35 Burst results for "Alyssa"

Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | Last week

Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

"Hi My friend Fred I love you so much. Can you start please by reminding listeners of your story briefly tell us about who you were before Jamie was murdered and who you've become after. Was Murdered? It was just nothing more than your. Typical Dan of two kids to teach kids as a husband. Suburban lifestyle now. This week, that's the lifestyle community that was known to be super. And secure I also was rubber at a son. Who's going through the loss of mine? Her brother Michael From cancer related to service and. He died in October two, thousand seventeen. I want to thank Mr Collins Mr Naylor putting this together. But as I sit her today, I can't help but think. What an incredible metaphor. This room is. For the entire process. That getting healthcare and benefits for nine eleven. First responders has come to. ME. A filled room. Of nine eleven first responders. And in front of me. A, nearly empty congress. So, my wife took A. Forty. Two, thousand, eighteen. Months after my family's call to the loss of micro and as a family, we've never been through anything wiped out before this kind of significant loss we were fortunate. We just all were managing to live our lives and my brother's loss was the first. My parents had outlived their son and that's the worst thing that happened to her family. Right. It should have been the most overwhelming family ever experienced except four months. Later, my daughter was hard because I sent her to school I to school at fourteen to learn to be safe to laugh to be excited about coming home on Valentine's Day for the plan. I had set for life family and didn't work out that way shooter came into school at day my slide Jesse. Thank God I still get to. But J visitor cemetery and. As only, this kind of thing had harrison was the outlet. Grandparents should alain grandchildren. It. Stops inning for me and really understood the gravity of what happened. I went into this whole new life. I don't have the same life I had before and my wife actually became depended upon me. But upon the amazing people who I got to surround myself with WHO became a part of my life or who were already a if my life and I would emission and we're going to succeed we're going to change the. Politics of country we're going to pass on safety after November third every time I hear you till the story I feel like there is something a little bit more grounded in the way in which you tell your story, and I'm wondering if it is because you had this time to write this book and really reflect you've got a book coming called find the Helpers and before we get into that I, want to note The huge amount of praise. This book is already getting new have blurbs from members of Congress actors, activists, people from across the social and political spectrum, and they're all raving about it and I don't think in my life. I've seen such hype about a book even before it is released. So what do you think it is what do you think it is about finding the helpers that makes it so universally loved and also. Tell me about the process of writing it, and if it was Cathartic for you because I think we hear. So often people that tell stories an especially stories that are so close to your being your heart people always say you know it was Cathartic and it was their -Peutic for me to write. This is that how you felt writing it such a great question because this was not the case before Jamie was killed. Afterwards. Writing became my therapy in started doing social media. You know I became very prolific on twitter and I considered people twitter became force. My way of getting things out of me and those book just took to another level being able to sit down and think about all of the relationships what they meant to me about my daughter and what hurt lost means to me and others, and what my book really got to think about is people in a very different way because you hear the same things I hear people sock opticians, sock media. And I writing my book and I couldn't come to that conclusion any of these

Mr Naylor Jamie Congress Harrison Twitter Fred Mr Collins A. Forty Michael Jesse Alain
Benefits of wearing a face mask

Science Vs

04:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Benefits of wearing a face mask

"Hey It's Wendy here. They very quick mosques update. then. You might recall that we made a bunch of episodes about this new virus. It's called the corona virus virus and one question just came up over and over again does wearing masks in public actually slow the spread of this virus. And early on, we had signs verses actually went sure. Because there just wasn't that much evidence showing that mosques and particularly cloth mosques could really keep us from spreading this virus. That was back in spring which feels like a lifetime ago when pussy was just a glimmering Cardi B.'s is. And since then more and more evidence has started trickling out about mosques like at fast there was some concerns that wearing mosques might make people touch their face more but then a study of over seven thousand people came out showing that those who will mosques actually touch their face a lot less great because it suggests that wearing a mask doesn't increase your risk of getting infected. Yes. They can be uncomfortable, but there's really no reason to not wear a mask. This is Dr. Rachel joins from the University of Utah and when we spoke to Rachel in. Our first episode on masks back in March. She was pretty poop hooey about cloth mosques, but since then things have changed. So given the evidence that we have now a you on team mosque. Yeah. For the general public I think that it's reasonable to wear a cloth masks. I think that evidence is increasing. That would many people at a community are wearing masks consistently fewer people are getting the disease. So for example, they have been more and more studies coming out showing that in places where people wear masks, they tend to have low cases of corona virus. And then this case study that was written up by the CDC. Has Dollars Missouri who had been working while they was we've covet. They'd seen more than eight hundred clients while they were sick yet everyone the stylists and the clients will mosques mostly cloth or surgical. None of the clients got sick. Thinking is still that surgical masks and in ninety five of the best if you can get them but more lab studies looking at how stuff comes out of your mouth. Also, making cloth masks look worthwhile particularly if you had liars. And while these all might feel like science has flip flopped down the old switcheroo on you. The nerd truth is that this all actually shows that when it comes to this pandemic. Science is working. We get more data. We changed our minds. So scientists are complicated process in the whole purpose of the is that. Our ideas and our knowledge evolve over time as we gather more evidence, that's a totally natural and desirable process for science. My final question it comes from one of Alyssa's whose name is Bruce. And he asks how well the mosques protect me if I can still smell someone's flatulence. Rachel we've come to you with the most serious and pressing questions if this. Corona. Virus. And I demand an answer. The flatulence odor is the result of some specific molecules that are in the gas that is emitted and those molecules are much smaller than the SARS virus or any kind of respiratory droplets. So you should get better protection against droplets in particles than do against the odor molecules actually. I the way you phrased that you will get better protection. Against, cove it, and you will against a fought, he wear a Moscow. Sorry brace even though mosques cop protect you from follicles. You should still pop one on to protect you from the viral particles.

Dr. Rachel Wendy Bruce Corona Alyssa Missouri CDC Moscow University Of Utah
Alice Johnson receives full pardon from President Trump

Sean Hannity

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Alice Johnson receives full pardon from President Trump

"Full pardon for Alice Marie Johnson. She was serving a life sentence for her involvement in a drug conviction in Memphis. When the president community sentence two years ago today, the president praised Johnson for her efforts to help other inmates like herself. Alice has done an incredible job since he's been out. And recommending other people. We said how many people are they like you? There's only one Alyssa's forest. I'm concerned. But how many people are like you or your circumstance where they were given this massive sentence and they're good people, great people. And she said so many Johnson spoke last night at the Republican National Convention and thanked Trump for his compassion. Rage News time

Alice Marie Johnson President Trump Alyssa Memphis Donald Trump
Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

"There's is daily top. We have so many feuds to talk about today starting with rose McGowan claim that a listen the Llano. made the charm set toxic A. Okay this whole thing started as a political view, but then it got very personal rose accused of throwing fits in front of the crew on the set of charmed rose even says she cried every ten shows renewed because a listen made the set. So toxic in a statement to news listen. Milano said hurt people hurt people commenting any further doesn't align with my wellness plan we have not yet heard back from rose or or Warner, brothers, which produced charm. So a lot to unpack here. Again, it started off very political was a Democrat argument but then rose went there why he thinks she went there to bring charm to behavior. Look, hold. One hundred percent and if we're fighting and I'm holding a grudge against somebody I'm pulling out every receipt I don't care it. One Thousand Nine, hundred, ninety, nine, hundred. This is an audit. We're going to have this fight whether you like it or not. I guess that's true and also she's trying to discredit a list right? That's her way of saying like you shouldn't. You can listen to. Elissa because she's not as relatable as you think because listen to this she may two hundred thousand dollars a week on charm and was still throwing right she didn't get paid enough. It's like a way to discredit. I don't know. That is also. To your argument, sometimes, people will buy into that and be like absolutely. You know what? She's right rose you. If she's FELICIA's really as bad as you say that I'm listed work she says, but then other people can see right through that to say like obviously you have a grudge obviously, you don't like her you've made that very clear. You said it in an interview you do not like or. Do we really trust your opinion because it's obviously very biased. I just feel like this has become somewhat sticky with rose like we can just expect her to just go off and sort of sale of these things and quite frankly does anybody really care twenty years later if the listen. Milano through set like threw a fit onset of charms like I just don't think that's relevant to the conversation like none of us were there. None of us really really cared that much about how she behaved obviously, you want to be respectful to the crew and people that work really hard. To put on a production as we all know but we've all had bad days on this show I just feel like if in fifteen years, one of us were to be like well, she was impossible to deal with. It's like, okay. Then you should have said something then I feel like it's just so kind of in line with WHO rose is trying to be now and I'm not saying that she likes her and I'm not saying that she feels like she's credible or that she believes in anything she says. Every time someone says something that has nothing to do with you. That doesn't mean you need to go and jump in on it. And I, I hate to say this because I'm not away from everybody's experiences and I always say this you gotTa pick struggle and you've got to stick with that struggle and pick up a fight and fight as hard as you can. If you're fighting in the me too movement because it happened to you I totally get it. You're also writing because somebody was in a toxic work environment made something toxic fighting another break, and then what's next if something else comes up and you're fighting about that as well take you just take it away and makes it seem like you're only saying those things because. Of the week, right right and it's also like she made two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a week like made that much money. It was a hit show like I don't I also don't see how that's relevant. You know what I mean like you don't need to also bring up how much somebody made I. Don't think that that's her pleasure bill, but I will say. It rose McGowan felt leg she made. made the workplace toxic that are that's her feelings. That's her way of engaging and listened with tolerance to her. She don't have to do it over the air. She can do on the phone and just throw rose a my dad if I if you thought that way and I did that to you but I, don't think. Anymore. I don't think. I'm. Giving that apology I'm sorry I. Think we know a lot of different people not everybody has a good day I. Think People think just because you're on television or you're part of ensemble cast like your life is so easy. It's a lot of hard work that goes into this. So maybe she maybe she had a bad week or month or whatever. But there's a lot of people that we've experienced that can be toxic or disruptive or difficult to deal with. But that's just sort of this part of this dysfunctional family you keep that within yourself. You don't need to go and spread around and the and the truth is like the whole point rose trying to make was was again a political argument and so politics you know just keep arguing your facts and I think that's a fair argument to have. We argue politics stop in this country. So if you want to argue that with Eliza and you guys want to go back and forth about what who vote for do that. But I say again as you guys said, keep the history out of it because honestly just makes your arguments. Lesson weaker. We aren't just there's no right word. Thank point.

Rose Mcgowan Milano Warner Elissa Llano. Eliza
Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:59 min | Last month

Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

"I'm Senator Doug Jones from Alabama and here's the truth it all my work in the Senate I have your back and no one else. Sorry, not sorry first of all senator thank you so much for taking the time to do the podcast I would like to start by talking about Kobe nineteen and we're recording this in the middle of July. We knew in February and March, what needed to be done right now one hundred, thirty, eight, thousand people have died projections indicate more than two hundred, thousand people will die by November, cases are rising almost everywhere in the. Country especially in the South and the trump administration is just I don't know how else to say it, but he has just failing in every possible way in managing this pandemic. So what is your opinion? What should we be doing nationally and what should Alabama be doing to combat covert nineteen listen first of all, thanks for having me I really appreciate this opportunity to speak with you. It's good to talk to you. See you again. Let me tell you I think we have to do what I've said all along that we have to do and that is listened. To the healthcare experts listen to the healthcare experts that are the national voices like Dr, Fallacy and Dr Redfield and those that are on top of this, listen to your local healthcare professionals, listen to the statewide healthcare professionals and follow their advice. The problem that we have right now is that clearly we have a lack of leadership from the administration. We have not seen the kind of leadership that we should have from the very beginning of this administration was downplaying it, and then as I think the president realized that we had to shut the economy down which was. His Pride and joy Dan, he started to try to intimidate people too much to open the economy up. He was intimidating protesters in Michigan and elsewhere, and that had a ripple effect around the country. Then it was politicizing the wearing of masks as we learned more and more about this virus it became clear that we needed to wear masks, and then all of a sudden became a political issue. It's not as much anymore, but it's still in places a political issue, and now we're politicizing the opening schools schools. Do you think that Alabama was too quick to Rio Ben? I think we tried to accelerate. The process and I think you know From our standpoint that has had a negative impact on our progress and I think that's why we've regressed. And we've seen a three hundred percent increase. In cases month over month after going the first three weeks of this. At a forty percent club if people would listen to the healthcare professionals, follow the guidelines and understand the world had never seen this virus before like December nobody has the antibodies at that time. Nobody had the immunities and this is a work in progress. We are learning more and more and more about this virus. As we go along, we have no vaccine are therapeutics are getting better. The only way we can stop the spread of this virus is for us to do our part. We're in this together, we need to act like, do you think we need some sort of coordinated national shutdown? To try to get this under control I. think that would be very, very difficult to try to do that in there are places in this country where I think that you wouldn't need to shut down nationally right now if they take some of the precautions, we're a big country where diverse country we have seen the virus spread in different areas I think it would be very, very difficult to try to have any kind of national shutdown but you know a lot of the governors are stepping a lot of them are not and lot of them are seeing their states ravage along the governors. have been stepping up doing the right thing. Our governor in Alabama issued a statewide score. She's the only governor in the deep South that his issue that in fact, the governor of Georgia, which is raging as much as Alabama yesterday issued something banning local officials from issuing a mask order. So damnedest thing I've ever heard of and so I think that the states are stepping up individual beers have been stepping up. I mean. When you have a lack of leadership coming from the administration, you've got to have the local leaders stepping up. So I think we're doing it on a hot spot by. Hotspots state-by-state by state community, mount community basis be tough to do it on a national basis, but there's plenty of spokesman out there illicit from the national level better telling people to wear masks and suggestions and do those things. It's amazing to me how the masks were politicized and I saved a lot on this podcast. But anytime, we politicize something we dehumanize it and I think this is a perfect example. But when you look at deaths, the numbers don't lie. So even if you were the type of person to say you know what? I don't believe in science I think truth and fact is. Relative there's concrete numbers here that are undeniable and do you think that there's any chance that we get this under control while this administration is still in place or do you think that it's going to continue to rage and grow until we have leadership in there that can at least be willing to listen to science? Are we gonNA answer you with a glass half full and I'm going to say I put faith in the majority of the American people to start doing the right thing. They're seeing these numbers to their seeing the lack of leadership they're seeing the numbers in the deaths in. The virus, they're seeing the fact that the average age of someone catching this virus now has gone down fifteen years fifteen years from when we first started to. This is just not a senior's forest anymore. So I'M GONNA put more faith than I guess I have more faith these days in. Awadh. The governors of whatever political party and local leaders and mayors to lead by example, and to do those things necessary. What's interesting to me is that her so many folks in Alabama and we had a problem with folks not wearing masks we still do but the so many people aren't listening to the Reason why you wear a mask they think it is just to protect themselves. I've heard so many people say well, I don't need to wear a mask I may get it but I'm gonNA low risk category. So I'll take my chances. It's not about you. It's about the people with preexisting conditions, the diabetes heart disease that things like that puts them at risk. You could be a symptomatic and spread this disease spread this virus so easy without wearing a mask and you not even know it and putting people at risk. So I'll tell folks down here. Look this is golden rule time. Okay. This is new unto others as you would do unto yourself and so wear the mask for others where the mass for those healthcare professionals that are on the front lines that are just having mental breakdowns these days with all that they are overwhelmed about look I'm going to again go back to your question I'm going to have a glass half full I give a lot of faith in the American people to see where we are at start making these comparisons and see through the like of leadership and start doing the things necessary for themselves.

Alabama Senator Doug Jones Senator Senate Kobe Dr Redfield Joy Dan President Trump Rio Ben Michigan Georgia
'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

Steve Cochran

00:52 sec | Last month

'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

"For Who's the Boss fans? Yeah, looks like the old eighties nineties, Siri's is going to be coming back Tony Danza and Alissa Milano. I've already signed on for the reboot. Tony Danza's character will be playing a former major league baseball player, Alyssa Milano, his daughter on the show will be playing a single mom. Judith Light, has not yet signed on for the project, although she is said to be very supportive of it on the young man, Danny Pretoria pin Toro. Was the younger son of the show. Jonathan also has not signed on for yet. I thought the most hilarious person on that show what was the mother, Mona actress Catherine Heldman, and she passed away. Last year, but it was it was a popular show for 8 10 years. Something like that,

Tony Danza Alissa Milano Judith Light Catherine Heldman Siri Danny Pretoria Baseball Jonathan
‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

Jason and Alexis

00:14 sec | Last month

‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

"All you fans of who's the boss, a sequel. To the hit series is now in development at Sony Pictures Television. It's going to take place 30 years later, Tony Danza and Alissa Milano will overturn is Tony and Samantha. Miss Ellie.

Tony Danza Sony Pictures Television Alissa Milano Ellie Samantha
There's No Such Thing As A Normal Period With Dr. Alyssa Dweck

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:20 min | Last month

There's No Such Thing As A Normal Period With Dr. Alyssa Dweck

"Dr Welcome to the how and keeps so much for having me. Yeah. Thank you so much. Thanks for being with us, do you WanNa talk about the all important topic of periods in quarantine and our cycles how they might have been affected by? Recent events in the ensuing stress from. and then also you know I know quite a few people who an alien you definitely do to who have thought about you know conceiving or how this might affect future plan for children in quarantine. So and just kind of in this new phase wherein so we love to talk also about you know fertility and you know how to deal with that with that sort of thing you know and knowing if it's a how habitual issue or maybe like a hormonal show. So we have lots to talk about today. Great well, this is my favorite subject and frankly I am seeing people in my office day in day out with changes in their cycles because of changes in their general stress and routines that have come along with quarantine, and thankfully here in the New York area we are. Emerging from that. So we'll see what happens with menstrual cycles after that time and I'm sure also it's like people changing who they're living with two and like changing up their routine in that respect. So I know I remember from camp at least my cycle changed with all the girls in my bunk. So I'm sure that that also affected things one hundred percent. So living in a different arrangement and environment can absolutely change a cycle. We also know that stress like severe stress I don't mean stress like Oh I have an exam tomorrow my period's going. To be different but significant stress like a loss or going to college, and I would have to say that living through a pandemic that none of us has ever experienced in our lifetimes should surely qualify as stress of that level. The other thing that occurs during this time is that our dining habits are changing our exercise habits are changing our stress levels are off the chart. So things are different and remember where we are. We are what we eat and we are what we do in terms of activity saw periods are going to change as well. So in terms of like things that people might have experienced changes they might have noticed that they might have been worried about or maybe they were. You know just sort of like winging it because it was hard to see doctors for awhile. What are some some symptoms are changes that people could have experienced or that you have seen? So, this is my anecdotal reports because we're now seeing people back in the office again. But prior to that, we were seeing patients via telehealth, which is a whole nother subject but you know we could really ascertain a menstrual habits during those visits as well. Women are noticing skipped periods they're noticing their periods or shorter or longer heavier or lighter, or just irregular for what they are used to. So bottom line is they're just not the same as what was normal for them before this level of stress the other thing are some of the PMS type symptoms that people are experiencing are different. And this is one I'd like to suggest really has an awful lot to do with. Diet and exercise because granted you know when you move home from living on your autumn in hat and let's say a now you're living in your parents basement waiting for since the clear on the health front, your diet is going to be different. You may be eating more comfort foods which have more salt or more sugar or just more volume and calories your exercise habits change because the gyms are closed. So these things all have an impact on your period and the symptoms that you have before he endured. So what so what about like symptoms like psychological symptoms 'cause I know I felt that more extremely in quarantine just when I know that I'm nearing the end of my birth control pack like I feel like just like just just tie like brain fog basically. Sadder. Is. That is that could that be due to this time oh? No question look I mean some people with underlying depression or anxiety has noticed a heightening of their symptoms, and hopefully they are still receiving the necessary assistance with therapy or mindfulness exercise or medication. But I think people who never even haven't underlining a mental health concern are dealing with stress levels that we've never known before but I really equate this to stress that may go on in in other instances for example, when young women go after college for the first time and hopefully that will still be. The case now, this fall as we're coming up on it, women lose their periods because of stress because of a change in their habits, and also because of what you brought up, which were different roommates and stuff like that other huge stressors that do this would be like a significant loss or some sort of excessive weight loss or diet change. Those things can also change the menstrual cycle.

PMS New York
Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:43 min | Last month

Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

"For nearly thirty years, women in the Mexican border city of Juarez. have been disappearing many of them turning up dead in mass graves. We. Don't know who the killers are very few have been charged and fewer convicted. My guest this week. Our odds volition and Monica Ortiz Rebbe. Of the amazing podcast forgotten the women of what is the final episode two, which is now available, they are incredible journalists with an infuriating story to tell. If! You've ever been to war with disposing of bodies, Israelis. You don't have to dig to her dirt. You're digging through saying. Just across the bridge from El Paso Texas, hundreds of young women have been tanning up dead in Juarez Mexico. Many artists covered in mass graves. Some have strange symbols coughed. Some. have their hands bound with shoelaces? And? Everyone from the families of the victims to the United States. FBI has tried to uncover who is behind these crimes. But one thing is clear. The crimes are connected. They're not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it. No one talked about it. These are like ghosts. The numbers started to rise, and then a lot of theories were floated up the gangs serial murder. The cartels organ traffickers the possibility of some sort of strange devil worship. It's been fifteen years since I first heard about these murders, and I've been haunted ever since. How is it possible? These crimes remain unsolved on journey to find out we talk to victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims the new one of the culprits. We visit, the site of one of the mass graves and traveled to a dangerous part downtown. Where many of the women disappeared? I Voloshin, I'm one of the hosts of Forgotten Women of Juarez. The podcast explores what happens when this become targets, and when the judiciary is compromised, I'm fighting for bust institutions and freedom of speech. Sorry, not sorry I'm Monique, our three, they co host of the podcast forgotten. The women of what is I believe workers everywhere should earn a fair wage and women ought to live free from violence Nazari Period I. WanNa give the listeners some back story on what's happening in Juarez. How many women have gone missing in the crimes not being? Even really investigated by authorities and then go into why you felt it was important to do. The podcast I first started working on this podcast of several trips to the Texas Mexico border specifically El Paso Texas and In Mexico. And it took me several trips before I learned something that everybody in the region knows, which is that? Since the early nineteen nineties, hundreds of women have turned up dead in Horace, and many of them met incredibly brutal fates, which was evident from that bodies when they were discovered. That been five mass graves of Women Discovering Juarez since nineteen ninety five. And yet, all of this was happening right across the border from one of America's safest cities, a prosperous suburban Texans city, and so I was just very curious. How could this be happening? How could the crimes not be solved? And it ended up being this journey with Monica that open up. All kinds of other questions particularly learn things like the FBI had tried to solve the crimes, not once not twice, but three times. When the mass grave was discovered, and suspects confessed harder Crawford was the FBI special agent in charge of El Paso. Is Office was just a few miles away from the site. The mass grave and he taken a special interest in the murders of women in Juarez and was following this case closely as a potential breakthrough. You could sense that the pressure was mounting. Political pressure public pressure international pressure. The families and relatives and friends of the disappeared. Women were allowed. Those women would hold use. Mourning the deaths and George attention to that. That was huge. There was all kinds of attention from the international press. People like Jennifer Lopez. Eve ensler involved and yet these crimes remain stubbornly unsolved wasn't clear. Who was killing these hundreds of women, and why and it was a story of vulnerability, but also a story of the deep paradox irony of the border that many of these women were working in factories, which were American owned could see across the border into a Passo a city of. A Fred safety enormous safety by comparison and that Alpes Owens could see back into war as many of them had relatives there many of them. Have Friends there and yet. Those this seeming inability to do anything and that struck me as something which was I had to know more

Juarez. FBI El Paso Texas Juarez Mexico Monica Ortiz Monique Crawford Eve Ensler El Paso Jennifer Lopez United States Alpes Owens Murder Texas Mexico Voloshin Horace America Special Agent In Charge Mexico George
ViacomCBS drops Nick Cannon, cites 'anti-Semitic' comments

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

ViacomCBS drops Nick Cannon, cites 'anti-Semitic' comments

"With the the a Viacom White French surge the virus House CBS tourist last is pandemic trying is terminating month industry getting to in distance industrial worse its relationship itself has Congress received production after with entertainer a will further its be back trade boost Nick but in cannon Washington adviser will it with for last criticized the what next partial it calls week hateful to reopening Dr consider speech Anthony a fresh and the Fauci federal anti of Disneyland relief semitism reserve package USA says Paris industrial today marches published Republicans on are the production opening let an opinion up up with have increased the latest been piece of reluctant the top about by five Peter floor to Navarro and approve of a half the Viacom Eiffel percent more outlining Tower CBS eight last the has month ways but cut priorities ties he's disagreed with that Nick was cannon two have the main second without shifted over sections straight an G. episode as monthly of the White virus York's of gain his House continues video most strategic podcast frequent and hammering communications better TV cannons than the theme what U. class S. economists chief park Alyssa resort featuring had Senate Flores forecasted professor GOP cuts says Griff Disneyland chief the of peace Public Mitch but McConnell Enemy did parks it was not still and says that go the was Walt nearly he through filmed now Disney eleven normal last hopes studios clearance to year percent quickly and ran processes approve below on are YouTube the a now relief February opening two weeks bill and their is ago level doors Navarro's which to is the before expected can public opinion an ingress the first to academy alone hit say a that trillion four virtually black months people but dollars shut it are off comes the down true as to due he closure Hebrews trump to will the roll allies corona as out and a result details Jews virus in have and of taken next the pandemic out their identity week of however the White focusing the House the rebound movie have on been cannon trying schools cheese in industrial writes to in on and discredit Facebook Hong kids production he safety vowed wholeheartedly jobs may she measures not and last apologizes unemployment asked including yesterday managed a and resurgence at but a healthcare Georgetown denies attendance the in companies University Colbert claim nineteen reduced house that event Democrats he did cases capacity not just reach have out home to already acknowledge to has American support forced approved the many situation social should a southern three trust distancing and trillion about western he the virus and demands dollar boasted governors pandemic full bill ownership cleaning to pause speaker of and felt his disinfection improv Nancy she or said reverse Pelosi series for of rights the wild most warns the economic N. and part out of Congress spaces trust re does opening canon not as respected well has make up other their a big I deals states medical full enough unconnected top authorities investment officials the Viacom my in I fighting camp say believe CBS in the I'm Washington a virus maximum one including of them of hosting the two economy so fifty NBC's I think people will you America's pay can trust an will got even me now talent bigger be sabar allowed and price fox's mag at ani the the top masked Sager Washington floor singer at made the time Donnie Washington to enjoy the panoramic views of the city of light I'm Charles the Ledesma

Viacom
US industrial production surges 5.4% in June

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

US industrial production surges 5.4% in June

"With the the a White French surge the virus House tourist last is pandemic trying month industry getting to in distance industrial worse itself has Congress received production after a will further its be back trade boost but in Washington adviser will it with last criticized the next partial week to reopening Dr consider Anthony a fresh the Fauci federal of Disneyland relief reserve package USA says Paris industrial today published Republicans on the production opening an opinion up have increased been piece of reluctant the top about by five Peter floor to Navarro and approve of a half the Eiffel percent more outlining Tower eight last the month ways but priorities he's disagreed that was two have the main second without shifted sections straight G. as monthly of the White virus York's gain House continues most strategic frequent and hammering communications better TV than the theme what U. S. economists chief park Alyssa resort had Senate Flores forecasted GOP cuts says Disneyland chief the peace Mitch but McConnell did parks it was not still and says go the Walt nearly he through now Disney eleven normal hopes studios clearance to percent quickly processes approve below are the a now relief February opening bill and their is level doors Navarro's which to is the before expected public opinion the first to academy alone hit a trillion four virtually months but dollars shut it off comes down as to due he closure trump to will the roll allies corona as out a result details virus in and of next the pandemic out week of however the White focusing the House the rebound movie have on been trying schools cheese in industrial to in and discredit Hong kids production safety vowed jobs may she measures not and last unemployment asked including yesterday managed a and resurgence at a healthcare Georgetown attendance in University Colbert nineteen reduced house event Democrats cases capacity just have home already to has American support forced approved many social should a southern three trust distancing and trillion about western the virus and dollar boasted governors pandemic bill cleaning to pause speaker and felt disinfection Nancy she or said reverse Pelosi for of rights the most warns the economic and part of Congress spaces trust re does opening not as respected well make up their a big I states medical full enough top authorities investment officials my in I fighting camp say believe in the I'm Washington a virus maximum one of them of the two economy so fifty I think people will you pay can trust an will even me now bigger be sabar allowed price mag at ani the top Sager Washington floor at made the time Donnie Washington to enjoy the panoramic views of the city of light I'm Charles the Ledesma

Nancy Sager Washington Disney Disneyland GOP Peter Washington Charles The Ledesma Donnie Washington Pelosi Congress Colbert Hong Mcconnell Mitch Flores Navarro Paris
White House trade adviser Navarro critical of Dr. Fauci

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

White House trade adviser Navarro critical of Dr. Fauci

"With the the White French the virus House tourist is pandemic trying industry getting to distance worse itself has Congress received after a will further its be back trade boost in Washington adviser with criticized the next partial week to reopening Dr consider Anthony a fresh Fauci of Disneyland relief package USA Paris today published Republicans on the opening an opinion up have been piece of reluctant the top by Peter floor to Navarro approve of the Eiffel more outlining Tower eight the ways but priorities he's disagreed two have main without shifted sections G. as of the White virus York's House continues most strategic frequent hammering communications TV the theme U. S. chief park Alyssa resort Senate Flores GOP cuts says Disneyland chief the peace Mitch McConnell did parks not and says go the Walt he through now Disney normal hopes studios clearance to quickly processes approve are a now relief opening bill and their is doors Navarro's which to is the expected public opinion first to alone hit a trillion four months but dollars it off comes as to he closure trump will roll allies as out a result details in and of next the pandemic out week of the White focusing House the movie have on been trying schools cheese to in and discredit Hong kids safety vowed jobs she measures and unemployment asked including yesterday managed and at a healthcare Georgetown attendance University reduced house event Democrats capacity just have home already to American support approved social should a three trust distancing trillion about the virus and dollar boasted pandemic bill cleaning speaker and felt disinfection Nancy she said Pelosi for of rights the most warns and part of Congress spaces trust does not as respected well make a big I medical full enough top authorities investment officials in I fighting say believe the I'm a virus maximum one of them of the two economy so fifty I think people will you pay can trust an will even me now bigger be sabar allowed price mag at ani the top Sager Washington floor at made the time Donnie Washington to enjoy the panoramic views of the city of light I'm Charles the Ledesma

Donnie Washington Sager Washington Georgetown Attendance Universi White Focusing House Disney Disneyland GOP Washington Charles The Ledesma Congress Pelosi Nancy Hong Mitch Mcconnell Navarro Peter Floor Usa Paris Anthony
White House trade adviser Navarro critical of Dr. Fauci

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

White House trade adviser Navarro critical of Dr. Fauci

"The White House is trying to distance itself after its trade adviser criticized Dr Anthony Fauci USA today published an opinion piece by Peter Navarro outlining the ways he's disagreed without G. White House strategic communications chief Alyssa Flores says the peace did not go through normal clearance processes and is Navarro's opinion alone but it comes as trump allies in and out of the White House have been trying to discredit vowed she asked yesterday at a Georgetown University event just home American should trust about the virus pandemic felt she said for the most part trust respected medical authorities I believe I'm one of them so I think you can trust me sabar mag ani Washington

White House Peter Navarro Alyssa Flores Dr Anthony Fauci Usa G. White House Georgetown University Ani Washington
Highlights: Man City 4-0 Liverpool

ESPN FC

04:50 min | 2 months ago

Highlights: Man City 4-0 Liverpool

"City's four nil demolition of Livable Craig. Burley Steve Nicol and DOT WITH ME Steve Big deal. Know. Alyssa not disappoint, and it's as deflate and. But it's no big deal and really should we be surprised? You know Liverpool war on heightened. Anyway, and we're playing against a great team. And they just outplayed, but you know what. After the next game when they weren't well before Gotten Craig I saw you on twitter, talking about how this is taking the shine of slightly the title. Yeah Yeah was trying. Trying to encourage those edits that will suggest that not go away. Hide under a rock. Liverpool for fifteen twenty minutes. Were the Liverpool. That will come to admire, but then I just thank God. For you know war subconsciously. Doesn't really Martin and the. It doesn't for them and and some sense from a professional standpoint, the steam engine you don't. You don't ever want to have that happen as a player. In the League wrapped up nearly as you have then subconsciously unless. Pledge Not can say they've been celebrating. And some wager in this lockdown social destin's and still managed to enjoy this, and so the preparation has been affected is on top of that. You know we know set here agreed site. We know we'll set. These problems are done set. These problems have been the catastrophic mistakes have made defensively. They can open up any team. You're never meant that neither team that for seven days as we celebrate within the League you agree in. Yeah absolutely I there was a god Ivana formed by the Manchester City plans level, and quite rightly, too, but that was all. They began to give them tonight. I think they wanted to just make a point to live appropriate is little point and admire reflection. Watching that was it felt unreal. It felt like a friendly. It didn't have the intensity really of Manchester. Manchester Society Liverpool game as we understand it, it'd be end. It didn't really matter being Liverpool picture full strength team They wouldn't have wanted anything like that to happen, but it did and all. I can say really. Is that Liverpool? Party might have been a heck of a lot better than we all saw. Because the defendant in particular had double vision. Steve. What's that income? which is clarify that you're not broadcasting this show from inside the show or Cuba? benching cuts from living. Off. Of criticism of the date goal. If Mrs Dark appears from behind those curtains. I promise you. Stephen. Stevie. Stevie USB the situation before where you want. And having to go through the motions he must be. Yeah the one that comes to was way by two three Liverpool dropped the title up. We're like four games to go. And of course I'm I've just joined the team and I'm trying to get and so I'm I'm all on edge I'm I'm I'm coaching trated and that same team that completely dominated dot year. Finished the season with with like. Three defeats a two defeats, two draws, and then score any goals and. Just was was a shell of what had been previously, and these were these were experienced center national players who had been through the ringer renew. It was all about. And it didn't. Didn't really have that much. There was no wedge. There was no edge with the coaching staff and so. Particularly me I shouldn't have been surprised. It Didn't really matter in the end, but I'm intrigued to get your thoughts on the penalty Steve Did. You think it was the right decision. Listen I can see why the referee gave it because. Y-. Gomez on was across the front, and how to hold of of of Sterling, no question. The problem I have is that and the same tussle they were having sterling had half of Gomez Short, and he's left hand holding them all. So that's the only thing that annoys me I can see why it was given. A little dive, either by the way I don't see how you can die when somebody's holding onto your belly button. But I can see why it was governed. And as you said previously, the truth is the titles wrapped up. So why get bent over of boater? Didn't

Liverpool Steve Nicol Stevie Manchester Gomez Twitter Alyssa Manchester Society Destin Stephen Martin Mrs Dark Ivana
Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

"Alyssa Milano is fighting back against claims she wore blackface in a 2013 parody video. Defending herself on Twitter, the 47 year old actress explain that the video was from a funny or die sket. She appeared in parodying Snooki from Jersey Shore. She also included a link to one minute clip from the video documenting your transformation into the reality star who, like her other jersey shore cast members turned tanning into an art

Alyssa Milano Jersey Shore Twitter
Miami - Gov. Ron DeSantis signs Alyssa’s Law, requiring silent alarms at all Florida public schools

Sean Hannity

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Miami - Gov. Ron DeSantis signs Alyssa’s Law, requiring silent alarms at all Florida public schools

"Victory for the mother of a Parkland massacre victims of Iran to Santa signs Eliza's law requiring all public schools in the state of Florida to have a silent panic alarm. The law's named in honor of 14 year old Elissa Allah deaf it was killed. It's Stoneman Douglas. Mother, Lori says. This will make everyone say Furred school, so the teacher would be empowered to be able to press a button on their cell phone, and it's a direct link to law enforcement so they can get on the scene as quickly as possible to take down the threat. Auriemma come into triage that they felt the laws already on the books in New Jersey. Allah Deaf is hoping it passes in New York next, and she's also working on a federal Elissa is law.

Stoneman Douglas Furred School New Jersey Iran New York Eliza Lori Santa Florida
"Girded Loins" - How Will The Supreme Court Rule?

Hysteria

03:53 min | 3 months ago

"Girded Loins" - How Will The Supreme Court Rule?

"I wanted to talk a little bit about the Supreme Court. Because I. Kind of always WanNa talk a little bit about the Supreme Court, but also because it's been really. It's been a real roller coaster ride for the last. Year or so everybody went in thinking that the liberals would get just pommelled and that America's social progress would get set back fifty years, and in some ways you not. Everything has been a win for sure I. Don't WanNa pretend that everything has been a win. There have been some surprising wins like last week on the day. That show came out the supreme. Supreme Court ruled that the trump's attempt to extinguish. DACA was unconstitutional. He didn't do it the right way so Daca. Lives we had neil gorsuch coming through and saying that the Civil Rights Act title seven covers the rights of lgbtq Americans when it comes to employment. Yep, but we still have one that's Kinda hanging over us like the sword of Damocles. And that is a. that's an abortion case out of Louisiana. Alyssa. What do you think is going to happen with the case? It might come down tomorrow. It might come down next week because the supreme, court loves to wait and save the big cases for the end. What do you think's GonNa Happen? Erin. I'd be lying if I said I knew if I even had an inkling that I think that Neil, gorsuch was going to SORTA. Come through or that. John Roberts we don't know like I. Guess My problem is I. Don't have the brain of a supreme. Court justice and I could never be one. Which is why I didn't go to law school. Because what's the point if you can't ultimately be a? Supreme Court Justice One day, but it's like I. Worry I worry that they've done these things sort of I think by following the letter of the laws they they believe it should be interpreted and I'm like. ARE THEY GONNA? Be like well and buy them. I mean the republic. We know how old Brett's GonNa. Go breads just he doesn't even need to show up for the for the hearing I mean he can just put that Shit on mute and play brick. But the others you're like, are they just? Are they going to be like? Wow, if we. If we are. Are we really going to Piss? Trump off like it's GonNa fire US court justice. If we don't if we don't give do him a solid here and set women's rights back thirty years. So I, don't I? Don't know I know what's going to happen. Yeah I. Mean I try not to get excited because you know one hand. There's no words no way to get excited, but there's also being in a state of having my loins just constantly go ahead. Is a little exhausting I really want to. I. Really Want to live in a world were John Roberts can. Be The deciding vote and in and write an opinion. He admonishes the Fifth Circuit Court for even trying to step to him right by deliberately directly confronting Supreme Court ruling from two thousand sixteen. But in two thousand, Sixteen Roberts was on the side of keeping the trap block question in place. I. Don't know what's going to happen and I'M Just I just get it over with I. Just wanted to know I. Just want to tell us. It's suspense we don't need. Yeah Yeah I just WanNa read Sonia Sotomayor's either concurring opinion or fiery descent. She has been really writing some interesting stuff this term. And I just really want to know you know. We have. We've affirmed the LGBTQ people are people. With amazing Yes docker recipients, also people I'm really excited to learn if women are also people less negative crazy. I know get crazy.

Supreme Court John Roberts Brett Neil Gorsuch Daca Sonia Sotomayor Fifth Circuit Court America United States Louisiana Alyssa Erin
"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 4 months ago

"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

"In two thousand eighteen Jocelyn Benson was elected as secretary of state in Michigan. It was part of a historic sweep. Where women were also elected to the governorship and to the Attorney General's office then the corona virus hit and Donald Trump went on the warpath personally attacking governor. Whitmer as she fought to get her citizens access to needed medical equipment. Well now he's also attack. Jocelyn calling her a rogue secretary of state for her plan to make sure all Michigan voters can apply to get an absentee ballot. This fall keeping them safe from the virus and ensuring everyone has a chance to vote. Jocelyn joined us to talk about the monumental importance of voting rights in the age of trump and the corona virus. This year we saw the. You're the woman. Two Point Gretchen. Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Benson Debbie Stamina and the list goes secretary of state of the Great State of Michigan. Four four my duties to invest in my abilities regard. Help me guys. The Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson says. She sees nothing wrong with paper ballots. Secretary of state says the voter absentee ballot. Applications are great way for voters to vote in coming elections without risking their. How ahead of a planned visit to Michigan Tomorrow? President trump is targeting the leaders of the state on twitter president trump on Wednesday threatened to withhold federal funding to Michigan after the state announced that all of the states registered. Voters would receive applications for absentee ballots in the mail this year. Benton Secretary of State of Michigan on fighting every day to ensure that every voice is heard and every vote is counted. Sorry not sorry first of all. Thank you so much for doing this. I really really appreciate it. It's interesting because you have a job that I don't think a lot of people fully grasp what you do as secretary of State in Michigan. You're responsible for overseeing elections. But can you give my listeners? Really an overview of what that entails. And just broadly what? The job secretaryastate position in most states overseas democracy and that means everything from money in politics and regulating promoting disclosure of bat to the actual act of casting a ballot and making sure those votes are counted accurately protecting the security of the process. Anything that goes into ensuring that our democracy runs well flows lows through each state secretary of State and from your perspective. What is the biggest threat to our democracy? And you can do that. Broadly but you can also do that in Michigan. Well Yeah I always say that. A healthy democracy requires an engaged. An informed electorate and so in that way biggest threat is disengaged and misinformed electorate. I think you need both. You need everyone. Voting particular especially systems of underrepresented communities whose voices has historically been at the table and decisions. That are made them. But you also need to to be informed about all the aspects of an issue that they can make independent decisions about what's best for them. We're having our communities so to me really. You need people. Running the system secretaries of state and we need elected representatives who all kind of flow into that any neighbouring and encourage engagement and Commission. Of course the media as well but if you poke short on either of those two metrics those two pieces than democracy is threatened and. I think that's some of what we are seeing today where you have in some cases. Low turnout or disengagement or feeling of apathy or. My vote doesn't matter. My voice doesn't matter which is the exact opposite of which real and democracy or people not having access to accurate information about the decisions that are being made note decision makers that are making them can hold them accountable. We here and we've heard a lot about Michigan this cycle. So what makes it so important in this election besides the Electoral College? And how did it become a battleground? These chicken is a collection of voters that really reflects the entire country in many ways certainly in the Midwest and you've got a very diverse population we've got the largest concentrations for example Arab American voters in the country. We've got strong urban areas with unique stories and history like Detroit and Flint and high levels of communities of color growing Tino population and then a lot of the state is very rural. And so the racial demographics. The economic demographics -cation you have also right next to Detroit. One of the wealthiest per capita community in the country and they got in some ways integregation and many of the problems that afflict and having the country historically are reflected in Michigan. There's a great thing I saw when I personally hear when Michigan accuses the whole country gets a cold that in some ways is a bellwether state. Her a lot of different things is that because of the people because of history because of the community that can indicate how rest of the country like feeling going and attention on our state certainly over the past ten years when it comes to presidential elections. Really underscored that.

Michigan Jocelyn Benson Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Be State Secretary Donald Trump Detroit Midwest Attorney Commission Twitter Gretchen President Trump Debbie Stamina
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:48 min | 4 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"The share of women in the House and Senate has increased over time. But it's still well below the share of women in the US population. And if you dig deeper. Congress looks even less representatives women of color make up eighteen percent of the US population but before the two thousand eighteen midterms the accounted for just seven percent of Congress and LGBT women. Make up about two point five percent of the US population but there are only two openly lgbt women in Congress that's less than one percent even with the recent wins by women candidates in the two thousand eighteen midterms. There's still a long way to go before. They're fully represented. I look at someone like just send our during the prime minister in New Zealand. I the way that she dealt with the terrorist attack on her country. Yeah the way that she wouldn't name the terrorists that was you know. She's amazing. Amazing. We will not talk about their names and then also the way that she's dealing with this crisis she is incredibly humble and that and just real like you really feel like she's telling you the truth this authenticity. Just I think is is one of her great strengths and I think just very clear. Nobody panicked. This is what we're going to do and we're going to do better for. I think she's really good also at hope and inspiration which people need people made in times like best. They need to know. We're all in this together and we're going to get back and we can do this and done things like this before we've done things that have been harder than before. Did you see that? The princess in Sweden actually took an online nursing class and entered into the frontline fighting this pandemic. It's the most amazing thing I was like. This is brilliant. She's a princess and she was like Nope. I'm going to take an online class and I'm going to really make a difference and it's just spectacular. The majority of frontline healthcare workers around the world. Are Women. Yeah actually in China. I think the numbers like ninety percent methods. And then there's also that stat that the country is that have been least hit as far as numbers go with Kobe. Nineteen have women leadership. Yeah so I'm wondering if you could shed a little light on how the challenges women face around the globe are maybe similar or different. Well certainly you've been a huge champion around Combating Violence Against Women and sexual assault and harassment. And that is in my mind. The biggest challenge women face I. Yeah globally there is no country no community no religion no social economic background of women anywhere on Earth who are not affected by gender based violence. That's just full stop. That is the only issue that seems to get worse. Not Better over time right. We're going to get more. Women elected to political office. More women are going to start and grow business. People are going to see. Oh Wow this is great for the economy okay. Yes let's keep funding. You can see steps forward on many of these issues but on violence against women. I mean the harder hit. Humanity is the deeper violence against women growth. Right now with this crisis in China triple. They had triple the cases really at the epicenter of Code. They had triple A. Cases of domestic violence in the height. They're of the virus and that is not a winston. It is a fact that when people lose their jobs and anxiety and stress is running high. That will be my own skin for that. There will be domestic violence. Bounce GonNa Children as well and then of course you add to that. Being locked down with an abuser or higher. Yeah it's horrifying. Yeah so to me. I mean that's that is the biggest issue and of course it takes different forms in different places you know in the DRC have rape as a weapon of war and other countries ravaged by war like Syria or Iraq in places like Afghanistan. You have girls being hung just because they're girls girls being burned with acid late certainly by strangers by partners by boyfriends acquaintances college. Campus Violence Sexual violence child marriage. Honor Crimes Cream genital mutilation. It takes on a different look in different places but we run. Something called an emergency assistance. Fund FOR EXTREME FORMS OF GENDER based violence is called Voices Against Violence Fund. And we will open up the fund and literally the cases that it's small bits of money that we can get out the door within twenty four to forty eight hours to quickly help a woman get back on her feet. Nadia Murad. Who is the is eating woman who escaped Isis in Iraq? Acting twenty fourteen. She was actually one of the first people to receive one of these. Just very quick fusions of financial support to help her family and she get healthcare relocation. You know her brothers had been killed. Most of her family was killed. The bill back something and I'm allowed to tell her story because she tells her story and obviously winning a Nobel peace prize a number of years later for suing Isis. But the fun that we continue to run at a number of cases is just through the roof and we you know quite frankly. We need more money to fund. Yeah believe me I would rather be preventing these Reno. And why should we were throwing money at a problem rather than trying to get it a solution but we're doing both let me ask you this. The numbers are just staggering. But do the numbers go down when women have power. I'm thinking about just even in the United States and domestic violence and violence against women and we have some really incredible women that are fighting in Congress and Senate and yet these numbers are still mind blowing. You know we fight so hard to get a seat at the table and then I'm wondering. Do you see changes within the community. Do you see that numbers go down. What is the tangible evidence of that? This is this is shifting or changing. Well certainly I think when the economy is strong right when other things are stable. That is certainly better. But that shouldn't have to be the case. Things be better never should be that humanity. I think we're not challenges. Honestly with violence against women is what I would call. One of the women leaders will work with called the silent. Majority silent majority is the majority of men who are good and who believed that bounced. Women should never stand but they don't do anything about it I well. I don't know anybody. You know one that. Maybe they don't know enough about it. They don't think there's a place for them to be part of the fight or minimal. And I think it's about. How do we engage those men to recognize that? This is a human problem and that they're part of the solution they have to be part of citation otherwise things will never change. Yeah so I think you see grace forward when Powerful men or influential men get it and they don't just get it and like a check the box way but they they really get it on a fundamental level and every decision that they make it somewhere in the calculus of how they're making those decisions and that's a big piece queer on an awards program here called the voices of solidarity and it's really about honoring those great guys who are in the fight. I love that and often risking their livelihood. We all met all around the world. There's some great. Ceo's and leaders that we've honored but there are also different young guys. I don't know if you're familiar with the Nail Polish undercover Keller's. No that into drank and it will turn a color. If you drink has been Mufi right yes and so these guys came up with this formula basically so that the nail Polish we turn a color if it was and now there's you just young college guys that they had a personal experience with a friend who had been drugged and raped in college and they decided to do something about it. It's kind of engaging men at different levels in doing good. I think that can make a huge.

Congress United States Violence Fund Senate China Iraq New Zealand prime minister Nail Polish Reno Sweden DRC Nadia Murad Ceo assault Keller Syria
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 5 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"So I think the thing that people do not want to do is to just sit at home and think sit at home and read the Internet. I think that is GonNa really tell people some national balance in the wrong direction and finally. I know it's hard to project at this point because we're so fresh in it. But what lessons do you think we can take forward with US after? This crisis is over an into the future to make the world a better place. I mean. That's a beautiful question. I think if you take a moment and look over the trajectory of our own individual alive my guess is we've all weathered some storms some some dark night and I think we can use those as a point of reference and I. I mentioned this because I think it's important. We recognize remember our strength and our resiliency right our ability and tendency to rise above the city. And I think if we even take a broader lens if we look across the whole of humanity from an evolutionary standpoint. We are a wildly resilient species and think about what our ancestors had to experience and endure so we not only have evolution on her side but we have our ancestors at our backs supporting us and I find comfort in that and I think it's important to remember that and really across spiritual practices from Christian Mr Mysticism to Indian Yogis. We we can all speak to that. Deep in print think EPA genetic ability to not only endured times but to rise above them and I think this is providing an opportunity for us to remember that collectively and individually and beautiful gift or opportunity to rise up for me that one of over linings and all of this. I want to say this without discounting all the very real suffering that people are going through because there are people who are you know are not able to pay their rent. People who are I mean? I think a large proportion of our country lives on the edge of survivor all time and so taking into account. I think what we can take away from. This is people eating at home. People nourishing each other. Like I know for me. I haven't cooked this much really there. Ever actually really loving the fact of being able to nourish the people in my life. I loved the idea of maybe trails are more important than we used to view them. Maybe the earth is more important. Maybe connection if we can come out of this and be more kind to the other people around us. I noticed noise. It's like at a minimum. You know yeah people are giving I mean through social distancing. I mean they're giving people more space but also think people are just being a little more kind a little more generous and I'm noticing it gets grocery stores. People are actually. I noticed when this started there were a lot of fights over toilet right and now it's like people seem to be taking that into account and I would love if we could come out of this being a kinder more supportive society because I really feel like we need to remember. Stephen Hawking writing about a crushing saying that it was an evolutionary. Holdover isn't working for US anymore. Because how live and I would love. This could be one of those tipping points where we could say. Do we really need to have to buy stuff all the time? Do we really need to be served productive so that we can just consume? Can we actually find more enjoyment just by sitting with the person across from sitting with our family? So any let me ask you this. Where do you find hope in these uncertain times? I think right now hope is really important and I think one of the ways that we want to cultivate that is underneath. Resilient tends to be laughter enjoy and I think one of the things we really wanNA focus is amidst this deluge of negative information or or intense information. I think it would be. It's really great to make sure that we're still smiling if it's rather than you know. Put something on net flicks. It allows you to smile like something that allows you to Find laster found some joy to find happiness to you. I know there's the John Kuczynski show about trying to find the bright spots amidst all of this. Because I think that's really important like when they say laughter's the best medicine I think right now. It's really salient point for everyone. Well thank you both so much for your insight and guidance. I certainly appreciate it and I know my listeners will to reach out connect be kind to yourself relieve you today with this very special spoken word from Prince. Ea scared yet. They say this thing it kills your immune system attach your lungs makes it hard to breathe spreading spreading like wildfire causing havoc. Your friends and family are going to get it if they don't already have. It is tragic. I tell you madness. Scientists say old people get worse but most get eventually they say this is new. Would no no no? This has been around for centuries look at history is just a different name a different strain and now there's no way to contain. It affects the rich poor young old. The unknown the famous. It's dangerous everyone's on edge. Locked inside of their homes nervously borders a close countries declare state of emergency. Grocery stores are empty. Nobody's praying in church. The world has gone to crap. No one to toilet paper so without first. The stock market crashed laid off work hand. Sanitizer was going for a million dollars. Escort you better not sneeze. Because no one's going to say God bless you pay might even arrest. You don't mean a stress you but washing your hands obsessively in the restroom. Not Protect you. Friends I'm talking about Corona virus. Now this is a virus even more deadly the F. Virus you've seen it is spreads every minute like epidemic lives on surfaces most commonly remote control. Tv's screens cellular. Phone makes you desperate doctor. Say every time you scroll down to feed reinfected it invades the brain and with a mutated turns into hatred. Blame CHINA DID it. No no Italy did no no Iran. They'll Spain a why didn't make it clear. The Virus Ladies and gentlemen is fear. But don't be afraid despite what you hear on Seal Your TV. There is good news during this tragedy to fight loneliness. People up performing concerts on balconies in Iran Japan donated supplies to China for free Britain on them was a poem that said we are waves from the same. See listen to me like every tragedy we can let this destroy us. We can use to our benefit in repair relationships with our sisters and brothers. Wipe away silly questions because when it's all said and done all we ever really had in this world with each other. So let's flatten the curve and expand our hearts social distance boost our moon systems. Be My for the where we put our hands but also where we put our attention be alert not fearful because the virus is a pandemic easily transmitted if you do contracted or exhibit symptoms. We recommend immediately hotline of a level headed friend. If you are exposed to your TV change the station. Decontaminate yourself through dance laughter meditation. Twenty twenty has been morbid from Kobe to cove it. Maybe these tragic moments to finally wake up to what's important right now. Tell someone that you care for them. Yes right now tell them that you cherish them if they are not in the same room ring them up and tell them you will always be there for them because together is how will rise above the only vaccine for this F virus and every other virus is love. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Iran CHINA US Indian Yogis Stephen Hawking John Kuczynski spotify Alyssa Milano Twenty twenty EPA Spain executive Corona Kobe producer Josh Cooke
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:46 min | 5 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Explained to my listeners. The difference between climate change and climate justice. Well climate change is. What's happening to us? All around the ongoing cheating of the planet and Catastrophic Effect Climate Justice is the reminder that happens a world. That's deeply unequal and unfair and the changes happened deepened at unfairness and injustice. 'cause if you're rich start that you can avoid climate change but you can figure out how to live with it if you lose your summer home in some places to a fire. You probably have another home to go to. But if you're peasant farmer on coast is the day of Bangladesh. They have been gold rises. You know eight inches and pushes salt water into your fields and makes it impossible to grow food there? I mean your other option is to live in a cardboard box and the edge of the national capital. You know and that's what already we think. Last year by twenty five million climate refugees were on the move the UN prediction. For how many weeks expect a little of the century tops out of about a billion people or one of being having to get up and leave your homes you know. I think that there's also a connection between these bona rebel areas and countries electing authoritarian regimes. That come in and make promises but that actually make the issue worse because they are loyal to the oil industry. I think that's true. We watch all over the world. This collection of autocrats all of whom have in common their fealty to with status quo and especially to the richest people in it who are often people from the fossil fuel industry so Putin in Russia the Saudi Royal Family Trump. I mean you know. Trump couldn't be bothered to roll out testing kits for the corona virus but when wanting this big campaign backers racking Baron Herald Ham us two billion dollars a day in the stock market collapse in twenty four hours it proposed a big bailout for those kind of firms right so these guys they get a good return on investment for their campaign donations and it's a huge huge part of the problem. Well Earth Day is coming up. What is your message to Americans and people around the world on Earth Day? Well big deal. It's The fiftieth anniversary. So the use of Said. Let's take the first day the twenty second as a kind of day of commemoration which think about the things that we've accomplished in the things we haven't accomplished and then when that's over issues the next day and the day after that to get to work people. Twenty third Thursday is been called Finance Day. And that's when we're really taking on these banks and others. So that's Today. If you have a chase credit card in your wallet to cut it up and to do it on social media so everybody else can see and your odds of having chase credit card are pretty damn good if you have an Amazon credit card united mileage card whatever it takes a little work to go do that but on the list of things that people have to deal with climate change. It's not like you're having to become a refugee and moved to a camp someplace. It means you have to find a different credit card so you can do it and it would be a huge signal to people like chase that we're sick of. We're not gonNA take it anymore. It's not okay to be trying to make money off the end of the planet right now. The oil gas and coal companies are laying waste to our planet. You take these dry corporations would have all the money. They need to continue full speed ahead but no they don't. They need money from banks to look for more coal oil and gas and the big banks have been eager to comply. Chase is the worst says the Paris. Climate Agreement Chases poured one hundred and ninety six billion dollars into digging up more fossil fuels that makes chase justice responsible for the destruction of our planet as Exxon Chevron. Vp and all the rest the final day Friday. The twenty fourth of April is Politics Day. In young people will be registering. Everybody vote getting them set for November. Because we're running out of four year cycles to waste if we WANNA have significant action by Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty. The latest we can possibly begin to go down that path. You know that governments don't turn on a dime so it's a huge year in so many ways. There are two huge levers to pull on them as political. The other is financial. We need to Yank as hard as we can. Go through them and see what happens. She what kind of change we can still create and speaking of the financial change our their funds people can invest in something like a 401k or investment fund that is managed for people where all the stocks in it are ethical and environmentally conscious. If your investor it's now relatively easy to find fossil free funds if you go to go fossil free dot org. There'll be some ideas any investment advisor now easily you there and the good news is if you if you started investing means a few years ago you would have made out like a bandit system has underperformed the rest of the market by huge percentage over the last inner ten years which would expect because you know someone else's figuring out how to do the job of producing energy or cheap ringing or cleanly so they're going to get their lunch that's why they're stocks are in the tank if you need a credit card. You don't have to go to chase bank. Their aspiration bank on the web. There's Amalgamated Bank on the East Coast Beneficial State Bank on the West Coast. There's local credit unions that are invested in fossil fuel. So these are the places to be keeping your money taking a credit card. These are all places that we can exercise some leverage as long as we do it together and publicly that's why going to stop the money pipeline dot com kind of join this joint effort so many different groups would be a really good idea so personally. Do you think we can make the change in time for this to really make a difference? I don't know I wish I could tell you for sure that if we did everything right at this point it was gonna work out. We know we're not gonNA stop global warming we've already raise temperature one degree. Celsius next enormous effect. We're not taking that back. And in fact the temperature is definitely gonNA rise some more. There's GonNa be more damage done. The best science indicates that we have a narrow window left albeit one. That's closing to make real change. That might still affect the outcome. In Large ways at period of leverage is short as I said the scientists tell us really the next decade is our best chance to be making huge change. This is the existential question of our time. In the same way that a century ago for our parents and grandparents the existential question was about Fascism in Europe and people had to cross the Atlantic and kill or be killed can order to deal with it. We don't have to do anything that hard. But we have to do more than we're doing now. Our Planet is outside. It's comfort zone so we need to be outside our coverage out and we need to be there fast. Well thank you for your life's work. Bill appreciate you so much and thanks for being on sorry not sorry we leave you today with Joy Harjo reading her breathtaking poem remember. Remember the Sky report under no each of the stars stories. Remember the moon now who she is. Remember the son's birth at dawn that is the strongest point of time. Remember sundown giving away tonight. Remember your birth. How your mother struggled to give birth. You are evidence of her and her and hers. Remember your father. He is Your Life. Also remember the earth's whose skin you are. Ritter Blogger yellow earthquake. Earth Brown earth wheat. Our earth remember the plants trees animal life who all have their tribes their families their histories to talk with them. Listen to them. They are alive poems. The win remember her voice. She knows the origin of this universe. Remember they were all people all people are you remember and this year versus you. Remember all is in motion is growing. Is You remember language. This remember the damn slight. Which is that life is remember. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and Engineering Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify Itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty Chase UN Bangladesh Amalgamated Bank Europe Alyssa Milano Trump Exxon Chevron Saudi Royal Family Trump Russia Putin Amazon Vp Joy Harjo East Coast Beneficial State Ba advisor
"alyssa" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Her this no breaking up Alyssa that place now why would you want to leave that I don't think I'd want to sell a lot either man go there right now they're not offered enough money for place of that's just one of a kind of play now did you think we'd be bad going on there got a great view of the ocean got a great view of rocket launcher that song yeah Ciara SpaceX trying to buy up those homes of retirees but many are saying I don't want to they would they want to stay a report states that while he lied muskets company was approved on local state and federal level back in twenty fourteen it only started become unbearable living there for research in recent years according to some residents of accepted the buyout others apparently are holding up pretty well for a whole lot more well I understand people want to say I understand if if somebody wants to leave I mean the yeah this is not a safe living there anymore because Charles by said that they're doing test down there and rockets are exploding yeah I need more space there's a look at your ability could you go put your so yeah and then there's been a lot of people's goals you know their retirement that's the that's the ultimate goal the ultimate in for some that's what people want to live out the rest of the line I got a really I bet they got a really involved H. away retirement communities like that all man I've always gonna they always got out of a group of old old folks they just love it very political very political I nasty nasty nasty hero he parks his car on the line yeah exactly exactly he's got his boat on the side of the house his car's been out there for seventeen days five one two eight three six zero five not even I'm paying attention nearly a two week search for a North Carolina woman who disappeared while out dumpster diving as well it's come to a tragic end horrible stores a horrible story authorities have found the body of a thirty year old woman named Stephanie **** in a landfill yeah the burning to police department revealed on Wednesday the discovery came just hours after the vehicle was found parked near some dumpsters behind a shopping center investigators believe that **** was rooting around in the dumpster on January the thirtieth when a garbage truck collected its contents and **** about one forty five in the morning an autopsy has been scheduled in a term of the exact cause of death but it's believed that she was in the dumpster the dump truck came along picked it up to its contents in the back of the garbage truck and then on to the landfill yeah it's a very trust sad tragic story for this this young woman and I just stopped you know I just wonder how many homeless people have we thrown in the landfill well I know that's a horrible thing to think about but is it safe to say on a cold night there could be homeless people they get warm inside a dumpster I'm I mean only a garbage truck can can confirm this but I bet there have been times were garbage men and and women in this city I've had to wake up the homeless people to kick him out of the dumpster before they empty I I think it would be impossible that the if if that had not happened who and where we have to be clear about that so says poor woman that they found in the in the landfill she was not homeless use dumpster diving looking looking for good to people with on what exactly had and and she was very attractive far from homeless woman but yeah I see that's what I thought the first thought when I saw the headline was she must been homeless since you must've been sleeping there whatever the case but I think it's a daily obstacle for garbage company just down no waist manager apps and has to be I talked to at least maybe sleeping in it or behind it or near at swap out to pick this thing up get out away we have a listener in is probably listening right now I know you're talking about such showed up in a BMW remote so aesthetic okay yeah I came out to mine as well as nearby yes and he hated that exact scenario that he has to deal with on a daily basis I don't know about his name or other other you know drivers out there we'd love to hear the stories though at five one two eight three six zero five nine other I think they're very threatening to in some cases since their home your your your your master with a home here my warped my safety my security yeah so the scenario the unfortunate scenario that you pay there I'm sure it's happened many times and we have no idea that it is happen idea no idea speaking of our community there's a new community survey that finds dissatisfaction regarding Austin's housing traffic and our local government sixty nine percent surveyed say they don't have faith in the transparency of the Austin city council nor that their tax dollars are being used as intended that is a drop from one year earlier fifty two percent think the city streets are filled in among other highlights most people say they're still lack of access to cheap housing the flow city streets as a constant headache and more than half say walking alone at night downtown makes them feel unsafe it's also worth noting that as the council works to a sweeping over all the land development code only sixty percent of the city's actually planning properly.

Alyssa
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:00 min | 7 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"They're saying may I think it's going to get pushed again and we're not even yet a hundred percent sure where it's going to be because they may end up needing because of the jury pool needing to seek a change of venue so it's just it's it's so frustrating and it keeps my wife and I in this kind of place of limbo. Where at least on that part I'd love closure? I'd love to never have to think about what's going to happen to that kid ever again But I can't and trial is going to terrorize the families. There's been so much evidence that we've not had to see that you know possession of law enforcement but in a public trial it's gonNA come out and we've been shielded from that and and I'm fine with that once. It's out though you can't hear it. You can't unsee it. Yeah and it's going to be there with US forever. I mean a community seems like such a a tight knit community. Can you speak a little bit too. How important that is been through this process? You know the night of vigil all I said in my speech this time gun. Violence came to the wrong community and mess with the wrong dad and I never realized just how how true the community part of that was going to be whatever was needed for as long as we needed after it happened. There were just members of this community that we're just there to hold us up to provide whether it was a meal because we just couldn't get out of the House that day or or it was some kind of emotional support and I knew a lot of people in my community before February fourteenth. But wow I know so so many more now who have just become to me these amazing parts of my life that I could never do without. And that's let's just the local community because I think of you know for me communities become a lot bigger even than just my local community. It's now this community of of other families that suffer from gun violence that have been affected by that. I become a part of my life. You know and I don't know. I know that I could get through some of the days that I get through without this big extended community. That's a part of my life right now. We live in this community. We've we've all that we want to change hands and we WANNA see the change when I say no justice November in the absence Oh We will how common core member and everyone else before February fourteenth. Not a part of my life but all of you now you are and it's actually to be honest. It's part of what my book is about. Because in my book I talk about my story and what happened but I also talk about how amazed I am at how amazing people have been. We always hear people say how people sock doc or entertainer soccer media socks politicians sock. Everybody sucks and for me. It has been completely the opposite. I am blown away at how amazing people who had been how they have helped me get through my days. How they have helped me go forward in my mission and I'm very thankful you know and if nothing else I do hope people can look at me and hear me say that and maybe try look at those who are around them differently? You know instead of with so much hostility recognized. There's a lot of good people Out there well and also. I think it's an important message because we sit behind our computer screens and we try to connect on a very different level. And I think that we're in such humankind is in such a transitional period right now because of that that we almost lost our ability to look into someone's eyes and feel real empathy empathy and compassion. And those of us. That can still do it. I think suffer from that because it is painful because life is not easy. If you haven't heard about anchor let me tell you a little bit about it. It is the easiest way to make a podcast. I've just joined and I can't tell you how much much I love it. And here's a few reasons why it's free. It's super easy to create and record podcasts. Right from your computer. Literally anyone can do it. Anchor handles all of the distribution. All you have to do is record or upload your podcast and then they send it out to spotify and apple podcasts and everywhere else and get this anchor can help you get paid for podcasting without any minimum listener number. Everything you need to make your podcast is in one place at anchor. Download the free anchor APP or go to Anchor Dot F. M. I'm to get started.

soccer core member spotify apple
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:17 min | 8 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Twenty Nineteen <Speech_Female> Jeff basis <Speech_Female> saw all <Speech_Female> his wealth. <Speech_Female> Drop by <Speech_Female> nine billion <Speech_Female> dollars due <Speech_Female> to divorce settlement <Speech_Female> and he's <Speech_Female> still the <Speech_Female> richest man <Speech_Female> in the world <Speech_Female> that's right he <Speech_Female> lost more <Speech_Female> than the annual <Speech_Female> GDP of <Speech_Female> at least twenty <Speech_Female> countries <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is still <Speech_Female> so rich. <Speech_Female> Nobody <Speech_Female> can catch him <Speech_Female> and yet <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> very public <Speech_Female> pressure forced <Speech_Female> Amazon to raise <Speech_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Female> to fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> per hour. <Speech_Female> More than half <Speech_Female> of its workers has <Speech_Female> made less <Speech_Female> than twenty <Speech_Female> eight thousand <Speech_Female> dollars <Silence> per year. <Speech_Female> They earn <Speech_Female> ten percent less <Speech_Female> than the national median <Speech_Female> income <Speech_Female> while laboring rang <Speech_Female> for the world's <Speech_Female> richest <Silence> man <Speech_Female> I'm talking <Speech_Female> specifically to <Speech_Female> the Republicans now <Speech_Female> and those <Speech_Female> who complain about <Speech_Female> Food Stamps Welfare <Speech_Female> Medicaid housing housing <Speech_Female> benefits <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> other social <Speech_Female> safety net <Silence> <Advertisement> programs. <Silence> Here <Speech_Female> because <Silence> this is important <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we need those <Speech_Female> programs in in <Speech_Female> large because <Speech_Female> of situations <Speech_Female> like this <Speech_Female> huge corporations <Speech_Female> and extremely <Speech_Female> wealthy <Speech_Female> business <Speech_Female> owners like <Speech_Female> basis <Speech_Female> and the Walton family family. <Speech_Female> Use these <Speech_Female> programs your tax <Speech_Female> dollars as <Speech_Female> an excuse to <Speech_Female> not pay <Speech_Female> living wages <Speech_Female> and benefits <Speech_Female> to their <Silence> workers. <Speech_Female> You'll notice Chris. <Speech_Female> They never <Speech_Female> seem to take <Speech_Female> smaller bonuses. <Speech_Female> Stock <Speech_Female> payouts golden <Speech_Female> parachutes <Speech_Female> or other multi-million. <Speech_Female> Dollar perks <Speech_Female> but their workers <Speech_Female> can't afford award <Speech_Female> housing <Speech_Music_Female> or food <Speech_Female> or healthcare <Speech_Female> or any of <Speech_Female> the other basic <Silence> necessities in <Speech_Female> life. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> have a problem <Speech_Female> with social all <Speech_Female> safety nets <Speech_Female> then you should be <Speech_Female> demanding <Speech_Female> that these incredibly <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> and wealthy people <Speech_Female> pay <Speech_Female> their workers <SpeakerChange> instead <Silence> of themselves. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's <SpeakerChange> corporate <Speech_Female> welfare <Speech_Female> going to those <Speech_Female> who absolutely <Speech_Female> do not <Speech_Female> need it. <Speech_Female> I can already <Speech_Female> hear you screaming. <Speech_Female> Socialism <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> redistribution distribution <Silence> of wealth. <Speech_Female> Will <Speech_Female> guess what <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you can't <Speech_Female> redistribute <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> which has never <Speech_Female> been distributed <Silence> in the first place <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> vast amount <Speech_Female> of money <Speech_Female> in the hands <Speech_Female> of so few <Speech_Female> has been taken <Speech_Female> out of communities <Silence> across America. <Speech_Female> Your <Speech_Female> purchase at <Speech_Female> Walmart doesn't funder <Speech_Female> schools <Speech_Female> it funds the <Speech_Female> Waltons. Next <Silence> mega yacht <Speech_Female> azure <Speech_Female> towns roads <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> infrastructure. <Speech_Female> Get worse <Speech_Female> and closed storefronts storefronts <Speech_Female> appear <Speech_Female> on Main Street. <Speech_Female> Jeff Faso's <Speech_Female> is personally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> funding a <Speech_Female> private spaceflight <Speech_Female> company. <Silence> <Speech_Female> How many any <Speech_Female> fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> an hour Amazon <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> do you think <Speech_Female> will end up <Speech_Female> on those luxury junkets <Speech_Female> to orbit <Speech_Female> back? <Speech_Female> Businesses <Speech_Female> have a responsibility vence <Speech_Female> ability to their <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> and to the community <Speech_Female> is where <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they operate <Speech_Music_Female> period. <Speech_Female> That's it <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the deal has <Speech_Female> always been hard <Speech_Female> work for a fair air <Speech_Female> wage <Speech_Female> but not <Speech_Female> anymore <Speech_Female> when someone can <Speech_Female> lose <SpeakerChange> nine <Speech_Female> billion dollars <Speech_Female> and not <Speech_Female> notice it while <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> their employees are <Speech_Female> losing their homes and <Speech_Female> to enable <Speech_Music_Female> this extreme <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wealth. Something <Speech_Female> is fundamentally <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> broken. <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> GonNa take good. <Speech_Music_Female> Corporate Governance <Speech_Music_Female> and more importantly <Speech_Music_Female> good <Speech_Music_Female> government <Speech_Music_Female> affects <Speech_Music_Female> we <Speech_Music_Female> live in the new <Speech_Music_Female> roaring <Speech_Music_Female> twenties. <Speech_Music_Female> And we <Speech_Music_Female> know of last <Speech_Music_Female> bill around we <Speech_Music_Female> get <Music> to act <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> before it's <Music>

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:42 min | 9 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"I felt such a loss of power and I would go to the Internet. You know and just search I noted for something inspiration and all I was not on twitter. But you can see tweets from people like in articles and there were just people I just. I remember that resonated with me and I started to look at their twitter timelines more and I thought it's myself and I discussed this with my partner because as you mentioned I am a very or I should say was a very private person. There are people in my life who didn't even know that I had kidney cancer. Who didn't know that I have lupus and a lot of them actually found out when I she did eventually go to twitter but there isn't a lot of awareness for people who are man with Lupus Lupus the the population lupus night mostly ninety percent women? Ten percent man wanted people to this day I still get tweets at me. That say I didn't even know that men could have lupus and you know they're being truthful and it's it there's just so much there's just not enough awareness and so I figured if I go to twitter and I do something to empower myself than I feel like I have some sense of control. You know some sense of empowerment. So that was my goal that if I could impact one person's life and I told my partner Jerry and I said if I could do that then Dan I'll just delete my account but you know the truth. Is it happened in a week. Somebody said you really changed my life and you know why it felt so good. I didn't WanNa stop and I just kept going and it was just it was like I was reaching shing people who felt alone and I know that feeling of feeling isolated alone scared limited and I wanted to reach them and I wanted to give them hope because we needed hope. especially that time especially when the repeal repeal for the was starting to go through Congress and go through the House and the first time it failed but it was coming back it wasn't than stopping and there it was like I just I just might level of involvement kept getting deeper and deeper until I started working with my Representatives.

Lupus Lupus twitter lupus partner kidney cancer Congress Jerry Dan
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:53 min | 9 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"There were too many important stories in twenty nineteen for us to get them all in one episode. Sui asks you to leave us a voice message judge on what you think. The big stories were here. Are some of your thoughts Alyssa This is Chris. I think I think the biggest story of two thousand nineteen was the government shutdown A note was early in the year but I I think a lot of us were afraid that the government would of never open again and I think that's a big concern. Turn with who we have in the White House right now That things aren't functioning the way they should be functioning. And that's a big story for for a lot of us out here. Thank you I. This is Peter. Morley patient advocate from New York City. And I'm also a patient might top news story of Twenty Nineteen Gene is the trump administration's continuous efforts to sabotage healthcare and the healthcare of hundred thirty million people. Oh in America with pre existing conditions. Hi Alyssa my name's Hassan Martini. I am the executive director of note Democrat left behind never before or have a coalition of Congressional Democratic candidates. Running in deep red districts. Come together like they have in two thousand twenty two form. No Dem left behind no dumb left behind the Pitney of grassroots organizing. These campaigns are run by candidates. Pure creatine will with with very limited resources and virtually no funding from the democratic establishment. I know deb left behind his Made up of nine candidates from across the country three of the nine vets six out of the nine female seven out of the nine candidates running in rural rural America. And of course nine out of the nine or Patriots to hear stories like Hell veteran Chris running of rural tenures Tennessee have his campaign event overrun on by KKK. Yes you heard that the KKK. You need to select know dem left behind. My name is Jeff Paris. I am a retired Air Force. Master Sergeant I believe the biggest story of two thousand nineteen the concentration camps in the United States. This administration has gone on record saying these people do not deserve personal hygiene products sanitary products products or adequate sleeping items like beds. This administration has also gone on record refusing to give vitals lifesaving. Vaccines like the flu. Shot due to this mistreatment treatment. People including multiple children are dying in these camps this administration. It's denying free. Healthcare being offered in there even arresting doctors that are driving having to bring lifesaving healthcare to these people for these reasons. I believe the United States of America is committing crimes against humanity in these camps under Article Seven Paragraph One item K of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and that this is the biggest story of two thousand nineteen highly suffer that I am happy birthday. I believe that we need more people. Are you more people that really care about the future of the she rent in our ball or short laid to for Eunice Bob during biting PS two Shannen Doherty. Because I really want to hear her talk about they are currently the IC so that she does a Lotta stuff on her social media and also about The new platform You seem to give people hope with a breasts concerts wholesale. I liked to that please known I know if she Inboard for Sean Revived Review Baugh or she Issue we thank you. The highly sought mytalk story for two thousand nineteen is brexit..

United States Alyssa This Shannen Doherty Sui Dem Jeff Paris White House executive director Eunice Bob New York City Morley Tennessee deb Air Force Patriots Hassan Martini Chris Sean International Criminal Court
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"If you haven't heard about anger let me tell you a little bit about it. It is the easiest way to make a podcast. I've just joined and I can't tell you how much I love it. And here's a few reasons why it's free. It's super easy to create and record podcasts. Right from your computer. Literally anyone can do it. Anchor handles all of the distribution. All you have to do is record or upload your podcast and then they send it out to spotify by an apple podcasts and everywhere else and get this anchor can help you get paid for podcasting without any minimum listener number number. Everything you need to make your podcast is in one place at anchor. Download the free anchor APP or go to anchor dot. FM F. M. to get started. I'm pretty excited to tell you all about the pretty big deal with Ashley Graham. PODCAST if you aren't aren't familiar with Ashley. Graham is a supermodel entrepreneur body activist and now the host of her very own podcast in season one. She interviewed guests. Such as Kim Kardashian West Serena Williams and Amy Schumer and now she's back for a whole new season with new episodes launching every single a week where she talks about business confidence family fashion love and so much more she recently launched. three new episodes hoods featuring journalist Gayle King Businesswoman. Cindy Eckhart and model Paloma elsaesser which you can listen to on spotify or wherever you. Listen to your favorite podcasts.

Ashley Graham Serena Williams spotify Amy Schumer Gayle King Cindy Eckhart Kim Kardashian Paloma elsaesser dot F. M. apple
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:18 min | 9 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Teams have therapists on staff. Like they have like a physical therapists. Do they have a mental therapist on staff No I mean. I don't think it's common practice. I think I think from the time that I got drafted onward. It was the advent of of people starting to explore that option. I think sports psychologists had been part of what teams were looking to do. But there's a huge difference between sports psychology and then and then methodologically breaking down mental health from a proactive standpoint treatment. If need be in an even more so not reacting to what an individual maybe facing and then manifesting as an individual person but what do we know about mental health and how do we create environments. That actually acknowledged what we know. You guys are under the impression that mental health is going to by default reduce production of an individual have played played against the best and and presumably the number one pick. Is Anthony Davis and shortly after Michael. Caygill Chris and these guys that I've performed time and time again but unfortunately personally because of my mental illness. I'll probably slip out of that range that those guys off. Aw Equation Mark any Asian rented. A room is against you and the council the rest of the room. Mikhail says you're Jewish Orlando Commandos often August twenty. Indiana's Miami jail. All again. I went through an entire season. Where played I was stay with an anxiety disorder where I ended up being one of the only players in history to lead my team in? Aw five stat categories. We ran rave about Royce White. If it's a smorgasbord a basketball players. He scores he take scoring rebounding assists blocks and steel so all categories. You could shoot it. Pass it jeeze physical. You better be paying. Lean attention if it's got the ball top and I think if you look at my life with all the things that I do it definitely has not hurt my productivity productively. So that's that's a bunch of bullshit. I mean you could make the argument bad. Hey you know if Elissa didn't have anxiety then maybe she she would have been able to do this. But but the point is that comparatively to the rest of your peers or to the rest of society. You've accomplished major major things right away. Who knows if I didn't have anxiety Zayed's if I could still do everything that I do? Absolutely that's the bigger. The bigger point. Part of the gift of being in in my body is that I am able to multitask and think completely too many issues at once while also raising my kids and and and doing a series is an an. I don't know if I would be that person if my brain chemistry and the way in which I think in process things.

Royce White Elissa Anthony Davis Orlando Commandos Indiana basketball Miami Mikhail Zayed Chris Michael
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"My my start was an independent cinema and for me at the end of the day to always story. Can I connect with the story. Does it resonate with me. Does it challenge my beliefs. I do I feel that it's going to resonate with an audience. That's how I think all of my decisions I don. We're just wondering are you less Listen there are pros and cons of being a principal. Don't what okay to hear the princess. Diaries I know that is going on. You're not telling me friends tell you know what. Here's your friendship tar. I'm taking it off and it's going into I think at Brock's and you know voltaire hair. I would personally like to learn about voltaire okay religious so enchanting nineteen having jackass might now multiple ones. She stole prescription drugs and broke the law. Your honor may you may. We're not sir. You're lucky day mistakes. I'm going to put you under house arrest. It's funny because I think acting has become less interesting to me the more I know who I exactly exactly exactly exactly dude. I just back figured out who I am. I don't want someone else. Baskin me a little bit at eight. Yeah and for me I now Alan to the point where I love story right. Where for me? It's story is what connects us. It's were the were the architects of the heart. You know like I can identify you know with a nine year old kid battling rolling aliens on Mars. But what I can identify with the feeling of terror. It's the feeling of loneliness the feeling of regret..

Alan Brock
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:43 min | 11 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Today's episode you'll hear my conversation with jen then but who is a former senior border patrol agent turned immigrant rights activist we talked about how she decided to become a border agent and what went into the training the abuse and misogyny she faced there and why she finally decided to leave she told me that it's really hard in the border patrol to have integrity jen's willingness we need to speak out about her experiences so brave and i hope you learn a lot from this episode hi this is jim bud and i'm a former senior border patrol agent chant i believe and i know that asylum is not a crime in being an immigrant is not a crime sorry not sorry i briefed the the media and testified in congress that our immigration system was at the breaking point that breaking point has arrived this week at our border is facing an unprecedented precedent is humanitarian and border security crisis all along our southwest border and nowhere has that crisis manifested more acutely than here in paso and then the difficulties of the job switch on and off from humanitarian mission to this guy trying to take your life every time we'd get off camera somebody would walk up who who was with border patrol and say listen i don't want to be quoted fights i feel like we are being treated unfairly right they were telling us they were telling us this off camera and i said oh you gotta let us show what you guys are going through a i think i'd like to start with giving my listeners a better better understanding of who you are so tell me a little bit about your childhood where you grew up family was like what you wanted to be when you grew up i grew up mostly in huntsville alabama and my childhood was is rife with a lot of alcoholism on my mother's side a lot of violence and abuse from her towards me and my father chose to deal with that by always getting jobs out of town and having an affair various escape yeah abandonment kana but i mean you know like they're still together and everything but that's that's how he handled it and i just didn't know anything was wrong about being you know violently beaten like that because i was isolated so much and that was your normal that was my normal yeah so what i did to deal with that was i studied and i read a lot tidier really good in school and and i just naturally had i think a lot of sympathy for my mother i knew she was mentally ill and self medicating and so forth and and when i got to college i saw my chance because i did well enough in school and i went to auburn university to like you either go to auburn alabama in alabama so i went to auburn and i graduated with a bachelor science and law and then then all of a sudden i found myself back at home and that was kind of like the first instance of recognizing how traumatic and bad my childhood had had been because he'd been out for a little bit yeah and i was like i can't stay here you know i'm i'm applying to all these law schools i graduated top of my class with honors i'm supposed to go to law school and i just am like desperate to get out of there all i can think of is i'm gonna get more school loans and i don't want to be in the same position you know a lawyer in the south doesn't make that much money on the average of certainly starting out and so i wanted to work and a family friend had told tell me about the border patrol and i said the wet because i didn't know anything about it i had to what year is this this was so i graduated in december december of ninety three but i had heard about the border patrol sometime in ninety four because it took about a year to get hired so you know i think immigration maybe baby was has always obviously been a big issue in california in the southwest but in alabama at that time it wasn't at all so i had never heard it i did it to run away you did it to escape yeah was there something intriguing about that line of service i had done my internship at the mobile alabama mobile county district attorney's office my last quarter and i was very fortunate in that they're investigative unit was headed by former FBI agent who was very ethical and very well versed in law enforcement and everybody in the office was just amazing really yeah i mean it was like what what we would hope law enforcement would be and they had every year in mobile county they had a an investigation of different agency within ascend to just automatically to make sure you know like a pop investigation and so what they did was they brought in this old investigator retired investigator by the name of bob eddie and he i assisted him and he taught me a lot about investigations and how to run investigations and it turns out and i didn't know this because he didn't brag about got it but after i had left there and i had even worked for him afterwards privately as an investigator mobile but after we separated a couple of years i was watching being oprah winfrey and all of a sudden there's mr bobby on oprah winfrey and i'm like what is mr eddie dude and it turns out that he was one of the first investigators like in might have been right after the church bombing in birmingham happen or it might have then the second one where they brought him more people because the first one didn't go anywhere but he's the one that figured out which clam members that were involved in everything and i don't think he you could bring him to trial that time there was a lot of so it seemed like everything was so i thought this is what i wanna do is wait you know and i was like the first intern to get my own case and they're like you're good at this i i like you know getting a puzzle and putting it back together and i just really enjoyed this tell me tell me a little bit about the training process zest like what did you go through in the border patrol yeah so i went to the glencoe academy in glenn county georgia and it was a four months at that time musselman's for months and we did you know a lot of physical training it's mostly geared towards the men the women have to run the same times then everything is the men do it's kind of a way to keep the numbers of the women down no no other agency does that the military doesn't even do interesting but the legal training was really piss poor they didn't teach you anything about international law now they don't teach international law they didn't teach constitutional law and then the law that they do teach the immigration law that they do teach it's multiple choice in it's like eight years let's see thirteen twenty five what's the title of that and then they give you mean you have to be a moron not to be able to get it and the instructors pretty much give you the answers before the past anyhow so they're just pushing people all the way through and the spanish was a joke spanish even today they say that border patrol spanish is the equivalent one of three years of college or three classes in college but that's that's not true basically you memorize thirteen sentences which are like where are you from last time i am you cross and that kind of stuff so you didn't learn anything about people coming over to seek asylum and what no no no nothing about immigration law no no and i would say back then though the agency back then was like were trying to keep drugs out we're trying to keep a kremlin shell think that you you were doing in that job that's what i thought it was doing that's what they told me was you know there's a lot of drugs coming across the border there's a lot of people bringing a counterfeit goods kids across the border there's a lot of people who need help but nobody ever mentioned families looking for jobs and stuff like that so i had no idea i mean my very first apprehension out in campo it was a family and i literally am looking around like where the drugs where the gums right now and i was very confused by that.

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

12:23 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

11:27 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Julissa sure sure but I know that's what you're running on I wanna we can fix it in part because of a recognition that S. among the same group of people and then you have a sprinkling of exceptions to make it seem like there's something going on but the numbers show that there's really not much going on that we're much by many measurements in the history of the world right now and unfortunately the dynamics of the economy are making those inequities more entrenched not less and one of the things that you know my campaigns talking about is that technology right now is getting layered over this winner-take-all version of capitalism and it's going to create the greater extremity than we've seen in the history of the world I really want you to break that down let's unpack that for a second I want you to talk about the changing quality and most importantly entity and it's GonNa take a lot not only from a local and a state level but also a federal and also a private investor level to get these communities back up and running how did we not plan better for this moment it's because the incentives in DC in particular broken I mean the fact is of DC does a bad job bob for five ten twenty years in a row known loses their job nothing actually happens they figured this out decades ago and the feedback making it Awesome is now broken to the point where tens of millions of Americans thought that taking a bet on a narcissist reality TV star was actually the right move Washington DC right now the richest metro area in the country mean just think about that for a sec like how the heck did that happen where do they produce what they produce is access to the spigots a federal money and if you go there you see you see that their incentives to serve the people of this country are vanishingly low so when you talk about like how do we not prepare our education system or a people for all these changes no one in DC has has any accountability or could creatively see it coming maybe or they can't see you coming either I mean you go there and I went there and said hey what are we gonna do to help people understand the fourth industrial revolution that is wreaking havoc now and communities around the country and someone in DC said to me flat out said Andrew no one's going to do anything about it here in DC and he said this is not a town of leaders is the town of followers what year is this this was twenty seventeen right after trump won I went to DC and I said hey what are we going to do and then he's not going to you know in here is going to do anything yeah why I'm running is that I realized that the feedback mechanism mechanism does not work. DC is not up for these challenges they either don't understand or don't care or some combination and so we're going to have to do it ourselves requires a popular revolution requires us to get control the government and then rewrite the rules of the economy so that it actually works for the eighty percent of the families that are living paycheck to hey check but here's the magical is this is the thing that you know I love magic here's the thing that earn energizes campaign is that there's nothing preventing the majority of citizens democracy from rewriting the rules of our capital flows to improve our own lives we can do it very very quickly if I were to be here and say we're GonNa fix our energy infrastructure we're GONNA fix to be honest our educational institutions a lot of it is blowing smoke because when you get to the ground it's very very difficult to change multi thousand person bureaucracies or an energy infrastructure that acquired hundreds of billions of dollars in investment has been in the ground for decades we should we need to make progress on these things and we should do it but the reality is changing those things is going to take a lot of time and a lot of struggle but changing our capital flows can actually happen overnight if enough let's get together and say hey guess what the majority of us have decided that every American adults you get a thousand dollars a month free and clear do whatever you want then it's the next day and we can actually write those capital flows to make ourselves and our people stronger healthier are mentally healthier less stressed out and you talk about our educational systems two-thirds of our kids academic performance and you know this as a parent to words of our kids academic performance as a result of what happens not in the school but happens at home and so that's words read to the child old parental time income levels where they're going to get their next meal nutrition nutrition and so right now one of the problems we have is that where asking are educators in our schools to do the impossible we're saying educate our kids but we all know that you can only control a third of the outcome right and decatur notice to if you go to a teacher and say hey why is it working they'll look at you in sale to be honest that kid goes home and we can't control what goes on the home they go home for the summer and some of them spend the entire summer playing video games they come back and then you know you have to work miracles so if we want to give our kids a real chance to learn what would we do do we would relieve extreme poverty we would put more money into the families and neighborhoods we would enable parents to have a greater chance to perhaps have one parent time with children so that they could read to them and support them and do the things that would help with their development we would make it so that the kids grew up in an environment where if they a are conscientious and diligent good things happen because a lot of them right now it's like you're a conscientious and diligent nothing could happen so then what kind of what kind of lessons are you getting and this requires a different approach to not our schools we need to reform our schools we do need to do that but we need to infuse resources into their homes and families themselves to actually get to the root of any of these problems in as many of my listeners know finding a Bra that fits is a pretty difficult task and going to a store to try on different styles can be time consuming and so frustrating but I recently discovered third love Bras and they are great I've tried a few different ones and not only are they cute but there are so comfortable that you don't even need to think about it third love has a fit finder quiz which takes under sixty seconds and uses data points generated millions of women to help you find your perfect fit over fourteen million women have taken this quiz date they offer more than eighty sites this is including their signature half-cup sizes and there is a one hundred percent fit guarantee if you order from them you have sixty days where the Bra wash it put it to the test and if you don't love it you can return it and when you do that donate it to a woman in need third love knows there's a perfect bra for everyone so right now they're offering my listeners fifteen percent off your first order go to third dot com slash sorry now to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase that's third love dot com slash a for fifteen percent off today I want to tell you about Lola okay a female founded company offering a line of organic cotton dampens pads N. liners they now offer sex products to the company was started because it's founders believed that women shouldn't have to compromise it comes to feminine care products unlike other major brands lola products are one hundred percent natural and easy to feel good about plus the products come in a simple customizable subscription sex by Lola is their line of gynecologist approved sexual health and wellness products designed first and foremost four women and it's also available via subscription condoms have been aggressively marketed towards men but an individually tested contraception and STI protection. I Love Lola because they deliver what I need right to my door in well-designed discrete box now they are giving my listeners thirty percent off your first month's subscription just visit Lila Dot Com and enter Elissa thirty when you subscribe that's A. L. Y. S. three zero so you mentioned giving a thousand dollars a month for people that don't know about the freedom dividend will you give us a brief explanation I'd love to so I know for many people my campaign the first they'd heard of this idea of every American getting hours a year no questions asked and they fund it with oil money and what I'm saying to the American people is that technology the oil of the twenty-first century where our data our information is now worth more than oil and no one listening to this remembers getting their data check in the mail and I'll tell you where the data check went it went to facebook Amazon Google like those are the companies that are now profiting to the tune of tens of billions of dollars off of our information our information and being what we search for what we buy on the Internet potentially what we say in a room all of that data collected for those that don't know acted and then sold to companies to make more revenue basically so they're taking our information selling.

DC Lila Dot Com Elissa fifteen percent one hundred percent thousand dollars five ten twenty years eighty percent thirty percent sixty seconds sixty days
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Safe access to abortion throughout much of the united states is about to look much like it does in syria the same people who scream about a non existent problem of sharia law in america are taking away women's rights rights to have their own bodies the same people who shout about the alleged virtues of small government in america are making government so big that it fills our wombs the same people who are all for taking away access to basic healthcare healthcare coverage for children are demanding fetuses have protections that no human in america receives it is terrifying and it becoming more and more dangerous to be a woman in america and i could not ask these brave souls to tell their truth without telling mine so here it goes in nineteen ninety three. I had two abortions. I was in love for the first time in the breathless way. You can only be in love when you were young. It was huge overwhelming even it filled every part of living and it was a joyful and exciting and powerful time in my life. I was on the pill taking birth control because i knew i was not ready to be a parent. I had finished working on who's the boss and i was starting to work on films and other projects and my career my life were in front of me and i was living them as fully <music> as i could and also at that time i was taking a drug called accutane. Accutane is an acne medicine that is so likely to cause birth defects if taken by a pregnant woman that the f._d._a. Now requires doctors pharmacies and women to sign signed up to a registry before prescribing dispensing or receiving it. I knew this and so using birth control was a doubly important decision decision for me and i still got pregnant. It was devastating. I was raised catholic and was suddenly. I put in conflict with my faith faith. I was coming to realize empowered only men to make every single decision about what was allowed and what was not how to loud. I had a career future and potential and also i suffered from sometimes crippling anxiety so i knew i knew at that time i was not equipped to be a mother and so i chose to have an abortion i chose it was my choice and it was absolutely the right choice for me. It was not an easy you choice. It was not something i wanted but it was something that i needed like most healthcare. Is i refuse to allow anyone else's bullshit morality to force me into a life of premarital selfie. I refuse to live in the narrative that sexual pleasure for men and that women exist to deliver that pleasure my body gives me pleasure sexually connecting with my partner gave me pleasure. Nobody will try and say that he was at fault for enjoying sex with me but you could be damned shore that the men enacting adding these laws think less of me for deriving the same pleasure from him and so i continued to enjoy a sexual relationship with the man i loved they tell you the pill is ninety nine percents effective at preventing pregnancies and yet a few months later i i found out i was pregnant again. So i had done what i knew to do to prevent pregnancy and was still pregnant so once again i made the right decision to end that pregnancy be assault against women's bodies over the last few years has forced me to reflect on what i would have lost. If i never had my abortions i would not have have my children my beautiful perfect loving kind and inquisitive children who have a mother who was so very very very ready for them. I would not have my career. I would not have the ability or platform. I use to fight against oppression russian with all my heart. I would never have met my amazing husband. David who steadfast and immeasurable love from me sustains me through these terrifying times fifteen years after that i love had fizzled my life would be completely lacking all paul. It's great joys. I would never have been free to be myself and that's what this fight is about. Freedom freedom from oppression freedom for women to have the audacity to be equally sexual beings as men freedom for women to live the life they were meant into have not just the life that is thrust upon them by pregnancy that cannot exist in their life my the reasons for having an abortion a real. They surround me every day. The reasons of all the women who have had abortions are real. They are hours and they are none of your fucking business. We told these none of your business stories not because we wanted to we told them because our voice is just about the only thing that male dominated government is leaving women for now i for one will never stop using my voice. Sorry not sorry she was born. She was just twelve a month ago. She was she was david livid anyway. Uh she was young. She didn't know the she didn't say no. I thought it was for a locker room after she. She couldn't tell anybody could until she didn't know oh was she should do also knew that it was sears. Zero living and bam shoes living in high uh to go uh. She told a friend been down roll told a friend was and a friend says she had no choice. Stay and the girl have much money and the boy is the issue was abusing as you wrote in a and bam an ohio george <hes> uh she anyway this place around <hes> a place young girl state bah <music> shingo chances <music>. The man brown's the man <hes> i just have a simple question and <hes> you see the young girl died today. <music> <music> sorry.

america David united states ohio sears syria partner assault brown fifteen years
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"And also how are we expecting them to not only pay for college but to know what they wanna do by the time they get to college because we've taken all these electives out and then putting putting them into debt and then expecting them to have jobs when they come out of college which they often don't because there's not a lot of jobs available double to to what they're studying right. It's i don't know how we grow from this but also i get get really annoyed. That people like you know any sort of top forty musician like where's the music scene right now like i. I think about any time where there's been political struggle and what's always come out of it music. There's no music coming out right now. That's interesting. When you go to go back to the sixties sixties in the seventies when we were just really rock'n it and what a time stamp of that what time to be able to like put on a crosby stills nash album and hear hear what people were feeling yeah dylan dylan joan baez joan baez they were they spoke of the moment neil young who's speaking of the moment now i mean we have soundbites invite zooming. Thank god we have the sound bite. That's a really interesting question. I think that social media has kind of dissipated a lot of that energy because people are able to immediately gratify the need to say something yeah like yeah. What bands are eh coming. I mean when i think about like for instance d._j. Kallad who's muslim. I'd love to know what he has to think. From his perspective about the muslim band ban like what is that guy an swift got on stage and said this award and every single award given announced tonight. We're voted on by the people and you know what else is voted on by the people the midterm elections actions on november six registration was bumped up the you know within twenty four hours i mean it's it's really powerful this platform and they have no of what that power must be or they'd making a conscious choice to just go. I just wonder because if you do because you don't know who you fans are you could have fans from all sides of the spectrum so so if you start politicising yourself then maybe you think you might have fans who are not going to buy your music or stuff anymore and then what happens. What's the worst that's going to happen. If if how much money do you need. I mean these you know what i mean. It's it's it's it's hard for me to an end. Maybe it's because it's a millennial thing and they're not really motivated politically anyway. Maybe it's just a general generational generational thing and they haven't had to struggle until now so maybe it's the next generation that will make the music of this era but it's crazy when you think about that there is no real time stamp that we're going to be able to look back at that and in the fact that there are people like you say with huge platforms that don't do anything. They're making a choice. They're making a choice not to do anything or maybe they don't care. Maybe that maybe they're not awake. I mean i can't i can't get mad at somebody who's asleep right right. Who's ignorant of the situation but on the other hand. I can't imagine anyone who is not aware of what's going on so they're choosing thing to block it out so anyone you're saying yes anyone. That's <hes> socially or politically awake. I asked this question ashton and i asked this question. If if i'm sitting with a politician as well because i think it gives you a real perspective into who they are. What keeps you up at night. It could could be personal or social or political. Is there something that an issue that keeps you up at night. <hes> not one particular issue. I i think you know it's taken a couple of years now to deal with this onslaught of shocking information that seems to have come from the white house almost daily <hes> some higher some whatever now into this other phase of so so i became addicted to wanting to know everything that was going on which would keep me up at night besides all of my other <hes> issues that i'm working on a personally rival like activism issues and things oh by the way samuel samuel french. Do you know about sam. Yes glazing. I do know about closing in. It's it's worth breaking. It is heartbreaking. Did it just move to move to digital like tonight. It's what's happening in in our society. Everything is going in you know how hard is it when you call some nominee company to radzi and i just want a bucking person like <hes> and there are people who are who don't have jobs. It's like well give those people who don't job john. Let's get it together like what the hell's going on and all i can think of is go back to marianne twenty twenty dot com and she has answers for these things. She really does alaska and she gets it. You know it's it's it's like there has to be a fundamental shift in the way we do business in the way we do our politics in order for us to survive because ultimately. We don't have a planet to live on all this other stuff. We're talking about kazman and i also think that there is it's almost as little human contact as possible preferrable like like we it just either. I think amazon's a perfect example of this how instead instead of you know we used to go on shopping sprees or get excited to go buy our food in the stores now because amazon one has made things so disconnected and it just shows up at our doorstep and we don't have to deal with parking and so we're getting to this place where like we don't have to connect with people at all that are unlike us by you know. You don't have to talk to the cashier at the supermarket and ask them how their their day is. That's an issue because we're not teaching our youth those really important skills where they actually see the us communicating with other people my god that's right. It's i should listen to me. I sound like an old person kids. Today i say that all the time speculating because it's such making eye contact with somebody and sitting at a table and having a conversation how many kids don't know how to do that because nobody sits down at the dinner table and practices converse.

amazon joan baez dylan dylan alaska Kallad crosby ashton neil marianne twenty twenty twenty four hours
"alyssa" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Should not exist that is used as its existence and its broad power to abuse human beings and to push the limits of the law and beyond it did so under president obama and under president trump and has received free rein to be abusive additives taken that license to the max now trump i won't read all of his tweets but he says these big flows of people actually i believe immigration has down but we'll let that go for the moment he's big flows of people are all trying to take advantage of dhaka they want in on the act exclamation point let me repeat that last sentence for you folks they want in the act i got news for you mr president freedom it's not an act this country is not enact this country is supposed to be built on fundamental liberties fundamental liberties that you don't believe in or frankly even understand now our good friend good friend of this program representative keith ellison had the right answer no more daca deal says keith you're never doing a dhaka deal your actions gave you away cancelling daca with no plan making racist comments about black and brown imigrants ejecting several bipartisan deals i think i think key representative alyssa alyssa made a mistake b y bipartisan deal you didn't for anybody he's right he didn't fool anybody trump has no idea how daca works there are tight requirements for qualifying for it he ignores that he makes it act like it's a party where everybody's coming in the aclu wrote yet another reminder that real donald trump ran on an anti immigrant agenda and his work to create a machine of human misery for emigrant communities since taking office now the way we treat immigrants in this country this country that was built on the ideal of the lantern of liberty being raised for human beings everywhere is an absolute disgrace this president is an absolute disgrace and an embarrassment.

obama dhaka representative alyssa alyssa aclu donald trump president keith ellison