read it. Traders found a new target guidance. This is certainly an interesting space to target. It is very complicated. it is very technical. And in many instances not very liquid. And it's very binary and there are a number of these names that have huge short interests as to add so it's oil it's all of those are sort of the all the things that i think people on this platform the read it platform would be looking for then. You mentioned cassava so quickly you talked about the volume traded. I think over the last three days today obviously included trade about one hundred and eighty million or show shares. I mean it's just amount of volume over three day period given its historical norm. And you've seen the stock go from about eight dollars a share. I think it traded at one seventeen today and reverse and reverse in a meaningful way. But this isn't just the red it crowd. I mean they actually had data come out a couple of days ago in terms of the alzheimer study. There was pretty positive. I think that field this as well. The concern i would have here and i'm not endorsing. I'm i'm not making procon statement of any of these names. We're going to talk about. But they did a secondary back in november from that mistake in november thirteenth. About eight million or nine million shares secondary around eight dollars a share. Be aware that for a lot of these companies given the stock price move. This is an opportunity for these companies to do secondaries. I would imagine you'll see one here in another name that you didn't mention but is a big enough market cap that talk about not necessarily a biotech company but falls under those parameters as named like vera site which is at another ridiculous move. You can pull that one up as well. i think. it's v. C. y. t. If i'm not mistaken and there's talk that maybe a secondary might becoming there so just be aware that a lot of these stocks have had tremendous runs but you know secondaries are looming out there. Potentially you can obviously see what could happen to the stocks in the midst of one very binary a lot of these names. Just be aware of what. You're getting yourself into again quickly. The way to play this all along the slow and steady ways been the. Yeah brian kelly. What do you make of this

Procon Alzheimer Vera Brian Kelly
Winter storm moves north, dumping snow along its way

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Winter storm moves north, dumping snow along its way

"I'm Julie Walker parts of the northeast are digging out from up to a foot or more of snow while other parts of the region like northern New England are bracing for even more out of shoveling and plowing could be heard up and down the east coast the National Weather Service says more than thirteen inches of snow dropped in Manhattan's Central Park as much as sixteen inches was reported in northern New Jersey the storm shut down public transportation canceled flights enclosed corona virus vaccination sites it caused power outages car accidents and some deaths in Pennsylvania thirty say a woman with Alzheimer's wandered from home and died of hypothermia and in argument over snow removal killed a married couple the suspect was found dead of a wound believed to have been self inflicted I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker National Weather Service New England East Coast Central Park Manhattan New Jersey Pennsylvania Alzheimer Hypothermia
2 Atlanta police officers fired over use of force during protest, back on job

Clark Howard

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

2 Atlanta police officers fired over use of force during protest, back on job

"Their jobs after being captured on video using a stun gun and the forcible arrest of two college students last May should be given back pay for the time that they were out, lawyer Lance Lynn Rousseau says. Atlanta's civil service Sport finds police investigators Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter were wrongly fired without an investigation over alleged excessive force while arresting tonight a pilgrim in Masaya Young. They are feeling vindicated. They are anxious to get back to work, and Lou Russo contends when they are investigated, they will be cleared. It's unclear whether this decision affects the officers. Criminal charges. Fulton County's new D A just turned those cases over to the state Veronica Waters. 95.5 WSB Tony Bennett has Alzheimer's disease. The

Lance Lynn Rousseau Ivory Streeter Mark Gardner Lou Russo Masaya Atlanta Fulton County Veronica Waters Tony Bennett Alzheimer's Disease
Tony Bennett reveals he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's

Joe Pags

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tony Bennett reveals he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's

"Singer Tony Bennett is battling Alzheimer's disease. Lisa G. Reports left. My 94 year old singer revealed his diagnosis and an article in AARP magazine. Bennett, who won his first of 20 Grammy awards for I left My Heart in San Francisco. Was diagnosed with the memory robbing disease in 2016. His last public performance was on March 11th in 2020 at the Count Basie Center for the Arts in Red Bank, New Jersey The

Alzheimer's Disease Lisa G. Tony Bennett Aarp Grammy Awards Bennett San Francisco Count Basie Center For The Art New Jersey
Tony Bennett Reveals Battle With Alzheimer’s Disease

Colleen and Bradley

00:21 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tony Bennett Reveals Battle With Alzheimer’s Disease

"Bennett has Alzheimer's disease. But it's family confirmed the news, saying he was diagnosed in 2016, but started to show real signs about two years later, when he was recording an album with Lady Gaga. Now the doctor who diagnosed Bennett, speaking to AARP magazine, says that he really is the symbol of hope for someone with a cognitive disorder. And Tony Bennett is 94 years old.

Alzheimer's Disease Bennett Lady Gaga Aarp Tony Bennett
Family of Tony Bennett opens up about his Alzheimer's diagnosis

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Family of Tony Bennett opens up about his Alzheimer's diagnosis

"Time Grammy winner singer Tony Bennett has revealed that he has Alzheimer's disease. In an AARP magazine interview, We learned that the 94 year old crooner was diagnosed in 2016, but his family kept silent about the dementia diagnosis since then. His wife, Susan. Benedetto tells CBS this morning, though, that music plays a major role in his life. He's not in any pain, and that's why he doesn't think anything's wrong with him. He's like Susan. Nothing hurts. I feel great. You know, he works out five times a week, he sings twice a week. With the pianist that comes over. And Susan Benedetto says that even in the face of the disease that is mostly silenced and still Jim at the sound of the piano, Tony Bennett rises up to sing with his perfect pitch and apparent ease.

Alzheimer's Disease Grammy Winner Tony Bennett Aarp Susan Benedetto Dementia CBS Susan Benedetto JIM
Music helping Tony Bennett battle Alzheimer’s disease

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Music helping Tony Bennett battle Alzheimer’s disease

"Singer Tony Bennett has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease I marches are a letter with the latest no I tags Tony Bennett's wife Susan says her husband has fewer and fewer moments of clarity and awareness she tells AARP the magazine that her husband was first diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in twenty sixteen she says he is not the old Tony anymore but when he sings he is the old Tony Bennett who is ninety four still rehearses his ninety minute set twice a week and sings with perfect pitch

Alzheimer's Disease Tony Bennett Aarp Susan
Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

The Bio Report

03:19 min | Last month

Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

"Thanks for joining us as a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about regulatory t cell therapy and cinema bio therapeutics efforts to develop these for autoimmune and degenerative diseases perhaps we can start their. What are regulatory t cell. Therapy's and how do they work sure So this is a feel that has Really over the last two decades exploded in our understanding of the importance of these cells in controlling everything from allergy to organ transplant rejection to autoimmune diseases. In basically what to rags. Dr is a very small population of white blood cells largely circulating in the blood but also present in tissues and these cells have the capability and capacity to actually shutdown unwanted immune responses perhaps most Typically in patients that have a defect in these cells called apex patients They'll usually die within a year or two of massive autoimmune and allergic responses unless they get a bone marrow transplant from a mother or father that That gives back there to population so these cells are really essential to controlling tolerance in the immune system preventing immune cells from attacking and destroying self tissue. You see these. Potentially addressing large populations of people with autoimmune degenerative diseases potentially how big a market re talking about an. How effective are we today in treating these conditions. Yes certainly this is a very big bucket ranging everything from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis type one diabetes and over eighty other autoimmune diseases Up through including degenerative diseases like ls potentially alzheimer's or even parkinson's disease and the reason is is that so many of these diseases are mediated by uncontrolled inflammation. People don't fully appreciate the fact that the immune system is playing an active role in a of of diseases outside of the more classic immune diseases so when you think about market potential it's almost impossible to To ferret out what the actual size will be in reality. of course These cells are gonna be used. I in diseases that are highly morbid and potentially a strong medical need either as disease class or as individuals and we hope to start out in diseases that are clearly a fall within that that rubric but ultimately one can imagine cell. Therapy's being a new pillar of medicine where you can think about them. In a variety of immunological settings where you wanna give a treatment once or a couple of times and then have a long-term living drug that will suppress unwanted inflammatory responses.

Autoimmune Degenerative Diseas Autoimmune Diseases Sclerosis Type Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Allergy Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes
Elon Musk announces $100M prize for carbon-capture technology contest

Sarah and Vinnie

02:57 min | Last month

Elon Musk announces $100M prize for carbon-capture technology contest

"Want $100 million? Yes. Yeah, okay. I said it first. Well, look, if you guys can compete for this, this is the thing that's not fair or their age classes. You can't put me up against the 35 year old Chester, and it's a brain thing. Oh, I still don't know. Nicole just looked up. No, no calls in our brain. I know. Honestly, God, I wish that I was a carbon scientist because Elon musk Has tease his latest philanthropic endeavor, a contest aimed at encouraging more innovative carbon capture technologies. That will reduce carbon emissions. And he said, I am donating $100 million toward a prize for best carbon capture technology. I guess the details are forthcoming. He said next week that he'll have details for us. But young scientists, old scientists, all scientists. 100 million bucks in it for you if you are the one who comes up with the best, most innovative carbon capture technology. People work on this all the time, So I'm sure there's companies that are like we will vie for that. It's Ah, I love it. I do, too. I wish that our government had been doing this for the last 20. Five years. You know, the kind of real institutional government sponsored? Listen, we've got to fix this stuff We're doing right now. Let's every year we should have a new winner. Right in this farce and conservation I How do we get rid of the plastic pollution? 100 Million program dollars for the best idea that that gets people moving? I like it cure Cancer $100 million for the best idea. I mean, there's so many things, you know, find a cure for Alzheimer's find a cure for this. That Developed this make, you know, make it that brain implants that can control the world things like cancer research and medicine research like that that tends to be Funded and people have been working on that non stop. I think this pollution stuff I don't think that's always In my ocean, clean water prizes. Clean air prizes. Well, I think it's great. Uh, s o test love and space. Ex CEO Elon Musk is saying $100 million prize. That is it. Apparently, he's donating this toward a prize. I'm not sure what that means, If he's in boots with somebody else or whatever it is, but it looks like there's gonna be some kind of competition. I don't know what the range of time is that you'll have to develop this thing. But if you're already Someone who's concerned about that and learning in that area or possibly developing something or just have a great maybe the kid with a great idea. Who knows? I love it. I do, too. I think it's great. It's the best thing he learns ever done.

Elon Musk Cure Cancer Alzheimer's Nicole Cancer
It's Been A Year Since 1st Coronavirus Case Was Reported In U.S.

KYW 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | Last month

It's Been A Year Since 1st Coronavirus Case Was Reported In U.S.

"Like Denard. Okay, Whatever the news radio we mentioned earlier this half hour. The U. S death toll from the coronavirus now, surpassing the 400,000 mark, providing a grim coda to the Trump administration. The milestone comes almost exactly a year after health officials diagnosis the nation's first case of the virus. The latest milestone comes a year after the first covert case was reported in the U. S. And with recent daily death tolls, sometimes topping 4000. The overall number will continue to rise. CBS is Dr David Eggers says. Vaccines are the only way to slow it down. The way we're going to really hit. This virus is by blocking it spread through the vaccine. The 400,000 death toll nearly equals the combined Number of Americans who die each year from strokes, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes,

Trump Administration Denard Dr David Eggers CBS Alzheimer's Disease Diabetes
Why the Death Toll From Covid-19 is Even Worse Than It Looks

WSJ What's News

03:21 min | Last month

Why the Death Toll From Covid-19 is Even Worse Than It Looks

"This week brought more sobering news on the coronavirus pandemic the us reported more than two hundred thousand new coronavirus cases for the ninth day in a row on wednesday on tuesday the us recorded more than forty three hundred deaths. A new high and wall street journal data analysis finds the global death toll. Currently nearing two million is four. Worse than the official numbers. Indicate here now to explain is wall street journal reporter john camp. Hi john thanks for joining me but you so john worldwide. The death toll due to the coronavirus is nearing two million. But a wall street journal analysis found that it's actually far higher than that more than two point eight million. What's not being captured in the official tallies we have right now. So the official. Tally is and we use account from johns hopkins university which tries to capture in real time. The data that each country puts out. Saying here's how many people died from corona virus but that data is just the known deaths that were linked to the disease. What it misses is really two big things and number one is people who died from covid nineteen but it wasn't written down on the death certificate or wasn't recorded that way in other words missed cova nineteen us and then the other one is essentially collateral damage people who died for other reasons that you can associate with the pandemic and that also doesn't get captured in account of covid nineteen deaths the. Us has been a helpful place because of a pretty good data from the cdc to explore this. And what we've seen is that there have been increases in deaths in things like alzheimer's and dementia and some cardiovascular issues and things like diabetes and health experts we've spoken with have said that this likely represents collateral damage from the pandemic. And you know for people with alzheimer's and dementia that could be some of the effects of lockdowns and disruptions in nursing homes that proved damaging for really fragile people in those settings For you know. In the springtime in particular they were instances where people were afraid to go to hospitals when they were having chest pains and so that could mean people having more heart attacks that proved fatal at home and these are what are known as excess deaths this all goes into the bigger bucket called excess deaths and this is something that scientists commonly used to try and really kind of measure the impact of a major event whether it's heat wave or a hurricane or a war because sometimes official counts associated with those events can miss the bigger picture so what scientists do and. This is what we did to in a fairly simple way. Is you look for the average number of deaths in in every country or in the place that you're interested in where there is a major event and then you find out how much deaths have increased over a period of time above that average. And that tells you that. There's you know unusual bulge and then you try and figure out what what makes up that bulge and what we found is that in most countries that we looked at cova nineteen will generally make up most of that but but certainly not all of it and that tells us that there's something else going on beyond just the disease

Alzheimer's New High And Wall Street Journ John Camp Wall Street Journal John United States Dementia Johns Hopkins University CDC Diabetes Heart Attacks Hurricane
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"My My my apologies if this is just a part of a manic episode, which I myself have had. But I I don't know fuse. If you was always this way or what's happened to him but anyway All right. Well, that's. That's all the questions from fans that look like. There was. There was kind of people were just wondering what is the most current like cutting edge thing that your the most excited about So there's some. Work that's looking at activation of brain regions using these transmit nick You know basic big big magnets right and they're they're helping activate brain regions that weren't functioning as well, and it's I can't say with confidence is GonNa work for Alzheimer's but a has does seem to work. So my my grandmother who just recently passed away had Parkinson's for or two, thousand, four SOC almost fifteen years before she passed. And that was something that was not a thing when she started with her with her Parkinson's onset I'm by the time she passed away the field came along a lot to the point that it's being tried in many clinics across the world the data. The data is still unclear. As to its efficacy but I think that's if you'd ask him what I'm most excited about I don't really buy into most of the. In terms of therapies that's been one therapy Alzheimer's that has worked and that came in Nineteen ninety-six is called Mandy. It doesn't even its efficacy is towards these specific kinds of neurons dinner in our breath since then pretty much every clinical trial has failed Lilly Pfizer Merck everyone has tried many different techniques and nothing seems to be working. We've got as far as face three and failed at phase three. So I. I'm more and more inclined to looking at methodologies. That that weren't taken seriously. Five ten years ago. Well it's interesting that you use that as an example because those. Trans Cranial stimulation that that is often very closely like within the same ballpark and associated and brought into the same conversation as psychedelics which seemed to kind of do some of the same like reports of the same experiences and seem to be doing a lot of the same things in the brain anyhow just. That's that's pretty speculative. I won't put that on you, but I will say regarding the studies that have failed so far. If you're are these studies on people that have Alzheimer's already because it seems like if if you're already if your guys already gave up and it's and it's too late that seems like you're studying different thing than something that could be early onset or preventive. Great question and people who? So, pulling the curtain back a little bit. They're they're people in the field who believed that we're just looking at the wrong thing that we don't be the they say that the trash is not the problem that we're looking at the symptom we need to be looking at is happening way before that. So how much are these guys making the house? How much plastic are they going through the inside their house?.

Alzheimer Parkinson manic episode nick
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:20 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"Well I should clarify not rats rats bigger. So it will be all of my s how dare you Shane Show there was. A real full out of. This is you should probably shut out the. PODCAST silver, you're going to get counseled on twitter at the rat. And then literally are rat to people so. Personal at the reason? I. Thought that is because I have. Where did TB I research? I had my own set of one whole shelf of mice. I quickly calculated how many mice on one rack in the room was about as big as my bedroom. We had just a little bit over a thousand mice in that room. So that's what I what I did, but that is that is hilarious. By the way it would be maybe a hundred in this is you know So the reason that another reason that they use along with the cost and the fact that you can work with. So many of them is that we have been able to insert human genes into the mouse genome. And see the effects that expression of human gene will have on a mouse behavior and mouse pathology super example in the in the Alzheimer's Field if you if you want to ask the question. Does gene x lead to Alzheimer's Disease Right whatever gene access it could. It could gene of choice. It with humans, you can't do that. Right. You May. If you're lucky you may run into a person that has a knockout of that gene and see whether they whether or not there Alzheimer's disease but that's an OBE one in mice. You can breed a hope you can insert that gene, knock it out based on some molecular techniques, and then look at the behavior and the pathology that maps. Sounds like a great concept chain, but as you might imagine. Not, great. Because the the mouse brain is very different that they both structure the way it looks if you look a human being, it does these beautiful grooves in to increase surface area a mouse bring perfectly smooth. There are no no groups that because soul guy. I liked that because the groups are kind of how we packs so much brain into our heads, right? So mice are just like and we don't even know. Thanks. This is this is all space I. don't even really I'm not even using half the space for my brain. You know there's just a nice smooth brain will be fun. There was a recent movie in the mouse world that talked about how they only use five percent of their brains. Yes. So. So you know with the my strength is so different I'll give you a proof of concept of that. Okay. Yeah. When I did traumatic brain injury research my brief my research looked at the impact of basically hitting the mouse brain with essentially the equivalent of a piston. So imagine if I if I could take off your skull and take a big old. I don't harbor big old hammer and smash the side of your brain with it. Okay. It would almost definitely in fact, let me go out on a limb here and say it would kill you for sure right? Yeah..

Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer twitter TB
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Come talk to me when you're fifty five. That is true. Then there's a dating. There's a hormonal component Alzheimer's. So it's like I feel only women not in that helped to live long enough to see some of these answers. I do take after my dad more than my mom. So hopefully fingers crossed. They don't have the Alzheimer's that my mom and my maternal grandmother. My maternal great grandmother all seem to have had and and honestly. You're doing the things that you would need to do. Have Interesting conversations with Aside from me thoughtful people and you know you probably read you exercise. You probably have like friends and stuff. You seem like pretty cool cool lady. She got lots of friends. And you know like you. You're a small business owner so all these things that are going to keep your mind active. You're meeting people all the time. These are the things that like without a history of brain trauma like they say you will more or less be fined for Alzheimer's but then there's also this total randomness of it whereas just like like your mom could have done all the exact same things And then she has Alzheimer's for some reason like she doing crossword puzzles every day of her life. I don't know sometimes it's just random. Do Crossword puzzles a lot but shells drink two liters diet coke every day. Yeah so it must be but I. I think I didn't exercise. 'cause she didn't have to worry she can eat her. My sister could eat crap all the time and not really gained weight. That's annoying I look at I and skinny arms now. I have to watch everything and I have. I have to work out all the time just to well that helps my brain and my emotions but to stay at a decent wait. I have to do all this. I have all this work. Which is okay. Because it's good for my brain but they like you know. The white bread wonder bread that I'm not even sure exists anymore. I don't know I make my own bread special shop for it so real glutton's like us while I liked what I was a kid. But it's not man like honestly way better like multi grain pride start just tastes better like I've made my own sourdot. Yeah me too yes good. It's it's awesome and minor segment of that on the podcast to read.

Alzheimer business owner
"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"With swallowing drinking and eating or going to be a problem too so swallowing becomes an issue issue. The brain is not sending those signals to tell the body. What to do there is a lot that has to happen for food to be eaten? You know the brains gotTa say first of all all. I'm hungry. The brain quit sending that signal but if the signal does happen then the brains gotta say pick up the fork. Put it in the mashed potatoes. SCOOP THEM UP. Put put the mashed potatoes in the mail. Chew swallow get it down the right pipe but not the wrong pipes and we don't choke to death swallowing and drinking become a problem in in eating not sleeping well or sleeping all the time. We just see that I can tell you my mom's slip slip slip a lot. Thank you if I had to choose now. I know if I had to choose And we don't get to choose. It's not up to us to decide but sleeping many hours a day. I think is easier for those in late stage Alzheimer's than not sleeping well not sleeping leads to another host problems that we don't win. We don't need increased problems with communication occasion. You'll hear things like I abba. ABBA ABBA ABBA ABBA awhile. I want you to get get get get in your like you won't want and can I get what they can't get their thoughts together. They these folks are more likely to experience infections and ammonia Nia on those chances for those things increase drastically infections especially urinary tract infections any type of invasions if they have a fall in. These is tearing the skin more likely to have infections because that pneumonia is a huge problem with votes. In the late stage of Alzheimer's in fact many of our folks will pass away because of pneumonia. In sometimes. That's put on their district. You'll get they die because of ammonia but really what they died was Alzheimer's that caused the body to be more success susceptible to them having pneumonia so it was really Alzheimer's that killed him and pneumonia was just an of a side. Perfect of that. They are definitely more likely to wonder if they are that kind of person who walks. We see some folks with a late stage. Alzheimer's as I've mentioned you just lay around all the time in sleep in some people that just walk and walk in walk in walk in walk in walk and you think sit down in those folks are definitely more likely to to try to open the door not necessarily because they want to wander. But it's a door in a DOORKNOB and I do remember how to do that so they opened the door and they will sometimes. It's very innocent thing but obviously that can lead to problems increased agitation and depression. That is very hard to deal with. The agitation is very difficult difficult because they are. They're not happy and they're not happy with you and they're not happy lives and they're not happy with what you're offering in their anger and they're liable to push you aside and say dirty words and that's hard to deal with and depression is hard to deal with. You're going to see some depression. I would say everybody dealing with late stage Alzheimer's because they are declining in to some degree are folks always know that and then no interest in activities obviously that is true no interest in activities because they know that they can't function the way they showed in it's causing them to just WanNa pull within themselves. It's a sad. It's a sad time of life but it can still be a good time of life we can still bring to our folks love in happiness and joy in music and funny stories and and I tell you one of the best things you can do is play that video and tell on Youtube of the daddy ripping a piece of paper in front of the baby and the baby be laughing. Every time daddy rips a piece of paper it just cracks me up in it will crack up your eyes with dementia. I know I've done it a bunch. Well that just clears up. Maybe a little bit about the different indifferences in the various stages of Alzheimer's. I'm here to answer your questions. You can email me and my email is carol at. Let's Talk Dementia Dot Org. Now I'm sitting here looking at myself in this screen and for those of you who watch it on Youtube use hat are on the podcast. You'll have to hear my description of got these white spots. Thought I just had this cream put on my face. As opposed to get rid of wrinkles in it did really well but I should have touched up my makeup before came on this show. I kinda look like a got got we're going on. Why didn't buy the cream? It was outrageously expensive but yes. I'll just be a wrinkle girl. I hope you you guys have a good day blessings miles.

Alzheimer Ta pneumonia Youtube depression
"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Treat mild cognitive dementia and Alzheimer's disease. So thank you so much Dale having me here at your place. Thanks very much Rhonda. So maybe we can start a little bit by just talking about some of the. Characteristics and pathological distinguishing features of Alzheimer's disease, and maybe what you were thoughts are what can cause Alzheimer's disease leads to it. Right. So. It's a good point because cognitive decline, very common and Alzheimer's is the most common cause of cognitive decline ultimately dementia. And by definition, this means that you have amyloid plaques in the brain and FOSS four elated tau tangles. So those those are the two main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's. But as you can see, that doesn't tell you why you've got it. It just is something you look at the rain, and of course you can get something that looks virtually identical without the Loyd and you can get amyloid without the cognitive decline. So it's a marker, but it's an imperfect one. Yeah, that's a really good point. You brought up and do you have any thoughts on why? There are some people that do have amyloid plaques in their brain that aren't really demented and some others that just don't seem to handle it? Yeah, it's a great point. So here's the thing that the. The whole world is turning upside down. Now when it comes to our understanding of Alzheimer's, it's been over one hundred years. Of course going back to Ellis Alzheimer's publications back in one thousand nine hundred sixty one thousand nine hundred seven, and there hasn't been a good understanding of this disease. And of course amyloid has been for years vilified and there's no question it. It is a neuro toxin. It does have toxic effects. The surprise has been that this is also a protectant. It's actually something that is made by your brain when you have specific insults. And for example, professor Rudy Tanzi and professor Robert Moyer at Harvard too few years ago show that it is an anti microbial. It also is professor Ashley Bush showed a number of years ago. It's actually quite a good binder of dive Valent metals like copper, zinc and things like that iron. And we showed a number of years ago. It is also. Response to a reduction in traffic support. So you actually get a change in signaling. So there are multiple different insults and metabolic changes that lead the brain to produce this stuff. And so I think there's been confusion because it's clear that when you produce it, you're at this increased risk for having a degenerative process. But as you indicated, there are many people that produce it and they successfully are protecting themselves. They don't actually have. The downsizing was often been stated, is those who then have inflammation on top of that seemed to be the ones that do worse. And that's a very general idea. But really it is a, it is a set of things, and we identified in published a number of years ago, thirty six different factors all contribute this, but they actually break down into just a couple of categories. So any sort of pathogens anything that's giving you inflammation, whether you have it because you have a leaky gut or because you have PG. Vallis in your brain or because you have beryllium of Lyme disease or you've been exposed to specific fungi, things like that. All of these things can engender that response. And in fact, we think more and more of amyloid as being like, napalm, you got the bad guys coming across the border. So you're now going to put down stuff that kills the bad guys the napalm. But in so doing, you're now going to reduce your air soil, you're now living in a smaller country, and that's exactly what's going on in the brain. You are downsizing the overall network. So that's what we call type one or inflammatory or hot Alzheimer's, and I should mention I, it turns out IRA Veda physicians from thousands of years ago, recognized dementia that was related to something that was hot, that was abnormally ultimately inflammatory as well as that that was related to dry us, which is what we call type two. Where you have decreased trophy support. It can be nerve growth factor. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, Estra dial.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ellis Alzheimer professor Dale Rudy Tanzi Ashley Bush Robert Moyer Harvard one hundred years
"alzheimer" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on WEEI

"We know it's so important for folks living with alzheimer's and dementia the more in home care where able to get the way we are able to ship those costs from nursing homes as well so obviously very supportive of having that funding in place on the state level yes and i'm kind of a larger note dan we touched upon this a little bit you mentioned alzheimer's it's the six leading cause of death in the united states has surprised to read i think on your organization's website it kills more people than breast cancer and pancreatic cancer combined so my question would be why is the all time alzheimer's awareness why does it not seem to match the toll it takes on people in this country you know it takes time it takes a movement it really takes a village behind these initiatives alex you'll see you know the change that we've seen around cancer for example or hiv aids the positive thing to mention around alzheimer's and dementia and specifically linked to policy we have seen four to storage years of alzheimer's research funding increases from congress and that just wasn't happenstance that was thousands of advocates going to washington dc and actually advocating for policy change to professional judgment budget it's called and not to get too key here but the reason i bring this up is there's only three diseases who have what's called a professor professional judgment budget which is the scientists the researchers at nih telling congress this is what we need for research funding to get things done so that was cancer hiv aids and then alzheimer's disease as a twenty fourteen right right so that certainly certainly good thing to see it going in that direction because you know i think i think there's some there's some there's some myths about alzheimer's you know one thing i think a lot of people believe dan is only affects old people but i can tell you firsthand it's not the case my grandfather was in his late fifties when he got the disease so yeah so is so what are some of the reasons you think maybe some people are kept in the dark doing dave alzheimer's dementia it's not really a lot of people don't want to be out you know be out in public with it so i i think there are a number of factors as well you know alex you're absolutely right if a lot of the work we do as well is raising that public awareness of this is not a normal part of aging this is actually a right degenerative brain disease so that's so important to keep having that conversation and let folks know that and that's the work we've been doing now is really reframing the narrative and a conversation of this is essentially a public health crisis this is not just an aging issue the big part of that is working on stigma obviously as you mentioned and that stigma issue goes across the board we've done a lot of work in massachusetts over the past year thinks the state budget funding actually on underserved populations across the commonwealth specifically african americans and latinos rep the two times more likely to develop alzheimer's disease why is that you know there's a number of reasons alex you can look at a lot.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Out all the environmental factors potentially connected with alzheimer's like i saw this one report in the journal of neuroscience about how even something like sleeping on your side can help delay the development of both alzheimer's and parkinson's and apparently it goes back to the fluid flush routine our brains used to clear out waste like it turns out the fluid flows most effectively when we're sleep and on our sides all right so it sounds like we've got the solution here we just need to do some sudoku puzzles all day long liner side and then drink ourselves into a wine komo's that that's the solution here yeah and pick up cantonese i think part of right right okay that's right but i mean you know there's no surefire way to hold back alzheimer's either you know that's the thing about all these environmental risks we're talking about like they can only suggest probable connections between things that have already happened like i've even seen studies that link drinking soda both regular and diet to the onset of alzheimer's and wild there might be a correlation between getting alzheimer's and drinking and soda that doesn't mean that one necessarily caused the other to happen well that's a good point i mean these kinds of lifestyle considerations can be kind of reassuring for us to think about but the research i do find most exciting this stuff aimed at finding new detection methods for alzheimer's it's two thousand eighteen and it feels like we need a better system than having to dissect these brains postmortem agree and that's why i was excited when i first found out that we actually do have tests that can identify those gene mutations i mentioned earlier the ones that make a person more likely to develop alzheimer's but as it turns out many people who develop alzheimer's don't actually carry that genetic marker while many who do never end up exhibiting alzheimer's symptoms well so this is kind of like the plaques and tangles then right like they're reliable markers that maybe point the way to alzheimer's except for all of these cases where for some reason they don't exactly and even genetic testing can't provide any real degree of certainty one way or another and that's what makes it also confusing like even if you don't have the genetic markers you could still develop the disease or thankfully some researchers have begun branching out from genetic and environmental factors and they're concentrating on these socalled biomarkers instead now the idea here is that the body exhibits tell tell biological signs of alzheimer's that we don't necessarily have to look at the brain to find so instead we can look for these clues in all kinds of places that might be in the blood or in this rebrov spinal fluid we mentioned earlier or even in the eyes of all places and honestly that last one is probably my favorite because all it involves is administering these fancy eyedrops and let's just so much less obtrusive than digging around and somebody's brain yeah i mean obviously sounds way better to me but walk me through what makes these address so fancy well even though we have things like pets cans to help us take a closer look at living brains it can still be incredibly tough to identify those beta amyloid bill ups that often point to alzheimer's and that's largely because the betas are just one of many kinds of amyloid and there are all kinds of hard to tell apart plus there are many different neurological disorders that are linked to specific amyloid 's so if you can't tell which protein you're looking at then you really can't determine which disorder it's pointing to i see so how did the eye drops without all right well this is where things get really cool so you you know how the eyes are closely connected to the brain right well the connection is so closed that amyloid actually accumulate in our is to not just the brains so the researchers are hoping that by adding these fluorescent markers to eyedrops they'll be able to light up the amyloid in the is in different colors and of course each color would correspond to different amyloid and by extension from that to the disorder it's associated with so in theory you could have a doctor diagnosing patients condition just by looking them in the eyes and then incredible it really is and it actually.

alzheimer parkinson journal of neuroscience
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcome to part time genius pearson and his always i'm joined by my good friend main guest shot ticket her and on the other side of the soundproof glass hunched over his brand new copy of mandarin for a while since i've seen a dummies book but that's our friend and producer trysted mcneil and of course he's on theme as usual you know i i was reading just this week about how learning new language can help stave off alzheimer's in some cases and this was from a study out of york university in toronto where they actually examined over a hundred longtime bilingual alzheimer's patients along with over a hundred monolingual patients and it turned out that on average the bilingual patients have been diagnosed with alzheimer's about four years later than the monolingual patients so the idea is that because learning a second language gives the brain such a strong workout it can actually help keep the full effects of the disease at bay longer which is really interesting but you know i it's honestly sometimes tough to say for certain because they're all kinds of genetic and environmental factors that can increase or decrease a person's chances of contracting alzheimer's and we'll be talking about a few of those later on but ultimately no one is immune to the disease in the greatest risk factor associated with it of course is is just age itself in fact studies have clearly shown that the number of people with alzheimer's disease increases with age so much so that roughly one in five people now suffer from it by the age of eighty five and i know all of this is upsetting to think about and people have alzheimer's disease in their family are already dealing with it on a daily basis and those of us who've been lucky enough not to have to face it in some big way would probably rather focus on just about anything else but the truth is this is something everybody needs to stay informed about particularly if you plan to live past the age of sixty now the good news is that scientists are already hard at work on new research and new treatments and that's what will be focused on today you know all those promising approaches alzheimer's disease that could hopefully lied earlier detection and improve symptom management and.

pearson alzheimer york university toronto producer trysted mcneil alzheimer's disease four years
"alzheimer" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"On this just because i wasn't raised that way and so that's an area of my life that i still need a lot of work on because i think like many people you know once you're a sugar addict it's it's a tough thing to break even though you intellectually know it so changing behaviour i think is something we all have struggles with maybe some people just maybe you're just like got it cool i love the way i feel so i don't i'm not tempted at all i'm not that girl but i think you know i tried to check the boxes of strong spiritual life i try to stay in community but i think it's a big issue also or how do people age and stay in community how do people age and stay involved how do people age and feel need it feel useful find meaning these things we know the opposite of that loneliness isolation we know that that's not good for the brain or the body and that that increases your chances of getting alzheimer's or increases the likelihood so i think i'm really interested in the larger conversation of how we treat people as they age do we discard them how to families care for parents as they age whose job is that had we take it from duty to joy how do we build our cities to incorporate that how do how does corporate america respond to people as caregivers so that's a huge other conversation but i think it's a really interesting one and needed one if someone came to you tomorrow said based on your incredible life experience what are your three most important pieces of advice for someone who just wants to perform better as a human being just at everything they do in their life what would you tell them matters mouse well i think your health mattis mouth i just had that conversation with my kids at the table i asked them that what is the most important thing for you and i was threat.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mci mild cognitive impairment yet the report from radiology states clearly alzheimer's um and i i it was really upsetting but i i asked to be diagnosed i was having memory problems that could not be explained uh in any other ways they did all the normal through while and we had the test and i kind of knew what the results would be yet when i got them i was still shocked and upset um and i realize now i mean this was back in july i realize now this i i'm of a lot of people wandering around out there who probably would qualify for the diagnosis if they had the brain scan they just don't know it because they're managing fine they have everything that they need to do and it's going smoothly for them so is it so for you to have the diagnosis and do you think's it having that diagnosis would you want to complete in advance directive now know on what you know akin comment that i i need can make uh because of the time you know sis ii went to seek a friend i didn't have any friends so we started to look into who could be a friend and w the person that i did find who was very uh compassionate told me about the document they use where he works called the five wishes it's a twelvepage document published out of florida by ageing with dignity and it's a beautiful guide for um for people that need to make advance planning uh it breaks it down into different categories and coaches you what to do what not to do it's recognized as a legal document in almost all of the states in the states in which it's not recognize you can still use it but you have to supplement it with a couple of other things that are.

florida alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Worse this patient were still completely able to understand the medical decisions that they're facing and could make them themselves what what would they be choosing and it's really really hard and so we go back and look at the living wills advance directives that many of those people have filled out and the reality is that the way that just about all standard advance directives are written um they don't really apply to what if i were to develop dementia than they are very focused on pretty specific and it's important but very rare conditions like a persistent vegetative state or a process comma but don't really speak to what if uh that person had dementia all right and of course dementia and alzheimer's um you know effect can affect a lot more of us during a 2012 ted talk global development expert alana shake told the audience that her father has alzheimer's and that she is changing her life with the expectation that she too will eventually develop the disease if the martyr wants to you the monsters gonna get you especially for me because alzheimer's tensor on and families so i'm preparing to get alzheimer's disease based on what i've learned from taking care of my father and researching what it's like to live with dementia i'm focusing on three things and my preparation i'm changing what i do for fun i'm working to build my physical strength and this is the hardwon i'm trying to become a better person so these all sound like really good and worthy things that one should be doing but of course she doesn't mention the thing about preparing for what happens once she gets it.

persistent vegetative state dementia alzheimer alana shake alzheimer's disease
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

Fear Based Life

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

"Yes you i mean like yeah love your deal i know yeah but like every saying it's so strange that everything intangible seems like an absolute fairytale to me lately yeah we'll get also in the me maybe that's just where you are now maybe like i love for there to be a heaven you know especially as my parents get older and look i i'd love for there to be something like that i don't know if i actually believe in it yeah i feel that same way i've gone back in the north yeah have you ever seen anyone die yes my grandmother oh you saw heard i am so sorry yeah no it is it was time it was time what happened being thin asking um she she'd been living with my parents and i was a college but i was a college that was very close and uh and basically got the phone call from my mom and she's like mom i'm starting to go can you come home and they would just you know it was time she'd been she had alzheimer's she wasn't she wasn't even really herself anymore and hadn't been for quite a long time and so it was basically just you know she was she wasn't even in her in there anymore the watching watching her body gives out we've kind of peaceful 'cause she wasn't the same anymore because yeah because she wasn't she wasn't my grandmother anymore you know when you she hadn't really really bad dementia towards the end and you know she you know she'd been this sweet kind of kind of simple woman you know and you know and she she cds incredibly horrible things when she was in the throes of dementia like enough to the point they you i don't know if you've ever seen anybody in with dementia.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Early on said alzheimer's disease and these of patients who can develop in their fifties 40s and even 30's and for them many of them have inherited a genetic mutation which gives them a 5050 chance of developing the disorder and so some patients will have a genetic mutation that if they carry that particular genetic mutation they will certainly go on to develop alzheimer's and there is a test for those individuals and in the book i interviewed many of the patients with earlyonset alzheimer's disease and some of the patients decided to have the test and found out they were positive and it sort of change a life in in in many different ways and other patients decided they didn't once night but for the vast majority of alzheimer's cases what we call the lateonset alzheimer's cases the stories a little bit different it's more that there are as opposed to genetic mutations there what we call genetic risk factors and these adjust variance in dna just in the same way that you have very syrian sin dna the account for differences in eye color height hair all these things that differentiates us from one another there are lots of the risk factors route seimas and we've identified about twenty so far and we know that they just slightly tip the scale in favor of out seimas but there is one in particular risk factor coot apob four and we know that that is a particularly strong respect to fraut seimas we know for instance that after the epa we fool gene is present in about thirty percent of the population but it's also president about fifty percent of all out seimas cases so you could if you want to to you know they're all these companies these days who allow you to have your genome sequence too you can be tested sudden jeans.

alzheimer epa president alzheimer's disease thirty percent fifty percent
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"A in a number of alzheimer's patients we why isn't as people would die of other classa widow again exactly because they don't have all the causes bit before getting out seimas so you know wants eu policy age of sixty five every five years your odds of alzheimer's in double but oversee it depends what your you'll baseline old saw butts in a because it's primarily a disease of old age if we can just push it back all manish the simpsons to the point where they don't have the profound memory loss they don't have the confusion and the fear and and all the things that come along with alzheimer's disease you can push that back and just let them and and then they will die naturally of some of the process so it's not s you know it it's a it's similar studies in the sense that she no it's it's finding a way to manage its treats it in such a trip to try and keep the symptoms of it at bay well i wanna thank you so much for talking with us god thank you for having me joseph do belly is the author of the new book in pursuit of memory the fight against alzheimer's after a break marine corrigan will have an appreciation of mystery writer sue grafton who died last week and will hear the interview i recorded with graft in a 1989 when she was up to the letter f f is for fugitive and her alphabet mystery series this is fresh air count which would you pay to avoid warning traffic swire plane tickets to voice he so expensive what can the tuna cannery in the middle of the pacific tells about taxes on part of rcs cohost the indicator a new podcast fight of money we're in every episode we take on a new unexpected idea to help you make sense of the day's news get it on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts.

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"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The evidence for these memory games and he's brain training games is it is very conflicting there is some evidence for its uh but the trial the trials and not port the problem is the trials in a big enough sophisticated enough and they have been replicated enough for us to say definitively if you engage in this memory game you will significantly increase your memory and loss of researchers think that actually you know your your trading son pulse of the brain and you'll you'll because you're getting through to the game itself as opposed to increasing the capacity and the ability of your memory in a in a global sense and so it's it's an ongoing air research it's just it's something that we there is evidence for and again i would sunny still encourage people to add to do these things because c training your brain and remaining monthly engage an active in as many ways you can is good for the brain but we still don't know for sure whether or not these having a significant effect everybody who reaches a certain age and start losing some of the memory things like omega i am i getting alzheimer's and let everybody always says is if you lose your keys you're just being forgetful if you forget what your keys are four then you're starting to have dementia as that a helpful way of looking at at uh i think that's a very helpful way of looking at it because it helps to distinguish between just normal everyday for guessing on something that is potentially a bit more sinister so as you said you noted losing aquis if it gets and we put a gloss is completely normal it's it but it when you find your gloss no keys and you think what are these four that's the sign that there's something else going on that it's not just the match.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You know there they're all tests it for you to understand your risk um but as notts for the vast majority of cases as not attest to to to know definitively if your destined for alzheimer's there labs several memory tests on the market can i tell you that you're having a memory declined because of aasheim asked mm it's very difficult to to to to to clean up meaningful information from memory tests because memory works by many ways to a a muscle and often people have every day for guessing simply because they're a bit tired they might be a bit depressed they have an navy given enough attention to thing they're trying to remember in the first place so they're all these different factors that can affect your memory and when you go through the process of getting an a diagnosis for alzheimer's so i did this in the book uh for one of my chopped hisashi went through the process of having the cognitive tests and having the memory tests and speaking to the memory specialists and going through every step along the way of of someone who goes on to learn if they have out was on on and all the memory tests do is just it it they add to a collection of evidence that then allows clinicians to say that the diagnosis of probable outside missed disease is what they call it we can only tell definitively a postmortem when pathologists than look in the brain and they see the buildup of these stick keep proteins that we complex and tangles and they they they they they look at that and that's in in collaboration with the deficits in memory and the behavioral changes and all of this sort of clinical signs that you see in a patient during life that is will put together to then to tell them eulogists okay this person had out seimas disease so the memory tests ernie a small piece of the puzzle and you know it's very interesting because recent research is actually suggested that although memory is one of the first things to go and out signs disease.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yes i think um the family is that first community is add two gives you feedback about the changes and gives you the place where you can try out this new way of being and as and so the the family it is a place where people can talk about it too can uh again that word on normalize life again it it it's also the place where a lot of learning has to happen um i one of the things and i think jerry mentioned is like just around the dining room table uh when the conversation goes so quickly am and we don't even realize especially at uh when their holiday gatherings the conversation goes so fast in it to remember that the for the person uh with alzheimer's out there trying to process what's being said and and often by the time they get their thoughts together um the conversation has already gone onto the next topic and and so it's so important to beat for the family to be become sensitive to this and in that case so to slow down in in to whom i may concern we have uh a refrained adjust give me a minute and and and that's what that touches on somewhere about the theater project that you just brought up to whom i may concern what are you dear what does it mean for people who share their stories on every it's it's an opportunity you know people are invited to to share people who are aware of what's happening to share uh what life is like and then um i scripted into a letter forms so that they are then able to read it before an audience of a care partners and and and professionals and what um this this developed uh from my dissertation years ago when i like kept listening to these stories and thinking you know i can't use told these myself people need to hear this and that's what to whom i may concern it it puts on stage uh people uh with alzheimer's or other forms of dementia and gives them a chance to initiate the conversation tell the stories and then in the talkback allows the audience to ask the questions that maybe they were hesitant to ask uh so so.

alzheimer jerry