35 Burst results for "Alzheimer"

Sanders to Biden: Cut back looming Medicare premium hike

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 d ago

Sanders to Biden: Cut back looming Medicare premium hike

"One one US US senators senators urging urging the the president president to to cut cut back back coverage coverage of of a a pricey pricey drug drug to to prevent prevent a a spike spike in in Medicare Medicare premiums premiums from from taking taking place place next next month month Vermont Vermont senator senator Bernie Bernie Sanders Sanders says says a a nearly nearly twenty twenty two two dollar dollar a a month month increase increase in in premiums premiums couldn't couldn't come come at at a a worse worse time time for for seniors seniors already already struggling struggling with with higher higher prices prices on on everything everything he he says says Biogen's Biogen's charging charging fifty fifty six six thousand thousand dollars dollars for for the the Alzheimer's Alzheimer's drug drug add add to to home home is is the the poster poster child child for for how how dysfunctional dysfunctional the the nation's nation's drug drug pricing pricing system system has has become become N. N. Sanders Sanders says says it's it's beyond beyond absurd absurd that that one one pharmaceutical pharmaceutical company company can can raise raise the the price price of of one one drug drug so so much much it it will will negatively negatively impact impact fifty fifty seven seven million million seniors seniors and and the the future future of of Medicare Medicare if if the the administration administration agreed agreed to to hold hold off off on on approving approving add add to to home home coverage coverage the the January January increase increase for for Medicare's Medicare's part part B. B. premium premium would would only only be be about about ten ten dollars dollars I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

Medicare Medicare Senator Senator Bernie Bernie Biogen Vermont Alzheimer's Alzheimer's Drug N. N. Sanders Sanders United States Administration Administration Medicare Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
Medicare's "Part B" premium will jump by $21.60 a month next year

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Medicare's "Part B" premium will jump by $21.60 a month next year

"The government is announcing monthly premiums for Medicare's part B. will increase by more than twenty dollars next year Medicare officials say the cost of the part B. premium will increase to about one hundred seventy dollars a month that's up twenty one dollars and sixty cents one of the largest hikes ever and they say it's partly because of the new Alzheimer's drug add to home which will cost about fifty six thousand dollars a year seniors just found out there getting a cost of living adjustment from Medicare increasing checks by about ninety two dollars a month for most retirees but this Medicare part B. increase will take a good chunk of that away Jackie Quinn

Medicare Alzheimer's Drug Government Jackie Quinn
In quiet debut, Alzheimer's drug finds questions, skepticism

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

In quiet debut, Alzheimer's drug finds questions, skepticism

"Persisting concerns about the first new Alzheimer's treatment in more than twenty years are curbing access to it four months after regulators approved Biogen's Abdu hell which is recommended for early stage Alzheimer's several major medical centers remain undecided on whether to use it big names like the Cleveland Clinic and mass general say they'll pass for now some doctors say they need to learn more about how and to help which is said to slow Alzheimer's works and how much of the fifty thousand plus annual cost is covered by insurance Biogen is not saying how many people have received the drug last month the company executives said they were aware of about fifty sites in fusing it I'm Julie Walker

Alzheimer's Treatment Biogen Alzheimer Cleveland Clinic Julie Walker
Ep 142: How Kindness and Community Empower Todays Nonprofit Leaders (with guest John Hoffman) - test

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:59 min | 2 months ago

Ep 142: How Kindness and Community Empower Todays Nonprofit Leaders (with guest John Hoffman) - test

"Came to twenty twenty one kind of annoyed annoyed that nonprofit leaders and their remarkable heroics in twenty twenty didn't get the spotlight or the recognition. They deserved we all fussed. In twenty twenty about the dearth of leadership in our society. I think folks just looking in the wrong place overlooking leaders around this country who educate advocate feed the hungry provides shelter bring beauty through the arts lead congregations to help us keep the faith all of these people right here in front of our eyes. I see it every day and it makes me kind of angry that others don't or worse still. We talked about staff board. Volunteers of these nonprofits the backbone of our society we talk about these people as nice. Nice really rubs me the wrong way. It feels really pass to me now. Kindness is a word. I can brace but i don't know that i had ever spent that much time thinking about the distinction between the two until i watched a documentary on amazon prime the film. The antidote offered me an aha moment. And i just love a good moment is i learned that the reason i embrace the word kindness is that implies action it requires commitment and in this documentary. We see through stories. Beautifully told by my friend and six time emmy winner. John hoffman the kindness. M- may be thought of as something gentle but it has real strength. John says that kindness is a weapon for change. One of the heroes. He's spotlights in the film. Says quote kindness is a practice. Kindness is a stance end quote. And so today. I want you to meet my friend and john. He and i both know this to be true. Kindness may not be the ultimate antidote. And it's not actually something special you can drop into any community at any time and find it blossoming and you'll find those leaders who are practicing it every day. John's journey developing idea and bringing it to life is as instructive and as inspiring is the film. What's up. I feel lucky. Indeed to be able to introduce you to my friend. John and grateful that he's game to share his story with you. Greetings welcome to nonprofits her messy. I'm your host joan. Gary founder the nonprofit leadership lab where we help smaller nonprofits thrive. I'm also a strategic advisor for executive directors and boards of larger nonprofits. I'm a frequent keynote. Speaker blogger an author on all things leadership and management learn. More at joan gary dot com. I'm a one with a mission to fuel. The leadership of the nonprofit sector my goal with each episode is to dig deep into an issue. I know the nonprofit leaders are grappling with finding just the right person to offer you advice and insights. Today is no exception. John hoffman is a six time emmy award winning filmmaker whose most recent films include rancher farmer fisherman which premiered at the sundance film festival in january twenty seventeen and out of many one which premiered at the new york film festival followed by net flex in two thousand eighteen much. John's work as a filmmaker has focused on the key. Health issues of our time including the weight of the nation addiction and the alzheimer's project all on. Hbo and i in human on discovery. A six hour series set in the world's largest research hospital. The nih is building ten. In addition to making films. John has also been a network executive. He was the adp of docs specials for discovery. From twenty fifteen to two thousand eighteen and After nearly two decades as vp of documentary programming at hbo not in john's by is that he was instrumental. In persuading me that i needed to leave corporate america and become a nonprofit executive director. He may take some degree of pride in that. But it is far exceeded by the gratitude. I feel for what became a complete personal and professional transformation for me so john welcome and i am just not sure i can ever repay you for the art of press. Suasion was on display during a lovely brunch at our home so many years ago. Hi john john really wonderful to be with you. I am so out of you and all that you have accomplished in the time that we've known each other But the the tremendous evolution of your sort of career. You're you're on understanding end leadership in the not so My hat to you for all. You're doing that seems. Seems like you go have a piece of my hat. So so let's pick up your story about the making of this film from the point at which you and your team became kind of hyper focused on this world kindness and how you might explore it in a documentary. I guess you kinda define it. I why don't you tell us about the process. Well in in the two thousand sixteen two thousand seventeen but bearing much In i was Very disturbed as so. Many people were by the growing distance in the country. An outright hatred that was expressed in so many ways in the country and i had the incredible good fortune of having a relationship with A nonprofit health system called dignity health. They had funded in a very generous way some public health that i was doing when i left. Hvo when i created a nonprofit media company called the topic good projects and i was with the ceo of dignity house and their model is hello human kindness and i was having a very interesting conversation with him and senior leadership about the strong commitment as a nonprofit helped brighter kindness and our authentic was and i said would you ever consider doing the documentary becomes and lighting and that led to were conversation and eventually led just on that word to them giving principal funding for what became the antidote total editorial control. It was literally confidence in me to make a film on that. Were not a big risk now. Really not big risks. And so i put together a small team. I found a remarkable co director cooperman. Who was nominated for the kennedy award for short film. She did hojo's violin. Beautiful beautiful short documentary and we started on jer. We read everything we could about compassionate empathy decency putt from art and poetry in economics and political theory and evolution. We found absorbs so much and we quickly came to the realization that the world does not need any more exploration random next is that there's so many media platforms that on. Social media is love stories of random acts. We

John Hoffman John Joan Gary Emmy Emmy Award Amazon Joan Gary NIH John John HBO Alzheimer Dignity House New York America Cooperman Kennedy Award Hojo
Rudy Giuliani and Boris Epshteyn Discuss Joe Biden's Declining Mental State

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Rudy Giuliani and Boris Epshteyn Discuss Joe Biden's Declining Mental State

"The thirteen brave americans. The thirteen brave americans who were killed. Whose blood is on. The hands of joe biden. The app just came out and last few minutes right. Will you what we're talking about. In terms of the civilians killed and then the disrespect the disrespect shown to true american with that with the the looking at the and with the five is that disrespect or is that his mental breakdown. You know i'm going to tell you. One of the key symptoms of dementia. Alzheimer's is inappropriate behavior. I mean i remember it in the middle of the campaign last year. I put out a very very isolated very authoritative podcast with doctors who very painstakingly went through the symptoms of dementia and alzheimer's as laid out in the dsm five which is a book that they used and They didn't disagree. They had like they nailed about eight of the ten symptoms. They showed them on tape. And the only difference between the two of them what one daughter was moderate and the other one was headed for real real serious difficulties and they debated exactly why one of the things they kept pointing out is inappropriate behavior for example when he says i was instructed. Now actually inappropriate even if it's true all your faculties you wouldn't say right what president would walk out and say. I was instructed to not answer any questions.

Alzheimer's Dementia Joe Biden
America Has Abandoned the Women of Afghanistan

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:51 min | 3 months ago

America Has Abandoned the Women of Afghanistan

"Over the weekend if you watch the solemn proceedings and shanksville. Your concerns grew about the infirmity of president biden. And i believe that. Those concerns are now feeling concerns. The effort to get americans and afghans allies out of afghanistan will falter because it draws attention to the president. And they're doing everything they can to get attention off of the president. Do you think he's infirm. One eight hundred five two one two three four. I do not believe dementia. I do not believe alzheimer's. I just think he's very much evidencing. His almost seventy nine years and that this is hurting america. Badly the news out of afghanistan with terrible all weekend long that toledo's announced new rules for female students. The not going with the blue burqas. If you go to my twitter feed you'll see they're going with all black from head to toe with an slit covering the same thing that isis war. The telegraph in great britain headline in taliban parade women in hooded veils to block vision. There is one story exactly one story in the financial times that was picked up by the washington post an afghan american woman that means she's just un-american and her escape be a secret of cia. One got one story over the weekend. The post notes that space for dissent opening afghanistan after taliban out to twenty years ago now the militants are trying to slam it. Shut trying not the word killing people there. murdering people. the wall street journal has an elite editorial. Those still left behind and afghanistan. That's where my focus is. We have left people behind one person. Play the tape of this later. Believe one on one group in the united states believe we left twenty thousand americans and green card colder green card holders behind

Shanksville President Biden Afghanistan Alzheimer's Dementia Taliban Toledo The Telegraph Great Britain America Twitter Washington Post CIA UN The Post The Wall Street Journal
Canary Speech Uses Voice to Identify Human Conditions Across Multiple Applications

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:50 min | 3 months ago

Canary Speech Uses Voice to Identify Human Conditions Across Multiple Applications

"Canary speech technology is currently commercially available. It's practical and scalable. We range in population sizes from a few thousand to hundreds of thousands of individuals within the population that we're monitoring and scoring. We have a range of different human conditions, stress anxiety, depression, we've had probably the most extensive use with. We've done some work in PTSD as well. Second to that we have a lot of work done in MCI Alzheimer's and cognitive function and decline. In this particular case, we currently have four clinical partners in different locations in the world where we are doing validation studies on Alzheimer's and cognitive measurements. And then of course, employee burnout, things like congestive heart failure, autism and others are ones that are being worked on as well. I've talked about our patents, we have new patents we're applying for things that we've been learning through these studies. And then our speech analysis as we mentioned before is done generally on 40 seconds to a minute of speech. And we return scored through our system within three seconds of time. Our partners range across the world. I've talked about hack attack meridian. I'm going to talk a little bit more about them later. Ulster hospital tele hospital and Dublin Ireland wake forest Hitachi SNK telemedicine companies like Best Buy health and several others.

Alzheimer's MCI Ptsd Depression Congestive Heart Failure Autism Ulster Hospital Tele Hospital Dublin Ireland Hitachi Best Buy
Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

"Canary speech has a full range of technology in our platform from a well developed extensive capability app. Available Apple and Android, of course. It operates on smart devices in multiple languages, we're currently deployed in Japan in Europe in Mandarin, and we've are entering the birds again market in Portuguese and of course in the U.S. and Canada. So we function within that app to be able to customize it for specific applications, whether we're dealing in stress anxiety or Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease or congestive heart failure. We have a range of engagements across more than a dozen hospitals in the world right now, where we're validating the initial models within the clinical environment for commercialization on those. We also have a well developed set of APIs that allow us to do multiple things, of course. One is to connect to internal health medical record systems. But also some of our some of our clients have existing apps and we interface to those in augment those apps through providing access to our technology stack and analysis of audio. With the same performance returning within three seconds, scores to arrange a different locations depending on what the application

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Congestive Heart Failure Apple Japan Europe Canada U.S.
Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Canary Speech: At the Intersection of Healthcare and Technology

"Canary speech has a full range of technology in our platform from a well developed extensive capability app. Available Apple and Android, of course. It operates on smart devices in multiple languages, we're currently deployed in Japan in Europe in Mandarin, and we've are entering the birds again market in Portuguese and of course in the U.S. and Canada. So we function within that app to be able to customize it for specific applications, whether we're dealing in stress anxiety or Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease or congestive heart failure. We have a range of engagements across more than a dozen hospitals in the world right now, where we're validating the initial models within the clinical environment for commercialization on those. We also have a well developed set of APIs that allow us to do multiple things, of course. One is to connect to internal health medical record systems. But also some of our some of our clients have existing apps and we interface to those in augment those apps through providing access to our technology stack and analysis of audio. With the same performance returning within three seconds, scores to arrange a different locations depending on what the application

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Congestive Heart Failure Apple Japan Europe Canada U.S.
How Canary Speech Differs From Traditional Word-Based Models

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

02:25 min | 3 months ago

How Canary Speech Differs From Traditional Word-Based Models

"Our technology compared compared to historic approach. Historically, it began with the evaluation of word based things, classic example of the British novelist Agatha Christie and her plight through Alzheimer's, it's nice if you have 40 years of data to do analysis on, but it's not a practical way of approaching this. And word based analysis is difficult to control for education level, use of words, multiple languages across nations, not the withstanding various use of language throughout a single nation alone. So it's, while ASR is a nice, solid stable dataset, it's not a very useful dataset for doing analysis on things like anxiety stress depression. It's roughly practical for Alzheimer's, but even there it's very difficult to control. Canary speeches approach was to use a primary data layer, which is in fact used for ASR and NLP. But we use the primary data layer nearly exclusively. And from those features and biomarkers, we construct and train models, algorithms, which are independent, both language and other elements. Fundamentally how the central nervous system dries the creation of speech. And that allows us then to use a very rich set of data in a minute, hundreds of thousands of data points are. Used. We extract features in real time compare that to previous models and model sets that we have used. And today we're doing that in a. Newly launched system that utilizes the highest level of security available. We recently completed an external audit for penetration, vulnerability cysts and are finishing up soc two type one in the next

Alzheimer's Anxiety Stress Depression Agatha Christie
"alzheimer" Discussed on The Travel Wins

The Travel Wins

03:26 min | 3 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on The Travel Wins

"My mother's best friend. It's you know it's somebody went to school with and so it's affecting everybody has so let's just a great way for us. All sorta get on board and start talking about it. I think in some ways in the past you know. We talked about people with senility. And you know we talked about people with dementia now. We talk more about people's alzheimer's because we're getting more and more diagnostic tools. But i think people might have been reluctant to talk about it because they considered sort of a a mental loss of mental capacity. And you know they associated with mental disease. Which has been a no no in our society for so many years and now all starting to talk about these things and we should because there's no shame at this. This is happening to families all over the place. We talk so so. That's one of the things we're doing his voice and and you know one of my marketing team says hayseeds allowed sport. So let's get loud about alzheimer's so i'm on board. I totally agree. So well beyond. Up get your with either the fact that you're sharing your voice with us when you know. I think that the platform that at that i started with the podcast gets to thirty five. Forty thousand people. You know who knows who that's up fact and it might not even be to your organization but it might make them donate to a different organization. You know just the thought of it so it's just show showing others. Well you can make a difference. You can do something you and emily and when you feel helpless do just to do any any making donations. Just go do a walk. Go on an alzheimer's walk you know. Look stuff up. Read about. It will were a little bit about you. Know it's it's all good. It's all good betters. Better that's by. That's my favorite thing. Better better it's your is. Hey i i know your limit. On times i i wanna thank you for using me and in between your trips and i. I can't wait to keep watching the you be on the road and and seeing all the places the car is going end up so thanks very much. Okay well listen. I appreciate it and it's a pleasure to each you and i enjoy getting to know you a little bit before. Today's broadcast but You know making the time and and making your platform available to us is really a an honorable thing that you're doing and i certainly appreciate it a really do and when you get back in and you're not driving around after we'll get some lunch again or something. Yeah yeah you know. He should tell everybody that you saw my on the road. Did you sent a picture to me. I was that was so weird like we were supposed to meet. And i'm like that's the car in the town of twelve million people were gods. We're on the same highways and byways apparently again thanks. Thanks bill.

alzheimer mental disease dementia emily
"alzheimer" Discussed on The Travel Wins

The Travel Wins

03:22 min | 3 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on The Travel Wins

"Am looking at self frings. Who is the founder of racing. Dan alzheimer's as well as the ceo of logistics. Alright they fill. I'm doing good and doing it's great to be home. I've been on the road and so it's really nice to be actually in a seek. It's not moving not too fast right trying to keep you know trying to keep a close since fever especially you can appreciate the time. It's actually. I think it's a good time because like you just got off the road and you're actually going back on the road so i am tomorrow. I'm fine houston were picking up our tribute car. Which is at a bmw of west houston words in showroom. I've been back home and that were jumping in the car..

frings Dan alzheimer west houston houston bmw
How You Maximize the Quality of Your Life with Behavioral Scientist Jon Levy

The Ultimate Health Podcast

02:30 min | 3 months ago

How You Maximize the Quality of Your Life with Behavioral Scientist Jon Levy

"I'm a person who really throws myself into. Whatever i think might be able to improve the quality of life and so i would do courses and read books and so on and one of the things that i jumped into was a seminar and a seminar leader. Said something that really had me me examined the entire way. My life is set up. He said that the fundamental element that defined the quality of our lives are the people we surround ourselves with and the conversations of behalf of them and he said that means that. If you want to impact your life what you need to do is either change the conversations that you're having with people or change the people you're having them with and that was fundamentally different than what everybody else was saying. I was setting my alarm for like crazy early in the morning and then headaches news eight thousand times and skipping the gym and feeling bad about it and he's now saying maybe you should just hang out with a bunch of people who fitness as part of their life and instead of going to the movies and eating tub of popcorn you'll meet them for a run and then it becomes natural for your life while i'm a science geek. I'm a behavioral scientist now. And so i looked at the research and there was this crazy study. By these two guys chris and fowler and they were actually looking at the obesity epidemic and they were curious does it spread from person to person. I got cold or is it. A percentage of the population like alzheimer's. Right you don't get alzheimer's shook hands with somebody who has alzheimer's and what they found was startling. If you have a friend who's obese your chances increase by forty five percent your friends who don't even know them have a twenty percent increase. Chance and their friends have a five percent increase chant and this kind of effect is true for happiness marriage and divorce trait smoking habits voting habits bitterly. Everything spreads from person to person and so i figured my biggest responsibility for my life would be to not only connect with extraordinary people balloons. It could have really in tact a really meaningful impact on my life but tabs them connect with each other so it spreads further and that was kind of the piffling. The problem is i. frankly didn't come from like when those super connected rich families. My parents are immigrants. And so i had to then figure out how to connect with the people i admired

Alzheimer's Fowler Obesity Chris
How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:21 min | 3 months ago

How to Recognise the Signs of Alzheimer's Disease

"We start with the, the warning signs of Alzheimer's. What's what's an actual warning sign? And what is actual related to normal aging? Which is actually having this conversation with our friends. Last night, really good friend has a tendency to do about 15 things at once, and can't seem to remember what she's doing. And I think I know for because it hasn't changed in fifteen years that that's just life is and not paying attention. So we're can we start there? Sure. So, you know, there's certainly as we get older and our brain shrinks, we start off some capacity, some cognitive capacity that is, you know, considered the normal aging process, but you know, in today's day and age, we really give very little leeway for that just to remind people, you know, our grandparents, you know, in the 1960s, 70s 80s as they got older, they became senile and that word is really fallen out of favor. So we don't really talk so much about senility as the diagnosis or excuse for having, you know, poor memory or or function. It's not to say that the dog. Not any change that occurs with aging but we really won't get towards. Is there more of a problem. And when we start thinking about dementia, which is the big umbrella term that we think about and, and Alzheimer's disease being the most, common one, there has to be memory loss. So that's a that's, that's a symptom and assigned really, that has to be there. And then there has to be some sort of dysfunction in other what we call spheres of cognition, and probably the easiest one that to talk about is something called executive functioning. So when you go see a neurologist Thursday, we are you know, you're going to be asked questions about who does the who does the bills at home? What are what are the what are the what's the capacity to pay the bills and somebody who may be paid bills forever in their adult life? And all of a sudden now a spouse or a child has to double-check. There's late payments. There's overdrawn on a checking accounts things like that is the ability to sort of have this high-level executive wage. Ocean is a is really a sign that there's something perhaps going on, much more than just. Oh, I can't remember that

Alzheimer's Disease Dementia
Tony Bennett Cancels Fall and Winter Touring Dates in 2021

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Tony Bennett Cancels Fall and Winter Touring Dates in 2021

"Legendary singer Tony Bennett is retiring from live performances if you were hoping to see Tony Bennett perform in person your opportunity may have passed the ninety five year old Grammy winner had canceled his upcoming twenty twenty one tour because of the cobit nineteen pandemic and now his son tells reporters Bennett won't be going on the road again Bennett had concerts planned in the northeast Arizona Oklahoma and Canada despite being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease but those dates won't be rescheduled earlier this month Bennett had teamed up with lady Gaga for two nights at new York's Radio City Music Hall the shows were filmed for broadcast at a later date and these may be the final live performances of his seventy year career I'm Jackie Quinn

Tony Bennett Bennett Alzheimer's Disease Grammy Oklahoma Arizona Canada Lady Gaga Radio City Music Hall New York Jackie Quinn
Biden's DARPA Will Accomplish Nothing With Red Tape Everywhere

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Biden's DARPA Will Accomplish Nothing With Red Tape Everywhere

"To this from Biden. Now cut one go. Something called DARPA, The Defense Advanced Research Project agency. Set up exclusively in the Defense Department. Good Lord to seek out the cutting edge research projects. That enhance our national security. An outfit that came up With the Internet GPS And a lot of still think a lot of things. My proposal. We do a similar thing. Now let's slow down. We needed DARPA, Ladies and gentlemen, because the private sector is not in charge of national security. The private sector is not in charge of national security. That is a Responsibility. One of the specific responsibilities of the federal government. Go ahead. I propose we spent $6.5 million now, where's that figure come from nowhere. Billions and billions and hundreds of billions and trillions and This is this is Like like a nightmare. What's going on here? Go ahead. Similar agency within the national shoot of health. The NIH called Advanced Research Project Agency are put H. Dark. They come up with these names. Arpaio age Sounds cool. Go ahead. Help speed Cutting edge research. How to detect Treat and cure diseases like Alzheimer's diabetes and cancer. Let let Let's stop here a second. The government has spent trillions of dollars. Addressing all these issues and their horrific issues, they really are. And if they want to partner with the private sector the way Operation Warp speed did and so forth and fine, but you're now going to nationalize.

Defense Advanced Research Proj Defense Department Biden Advanced Research Project Agen H. Dark Cure Diseases Alzheimer's Diabetes Federal Government NIH Arpaio Cancer
Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Evidence That Early Alzheimer’s Can Be Reversed With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"I want to start with a big picture question that a lot of people who are listening to this podcast watchings view on youtube one. Oh which is is it truly possible to recover from alzheimer's it's a loaded question and some people might even say it's a blasphemous question right. But you're the man to ask. I would agree with you. It's blasphemous but absolutely we've seen it again and again and again As proof for example we just published a our trial proof of concept trial In that trial eighty four percent of the people actually improve their scores so we have unquestionable objective evidence of improvement. And when you say you publish your trial right for those folks that are just new to you right and are not familiar with your protocol program that you've designed. Let's give a little bit of context around this. What was that trial trying to look bad. And what answers came from it. Yeah great point so way back in two thousand eleven we were looking at root causes as as you well know root cause medicine is critical and so we were looking at root causes of cognitive decline in two thousand eleven. We proposed the first comprehensive trial for people with mci or alzheimer's. And let me. just digress. For one moment to say this concept of mci mild cognitive impairment has really hurt people and the field when you say that someone has mild cognitive impairment that is like saying they have mildly metastatic cancer. It is a late stage of the process. Typically they've had the underlying pathophysiology for fifteen or twenty years before they're getting a diagnosis of mci and then about each year. About ten percent of those people will convert to full on alzheimer's which is a which is the end stage of really. What is the alzheimer's pathophysiology and just pause there for a second. If you could rename that right come up with a different term just to show people the severity in the weight that comes with data. Is there any thoughts of what you would wanna call that absolutely so there are four stages you a symptomatic subject of cognitive impairment. Mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's what they should be called is pre alzheimer's. That's the that's the A symptomatic period. Subjective is early stage. alzheimer's disease what we call. mild mild. Cognitive impairment is advanced stage alzheimer's disease. And what we currently call. Alzheimer's disease is final stage

Alzheimer's Disease MCI Metastatic Cancer Youtube Alzheimer's Pathophysiology
Progressives Have Made No Progress - They've Only Made America Worse

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:12 min | 4 months ago

Progressives Have Made No Progress - They've Only Made America Worse

"How are things getting better. Exactly heart diseases up. Eroticism is up mental. Health issues are up now. I'm not there. There's been a medical. Innovations praise got better better of course ability to detect detect tumors ability to treat alzheimer's those things have objectively improved over the last decade. But to say that in my lifetime humanity by has gotten infinitely better. That's not true. Life expectancy is also going down so life explains he's going down. Obesity is going up. Poverty is going up wealth inequalities going up. Homelessness is going up mental health issues. Going up. suicide is going up. Violent crime is going up. What exactly's progressive about the moment. We're it just give us more power. Perfection is around the corner. And the reason i say this is not to be doom and gloom we still live in the greatest nation ever to exist in the history of the world. We've so much opportunity around us. We should be optimistic and cheerful in the way that we approach all these things but don't fall the lie. Don't accept the premise. Don't say that all of a sudden are hyper commercialize. Society of the corporate class of declining church attendance and a kind of solis government that we live under somehow by definition better because of time marches. On that's not true and this is the brilliance of donald trump's marketing. He said you know what. Make america great again. I actually like how things used to be. They said he's anesthesiologist. Y- he's engaging in what are they used to say. They used to say he was engaging in this manipulative nostalgia nostalgia. I should say nostalgia. That's the right way to pronounce it. Try to manipulative nostalgic. Hard to say if you don't have a break between the two words that he wants to hearken back to a time of racism and bigotry. That's not true. He missed an america where everyone was walking around with a supercomputer in the right hand pocket. Where you weren't anxious all the time that you were about to get a text or tweet in email that up route your entire day. I missed that. America

Society Of The Corporate Class Solis Government Tumors Alzheimer Obesity Donald Trump America
Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

"The right thing to do. How big of a threat is the chinese corona virus. Well every single day in the united states according to data that is publicly available as of two thousand nineteen one thousand eight hundred people die of heart disease. Why don't we lockdown burger king mcdonalds and wendy's and not locked down businesses of people that are trying their best to get by in fact. Why would we lockdown gymnasiums when people are actually literally trying to get healthy by the way this is daily. Let me just reinforce this. This is daily. One thousand eight hundred people die. Every single day of heart disease one thousand six hundred forty of cancer four hundred seventy by accident four hundred thirty of chronic lower respiratory disease. Four hundred ten of stroke their three hundred thirty of alzheimer's and now cova deaths are below three hundred twenty four. In fact yesterday there was seventy one confirmed cova deaths. Seventy one confirmed cova debts. And if you look at category by category last year included zero to seventeen years old three hundred and forty people died involving with one thousand nine hundred and alex berenson says that that is almost immeasurable. Statistically fifty one thousand two hundred thirteen people died from all causes from ages. Eighteen to twenty nine two thousand four hundred ninety three people died from coverted and ninety six thousand six hundred twenty five from all causes from thirty to thirty nine years old. Seven thousand one hundred forty five people died from cove in nineteen allegedly and one hundred thirty seven thousand people eight hundred forty nine from all causes you go category to category. Do you know that cova was not the leading cause of death for any single age group including last year including eighty five years and older including seventy five to eighty four. It was not the leading cause of death for any category or any group.

Cova Heart Disease Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Alzheimer's Mcdonalds Alex Berenson Wendy United States Cancer
What The Heck is Being Death Positive?

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:21 min | 4 months ago

What The Heck is Being Death Positive?

"So what exactly is death positivity? You know, death positivity is not too different from dead body positivity or, you know, even sex positivity right. Where if you understand that there's all kinds of different approaches that, you know, it's, it's kind of accepting. Hey, death is a natural part of our Lives, which we all know instinctively, we know that logically. But when I when you start thinking about that, there's also that fear that comes along with it for many of us. And and so it's just starting to understand, okay, well if we look at death and it's just natural part of life, what it really does is it. Is us up to live our lives more fully while we're here. Sounds good. Yeah. After after birth last year we've all lived through a little more than a year. I think we need as much fullness as we can achieve and and I need a little more body positivity in my life, too. I'm not going to last name. I went on a huge weight loss. Journey, more years ago than I can remember. Now, I think it's been a decade now, holy Toledo, she's time flies. And that's that's amazing experience. When you lose a ton of weight cuz what's in your mind, isn't what you're seeing in the mirror and then you have experiences that reinforce that the mirror is correct, if your brain is wrong, and that's, that's just really fascinating. So, I learned a long time ago, I think having been over a hundred pounds overweight, is that our bodies are really pretty fascinating thousand souls for lack of a better term, you know, especially for some of us, you know, we've created an entire life. You know, we've created beautiful things to give to the world or maybe not only beautiful. But maybe technology, that's kept us together in the last, you know, year and 1/2. It's it's that's the way I try to look at. It's like, okay. I physically I might not look like swimsuit model but that's yep. I'm only five foot two. I'm not going to be a swimsuit model, no matter how much I try to change the shape of my body. Yeah. Well and, and I think the whole idea behind body positivity is helping your brain. Understand that you are beautiful in the shape that you are and go live your life, right? And so when we translate that to death positivity, similarly it's hey yes we are all going to die someday and that's okay. And again freeing us up to really live our own lives to the fullest There's seems to be a cultural belief that death is somehow a failure, which is really, you know, it's like I don't know if that's a Reliance on a medical profession or not really sure how we got to fighting death at all costs. Even when you've got somebody, who's not able to live life fully and not be able, you know, somebody with alzheimer's or somebody, that's got end-stage cancer, whatever awfulness, sometimes happens to people and I, I always lived, well, I still live my life, but when, my mom was still around, I did everything I could to give her as much quality and fullness as possible. And I kept telling myself, I will not do anything that extends, this, this dying process of Alzheimer's, and I didn't. And I told my husband and my daughter, if, if the situation arose like, I'd always thought She got pneumonia, I would call Hospice. I said you, you too might have to stand on either side of me and hold me up while we go KO hospice or whatever. Like, do not let me back down because I knew my mom would hate the way she was living and she would, she was terrified of getting Alzheimer's and she did so it's you know, I it's a difficult balance to know off or we just giving up or we accepting that. We all none of us gets out of this life alive, which many listeners have heard me. Say it's what my maternal grandfather always

Alzheimer's Toledo Cancer Pneumonia
"alzheimer" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

03:35 min | 6 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Sugar and insulin. Resistance is often a cause of inflammation a frequent cause of alzheimer's is inflammation in the brain. And you know. I pulled some information. I really liked dr pearl mater the author of grain brain and he states that the most fundamental message that he's trying to convey to the listening audience is to do everything possible to reduce inflammation overall. Will that means a diet. Rich in inflammation fighting food like healthy fats minimizing those processed carbohydrates and interesting enough. He says gluten restricted. I thought that was interesting because even a slight blood sugar elevation raises the binding of glucose to protein called glaciation. And this pro. This process profoundly increases the production of inflammatory chemicals and the tracking of an a one c measures this process. So the bottom line is if you're a one. C is elevated. You're your brain at risk. So what does that mean. What's that look like on a plate nikki. Oh that's a great question mouth. So i would say one and i've said this before on the radio but i want to repeat it That my favorite brain boosting meal. Because i actually feel like i get something from. It is like four ounces of salmon yom a big pile of broccoli and butter like cups of broccoli. I'm saying like two or three four cups. It's a lot and then you know a good two one two two tablespoons even of butter. That healthy fat is brain food. Yes it just my with my history of my injury. Fat is my friend. I need it. Here's a little tip to i just recently Realized you can take salmon. Let's say you buy wild caught salmon and it's in their little individual sleeves maybe From moscow i pick up. Yeah and you get home. You're like i haven't thought it shoot. You can take frozen salmon one of those frozen salmon's put it on your cookie sheet season it and cook it like three seventy five until it's cooked why you have time to thaw dinner. You can still talk frozen meal. Yeah it works you know. It just depends on a smaller piece of meat..

two three dr pearl two tablespoons four cups one four ounces of salmon alzheimer seventy five
"alzheimer" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

06:15 min | 8 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Here acupuncture life. We shape follow us again. Whenever we social media platform is so much to learn you. You like many people can contact us to delve deeper into a topic that piqued your interest in another sign. Another sign. someone can beginning. Alzheimer's is simple forgetfulness. Which would include memory lapses like forgiving people's names especially if known it for some time on of and we occasionally proud keys cell phones down certain things even the remote license for those who still watch television and we forget were put it slice now initiative age you you you can still do everyday activities like working socializing driving your vehicle but eventually memory lapses become more frequent and again you wanna get treatment as early as possible for. Have your loved one treatment as early as possible to deal with this problem. You're next fades is memory difficulties. Whereas in this phase memory issues go beyond forgetfulness. They tend to include struggling to remember recently read material such as articles. You've seen online courses folks and so forth also difficulty membranes to stay organized remembering certain things that were planned out you may find yourself saying. Oh my gosh. I forgot i had a meeting was scheduled. Meaning supposed to get together with this person. These are subtle signs. increased by slice difficulty. Retrieving names or even word. You're you're engaging in a conversation someone. You can't complete a sentence because oh my gosh what would fit here. There's a word for what i'm trying to say. If you find yourself saying to yourself pops quite often something to think about. Go sheehan acupuncturist. How many ways. I can tell you go she and acupuncturist thinking of. Oh my gosh. The needles have been hurt. I they don't promote any menu. Initially just my opinion. I can't speak for. Everyone and i won't do that. I won't make that mistake sometimes. You'll feel itchy sensation which is good too. Good thing you acupuncture explain to you. Why contact us. We'll explain to you. Use another component of memory difficulties challenges in the work. Shed social sex. That can be a problem. Is huge another symptom is problems with cognition slice act now in this stage damage to the brain even volvo other aspects of cognition outside of memory which would include difficulty organizing things calculating things difficulties with language. These types of problems can came definitely make it more challenging for an individual to perform their daily tasks seen acupuncture as like problems with cognition can also include being confused about what day of the week it. Now i know this state scare the shit out of a lot of people because there are days where i we most of us who say what dates thursday and in tuesday's oh my god. It feels like feels like if it's thursday don't panic don't panic but But finding yourself constantly attempting to remember what day is or even your location where your changes your sleep patterns and perhaps difficulty choosing the right clothing based on the weather outside problem. These are subtle these assigned. This point is no longer subtle but these are get here. Acupunctures right away or contact acupuncture smelly immediately or if you she a loved one experiences. I don't know what to do. Feel free to contact acupunctures Another sign is less dependent less independence. I should.

tuesday thursday Alzheimer sheehan volvo
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"And it's important because I'm here to support people and you know help them through the Journey that you're on that I was on that either people will end up on unfortunately. Yeah advice find people to support you. It's a very isolating job and life. You know, you feel lonely you feel like a lot of times you're the only person going through this no one understands what you're going through and it's it's hard and went off. You're lonely and isolated which is ironic right now because isolate yourself, but it's just not a healthy place to be even if you're an introvert you need other people and you need other people that I understand your story and know what you're going through so find your people reach out to them find whether it's from the senior center on Facebook find a Facebook group you like aging parent tribe is open to y'all whether it's a a friend, you know, our our church put me in charge of seniors or elderly and and we were doing a gift baskets for people and they said now is this for the senior or is it for the caregiver? And I said, oh it's for the caregiver the caregiver needs to be loved on because they're loving on so many other people that is so I wanted to give something to them that was just for them and was a joy for them and and the when I woke They said we just had no idea. We don't ever think of how the care and the caregivers need to be loved on so find your people wherever they are. There's people out there that understand life is very true. Local rotary clubs can help my Parkinson's support group. There's Alzheimer's support groups, you know start their that's a really great place to smoke and those people know other things and you use them to network and find other people. I have a funny last story. You said Parkinson's group. I was at my Alzheimer's support group. The facilitator is a godsend on suggesting other support groups other everything classes, whatever support she's aware of them..

Facebook 's Alzheimer Parkinson's Parkinson
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"And it's important because I'm here to support people and you know help them through the Journey that you're on that I was on that either people will end up on unfortunately. Yeah advice find people to support you. It's a very isolating job and life. You know, you feel lonely you feel like a lot of times you're the only person going through this no one understands what you're going through and it's it's hard and went off. You're lonely and isolated which is ironic right now because isolate yourself, but it's just not a healthy place to be even if you're an introvert you need other people and you need other people that I understand your story and know what you're going through so find your people reach out to them find whether it's from the senior center on Facebook find a Facebook group you like aging parent tribe is open to y'all whether it's a a friend, you know, our our church put me in charge of seniors or elderly and and we were doing a gift baskets for people and they said now is this for the senior or is it for the caregiver? And I said, oh it's for the caregiver the caregiver needs to be loved on because they're loving on so many other people that is so I wanted to give something to them that was just for them and was a joy for them and and the when I woke They said we just had no idea. We don't ever think of how the care and the caregivers need to be loved on so find your people wherever they are. There's people out there that understand life is very true. Local rotary clubs can help my Parkinson's support group. There's Alzheimer's support groups, you know start their that's a really great place to smoke and those people know other things and you use them to network and find other people. I have a funny last story. You said Parkinson's group. I was at my Alzheimer's support group. The facilitator is a godsend on suggesting other support groups other everything classes, whatever support she's aware of them..

Facebook 's Alzheimer Parkinson's Parkinson
"alzheimer" Discussed on The Dr. Gundry Podcast

The Dr. Gundry Podcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on The Dr. Gundry Podcast

"Initiative, at Weill Cornell, medical college in New York City. In her new book, the ex- ex- brain, or if you're trying to remember at the double X., Brain Lisa says genetics don't affect women's chances of developing dementia nearly as much as her hormonal status, lifestyle and medical report card. And she's working to get the word out. Lisa welcome to the program and Sandwich fanning. So what inspired you to write the? Brain what what kind of research went into writing this? A lot of research. So. I got inspired for lack of a better word by my family. Because I have a family history of Alzheimer's disease, the really affects the women in my family, so my grandmother was one of four siblings, three women and one man, so three sisters and one brother in three sisters developed Alzheimer's Disease and died of dementia, whereas the broader did not even though it were same age. So that was quiet. Shocking experience for on, says a family and really wanted to better understand what causes dementia in general an what causes dementia specifically women. And of course, my family is a very small data set. But then started looking into. At the big picture and it turns out statistically, these seems to be the ks all over the world so today two thirds of all timers, patients are women, which means that foot every men suffering from Alzheimer's. That are two women. And died Sunday which don't talk about enough and all my research has been really focused women's brains and better understanding. How brain held plays out differently, women and men. But. The fog of my research is really on women because. We have just been excluded from research for so long that we have been investigated and there's so much stigma around anything that could potentially happen to a woman's drain. That was really big part of my research, if not the biggest part of my research. Yeah, I think that's really important. Maria Shriver and I have talked about this that it most people I think the general public assumes that man get dementia more than women, but in fact, the the opposite like you say is completely. It's exactly the opposite and saying that. Yeah the vast majority of people who get dementia Alzheimer's are women and you guys are so much healthier than US men. You would assume right. And also what I think is interesting. That Alzheimer's disease. The only H. related new the Jenner to condition that affects more women than men like Parkinson's men vascular dementia fifty fifty, so there seems to be something specific to women that increase risk of Alzheimer's now in your book, you make it clear that your DNA is not the sole deciding factor in whether you get dementia or not, so can you elaborate on that? Can you tell us about the APO e four gene. What's your thoughts on all this? Because of my family history I started. I approached Alzheimer's I. IN TERMS OF GENETICS IN MY PhD was about genetics, also for context I have the not science, but will send nuclear medicine dual tidgy so I've been doing brain imaging since late nineteen. And that really convinced me. That genetic said incredibly important, but they're not as deterministic as most people think like for me, I was really worried that a genetic mutation was was drowning in my family in Obama, MOM's risk. My aunt risk. But all this work and everybody else's work has shown that no more than two percent of all at Siamese, cases are caused by genetic mutation. So for the vast majority of Siamese patient risk is genetically mediated. If you will of course, your DNA is a huge component of your health and being, but it's not as causative of Alzheimer's as most people fear, and that for me was incredibly empowering, because the first I was really like if I have this. Mutations that will not would do, but Danny turns out your chances of actually carrying a genetic mutation of small. Whereas, Everything else all the choices you make in your life everything else..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Brain Lisa Weill Cornell New York City Sandwich fanning Maria Shriver Danny US Obama Jenner Parkinson
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"As I said before with the Sadako I took it away wasn't doing I've tried to Doku? I am not a mathematician. I've always been a creative artistic person. Am I the only I laugh because I'm also a professional photographer? So I can I can do adding and subtracting very well when there's dollar signs and decimal points I couldn't even multiply sometimes when the dots Points that is it. I am not into mouth. The nitrites Doku partly because I have a very big family history of Alzheimer's and so I thought well this'll be a good brain challenge and I failed. I couldn't do it. I'm like I'll I'll find other ways to stimulate my brain. Starting to podcasts. Business was not on the list but they've been very beneficial very many of the other. Just yeah just you know. Prior to starting the podcast. I pass guest. That said she'd read a little blurb that I put on. Facebook encounter with my mall at with my mom and another resident where she lives if she said you know. You should write a book and I said you know. I think I might assumed my mom had been in the care home for about six months. I thought well I probably should wait until she's gone. Well I've just I've changed that opinion and I so I've told people the book is in there. It's it's inside here. I just have to wait for the right when the right idea. Hits me the idea will pop out and it will slow well. Your book gave me that. That idea the flow. Thanks me so so so happy and other questions that I had sorry is I know one of the things that I learned recently with my mom. I had many many guests. That kept telling me you know you should stop going for two hours on Mondays. And you should go for an hour Monday in an hour and another another day of the week in its and I am very structured. I'm not set my ways. I'm very structured. It was a reason that Monday's worked would go after a rotary meeting. And then I could come home and it was when I would come home after visiting her. I was just wiped out. I could not deal with Cli- answer anything I just needed to. Just be with myself. Maybe the dogs in the husband so I was not interested in taking chunks out of my week. That made it very difficult to function as a middle aged adult. My Grandmother's almost one hundred and two. So Yeah I know sometimes when I think about that I get tired This'll be my dad's mom for most listeners. And I've talked about her a few times. I didn't I didn't WanNa do that so I finally got smart and said you know what? I'm GonNa just do an hour on Mondays in a because a lot of reasons never managed to get the second day in but she would get. I would notice that the longer we were together the more tired I would get mentally in. She was getting tired. I didn't notice it until I started looking for it. I read what you guys did every day and I think now okay. He had a he had an afternoon nap but how he did not just become frustrated from just being tired from activity now slept very old and her and long.

Facebook Alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"And especially if it's introduced early enough what someone when when the habit of having back and anger is there. It's it's very difficult very difficult to change. Well I I completely agree with that. My husband was officially diagnosed with Alzheimer's. After our fiftieth wedding anniversary very shortly after waiting brisket and I must say that the diagnosis was really interesting. Because we sat if the Win Center for Memory Disorders the head of the center and when the doctor pronounce words rewards. You have Alzheimer's. My husband's immediate response. Hawaiian con not emotional was simply forwards favorites. I don't WanNa live anymore. And during the first year of his life you went down. Typical house harms half irritability and rigidity and fortunately for me never violence never never but a highly also highly inappropriate and fast forward a year. He became known as the man with the reading smile full of joy of life and I have to tell you the last.

Alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Most of us see a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. As the beginning of a journey that will be filled with frustration. Sadness and possibly worse there are very few positive stories we can read. But what if just by the way we approach caring for a loved one we can actually help keep their minds stimulated if we're really lucky maybe this continued. Stimulation will slow their decline. Or maybe just maybe. They can have improvements in some areas of their lives. What would that journey look like and is even possible reading? Choose enjoy an Alzheimer's book of Hope. I saw what could be possible if we approach this diagnosis. The different frame of mind while every person with Alzheimer's is different. I present this episode of joy to you in the hopes that you find a weight. Choose joy despite Alzheimer's this episode of Fading Memories is brought to you by family history films. Welcome to Fading Memories. A support of podcast for those of US caring for a loved one with memory loss. He listeners before we get into the show. I want to say. Thank you for tuning in every week. If you have episode suggestions questions feel free to contact me via the website. The link is in the show notes. You can also follow me on social media and get ideas dog photos. Maybe even a few behind the scenes of me all those links at the bottom of the show notes every week and be sure to check out the show notes because there's frequently extra information that.

Alzheimer US
"alzheimer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Alzheimer's disease brain cells degenerate and die causing a steady decline in memory and mental function while sometimes used interchangeably Alzheimer's is just one form of dementia dementia refers to the fact that I'm not remembering not thinking as well as I formally did and it's affecting my daily function but it could be caused by a variety of conditions Alzheimer's disease of course being the most common but it could also be caused by multiple strokes brain tumors medical problems Dr Ronald Petersen says there are essentially two forms of Alzheimer's maybe one percent of all Alzheimer's disease is due to what are called deterministic genes meaning that if you have this gene the abnormality in this gene you're going to get Alzheimer's disease and you usually get it earlier in life so in your forties or fifties but for the vast majority of people Alzheimer's disease is a function of aging although it may run in families for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit Mayo Clinic dot org now back to Sean Hannity on five sixty several how do you interpret it any other way what you were saying here I wanna wanna tell you Gorsuch I want to tell you Kaman all you ever leased a whirlwind you will pay the price you don't know what hit you won't know what hit you if you go forward with these awful acts now there are some Democrats to their credit that have spoken out about there's not enough of my from my point of view it's a threat I think justice Roberts the Chief Justice Roberts is right I think it was right in and coming out and speaking out but I don't think you can interpret it any other way now I've I've been looking and watching and observing and researching and we did find a log that he seems to have violated my interpretation according to eighteen U. S. cold one fifteen however threatens a federal official quote with intent to impede intimidate or interfere with such official judge a law enforcement officer while engaging in the performance of official duties they were hearing the case or the intent intent to retaliate against such official judge a law enforcement officer on account of the performance of official duties shall be punished by a fine or imprisonment of as much as ten years okay was he trying to influence judges on the Supreme Court intimidate them yeah I think this fits pretty well into that definition of the law I know others have said well you know it's just terrible Jonathan thirty Charlie said a direct attack on the integrity the courts he sounded more like a stalker than a statesman even liberal leftist trump hater scholar Laurence tribe admonishing it Lawrence tribe and Alan Dershowitz fight on Twitter all the time Schumer for inexcusable remarks Erica Bar Association said they were troubled is no place for threats like this John Roberts unprecedented saying justice is no criticism comes with the territory but threatening statements of this sort from the highest levels of government not only appropriate but they are dangerous all members of the court will continue to do their job without fear or favour from whatever quarter and then he's out there with this team of political hacks trying to spend it all wasn't threatening the judges when talking about them it doesn't work shock we got the tape one more on this and the election update on corona straight ahead.

Alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Come talk to me when you're fifty five. That is true. Then there's a dating. There's a hormonal component Alzheimer's. So it's like I feel only women not in that helped to live long enough to see some of these answers. I do take after my dad more than my mom. So hopefully fingers crossed. They don't have the Alzheimer's that my mom and my maternal grandmother. My maternal great grandmother all seem to have had and and honestly. You're doing the things that you would need to do. Have Interesting conversations with Aside from me thoughtful people and you know you probably read you exercise. You probably have like friends and stuff. You seem like pretty cool cool lady. She got lots of friends. And you know like you. You're a small business owner so all these things that are going to keep your mind active. You're meeting people all the time. These are the things that like without a history of brain trauma like they say you will more or less be fined for Alzheimer's but then there's also this total randomness of it whereas just like like your mom could have done all the exact same things And then she has Alzheimer's for some reason like she doing crossword puzzles every day of her life. I don't know sometimes it's just random. Do Crossword puzzles a lot but shells drink two liters diet coke every day. Yeah so it must be but I. I think I didn't exercise. 'cause she didn't have to worry she can eat her. My sister could eat crap all the time and not really gained weight. That's annoying I look at I and skinny arms now. I have to watch everything and I have. I have to work out all the time just to well that helps my brain and my emotions but to stay at a decent wait. I have to do all this. I have all this work. Which is okay. Because it's good for my brain but they like you know. The white bread wonder bread that I'm not even sure exists anymore. I don't know I make my own bread special shop for it so real glutton's like us while I liked what I was a kid. But it's not man like honestly way better like multi grain pride start just tastes better like I've made my own sourdot. Yeah me too yes good. It's it's awesome and minor segment of that on the podcast to read.

Alzheimer business owner
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"She hates it. I mean like we were at the store the other day and I might. Can you just come with me and I said Mike stay with me. This is nice. Let's just blink elbows and Mike. We're just walking together like friends and she literally was struggling and people started looking at me like you are not seriously trying to kidnap the lady are you. It's it's like you could tell that they were like okay. Wait that looks odd. But you know like they're logic was telling them that it was is probably okay but they wanted to make sure it was okay so I appreciated the the strange glances of concern but yeah it was still it. It was a little frustrated. She will not like not hold my hand not wing elbows and if I try to like re director by just gently touching her her shoulders. She'll she'll literally throw on the brakes to stop pushing like I'd pushed you really. Don't WANNA I've taken to the emergency because I pushed you down onto your face. It's crazy so now. Has Your son married. No now Done lose the my son. Josh has special needs so I won't heroes but he is more aware of Alzheimer's and understand Alzheimer's much more than so-called intelligent people. That's for sure He's a blessing he helps. His Dad is so funny is this to me. Is that mom you ever get remarried again. I'm not changing guys diaper. He's not my other. I'm done with them. I once again once was I always tell my husband. I wouldn't might have a boyfriend but they would probably live next door. That'd be about as closest they'd get because I like my quiet my and I'm not training anybody else. We've been married thirty years thirty one thirty think about it. Oh trouble thirty and again not traded but we very young so we treat each other and that's enough breath and we've been through a lot with my mom and my dad on hospice and I. It's Atari Nicki take a toll on in marriage when a parent has Alzheimer's when one of the in the laws I know did with Matt in I Matt was not supportive even though it was his own mother and it caused a wreck Between us because he saw me is the enemy Alzheimer's rich and That's a topic that I you you know have discussed. It'd be more than happy to come back and discuss it with you I'm I'm an open book. My license of luck and I will admit yeah hard caregiving can stink and it could be rewarding and there's no perfect caregiver at all you know people think they are perfect Jennifer Senate to me. I WANNA meet them. Yeah me too. Under discipline my mom I want meat and sometimes facility a large allege one will meet another man or a woman and become friendly. You know well. My husband's facility. If my husband was does that he met someone in a possibility I they had

Alzheimer Mike Jennifer Senate Josh Matt director
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Had tastic and one thing that's changed the all this happened with your dad and twenty eleven correct. Yes early twenty twenty eleventh okay. So in just in the last year twenty nineteen and I think the end of twenty eighteen. There's has been to federal legislation. Passed that aim to help doctors get paid for doing cognitive assessments. And Care Planning Planning. And that's something. I'm an advocate legislative advocate for the Alzheimer's Association. The Alzheimer's all day. Sometimes you know they right and so it's it's just interesting. Hopefully this legislation will help alleviate a lot of that problem but yeah I've I've experienced the same thing and one of my issues with medical. Profession is half the time they don't. It's like yes. My mom is the physical patient. But you can't take me out of the scenario. I'm not the taxi driver. I'm I'm the brains Raines. But she's the physical body so it's really frustrating. When you know they I tell them? I work Tuesday through Saturday you now now. I'm available most of the day on Mondays. Oh well this is only available on Wednesday through Friday. Well then find me a different one. 'cause they're more of them than there are of me and the only one of me. So that's that's a whole other podcast. I'm trying to work on dementia friendly medical team uh-huh and I loved it. I can talk to you a little bit about happenings. Were different you now in Peru regarding that issue I totally agree with you Jenn. It's it's really really serious in the the lack of not coordinating with families and again the improving. Hope I'm irs. I mean we really need to get clinicians on board with the testing because a whole family has to come together to help out whatever that family consists of. The person who's diagnosed with Alzheimer's is is no longer capable of sauce. I agree improving her Alzheimer's really Getting that old team. I grew now when you retire was reading. You sent me all kinds of wonderful notes that I appreciate in one of the questions I had because you said that I might have my glasses on Colombian old one of these things is really tiny. Let's hit fifty rish the warranty whereas outright..

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Association Jenn Peru
"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"With swallowing drinking and eating or going to be a problem too so swallowing becomes an issue issue. The brain is not sending those signals to tell the body. What to do there is a lot that has to happen for food to be eaten? You know the brains gotTa say first of all all. I'm hungry. The brain quit sending that signal but if the signal does happen then the brains gotta say pick up the fork. Put it in the mashed potatoes. SCOOP THEM UP. Put put the mashed potatoes in the mail. Chew swallow get it down the right pipe but not the wrong pipes and we don't choke to death swallowing and drinking become a problem in in eating not sleeping well or sleeping all the time. We just see that I can tell you my mom's slip slip slip a lot. Thank you if I had to choose now. I know if I had to choose And we don't get to choose. It's not up to us to decide but sleeping many hours a day. I think is easier for those in late stage Alzheimer's than not sleeping well not sleeping leads to another host problems that we don't win. We don't need increased problems with communication occasion. You'll hear things like I abba. ABBA ABBA ABBA ABBA awhile. I want you to get get get get in your like you won't want and can I get what they can't get their thoughts together. They these folks are more likely to experience infections and ammonia Nia on those chances for those things increase drastically infections especially urinary tract infections any type of invasions if they have a fall in. These is tearing the skin more likely to have infections because that pneumonia is a huge problem with votes. In the late stage of Alzheimer's in fact many of our folks will pass away because of pneumonia. In sometimes. That's put on their district. You'll get they die because of ammonia but really what they died was Alzheimer's that caused the body to be more success susceptible to them having pneumonia so it was really Alzheimer's that killed him and pneumonia was just an of a side. Perfect of that. They are definitely more likely to wonder if they are that kind of person who walks. We see some folks with a late stage. Alzheimer's as I've mentioned you just lay around all the time in sleep in some people that just walk and walk in walk in walk in walk in walk and you think sit down in those folks are definitely more likely to to try to open the door not necessarily because they want to wander. But it's a door in a DOORKNOB and I do remember how to do that so they opened the door and they will sometimes. It's very innocent thing but obviously that can lead to problems increased agitation and depression. That is very hard to deal with. The agitation is very difficult difficult because they are. They're not happy and they're not happy with you and they're not happy lives and they're not happy with what you're offering in their anger and they're liable to push you aside and say dirty words and that's hard to deal with and depression is hard to deal with. You're going to see some depression. I would say everybody dealing with late stage Alzheimer's because they are declining in to some degree are folks always know that and then no interest in activities obviously that is true no interest in activities because they know that they can't function the way they showed in it's causing them to just WanNa pull within themselves. It's a sad. It's a sad time of life but it can still be a good time of life we can still bring to our folks love in happiness and joy in music and funny stories and and I tell you one of the best things you can do is play that video and tell on Youtube of the daddy ripping a piece of paper in front of the baby and the baby be laughing. Every time daddy rips a piece of paper it just cracks me up in it will crack up your eyes with dementia. I know I've done it a bunch. Well that just clears up. Maybe a little bit about the different indifferences in the various stages of Alzheimer's. I'm here to answer your questions. You can email me and my email is carol at. Let's Talk Dementia Dot Org. Now I'm sitting here looking at myself in this screen and for those of you who watch it on Youtube use hat are on the podcast. You'll have to hear my description of got these white spots. Thought I just had this cream put on my face. As opposed to get rid of wrinkles in it did really well but I should have touched up my makeup before came on this show. I kinda look like a got got we're going on. Why didn't buy the cream? It was outrageously expensive but yes. I'll just be a wrinkle girl. I hope you you guys have a good day blessings miles.

Alzheimer Ta pneumonia Youtube depression
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

28:00 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Hear her story and how her journey with Alzheimer's led to the creation of this fantastic resource I'm not really her why because she's not good at that in the care residents she does and she doesn't it's really strange but she goes to these periods of being I'm very honorary and resisting assistance you know telling people I don't need help when she does I can only imagine having to parents like that so how long did you do how long do they live after the diagnosis were diagnosed in two thousand than six semi mom passed away in two thousand ten my dad lived yet another year in passed away in two thousand eleven renamed very connected is coppell throughout all journey on being never ever wants to me aside even in the early parts than your mom is doing these weird things I'm worried about her are worried about your dad is not paying the bills that country never be remained a tight team and then it became an which was really lovely in retrospect they were able to stay so connected even even tell the very end when they really couldn't say others names they were just their hearts for so connected in my sister and I then became the bad guys e even though we had had a very respectful family we'd never had disagreements but the two of them remaining a connected Koppel will allow them to place lay on and we were able to handle that instead of having them you know unease with one another so it's just the way it worked in our situation which does sound very nice I wonder if because is there like Your Dad's memory loss made it easy to not get frustrated with your mom in the weird thing she would do because my dad would get frustrated and irritated and snap at my mom in nanoseconds felt like sometimes I would say I would try to be very calm and positive I know it's frustrating but it doesn't help 'cause now she's angry you and so my mom was really great at holding a grudge never known seventy cold grungy months so she would be mad at my father and she'd go off and do her things which weren't necessarily normal because of her disease so it just it just made everything worse so now did you I use the journal as like the backbone for your your book that's a great question I never intended you're right it was not on my bucket list this was a very private personal thing that I was going through because I lived in such a small town I didn't share this diagnosis with anyone else in my mind is a part of my parent's health your privacy and I had no right to talk about it but in my workplace I worked in the low in a local school district because we're such a small town some of my friends that I taught with were not from my community so they're a small handful of people maybe three people I can fight it in only after their occurrence had passed and I had some inkling that the had gone through in Alzheimer's experience as well and you know we would talk before or after school and they say Sheen you know we just I believe that Bose your parents are going through this isn't this same time you should write a book about this and I thought why I I am barely staying alive here I don't have time to write my lesson plans and just looking for the whole air will the thrill and I completely dismiss that until I sat with my dad one week after my mother guide and he had absolutely no knowledge of Kerr no memory of her nothing she was gone sixty six assures of marriage dissolved and I thought wow you know maybe this could maybe this should be reported for my family Always maybe this could help others so I started on that manuscript using the Journal and fleshing that out his journal was day than I took them to the doctor and their blood pressure was this in a pulse with this you know that kind of thing so began to build them around that journal still thinking this was going to be a family story and I decide hey did I would join a local rating group to write my family story now and when they got a hold of what I had written they suggest this has such a larger scope than your family so many other people can be helped by reading his journal this jer donate and so they told me all right regatta get to know your parents before this happened so that's the thirty pages of the book is you know trying to show the lifestyle that new lead in the nineteen fifties how we were raised he's how mom and dad were connected during that time and then the diagnosis happens we go through the journal that his flesh drought and that proceeds APP to nearly two thirds of the book until we have to move them to a care facility study and then the last third of the book is not journal entries but it's what happened at that point wines removed we removed them from their hound their house until they're passing sell net that's how it became a book in without that writing group pressing me to publish it I queried for about a year different agents thinking okay if I if agent doesn't pick up this luggage just not worthy in forget it I'm not going to publish I had just from one agent who wrote back and said You know I put your manuscript in front of Beta readers a really historic but you have no name or famous which to sell a book so we can't take risk review so okay yes yes but I had read through the journey and I thought okay he bought and done this and I knew Marion Schuco yet written and self Howard I have it but I'll tell you the night that I push the final published button I really felt like I could be struck by enlightening and died right there because I was so guilt laden for publishing this and then I saw Auburn kind of hoped that it would just right in the basement of Amazon and it would only be my fiance that read it you know in I I knew I had the safety zone of I could always unpublished shit if I needed to the people began to read it and I got some positive reviews on it which was I Guy I believe this so I was still filled with this uncertainty and I thought I'm going to send this to Marian should aw and just see what she thinks so shy continuous whole it down is at worthy in for me to reach out Maria Schuco that was reaching out to greatness for me and I thought she probably get Tannen Rowe this in the trash I'll never here and she got back to me and she said I love your book would you help me raise awareness of books about Alzheimer's and dementia because hers is fiction in as you know she's a nurse and she had written a kind of as an elder romance because you know couple in her work is very connected and she was not finding a home home for it except with people who are reading about Alzheimer's and she was trying to market it with romance novels in the cover just in a bit there are these you know at that time recover wise these beautiful blue hydrangea but then she changed it to this grey haired Blonde beach it just didn't work with other romances bare-chested man and stop and so she said would you help me raise awareness I was asked Lisette of course and she said who else have you read a Nicer Wide Red Vicky toppy is somebody stole money I R- she said let's get a hold of her and see if we can work together and so that's how Altaf Thursday again we really begin trying to write for other websites and then about a year in we decided don't we ask any we were trying to write secure living websites that having not not necessarily websites about a year end you know there are lot of other authors out there it written about Alzheimer's what if we invited them to rate for us to tell the story behind there story for ice and and we started to do that and I mean the response has been incredible so since in two thousand sixteen we began that in two thousand sixteen since that time we've had more than two hundred authors of Alzheimer's Dementia Books bright four on about their the story behind their story and we don't have approach other people now they come to us and were scheduled it our next hosts that we would schedule I mean were completely held until the beginning of February next year so someone were to contact us today we couldn't possibly post them until February of next year so it's amazing and I think that's what has helped my heart heal from from the trauma of revealing personal story it's like you said about your instead podcasts are I'm sorry I forgot the exact word you read there when you realize people reach fact to you and say thank you for doing this this really helped me then you realize than the material you're pulling together in this venue the people you're interviewing hide casting masks on on your youtube channel it's helping other people feel less alone own through sharing those personal difficult vulnerabilities we as all authors hope a to give healing to those who are living at now is is definitely not a fun journey at all do you feel the old differently now that instead of revealing their personal health secrets that you're helping with the stigma from this disease because my mom never admitted that she was she had an issue and we we thought I thought she went through all the testing to donate a kidney to my dad in the summer of two thousand eight and she was objected for cognitive impairment which wasn't surprising I thought that was when she was diagnosed I thought okay finally we're you know no more pretending that that there's not a problem and I found out at the beginning of twenty nineteen gene or maybe it was in somewhere that fall twenty eighteen when her general physician I told them my sister and I can't we phone with all this lack of medical knowledge that they never told us about so I need to see her diagnosis so he brought it out shoes actually donut DOPP diagnosed I was trying to say donated years later she was literally thirty seven months later she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's and by that point I mean she flunked the test with flying colors she there was no denying it at that point it was like because of an aneurysm or undiagnosed Alzheimer's and my also my maternal great grandmother had no memories at the end for life suite of Plenty of family history sorry so is a little bit of surprise to me that she was in such huge denial nowadays tells me frequently well my brain just doesn't work for well anymore sometimes I say you think it's a slack no kidding well I relate because my parents you know the both sat in and heard the diagnosis my dad and very peaceful man became enraged in stood up actually I defy the doctor it was it.

Alzheimer thirty seven months one week
"alzheimer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You against Alzheimer's I zoned out what okay this is we're talking about reasons why you should learn to play an instrument here's how it will benefit your body how about social benefits done a yeah if it's an instrument like the guitar it's easy to carry around so you can bring IT camping or to a party like if you're a campfire in Europe north and then you busted out a clarinet people very okay but I don't know that I want to hear your clear now although I've always wanted to learn to play the saxophone assisting about saxophone last night wishin I knew how to play the saxophone seven six this is Carol a sense of door to door yeah he went to the door to door it's Christmas comma Carol that's the that's a home or special about a woman named Carol who was not exactly in the festive spear it's Christmas comma Carol bloody hell they're also health benefits learning how to play an instrument they can relieve stress Donna which is the root cause of a lot of health issues plus a study at the university of Utah's pain research center found that you can get so absorbed in playing an instrument it even works as a pain killer Donna Donna wonder yeah that's fabulous I would love to learn how to play the piano yeah well what I mean just to be able to sit down and just what it is what an instrument right you know they say this about freedom freedom is not the absence of constraints it is the presence of the right constraints so two people want to learn how to play the piano okay okay you want you wish right now that you could sit down and just crush it at the P. I do two people want to learn how to play the piano Billy and Susie someone comes abilities or when he's about supposed to sit down to practice the piano I really do want to go out and play yeah I should have to sit here and practice the piano if I want to play I want to place who goes out and plays year after year after year knock knock knock Susie do you want to come out and play it's time for me to do my piano lesson other people were outside playing or say Mitchelson of any sort of freedom she's like just indentured to that she has to play yeah yeah this call had stripped of however years later Billy a total dolt and probably an addict at that point has nothing going for however Suzy can sit down at a piano in because she had the right constraints of practicing she now experiences the sweet rich freedom that is being the master of an instrument in being able to totally express oneself musically and artistically did this just turn into like a self help presentation you want to know where to buy vinyl yeah we did fan H. Q. the sports star you can you can get a an Adam feeling dressing that not job probably works there is just screaming over there they had a you can get it out of the you in Jersey and then I was at the one in Eden prairie center yesterday they have this like this in just a random pop up of vinyl that you can buy I'm Brian you once a vinyl and for ninety nine I'm sorry six now you're just talking about the actual vinyl records our records okay is there music on them yeah there's music all okay not buying the materials I have my my niece's boyfriend who does something he makes something with vinyl like he just wants the dis okay that's not what I was talking okay I'd like if you won a best of you know pick pick a person they're all there it's an H. Q. it's really surprising and they they again start as low as four ninety nine right and what you like that's your ice rinks to really round out a library or the use of the brand new they're not brand new of course not news for the loser it is it is that they're so expensive last night and then after that I listen to a little bit of jazz on the way home Louis Armstrong someone else and someone else it was these three guys doing a live recording all lord and have a look at here the crack it was really late he doesn't now is my impression I actually was watching a comedian over the weekend and he said he went through this whole bit of the all the people to get the names wrong or the the lyrics wrong and for all this time in what a wonder what a wonderful war that's great he thought Louis Armstrong was saying dogs say good night what you know what I'm saying yeah so yeah I'm blessed day dog sick at night you know the real lyric is like dark sacred night yes the that's easy to misunderstand what he envisioned these dogs saying good night and how what that would what a Wonderful World of the internet to get those people who spell Louis with an S. how about them right we look to the St first St Louis yes.

Alzheimer