35 Burst results for "Alps"

DeGrom fans 13 over 5 innings, Mets sweep Pirates

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

DeGrom fans 13 over 5 innings, Mets sweep Pirates

"The Met scored four runs in the bottom of the 8th inning to beat the pirate 7 to three to sweep the four game series and remain in first place in the national league east one game up on the braves Met pitches had 20 strikeouts which tied a major league record and impressed met skipper buck showalter I think the thing I was most proud of the fact we didn't walk anybody No it's Alps for Alps but when you think how hard how hard it is to do and how infrequent has been it gets your attention Jacob de Grom had 13 strikeouts but left in the 6th after surrendering a three run Homer to O'Neill Cruz Mike mancuso New York

National League East Buck Showalter Braves Jacob De Grom Neill Cruz Mike Mancuso Homer New York
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:30 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"I knew that athletics having been such a big part of my upbringing. I at the moment am not discovering what I'm physically capable of and so when I had this burnout I had a simple but profound epiphany which was a recognition that everything that I was suffering from was actually my own creation and so then I thought okay well, if I created all of this suffering, then I can create my way out of it. So I asked myself the question I was just like if I could do or create anything in the world right now, what would I actually want to do? And within 5 minutes this vision came through and was I'll be running marathons climbing mountains, traveling the world transforming my life and working out some way to help other people do the same. And so following that, I spent three hours just downloading this big grand vision and then the next day I found my parents and best friends and business partners and said hey guys in two years I'm going to be heading out of Australia and I'm on a mission to run a marathon and climb a mountain on every continent and I'm sharing this both as a declaration and also to give you guys two years to prepare yourselves for my departure. So that was a powerful question to get unstuck in your thinking and to facilitate action and I've used questions like that in my own life. I'm struck with just how powerful that question was. Did you have a vision for the leadership program at that point and just putting together the mountains of marathons idea? So what actually happened is after I got connected to that vision, 6 months later I met Jenny and so Jenny is the cofounder of mountains and marathons and a really cool part of what we do. Definitely. And she had had a lot of experience in leadership coaching and leadership training. So when the two of us began to date, romantically, I shared about her, I shared with her about the vision of mountains and marathons and initially she was a little reserved and a bit hesitant because she'd never run a marathon for Anita at higher she'd never more she'd never read more than 5 kilometers. Whereas I'd already done a couple of half marathons, so I had a sense of what I may have been capable of. The journey had very much a lot of limiting beliefs around what she was physically capable of. And she just crushed it today at the mount blanc marathon. That's right. And so what have you. Yeah, and so this was Jenny's tenth marathon in the last four years. Amazing. Yeah, crushed it. And so yeah, so she's very inspiring and inside of what we do, I guess. I like to push the edge and go for the big grand moving more into the ultra space and I guess serve as that Beacon of inspiration and possibility, whereas Jen is kind of like, I guess I'm kind of like Angie in your kind of and Jen's more like Trevor. As far as you normalize the marathon running scene and Angie kind of pushes the envelope and that's kind of the dynamic that Jenny and I have. Definitely. But yes, Jenny, you know, when we were exploring what we actually wanted to create, we knew that we wanted to build something that married a number of our passions. And so leadership, leadership training, coaching, this was a big part of our background and then also this really strong hunger for adventure and testing in my case testing physical boundaries and discovering what we're truly capable of. And so when we kind of pulled out the butcher's paper and stuck it on the wall and said, okay, what do we want to build here? We really looked at one of the key things that we're really passionate about and then how may we be able to create a business model that actually threads and marries these teams together. That's awesome. So I'm really impressed by your community. There's about 20 folks here at the house and they're just so positive and most everyone ran today. Some people ran this marathon as their first marathon. So you talked them into that, I guess. Yeah, well, you're really good at making people think big. Yeah, yeah. I mean, it's kind of the heart of what mountains and marathons is about. It's really about getting people in touch with the possibility that they are for the world. And what they can live into. And so we design our line leadership program to 6 month transformational leadership program that graduates by running a marathon or climbing a mountain. And so for many people, if you've never ran a marathon or climbed a mountain before, regardless of what you're navigating in life, the simple consistency and commitment to following through on the training and preparing yourself psychologically physically spiritually to take on that kind of challenge is in and of itself transformative. And it opens up a whole new world of possibility once people do that. So definitely. Yeah. Well, you're really great at connecting with people and something I heard you say at the dinner was thank you for honoring your yes. Can you explain what that means? Well, I think in life we receive invitations and there's something inside and how I would describe it is like there's something inside our body that feels expansive when we're invited into certain things and there are some things that feel constricting. And sometimes you can feel it physically. You feel it physically. Yeah. Yeah, and often though, what can happen is the body may be a yes, but the mind starts to go all but what, you know, it's going to mean I'm going to need to take time off and like the mind can kind of get in the way of honoring the yes because all of the logistics or what will people think can get in the way. And so yeah, the dinner when I was celebrating everyone around the table for honoring their yes, it was really acknowledging that part of them that felt that hell yes in their body and then trusted that such that they were then willing to take all the pragmatic actions to book flights and take time off work and ultimately fly over and be with us even chamonix. Yeah, love it. So another cool thing is that you guys attract a lot of beginners, people who have never run a marathon into the program. And so what do you think the reason for that is people like just really looking for a life change and also wanting to get more fit? Yeah, I think there's something inside and you would get this entirely Trevor is just the nature of people get connected to who would I have to become to run a marathon? Sure. And so that, you know, for many people can be really you can activate all kinds of fear and uncertainty. But there is a kind of an inner knowingness of like the person who runs a marathon is not who I am now. And so inside of that, when we talk about facilitating a holistic life transformation, part of that is the health component in a part is relationships, parties, work related parties, finance, party, spiritual, we integrate all of these key life themes into the aligned leadership curriculum. And the common thread inside all of it is the consistent training and preparation for this marathon, and the reality is, is that those who have never run a marathon before knowing that they've got accountability, they've got great coaches, you know, and we obviously partner with MTA with Cindy, our marathon coach supports all of our members to, in many cases, run their first marathon and send these amazing meeting them exactly where they're at and they feel held and supported and guided every step of the way to feel confident to run their first marathon. We should say that everyone's training for Patagonia marathon. That's right. So you guys go to just epic places to run marathons and climb mountains.

Jenny mount blanc Angie Jen athletics Trevor Anita Australia chamonix MTA Cindy Patagonia
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"So I rolled through, I drank some cold Coca-Cola, which tasted really well still, didn't have an appetite, didn't eat anything they had like cheese and meat and bread and cookies. And I love to eat even during races. I'm like, could probably be one of those people who spent too much time at the aid station. Well, I spent a long time there, but it was because I started laying down the shade. Uh oh. Which a lot of people were doing. So like I said, thankfully, the four miles were mostly downhill and I was able to run much of it and I was just overtaking runner after runner. I do enjoy running downhill. We were still on the single track trail. So there wasn't a whole lot of room to pass and sometimes you get stuck behind a group of people that were going slow, but most of the time they'll runners would move to the side as they heard me come from behind. Sometimes I'd have to say, excuse them why, which is just about all the French I know. So I'm going down the trail at what feels like a pretty good clip. I'm sure if I watched the replay, like I'd be like, wow, this is really slow and boring. But I felt like I was moving really fast. I was passing everybody pretty much because I started kind of getting close to the cutoff and getting a little nervous that I wasn't going to make it. Once you get to town, there's like a little loop that you have to do. You get really close to the finishing line. You can hear all the excitement and then they send you out around this block and then back. So I did walk a little bit. But once I saw the finish line, I started running cross that thing in 9 hours, 47 minutes and 33 seconds. Beat the ten hour cutoff. Oh yeah. Gin from mountains a marathons was there to greet me. I probably look like death. I just shuffled on through to the post race sort of drink area where they had cold water and I just sat down on a bench and didn't move for maybe like 15 minutes. I thought you were gonna say that you got a cold beer and then sat down and didn't move. Well, the line was too long for that. You were even too tired to stand in line, huh? All right, I made it. With about 11 minutes to spare before the cutoff. So I'm feeling good. Looking at the clock, runners that are out there have less than four minutes. It's getting down to the wire. I was curious to see who would squeak in under ten hours because where I was seated at, you could see the countdown clock and the finish line. But really what happened was, after ten hours had passed, people were still coming through and they were still giving them metals. So they may not have gotten official finish time, but they still got a metal. No, I think they got a finish time. I think the organizers just sort of were gracious about it and I did hear a story later that the last finisher was a guy in his 70s and basically the people who were cleaning up the course and taking down the course markers sort of walked with this guy and motivated him to get across the finish line. He was the last guy. Oh, wow. So after you watch those final few finishers come in, did you eat or drink anything special for a post race celebration? They were having a pizza party at the mountains and marathons house that they rented. So I went back up there and met with all the folks from that team got to hear how it went for everybody. There were two or three people who had done that as their first marathon. That's phenomenal. I know. When I was sitting in the finish area, one of the mountains of marathons, people, a guy named Jeff came through. He finished after I did, and he sat down and we chatted and he's like, man, he says, I've done 50 milers. I've done. I forget how many marathons he said. He's done a lot of marathons. He's like, this shouldn't be called a marathon. This doesn't even resemble a marathon. This is like an ultra marathon. Yeah. So I'm so happy I did the marathon du Mont Blanc and I highly recommend it if you can get into it. My motto is, you know, do some epic stuff. That's right. And the final thing I want to do is play a sound bite with jamin from mountains and marathon. Jamin is a guy who really is pursuing a life of adventure. He does epic stuff and I'll play that for you in a second. First I like to thank our sponsor, the boulder thawne and boulder Colorado. Of course, we're talking about a marathon in France today, but if you can't make it to France, you should go to Colorado. Boulder is an extremely beautiful area, and you can join the boulder community, which is one of the greatest health mechas in the U.S.. They have a marathon, half marathon, ten K and kids run, and it happens this year on October 9th, 2022, and you can get $20 off the marathon or half marathon registration if you use the code MTA 20. Yeah, it finishes right in downtown boulder, Colorado, a really cool place. Check them out at Boulder thawne dot org. That's bolder and then thawne. Boulder thawne dot org to jump into the October 9th event. Full marathon half marathon ten K and kids run boulder thon dot org use the code MTA 20 for 20% off. And thanks also to our new sponsor prenex makers of joint health plus. One thing it's important to do is take care of your joints as a runner. Joint health plus is a supplement that delivers ingredients that are clinically proven to offer the most comprehensive and complete joint protection and relief available on the market when I was talking to David one of the founders of preven X. One thing that really impressed me was the amount of research and clinical studies that have gone into the formulation of joint health plus. That's right. The main active ingredient in the joint health plus is something called nem, it's clinically proven to reduce joint pain, joint stiffness, and improve joint flexibility in 7 to ten days, and it's clinically proven to protect joint cartilage from breakdown during exercise. It's found to be up to 5 times more beneficial than glucosamine and chondroitin alone or in combination. It also contains boz willen, a powerful natural and clinically proven anti inflammatory and pain reliever that helps provide additional support for joints and as most people know it's really important not to be taking anti inflammatory drugs because they can have a lot of unpleasant side effects on the body and so something like joint health plus is something good that you can do for your body. Yeah, I've been definitely taking it after this brutal mountain marathon and my joints are feeling good enough to go out and do half marathon 6 days later. Awesome. Now we need to go find some more hikes to take the kids on. Since my joints are feeling so good. So you can say 15% on your order by visiting prevx dot com and using the code MTA as VIN EX prevx dot com. It has a 100% money back guarantee. So if you don't feel the benefits within 30 days, you can return the product. No questions asked. Preven X dot com. Use the code MTA. Hey, I'm here with jamin hippel. One of the leaders of mountains of marathons, Jamie, you got a really cool story. So maybe let's go back to the beginning and we'll give you the idea to do something like this to have leadership program and to center it around mountains and marathons. Yeah, tribute. So the foundation of mountains of marathons is actually stemmed from a really challenging point in time in my life. Back in 2016, I was in deep burnout, and at that stage, I was running three independent leadership development companies back home in Australia and kind of doing 16 hour days, 6 days a week and just really not taking care of myself and you know I was in my mid 20s at the time and

boulder Coca Boulder Cola Colorado MTA jamin Jamin preven X. France boz willen Jeff U.S. jamin hippel David
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

05:20 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"In a bucket of ice water or a cold creek somewhere. That was a total grind. That really sucked. That was one of those sections where I'm like, why am I doing this? There were tons of people sitting down. I admit I sat down for like 30 seconds, it felt good. But I gotta keep moving. So catch you later. So I finally came to that mountain stream that I was dreaming about and runners were drinking straight from it. I still had plenty of water in my hydration pack from when I rolled through the last checkpoint, but I did drink from the waterfall. I thought to myself, why not? When in the Alps, drink from the waterfall, huh? Yeah. I wouldn't recommend it in a lot of areas of the world, but it must be safe there because people were doing it. I guess so. So we continue to climb and we made it up to 1700 meters, which is 5577 feet. Then there was a short downhill section. Of course, it's really technical and rocky. And I heard a runner yelling in pain up ahead. I could tell it was a man and I'm like, oh man, something bad has happened to this guy. So finally reached the scene and he had fallen. And I think hit a tree. And he was just like sprawled out on the ground, his poles were on the ground, you know, sort of flung about and some runners were around him, helping him. Some people had cell phone service so they were calling for help, but yeah, this guy looked like he had taken a fall and probably hit his shin or his femur bone against a tree. Oh, that sounds brutal. And I imagine it's not easy for rescuers to get to some of those sections. So at approximately 30 K point, we started climbing up again. And when I looked up, Angie, I could see nothing but endless mountain. 'cause you know when you're in a mountains, there's always these false summits. That must be the top. We're almost there. When you get up there, it's like, oh, we're not almost there. Remember that hike to the Lake with the kids? Yes. They gave up because it kept being just over that hill. So when I looked up all I could see was nothing but endless mountain, and I really didn't know how far up the course would go. Like when would we actually stop climbing? But you just had to keep pushing forward, even making small progress. I was probably doing like 20 minute miles. Because in the back of your mind, I'm sure you're thinking like there's cutoffs and I don't want to risk missing them. Just have to force yourself forward. That's right. So I started to hear noise about an upcoming aid station and it was great news, like the best news I heard all day because I was longing for some cold water, like the splash of my face, dump on my head to fill up my pack. So I got close to the la fleur. Checkpoint, which was a cable car stop. This was at 34.2 kilometers. And I heard a volunteer who spoke English and he told me it was only 600 meters and I'd be there. So I'm like, oh great, great. So I keep going and keep going. I'm like, huh, I don't know how far 600 meters is. 'cause it's still a long ways away. We'll finally I came through the tree line and I could look up and I could see the checkpoint, but it was like up this impossible gravel road with like more switchbacks and climbing. I'm like, no. It was so close yet so far away. And just to get up this gravel road, I had to stop and rest several times.

Angie
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:20 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"22 brother and you're wrong. So you said the energy at the starting line was really awesome. Tell us what the course was like. Well, it's beautiful as one can imagine. So we ran through the valley for a couple kilometers and at this point, no one's walking because we haven't really started climbing yet. And I was actually looking forward to the climbing, like starting to go up. So you could walk? Yeah. Oh, just hike. You know, I love to hike. Right. All right, couple. Kilometers in basically. Running along the valley floor, some roads, some trails. Beautiful day. I'm already sweating. A few sleeves, so. Gotta keep drinking water. And keep up with my electrolyte intake. But it's a great day to be on the trails. Sure enough, we started climbing it about 3.5 kilometers. And we just went up and up and up. And it wasn't bad because it was in the shade. Earlier morning, it's probably on the cooler side. Yeah. People were moving along, you know. It was kind of congested. Actually, the whole time was kind of congested. It was different than my marathon in Italy where I was like by myself for long, long stretches. There's always people around, you know, we're kind of like ants going up this mountain until finally, we reached 7218 feet or 2200 meters, a spot on the map that was called cold deposit and the climb, of course, was hard, but it was just stunningly beautiful. We were high above the tree line. We were climbing single file, up the ridge of a mountain. You could see the jagged snow covered peaks of the mount blanc group. You could see far below down in the valley floor at the town of chamonix where we'd all come from. And I knew that we had to descend back down there, just to get to the halfway point, all right, and then you can look across the valley to this next mountain, and I knew that we're going to have to climb that one and then come down again to get to the finish line. So we just done like the hardest climb of the whole race and we're not even halfway done yet. Did it feel demoralizing? It kind of did. It kind of felt just enormous, like the task was enormous. But I was feeling good, you know, people were moving really slow. It's single file the track is really narrow and you kind of had to wait your turn sometimes to go around these rock faces. People were sitting down where they could and I saw one lady who was seated and just crying. Like, I don't know what was going on, but you know, she'd already, I guess, decided that she wasn't going to make it that day. And it was just distraught. So yeah, it was starting to get real. But when we finally hit the top, people were just taking pictures and resting. It was just spectacularly beautiful. And you can see pictures of it, of course, on our Instagram or on the website. Oh, okay, that was rough. We just climbed a wicked steep mountain single file. Now I'm pretty sure we got to go down and up another mountain. Beautiful up here though. So at what point did you hit the first aid station or checkpoint? Yeah, so I hit that at about 13.5 kilometers and I beat the first cutoff, I think there was two hours and 45 minutes is what you had to make it to that one. And so I was doing pretty good. I rolled through there with an hour to spare. So you're feeling at that point. Like, yeah, I got this. It's going to be a cinch. No, not really. And then we started running down. Just down, down, down. If you look at the course profile, it's like a triangle, like Angie called it like a heart rate monitor. We went up and then we're going down. Epic day to be in the Alps. Now we're going downhill, which is much preferable. We'll check in later. I really enjoy running downhill, so the second checkpoint was just over a half marathon. It was 23.5 kilometers in the village of valor scene, and it was really set up nicely. It felt like a finishing line. You're running through crowds of people standing on both sides of the course cheering. And in France, they go, LA, LA LA and it's funny, 'cause every Alpine race I've done, they've yelled something different. So here in France, they were seen ale ale. So we go through and pass under this inflatable arch, and it almost felt like a finish line. I'm like, wait, is this it? You wish. All right, rolled through the halfway point. Let's do this little village. After coming down off the mountain, rigorous. Switchbacks. I beat the cutoff by, I don't know, 50 minutes, almost an hour. Thank you. Thank you. Now we're going across the pasture, and then we're gonna go straight up. The mountain again. This will be the ultimate test. It's feeling good though. Check in with you later. And it was after this that we went along the valley floor, and there was no escape from the sun. No more trees to run through. So everyone really started slowing down. I walked a large portions of this, and it was interesting because to cross the road, they set up a temporary pedestrian overpass. Wow, that's interesting. The scaffolding you had to climb up, and this felt like a Spartan race. So once we crossed over the valley, then we're going to go up the other mountain. At this point, the race gets grueling because there's no more shade. That side of the mountain is just exposed to the sun. It's thought that it was that hot, you know, it probably was in the 70s, but with the constant climbing and no wind, it just got really hot. And when you're at the altitude, there's something about the error being thinner and it feels like the sun is a lot more intense, at least that's my experience. So this is probably the toughest climb that I've ever dealt with in a marathon. It was just really hard to will my body forward. At this point, everyone's walking, you know? Were you like questioning your life choices? I was. It was like, at this point, I'm like, what am I doing out here? Why do I even do this? I obviously struggle through the whole thing. You gotta get through that negative space in your head at every marathon, right? Right, exactly. And even a half marathons. But runners were sitting down. There'd be a spot of shade, like with one tree, and runners were sitting down and taking breaks in the shade. I held off for quite a while doing that 'cause Angie I knew I had a principal you would never do that. But I did find myself maybe like three times during this race like having a quick sit on a rock and a shade. But sometimes, just to catch my breath and rest from the constant climbing, I would just lean over on my trekking poles. Okay, that was miserable. I'm not gonna lie. We just went up this mountain for the last hour. Merciless. Up, up. Not a lot of shade in the sun. It's really taking its toll. I feel like I need to stick my head

chamonix Italy France Angie LA LA LA
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

01:54 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"Lots of runners walking toward the starting line. The rules are simple. You have ten hours to complete the course of 42 kilometers of 2500 meters of vertical. Enjoy the race, everybody. Not so bad. So take us to race morning and describe it for us. What was your process that you went through? My wave didn't start till 8 a.m. and as they got close to the starting area, they were just great energy and the race organizers did a good job of pumping everybody up and they were making announcements in French and then someone would translate into English, which was really nice. Okay, and here's something Angie that you would have noticed. There was like 5 toilets for like 2000 people. That totally blows my mind. And you said, along the course that you didn't see any porta pots either. No, I don't remember any. I'm like, what do people do? I don't know. I go in their pants. I don't know. I've done a handful of these marathons now in the Alps and you just don't see a bank of porta pots like you would in a race in the states. As you can imagine with only 5, those things were hammered, man. Oh my goodness. Yeah, this is a tip if you are doing a race in Europe or often many places that don't have adequate porta pots for a race, bring your own toilet paper because often if you get a porta pot, they will not have toilet paper. It's a good tip. Bring what you need to take care of business. That's right. For these trail runs, like the race website says,

Angie Europe
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:38 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"Given the fact that you knew it would be challenging? Yeah, I do love running in the Alps. So we live in Pennsylvania near the Appalachian trail. It's nothing like the Alps, but I basically did all my long runs on the Appalachian trail, but now as I look back, I only did long runs. This is what not to do, folks. I know. You that have been listening to the podcast know that you should always listen to Angie. She's a running coach. She's done 68 marathons, and she trains, like you're supposed to train. Me, I am just a humble podcaster, and a lazy bastard. So I basically only did long runs. I called my long run only plan. So I can see people emailing us for your long run only training plan. Basically you take the trail marathon plan from the academy and you ignore every day except the long run day. That's how you do it. Well, I've known people who have ignored all the long runs. So I would say at least getting the long runs in is admirable. And I do remember I did one lower body strength training day and then I was like, all right, that's enough of that. Don't want to stress the lower body. Well, of course, we did that hike three days before your marathon. Were you sore at all going into this marathon from having done that hike? A little bit for a couple of kilometers, but yeah, it worked itself out because as you're going to hear most of this is just hiking. It's just a grueling death march in the mountains. It's not a lot of running involved for this marathon. At least for me and the people who were back there in my way so you already kind of gave us a spoiler alert that this marathon took you longer than your last marathon in Italy. How did mount blanc compare to other trail marathons that you've done? I would say that this marathon has been the hardest so far. It was harder than my marathon, Italy, which was the hardest up to that point. And I think the reason why is because of the heat. It was just warm and we were exposed to the sun and the heat just really took its toll. As you're gonna hear from the sound bites, I'm gonna play. Yeah, heat is a really tough element. Oh yeah. So were you nervous going into it, having previewed the course a little bit on that ride up the mountain we took, like, what were your feelings going into this race? I think I was nervous until I got to chamonix, the just excitement around this race we had met and had dinner with the mountains of marathons team and we had walked around chamonix had seen the course finish line and start line setup. I actually started getting really excited. So it was a nervous energy in a positive way. It wasn't like the dread of old man, this is gonna hurt. This is gonna be hard. Wasn't there, it was more like, man, let's get going, let's do this. This is awesome. Yeah, as we walked around chamonix, it was exciting kind of inspiring because you see runners everywhere and hikers and it's just like part of the culture, like people are out there challenging themselves, doing hard things. And so it kind of feels like, yeah, that's what we should all be doing. That kind of felt a little bit left out. I'm like, oh man, I have to stay back with the kids. I know. So what kind of equipment did you bring? Well, besides the mandatory equipment, I brought a new hydration vest. I found it REI. It's a one and a half liter, a little smaller than I like, but worked well. I do like to wear compression socks. I feel like they've preserved my legs. I have a pair of path project shorts with the base layer in the air, my favorite shorts. Do they help prevent chafing? I'm comfortable places. Yeah, they're really good. And the pockets are good and the stuff doesn't bounce around made by path project. And I brought a small roll of electrical tape 'cause if I ever get a blister, I'll just tape it up. I also brought my MTA trucker hat and my blue hat and a pair of good or sunglasses to keep the sun off of me. I was wearing cloud venture trail shoes that have had a good life and need to be tossed. They've got too many miles on them. They're made by on, which is a Swiss company. Yep, of course, yep, on cloud venture. I was carrying trekking poles. I have a pair made by the company lecky, like a tricking pulls, and I also bought those at REI years ago. I would not go without them. So I've never used trekking poles before. What are the benefits of using them? Why do you like them so much? I would say that 95% of the people out there had trekking poles. Basically, they increase your stability going up and down. You know, especially really technical stuff. They've definitely saved my ass a few times from falling. It does reduce the force on your knees, kind of transfers some of the work to your arms because you're stabilizing yourself with your poles. Therefore, your legs are not doing all of the stabilizing work, so it kind of helps preserve your legs. Plus, when I got tired, I could lean over on them. Which was a sad sight, but it was nice. They could probably be used for self defense in a tight spot too, right? I guess. And of course I had my you can bars, big thanks to you can for being a faithful sponsor of the show. I had a bar before my race and then I took two with me. I basically didn't eat anything else because the heat just made it so nothing looked good at the aid stations. You know, I had water had Coca-Cola, but basically all the food just did not look good. I knew I just shouldn't eat it, but I was able to keep using the Yucatan bars. They're really gentle on the stomach. And of course, that's why we love them. Yeah, that's right. I mean, when I heard what you had done for your fueling, I was like, you made it for almost ten hours on three you can bars. Yeah. That's pretty amazing. But we've heard from many people about how you can really help them during their races, pat recently told us that he did his 20th marathon, the seabrook, lucky trails marathon in Texas, he finished in four 50, which made him play second in his age group of age 65 to 69, and he said, I ran strong the entire time with you can with a faster, second half. Yeah, I'm so glad we've turned a lot of people onto it. It just works. And of course you can get 20% off with the code MTA. If you go to you can dot co use a code MTA for 20% off, and I just want to give a shout out to another podcast sponsor tanri outdoors. They make sunscreen. The sun was so brutal. On us that day, if I didn't slather up really good with sunscreen, I would have been in a lot of trouble. And the good thing about tanri, it's made forerunners by runners. It doesn't come off when you sweat. I was out in the sun for like ten hours and didn't get a sunburn. I was kind of expecting you to come back looking really red like you have during past races and you didn't. So it really testifies how tanri works. And as runners, we do spend a lot of time outdoor in the sun. That's especially evident in the summertime when the sun is hot and intense. And it is so important that you protect your skin because skin cancer and all sorts of skin damage can occur just through a couple of sunburns. Yeah, I wouldn't think of doing a race in the summer or a trail marathon or something to elevation without sunscreen and like I said, tanri is made 4Runner's buy runners. Check them out at tawny this TA in our eye. Tom Reed dot com. All right, morning of the mount blanc marathon. Looks like we're going to have good weather, but it's just beautiful here in chamonix. See mount blanc. Snow covers these glacier. Towards

chamonix mount blanc Appalachian trail Italy tanri Angie MTA Pennsylvania Coca Cola pat Texas skin cancer Tom Reed
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:19 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"On my way well my way all right, well now it's time for one of our world famous race recaps. I'm gonna talk about the marathon du mount blanc and just as a disclaimer I don't speak French so please pardon my mispronunciations. I might say mount blanc instead of saying Mont Blanc. Angie, you don't speak French either. I do not. I love how they'll like they get almost done with a word and they decide, yeah, I'm just not gonna say the rest of the word. But sometimes they're added on to the next word in a phrase. Yes. I've done a little bit of French on DuoLingo and just for some basic phrases. And so yeah, it's very interesting how each language has its own intricacies. So I wanted to do the marathon du mount blanc ever since I heard of the tour du Mont Blanc, which is a 170 kilometer trail that circles the mountain. Of course, mount blanc is the highest mountain in the Alps, rising up to 4807 meters or 15,000 774 feet. So this trail that goes around the whole mountain. It journeys through France, Italy, and Switzerland. Most people do it counterclockwise and it takes between 7 to ten days. It really is just an epic hike and I love to hike. So someday I want to do the entire tour du Mont Blanc. And there are some amazing refuges you can stay in to break up the days. Yeah, that's what's cool about it is you can hike from hut to hut as long as you make reservations early enough. We actually did a hut hike before the marathon about three days before my race. We started in Les contamine and then we hiked was about 5 miles to the refuge. We stayed at the refuge Dupree and it was about $70 a person includes dinner and breakfast and of course a soft comfortable bed in a hot shower and all the stuff you get. That's right. You know what's amazing is there's a famous ultra marathon I'm sure all of you have heard of is called the UTMB ultra trail du Mont Blanc and it's in August of this year like this is like the most fit ultra runners trail runners in the world come and compete and they'll circle the whole mountain in one go and the cutoff I was reading is 46 hours and 30 minutes to make it all the way around a 170 kilometers. They don't stop and stay at huts. We had a previous winner on the podcast, Courtney de Walter, an American runner, won it in 2019, and she did the whole mountain in 24 hours and 34 minutes. And then last year, 2021, she came back in one again, beating her previous time. She went around all 170 K in 22 hours, 30 minutes, 54 seconds. Having hiked on a tiny percentage of those trails, it is just mind-blowing that people are capable of doing a 170 kilometers and less than 24 hours. Yeah, it is incredible. It is. I mean, this marathon that I did when you look at the winner's time, like the dude ran in like three and a half hours. Yeah. And it was like all I can do to finish in like ten hours. It really gives you an appreciation for just how fit these trail runners are that are winning these races. They're basically like mountain goats in human skin. So I'm so glad I had the opportunity to come to France and to run this amazing, beautiful marathon. I'm super thankful to my Friends jamin and Jen from mountains and marathons for providing a race entry to me. It's really hard to get into this marathon and they had worked out a deal with the race organizers prior to COVID so they were finally able to use these race entries they had and they very generously gave me a race injury so Jamie and Jen run organization called mountains and marathons. It's a leadership program that culminates at the end of 6 months in the group, their clients either running a marathon or climbing a mountain like Kilimanjaro. It's really neat program and we actually provide the endurance coaching for the clients. So we have partnered with them now for a couple of years. So actually MTA coaches are the ones writing the marathon training plans for the mountains of marathons, team members. So anyway, so glad to have gotten a race entry, a little bit about the marathon. It starts and finishes in the beautiful town of chamonix, France. The highest point in the race is 2200 meters, which is 7218 feet. The total ascent is 2540 meters or 8333 feet, and they give you ten hours to accomplish this. Now, like I mentioned, I've done a couple of marathons in the Alps. The hardest one I had done was last year in Italy. We actually had like 9000 feet of net elevation change and so even more dramatic than the marathon du Mont Blanc, so I thought, yeah, there's no problem, you know, we have ten hours to finish. I'll have no problem finishing. That's what I thought. Now we had our kids with us, so Angie did not run. She was kind enough to stay with the kids while I did this marathon, but Angie right here, we're looking at a map of the course profile and how would you describe it? Sort of like a heart rate monitor. Very jagged, lots of up, drastic downs, and then more up. And then another drastic down for the very end. Yeah. The day before the race, we took the whole family up in a cable car to a spot along the course and rode straight up. This mountain, and we're seeing this path that is zigzagging up the mountain. Yeah. And there's some people who are hiking up. There's some runners who are running down because the day before they had the half marathon and the ten K, the 90 K was supposed to happen on Friday and that was canceled due to bad weather. So we're riding up in this cable car and just seeing how steep this course is. For me, it was like, wow, that is intense. It's like a reality check for me. Yeah, I know. I was kind of thinking like, is this even a good thing to do? Because sometimes driving like a race course can actually psych you out a little bit because you're like, this is actually a really long way in a car. You know, and I have to run this the next day. So here's what says on the race website to participate in this race. It's recommended to have good mountain race experience and to be comfortable in any ground and to be autonomous for several hours. So no hand holding. And they did make us bring the following equipment. So this is under the mandatory equipment. I guess they could have checked you at any time and you had to be able to show that you had a phone, a reserve of at least half a liter of water, a waterproof, and windproof jacket, and it says adapted to your size. So I can't carry a kid's jacket. I got my jacket. Survival blanket, whistle, a personal cup, and a mask. I also had to upload a medical certificate from my doctor and I had to have search and rescue insurance. They didn't check for the insurance but supposedly it was required, and I had it. Good, because I don't want to pay out of pocket for bringing you off the mountain. No. So you're not a stranger to marathons in the mountains. In fact, you know, you did the one in the Alps last year in Italy. And you knew how challenging it would be, how did you train for this particular marathon

mount blanc du Mont Blanc Angie Courtney de Walter France Mont Blanc Jen Italy
Mike Gallagher: Salzburg Is Famous for Two Things

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:57 min | 5 months ago

Mike Gallagher: Salzburg Is Famous for Two Things

"Well, thanks, Carl, greetings from Salzburg, Austria, without a doubt, the most magnificent magical enchanted city I've ever seen in my life. I'm so glad we got to come to Salzburg. Of course, Salzburg is famous for two things for the tourists. Wolf Wolfgang, Amadeus Mozart. This was his birthplace, and where he spent much of his life. And of course, the sound of music, some scenes that were filmed there. The architecture, though, beautiful churches and cathedrals everywhere. This is a beautiful, beautiful Austrian city nestled on the river and with the Alps and the beautiful fortress believe it or not, overlooking the city that encloses all of it. Just the history, the charm, and of course everything is Mozart Mozart Mozart. This is where he was born. See this house here, with the yellow painting on the outside. That's the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He lived here for a number of years. He moved to Vienna, became disenchanted with Salisbury because he felt they didn't recognize his greatness and wow, his greatness, of course, prolific and felt the world over. Interesting facts about sound of music. We saw a couple of the places where the movie was filmed, including when Julie Andrews came running through the courtyard with her guitar. We saw where they had the big music festival where the von trapp family flat fleas at the end of the movie for the big dramatic finish, but our tour guide explained that locals don't really like the American version of the sound of music because the sound of music was the story of Maria von trapp was originally captured in the early 1950s by a German film. So the Broadway musical, which was mounted in 1959, and then the movie a few years later, for them was just a reprise and they didn't care. People in Austria and even Germany, they didn't care very much for the sound of music. Believe it

Salzburg Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolf Wolfgang Mozart Mozart Mozart Austria Carl Maria Von Trapp Salisbury Vienna Julie Andrews Germany
Mike Gallagher Reports Live From Neuschwanstein Castle

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Mike Gallagher Reports Live From Neuschwanstein Castle

"Carl. And welcome back to Germany. This is the very, very famous Neuschwanstein Castle. This is the inspiration for Walt Disney for Cinderella, both the movie and the theme parks, fascinating story about this castle. This was crazy king king Ludwig, who built this castle because he wanted a beautiful masterpiece. A lot of cutting edge technology, indoor heating, running water, things that were unheard of at the time, flushing toilets, even a ringing phone. These are things that were well advanced, and that was king Ludwig's innovations. But this is the castle here in Germany, famous for the Cinderella castle. Have you ever been to Disney World or seen the movie Cinderella? And we're getting this beautiful tour of the Bavarian Alps. Right at the foot of the Bavarian Alps, the weather is perfect, having a beautiful

King Ludwig Neuschwanstein Castle Germany Carl Walt Disney Cinderella Castle Bavarian Alps Disney World
G-7 set to back pursuing Russian oil price cap, tariff hikes

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

G-7 set to back pursuing Russian oil price cap, tariff hikes

"The group of 7 summit starts with Ukraine as the number one topic Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has joined G 7 leaders by video link at their summit in the Bavarian Alps zelensky could be seen on the television screen next to a round table where the leaders were sitting the G 7 leaders are committing themselves to backing Ukraine for the long haul with British prime minister Boris Johnson underlining the need for grain stocks to get out to the world market The G 7 supporters of Ukraine are around the world have to continue to help the Ukrainians to rebuild their economy to get their grain out to export their grain and of course we have to help them to protect themselves The G 7s set to announce an agreement to pursue a price cap on Russian oil aiming to curb Moscow's energy revenues I'm Charles De

Volodymyr Zelensky Ukraine Boris Johnson Moscow Charles De
"alps" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:27 min | 5 months ago

"alps" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A global news update the G 7 summit is underway in Germany, Scott Carr has more. President Biden and other members of the group of 7, including the UK, France and Japan gathered in the Bavarian Alps today for the annual meeting of the world's leading democratic economies, sanctions against Russia and support for Ukraine are among the top items on their agenda. President Biden called for Western Allies to maintain a united front against Russia. The prime minister of Norway says Saturday's terror attack won't stop the fight against prejudice. He made the statement during a service at Oslo cathedral today, the prime minister said even though the attack put an end to the city's gay pride parade, the fight against discrimination, prejudices and hate will continue. Doctors should be punished for violating an anti abortion law, not women. That's according to governor Kristi Noem, appearing on ABC's this week the South Dakota Republican said women in a crisis situation shouldn't be punished, Noam declined to discuss the legal implications if a woman goes to another state to have an abortion. That's the latest I'm Dina kodiak. You're listening to Bloomberg businessweek with Carol massar and Bloomberg quick takes Tim stellan from Bloomberg radio. Starting a company is tough. Luckily, Catherine Finney, the founder and CEO of genius guild, has some tips for aspiring entrepreneurs. You can find those in her new book. It's just out this month. It's called build the damn thing. How to start a successful business if you're not a rich white guy. Carol and I asked Catherine for some of the key highlights this week and how she came up with the title of that book. Being out in the talking conference circuit that would often get entrepreneurs coming to me pitching. And they would give these really well thought out ideas and I would ask, well, okay, well, let me see a demo. Do you have something on your phone? I could see, and they would say, oh, well, I haven't quite built it yet. And they would go into all these reasons why they didn't. And I would say, well, just build a damn thing. What are you waiting for? But that's like what venture capitalists or that's what I should say founders always say needs to happen, right? You need to have this minimal viable product in order to build on it and iterate, right? Yes. You have to start off with something. In order to get feedback and actually in building your minimum viable product, which is really the simplest version of your product that you can build to be able to put out into market or to show the people that get feedback, it allows you to get information, get thoughts, get feedback before spending too much money and building your product. And that's very, very important. Oftentimes, founders, particularly boundaries who come from communities that are outside of your traditional communities in the startups, will spend tons and tons of money, tap into their 401k to build these robust prototypes without knowing whether or not there's a market for it. And it really goes back to this concept of product market fit. Does your product have a market? Does your product have people who want to pay for it? And so your goal with your minimal viable product is to find out this product market fit without spending a ton of money. You know, it's interesting what I love also about this book and I feel like some of the conversations Tim and I were just back from Dallas, Texas at the inside 2022 conference talking with financial professionals, but diversity and inclusion came up big time. And one of our chats specifically was about how you have to have diverse investment advisers to reach out to the diverse investment public that is out there who are increasingly being left behind. Talk to us about that when you know in terms of businesses that are being left behind and markets that are being left behind because we're not Tapping into a more diverse consumer marketplace and not supporting diverse entrepreneurs who see the need for that. Yeah. I mean, you're leaving money on the table, right? One in four new entrepreneurs are Latino. Black women are one of the fastest growing groups of entrepreneurs. You are leaving money on the table when you're not reaching out to these markets. This is the new future. And so it's really important to be able to understand how to reach these markets in the world of startups, how to work with the startups coming from these markets, mostly because you startups are Tapping into new areas and new opportunities for growth that you may not be able to access or even understand if you're not a part of those communities. So by investing in them and by getting to know these amazing founders, you're actually giving yourself more diversification within your own portfolio. All right, I want to be provocative because I love that you lay it out there and thanks to kind of sharing some materials with us. You talk about arming readers with responses to investors who have told her, quote, great pitch, but I just don't do black women. I mean, that happens. That's a reality, right? It happened to me. Well, tell us. All right, so tell us about that. Well, I think, you know, and it's been well documented in venture capital about the pattern matching, right? Of this idea of because every successful founder rather that's been was a 25 year old white guy from Stanford. That means that every successful founder is going to be a 25 year old white guy from Stanford. What is interesting about that is the inherent fallacy, which is it also means that all your failed investments also came from 25 year old white guys from Stanford. And so what happens is when someone like myself or woman or a diverse entrepreneur shows up, it's kind of like, you know, this anomaly, like, oh my gosh, you're

President Biden Scott Carr Oslo cathedral governor Kristi Noem Dina kodiak Carol massar Tim stellan Bloomberg radio Catherine Finney genius guild Russia Bavarian Alps united front Bloomberg businessweek Noam Ukraine Norway South Dakota Bloomberg ABC
 Protesters gather as G-7 leaders set to arrive in Germany

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Protesters gather as G-7 leaders set to arrive in Germany

"Protesters are gathering as G 7 leaders set to arrive in Germany An estimated 1000 protesters are gathering in Munich as the group of 7 leading economic powers hold their annual conference in the Bavarian Alps Germany holds the G seven's rotating presidency this year and oxfam spokesman tells The Associated Press we need concrete action to cope with multiple crises of our times He says the G 7 have to act immediately and fight hunger inequality and poverty Germany's top security official has called on protesters to refrain from violence I'm Charles De

Germany Bavarian Alps Munich Oxfam The Associated Press Charles De
Biden's mission in Europe: Shore up alliance against Russia

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

Biden's mission in Europe: Shore up alliance against Russia

"President Biden is headed to Europe I'm Ben Thomas with details The president is looking to sustain the global alliance that's punishing Russia for its invasion of Ukraine Biden's first stop is the meeting of the group of 7 leading economic powers in the Bavarian Alps of Germany following that he's onto Madrid for a NATO summit Ukraine's president Vladimir zelensky is set to address both by video The trip comes as the four month old war shows no signs of abating and the aftershocks to global food and energy supplies deepen U.S. and European officials note the resulting inflation is posing political headaches for the leaders at home and growing challenge to western resolve Ben Thomas Washington

President Biden Ben Thomas Ukraine Vladimir Zelensky Bavarian Alps Biden Europe Russia Nato Madrid Germany U.S. Headaches Ben Thomas Washington
Jack Posobiec Discusses the Inexcusable Inaction of the Uvalde Police

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 5 months ago

Jack Posobiec Discusses the Inexcusable Inaction of the Uvalde Police

"On the cutting edge of what's happening and you've all day. I think this is important for two reasons. Number one, we should always care about the truth, always. But number two, I think that it's important when it comes to our gun control debate right now. Because if we look at Yuval day as the facts actually show us, this has very little to do about gun purchasing or red flag laws, and a lot more about a police failure to intervene. What are your thoughts? Well, one of the big things that people need to understand about you validity, and it's actually something that even in the initial reporting. And this is something where I do have to ask for forgiveness on because when this all happened, I was over in Davos, Switzerland, I'm going up and down the Alps, where getting detained, we went to Ukraine. I come back. And that's what I really was able to start sinking my teeth into the details here. Then yesterday, the Texas Department of Public Safety comes out. That's the head of the Texas police and they start releasing these documents based on the timeline based on some of the 9-1-1 calls, the dispatcher calls with the local chief. And so now we've been able to dig through those documents to dig through this hearing. And one thing that I think everybody needs to understand is that this guy Pete arradondo, one of the names you need to memorize in this is Pete arradondo. Originally, the way it was being reported, I think a lot of people had the misunderstanding that he was the chief of police for all of you validated. It's not true. He's actually the chief of police for the validity ci DS, the consolidated independent or CIA SD school district. So he's the chief of police just for that school. That is his sole duty, his sole responsibility, and it's a 6 man force that is directly assigned for the security of that school. They're brought on by the school board, and then that's, of course, working in conjunction with the city council. But this really is a situation where he had one charge and that was the defense of this school. And so when

Pete Arradondo Davos Texas Department Of Public Saf Switzerland Ukraine Texas CIA City Council
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"Ran by castle which is a nice bonus. Yeah and then. We went along a path down into town. And i must have looked delirious because people in the village kept pointing to me which way to go and i saw the finish line. I saw finally that blessed site. I made my way to cross under this inflatable arch that they had in as i was crossing. There are people standing around. There were cheering and there was an announcer who was reading off names. Since just meek crossing he read off my name. Nice and slow and loud and he got to What country. I was from and he said like really dramatically trevor spencer from the united states of america like the olympics. The tone was kind of like. Why would you come all the way over here to do this. And then with all the spectators standing around. And there's this guy with a camera filming everything. He's like sticking his camera in my face then. The race announcer starts asking me questions on mike no way. So trevor from america what did you think about the sky. Marathon sticks the mike. In my face all i think to say was So beautiful but it was brutal but it was really beautiful I think whoever designed the course is probably sadistic so at that point before across the finish line. I thought because of my my dumb marathon. Math that i probably was inefficient. Eight and a half hours. Well the clock said nine thirty seven. My time was nine hours. Thirty seven minutes and eight seconds so the lesson here is never do mathurin during a marathon. Also timezone took me nine and a half hours but when you texted me back to say that you'd finished and how long it took you. I was still thinking maybe it was a typo like enemies six and a half hour our son gavin and i were like debating and like he must have been a typo gavin was like i could do it in less than six hours. Has this thing where he thinks he can do better else. Yeah we go to the zoo in costa rican talk about how strong sloth sar. He's all. I could beat up a sloth full of fourteen year old hubris. Yes so i actually finished the second to the last male out of one hundred and three and they're also three guys that dna and also finished in front of five women there were total of nineteen female finishers and there were zero d-fs among the ladies. Of course not well congratulations. It sounds like an amazing brutal beautiful race. Yeah when i was out there doing it. I thought okay. This is one l. Definitely not come back to do ever ever ever. But now that i think about it and look at the pictures and i think about the amazing journey that it took me on. I think yeah that. That's something i might do again. It wasn't so bad. So bad now. But i i look forward to going back to Italy another time after the marathon. I spent another couple of days in suty role and then i went over to slovenia since i never been slovenia went to a beautiful place. Called lake bled hike around the lake tour to castle actually end up doing probably eight miles a day walking on the rest of my my trip. Since i went over there by myself. I tried to pack in a lot of stuff that angie and the kids wouldn't necessarily be excited about like going to a lot of museums and It's really cool pretty much. Any major city goto their free walking tours led by locals to two and half hour walking tour. So i did. One in venice actually did to walking tours and venison did lubiana the capital slovenia. And now. i'm back in the united states of america. The hardest part of the trip was the flight back across the pond leaving. Vanessa headed direct flight to jfk which was like nine hours almost as long as my marathon. I rather run a marathon. Sit on a plane for nine hours but time we got to jfk. It's like three in the morning or four in the morning in italy. And i i didn't hardly sleep at all because i can't sleep on a plane really that well and then i had two more flights to get back to our small local airport. Yeah to get back to harrisburg. Well thank you for listening to my race. Recap i think. If there's any takeaways from this it could be to just enjoy every mile. You're in or kilometer and to watch out for problem centric thinking because whatever you focus on expand so try to expand you know good thoughts happy thoughts thoughts serve you better. Yes that ebbs a great thing to focus on for sure. Well now. It's time for this episode. Quick tip we have a question. Sin by rebecca about how many calories to consume on long run days versus lower mileage days. She doesn't wanna under fuel or over fuel. And we pitch this question over to our friend angelo. Pull the at met pro. He is Metabolism expert based in california. This company met pro has helped lots of people in our audience and was able to lose thirty pounds working with one of their nutrition coaches and she was able to peak at her goal race and she did a three nineteen marathon at the age of forty one and qualified for boston by twenty minutes. In addition to helping runners angelo has experienced working with athletes. Who need to cut weight or gain weight. The time their nutrition so they can peak at competition and he's also as you're going to hear helped contestants who are going on reality. Tv shows so that's interesting stuff but as a runner it is important to know how to just down just based on your activity level especially in the long run days. So let's go jump into the quick tip right now. This question comes from rebecca and she says i have a question regarding fuelling properly and metabolism regulation. I have trouble knowing. How many calories consume on long run days versus lower mileage days. Is it possible to damage your metabolism bhai under fueling or over. Fuelling for your runs. How do we know if we're taking in too many calories as a runner. Okay i can actually give you a fairly direct answer to that one. So i defining damage your metabolism it is not a factor of damage or not damaged simply a factor of whatever you eat. Your metabolism will acclimate to few eat. More your metabolic rate will acclimate to more fuel. If you eat less it will feel like your metabolism has been damaged in reality it simply acclimating to less fuel. I once worked with a gal who is going on one of those survival show reality. Tv shows and had to go twenty one days without jimmy. She's eating bugs right twenty one days when she'd get a headache she get angry. She'd get and she's like. How am i gonna do this. You know so. We slowly conditioned her. She was used eating five or six times a day. We slowly conditioned her to just eating three times a day then as the show got a little closer down to two times a day and then before she left for the show we had her just eating one. Big neil and one snack. We were conditioning. Her metabolism to be used to less fuel longer periods of time between fuelling. 's so for most people. That's not a good thing for most people for her. It was she did great. They won the show. They did awesome well when you said that she was going on a reality show. It's going to be naked and afraid and was going to say choose out. They're eating bugs on naked and afraid that was the one who was a. That was the one and anna bunch of others but You see how. It's just a matter of strategy. Now you see how i i start talking. Is this what was the question. She's running give it read.

trevor spencer slovenia mathurin united states of america gavin Called lake costa rican italy trevor olympics angelo mike rebecca angie venice Vanessa harrisburg
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"In suspense. When i did the marathon and switzerland which my first race in the alps i dealt with a big changes elevation as well but the majority of it was at the second half of the race because the first half you could run it in the second half was just the death march going straight up well this race. It just started off the massive climb and then never stopped. Yeah oh just power hiking pretty much the whole time yeah. This is my slowest marathon. By far i mean after an hour. I'd only gone five k. Wow okay just past the five k. Sign five kane and our just opened up my first. You can bar hungry. Just wanna make sure preemptively fuel. Let's get data out nature. We'll check in with you later and you can hear in this audio clip that i started in preemptively fuelling with my you. Snack bars right away. We definitely appreciate. You can't be longtime sponsor. The podcast i've taken. You can't bars to marathons in germany. Switzerland austria the uk in italy not to mention dozens of races in the us like half marathons foles and spartan races. That's right. I've even given you can out to people i one marathon. I did ladies. Like i forgot my you can fuel. I said i have an extra bar if you want. If you want to try him co two you can dot co use. The code mta challenge. You'll get twenty percents off because they also sponsor our virtual challenges so use that code at you dot co we love it. 'cause it's a slow release carbohydrate source comes in a powder you can mix with water or bars also have jails now so you can't dot co use the code. Mta challenge will get twenty percents off so it might be tough but the racist just breathtakingly beautiful everywhere. I look also help at the weather perfect. It was raining on us whole time. I probably would have not appreciated. It was hard to stop and take pictures like constantly. But even in the toughest moment i look just look around and i would think this is the reason i'm here. I've heard that as humans. We have this innate longing for beauty. cs lewis wrote this in his book till we have faces. He says the sweetest thing and all my life has been the longing to reach the mountain. Define the place where all the beauty came from my country. The place where we ought to have been born. I ran through the most amazing not in valley greenfield's and huge dolomite mountains. Judy up toward the sky and remind me why. Come here as long as the obser- here i will keep coming. That's all i know. You did get some amazing pictures which will have to share on our blog and on social media as well. What were the aid stations. Like i mean did they have eight stations or were you required to carry all your stuff with you. They were kind of few and far between i. I went a pretty good ways before. I came to any aid station. So having my own fuel with me those you can't bars was very handy and you had to hydration pack that you're using you had a hydration pack with one liter water bladder in it So as we're going along we went from bozen up to a little mountain village called written. We kept climbing on hiking trails and gravel roads and there were some sections that were We were just running on the road kinda to get from one to the next but everything was walmart with paint yellow flags and it was pretty much alone the whole race for most of the time. I had no one around me. The race website said if you drop out of the race. it's your own responsibility. Get yourself back so you might as well finish. Don't even know how i would do that. You know where i was so actually. We're making our way up to the top. This mountain called the rittner horn and it's his high mountain plateau. It's accessible by gondolen. People ski up there and once you the the rittner horn you have this expansive three hundred sixty degree view of the dolemite's lots of families and they were out hiking kevorkian on the mountain looking for a way to use the word cavorting in the sentence it was interesting to see people like all bundled up jackets because spits no a little bit on us up. There and here wasn't shorts and a t-shirt so at this point when we get to the rittner horn. I'd climb so much in my legs. Were so tired. But i wasn't even halfway done yet. Okay way high up. On the mountain pasture amazing views cow bells walking by a bunch of cows it feels like going uphill non and man. My leagues refueling it. Okay well past the twenty k. Mark four and a half hours in still going uphill expressed by this beautiful mountain guest house off the hikers out today. What's cool is you can stop these guest houses and have a meal gives drink even state. You want one night and keep hiking okay. It's so steep for so long feels a cruel joke. But it's all good bells as you hear actually Sheep grazing okay. Past the half marathon point so leaving the aid station. Amazing gorgeous view on the dolemite's vendor soon this all split up and dolemite con picture rolling hills. Ancient cattle fences built out of rock. It's gotta be millions. It's rocks is stacked up tightly together. Free range cows and in the distance. The dolemite's which are famous for these barefaced mountains. That up like spines through the alps. It's all quiet except for the sound of my own. Footsteps breath distinct cowbells once in a while. Someone on a bite goes by. Pass a hiker. It's funny how warm everyone's dressed who's not running people have coats on and they're all leered up here. I am in shorts and a tee shirt. My state really warm but my hands are cold so through some gloves that are brought which was a good choice actually brought them. Webby told me to bring. And i actually listened. That's it for now. Got a nice downhill sections. Turn us off and start running so at this point. I'm getting really worn down by the mountain. But i finally passed. The halfway point. Got too much needed aid station. Fill my hydration pack which was just about empty so the timing was perfect and i was starting to feel like a little bit like eh elevated headache coming on which i was pretty worried about. That can really ruin your day fast. You know so. I tried to just keep sipping water and just nibbling on food but they say is you. Don't wanna guzzle water. You don't want to eat a bunch of food one time and make all the blood rush to your stomach way from your brain. The aid stations also had electrolyte sports. Drink but they had a no cup policy so he had to bring your own cup. Oh no so. I didn't have a cup like support directly in my mouth. That's sanitary i was like. How do i get this. Goodness send me so on top of the rittner horn at the station. I started to see some runners come up from behind and it was then that i began to care more and more about not finishing dead last my goal leaving the station thankfully there were some nice downhill sections and i was able to do some actual running. Nice the next section of the course. We went from the rittner horn to a place called totent- commercial that name actually means chapel of the dead comes from the word tot- which means to to kill and the word kerr which is church to these little white chapel on top of a mountain at the altitude of twenty one hundred meters and it's just a hut with like a crucifix inside. It was hard to tell from the course map what to expect. There weren't actually mile markers kilometer markers on the map it was just a huge blown up maps and not a lot of little detail. All i see was that there are sections on the map that were color-coded and the section i was going into was red and then coming up on some sections that were black. The key on the map said the red indicates a hiking incline and the black indicates a difficult hiking inclined inclining all day. And now i get to the real incline. Apparently right right at the chapel of the dead already filling kind of dead. Yeah so. I came upon this boulder field and went across that for long ways and then eventually to this massive ridge refer to it as a wall in this audio sound bite and this is massive ridge and look at it from a distance and i can see little specks on top where people were up there and i thought to myself. How do i even get up. This thing got closer to switch backs going up so this is after i am just so spent looking for relief waiting for the the uphills to end and then what do i see the biggest uphill section i've ever seen it's so steepest even look possible to go up so i i go up at this point. A couple of people have passed me. And i was always moving forward. I never stopped other than to take a picture but people were also walking than they passed me. I was walking. They were walking past me. And i thought okay now i can see how slow i'm going. I'm walking guinea. Passed by walkers okay. Wherever designers course.

cs lewis Switzerland valley greenfield dolomite mountains mta Mta austria italy Judy germany walmart uk Webby us Mark white chapel
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"So trevor. I know people are excited to hear about how your sky marathon went in italy. So tell us what made you want to sign up for this event. When i posted some photos on instagram people were asking. Where's the race recap will here. It is so. I went and did the sued t- role sky marathon in italy. Big thanks to angie. For watching the kids while i went over that we're not always able to travel marathons together these days but i was able to get away for a trip to europe was not to like about that for two whole weeks. Yeah kind of squeezing. A lot actually flew into venice and then stayed there couple of days. Amazing place rented a car and drove up to northern italy. In the trentino alto. A dodgy region of italy up against the alps. It's predominantly german. Speaking actually because east to belong to austria until after world war one so in german suty role which means south t. role because it was part of the tea role region in austria. So it was cool to practice german while i was over there and Of course run a beautiful marathon in a beautiful place so the race took place on august. Twenty eighth it was my eighteenth. Marathon to date is my third marathon in the alps and it was definitely the most challenging. We climbed a of twenty eight hundred meters or over nine thousand feet It was just a constant climb up and down mostly up the race also has a sixty nine k one hundred twenty one k which they didn't have this year for i don't know why they also have a half a trail half but with all the events combined they call it. The most extreme experience in the alps. Wow that saying something. I know especially because i can think of some pretty extreme experiences exactly so tell us about the day. You know the days leading up to the marathon. How you're feeling and what kind of preparations that you had to have going into the race will. My training was tough. Because we don't live elevation so i tried to get as much trail time as i could in just going up and down trail. I think that might have helped my leg strength To get over there you had to have a negative cova test or proof of vaccination. Which i had i've been vaccinated so have my little card in europe. You pretty much get everywhere. If you have a green pass which says that you've been vaccinated or had a negative cova testing to get into museums or even hotels and restaurants. You gotta show your green pass so in lieu of a green pass. My little cova certificate from here in the us worked and most people didn't even check. It was able to do everything i wanted to do. Over there and even travel between countries. Because after the i went to slovenia it was only three hours drive to lake bled slovenia. Of course you have to cross through austria to get into that part of slovenia. So i was a little bit nervous about how difficult would be to travel over there but everything worked out well and interestingly this might be a good time to go because there's not a lot of tourism compared to other times like venice may be at forty percent. Wow which is still a mad house. And there's not a whole lot of americans which i'm sure. Europe is quite relieved. Grateful for in other places. I went that people were telling me that. I was the first american that they've met all summer. Well that's interesting. So i know a lot of european marathons require you to have a medical certification saying that you're able bodied enough to run the marathon at the case with this one for sure. Even the berlin marathon wanted you to have that. I don't think it's ever been enforced but for this one since it was such an extreme mountain race i think they were probably gonna check it and they wanted us to email that over so i had to go get a checkup from the doctored and i go and explain what i have to do. I show them this this doctor attestation form and it's all in german and they're like if you're going italy. Wisest thing in german. Explain going to the german speaking part so had a physical. Dr looked into my nose. Look into my ears grabbed my balls and then pronounce me good to go all. That's a relief. Was there any special gear that they required you to carry for the this marathon year. That's another thing about all the racist. I've done in the alvis. They give you this list of gear that you're supposed to bring in. I never anybody check to make sure ahead everything. But they wanted to bring a whistle an emergency blanket a map gloves long sleeves a hat and then all kinds of stuff so i did bring a lot of that stuff. In fact here is a sound bite from race morning at my hotel. Stay a beautiful hotel right there in bozen which is where the race took place in by the way. There's names for everything in both german. An italian. so you might hear me use a combination in his recap so zain bozen or in. The italian is bolzano. One of the largest cities maybe the largest city in trentino alto dodgy or suci role than fact. The whole city is ringed by mountains. And it's quite intimidating because there is like cars go into the top of these mountains on winding roads and i'm thinking okay. We're running up there seriously. But here's a soundbite..

italy austria slovenia europe trevor angie venice berlin Europe bozen us zain bozen bolzano trentino
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"So trevor. I know people are excited to hear about how your sky marathon went in italy. So tell us what made you want to sign up for this event. When i posted some photos on instagram people were asking. Where's the race recap will here. It is so. I went and did the sued t- role sky marathon in italy. Big thanks to angie. For watching the kids while i went over that we're not always able to travel marathons together these days but i was able to get away for a trip to europe was not to like about that for two whole weeks. Yeah kind of squeezing. A lot actually flew into venice and then stayed there couple of days. Amazing place rented a car and drove up to northern italy. In the trentino alto. A dodgy region of italy up against the alps. It's predominantly german. Speaking actually because east to belong to austria until after world war one so in german suty role which means south t. role because it was part of the tea role region in austria. So it was cool to practice german while i was over there and Of course run a beautiful marathon in a beautiful place so the race took place on august. Twenty eighth it was my eighteenth. Marathon to date is my third marathon in the alps and it was definitely the most challenging. We climbed a of twenty eight hundred meters or over nine thousand feet It was just a constant climb up and down mostly up the race also has a sixty nine k one hundred twenty one k which they didn't have this year for i don't know why they also have a half a trail half but with all the events combined they call it. The most extreme experience in the alps. Wow that saying something. I know especially because i can think of some pretty extreme experiences exactly so tell us about the day. You know the days leading up to the marathon. How you're feeling and what kind of preparations that you had to have going into the race will. My training was tough. Because we don't live elevation so i tried to get as much trail time as i could in just going up and down trail. I think that might have helped my leg

harvey sutton angie trevor Angie npr brain tumor mta italy maine tara cali
Race Recap:  Running in the Italian Alps

Marathon Training Academy

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Race Recap: Running in the Italian Alps

"So trevor. I know people are excited to hear about how your sky marathon went in italy. So tell us what made you want to sign up for this event. When i posted some photos on instagram people were asking. Where's the race recap will here. It is so. I went and did the sued t- role sky marathon in italy. Big thanks to angie. For watching the kids while i went over that we're not always able to travel marathons together these days but i was able to get away for a trip to europe was not to like about that for two whole weeks. Yeah kind of squeezing. A lot actually flew into venice and then stayed there couple of days. Amazing place rented a car and drove up to northern italy. In the trentino alto. A dodgy region of italy up against the alps. It's predominantly german. Speaking actually because east to belong to austria until after world war one so in german suty role which means south t. role because it was part of the tea role region in austria. So it was cool to practice german while i was over there and Of course run a beautiful marathon in a beautiful place so the race took place on august. Twenty eighth it was my eighteenth. Marathon to date is my third marathon in the alps and it was definitely the most challenging. We climbed a of twenty eight hundred meters or over nine thousand feet It was just a constant climb up and down mostly up the race also has a sixty nine k one hundred twenty one k which they didn't have this year for i don't know why they also have a half a trail half but with all the events combined they call it. The most extreme experience in the alps. Wow that saying something. I know especially because i can think of some pretty extreme experiences exactly so tell us about the day. You know the days leading up to the marathon. How you're feeling and what kind of preparations that you had to have going into the race will. My training was tough. Because we don't live elevation so i tried to get as much trail time as i could in just going up and down trail. I think that might have helped my leg

Italy Austria Trevor Angie Europe
"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Marathon Training Academy

"This is marathon training academy episode three hundred sixty two. Thanks to the richmond. Marathon in richmond virginia for sponsoring this episode. You can run through. Virginia's capital on november thirteenth. They offer a half a full k. Sign up at richmond. Marathon dot org and registered. Now the beat the september sixteenth. Price increase discouragement. Marathon dot org. This podcast is brought to you by you. can you. can't patented ingredient. Superstar ch has the remarkable ability to provide a steady release of energy without spiking blood sugar levels. Fuel your next personal best with you can and save twenty percent on your order with code. Mta challenge bum-bum-bum-bum-bum-bum-ba barbara apple welcome to the marathon training academy podcast where we inspire and empower you to go.

The Dixie Fire Continues to Rage

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 1 year ago

The Dixie Fire Continues to Rage

"The Dixie Fire continues to rage. It's now the largest single wildfire in California history and has burned more than 505,000 acres. Is still threatening at least a dozen small communities. It's destroyed 1000 buildings, many of them homes, Cal Fire chief Tom Porter says almost a month after the fire broke out, there are new challenges on the horizon. The concern we have going into the next few days is another bout of monsoonal moisture coming up through Southern California. Turning into dry lightning potentially through this area and all the way to the north coast of California and then into Oregon, Washington as well, Porter says. The conditions are so dry that a single blade of grass can be a mission point. After 29 days, battling the Dixie Fire Containment stands at just 30%. With thousands of firefighters fighting blazes in California officials have decided to close down the Trinity Alps Wilderness area until November. That's a popular vacation spot with more than half a million acres of granite peaks lakes and trails. In a statement, Forestry officials say they can't spare the aircraft and personnel needed to track down lost or endangered hikers. They also hope the move will help prevent new fires from igniting in

Dixie Fire Cal Fire Tom Porter California North Coast Trinity Alps Wilderness Southern California Porter Oregon Washington
"alps" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Glacier blood. No it's not a new flavor from heavy metal water company liquid death glacier blood is what some call the phenomenon of snow on the alps turning red and the snow isn't read from some type of pollutant or something like when that chocolate factory accidently coated whole town in switzerland with reddish brown cocoa dust last year. It's a naturally occurring phenomenon as the result of snow. Algae quoting the bbc normally these micro algae have a green color as they contain chlorophyll. The family pigments produced by most plants to help them absorb energy from sunlight. However when the snow algae grew prolifically and are exposed to strong solar radiation they produce red colored pigment molecules known as carotenoids which act as sunshield to protect their chlorophyll and quotes now. This red snow is not a new phenomenon or even a new discovery. The bbc notes that it's mentioned as early as eighteen nineteen in a book about an arctic expedition the year prior and the new york times points to aristotle as having the first written observation of red snow. It also doesn't just happen in the alps. Researchers two years ago found samples of what they've dubbed sanguine. Ah in europe. North america south america the south pole and as clearly illustrated by that eighteen nineteen book the north pole new occurrences do seem to be increasing however and some recent findings are shedding more light on the bizarre spectacle while the data isn't fully there yet most researchers believe climate change is responsible for the increase in red snow leeann bending a professor of interface geochemistry at the german research centre for geosciences in potsdam told the bbc quote the rise in the atmosphere carbon dioxide levels increases the temperature which leads to more snow melting. The moment there is liquid water on the snow. The algae start growing and quotes

global sustainability institut nick king Linda shia new zealand Tasmania alex jones university of notre dame jones mike new york times cambridge university dr joseph john mandile ireland jackson Iceland Jones norway olympics
Why Is Snow on the Alps Turning Red?

Kottke Ride Home

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Why Is Snow on the Alps Turning Red?

"Glacier blood. No it's not a new flavor from heavy metal water company liquid death glacier blood is what some call the phenomenon of snow on the alps turning red and the snow isn't read from some type of pollutant or something like when that chocolate factory accidently coated whole town in switzerland with reddish brown cocoa dust last year. It's a naturally occurring phenomenon as the result of snow. Algae quoting the bbc normally these micro algae have a green color as they contain chlorophyll. The family pigments produced by most plants to help them absorb energy from sunlight. However when the snow algae grew prolifically and are exposed to strong solar radiation they produce red colored pigment molecules known as carotenoids which act as sunshield to protect their chlorophyll and quotes now. This red snow is not a new phenomenon or even a new discovery. The bbc notes that it's mentioned as early as eighteen nineteen in a book about an arctic expedition the year prior and the new york times points to aristotle as having the first written observation of red snow. It also doesn't just happen in the alps. Researchers two years ago found samples of what they've dubbed sanguine. Ah in europe. North america south america the south pole and as clearly illustrated by that eighteen nineteen book the north pole new occurrences do seem to be increasing however and some recent findings are shedding more light on the bizarre spectacle while the data isn't fully there yet most researchers believe climate change is responsible for the increase in red snow leeann bending a professor of interface geochemistry at the german research centre for geosciences in potsdam told the bbc quote the rise in the atmosphere carbon dioxide levels increases the temperature which leads to more snow melting. The moment there is liquid water on the snow. The algae start growing and quotes

BBC Switzerland Arctic The New York Times South America North America German Research Centre For Geo Europe Leeann Potsdam
Ashley Judd Walks Again Long After Shattering Leg in Africa

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Ashley Judd Walks Again Long After Shattering Leg in Africa

"Actor Ashley Judd is walking in the Swiss Alps six months after she shattered her leg in Africa I'm marquees are loaded with the latest Ashley Judd writes on Instagram she was able to walk up hill in the Swiss National Park on uneven surfaces for an hour judge says her medical team expected her to be able to move her foot in a year but she had movement after four months in February Judd was on a research trip in a Congolese rainforest when she tripped over a log and shattered her tibia she spent five hours on the forest floor biting a stick and pain and Judd nearly lost her leg now John says her leg will never be the same but she and her legs are buddies

Ashley Judd Swiss National Park Swiss Alps Judd Africa John
"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

"Proper scary flying tunnel and this is just way again emphasizes enough way way way beyond anything recreational and and in my opinion beyond anything that most of us should be doing even excerpts pilots. An maybe with the exception agreed on maxime but paul. He doesn't seem to mind erin union. They don't seem to mind really extreme conditions. But it's vastly extreme and the of the stuff we we're flying. Ooh i was reagan flying the cane hour winds in pretty okay with it and some of the phone days were just tear mine and again pretty okay with it just laughing it off the whole day i had flying down from fish down the rhone. I had a monstrous tailwind and much win for the thermals. Even be thing even totally gray anyway. And i basically read sore down wrong I'd just plant myself onto one of the kind of north south facing ridges and wouldn't even need to turn. I just sit there to take the elevator up in it full bar until i couldn't hang on anymore and huck over the back and do it again. And again and again slope landed when was about to dump rain and hit out under a cow thing high and bauer later. I was back in the air and wasn't sunny but it was just was reigning anymore and kept going in. You know i would never certainly comfortably fly on a day like that home in most days. Were like that and so you know going around. Won't block was even worse a strong north day at so. Yeah it's extreme and it's definitely. I don't think you know that one day that kriegel had the big flight he was asked house flight wasn't he just said is bad or something. I mean it was like one word. It was just a hardest white. He'd ever had in his life. I'm sure he was pretty scared like he was catching awada collapses that's kriegel and he regularly trains sixty can our wind and stuff in the snow so i can't emphasize enough that this race year on year like the two thousand eighteen. We had no one. You can launch anywhere in the when there was quite a few thunderstorms and stuff but hardly any gust fronts. No wind no fern. And i think for many that that was their first year or just blown away by the difference the can have from one one race to the next for those who were contemplating doing the xl and competing in something like this. You just have to know that. That's what you're taking on and you have to be pretty good. Judging is this do. I have this move to i. Can i fly in these conditions. And like you said you do get in this crazy confident head space where you can handle it or you don't in lost a few people. I talk about that here in a bid to to fear injuries. And they're you know they're very real as far as calculated risk cat on how calculated it is i. I'd like to think we're all taking calculated risk but the end of the day. You know you hawker you don and tom doodo got to a few places really tall and decided it just wasn't flyable and what down and you know maybe some of the other pilots would have decided it was okay Certainly there have been quite a few times where probably wouldn't okay. Launched in in you know made a word. So yeah carnage. There were definitely a lot of carnage in this one like there has been in other high confli races and again..

kriegel maxime awada erin huck reagan bauer paul tom doodo don
"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

"Properly scary. Oftentimes it was pretty wild. I know a lot of that was picked up on with the live tracking but a lot of it wasn't we were dealing with a lot of fern Wins that were similar to what we had in twenty fifteen which was my first but even scare a lot of firm when and a lot of thunderstorms unbelievable. Hail the kind of breaks windshields on cars and a lot of lightning and several fear injuries. That took people.

If General Mark Milley Wants to Understand 'White Rage,' Then He Can Resign and Leave

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 1 year ago

If General Mark Milley Wants to Understand 'White Rage,' Then He Can Resign and Leave

"General Mark Milley. Is the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. And he thinks he's clever. He's not. He's actually quite stupid. As far as Joint Chiefs of staff, go He wants to defend the Marxism that is being preached in the military. Would not so clever arguments. Cut one go. On the issue of critical race theory, etcetera. I'll obviously have to get much smarter on whatever the theory is, Um But I mean, what? What the hell are you talking about? Whatever the theory is I haven't read it. You know nothing about it. You guys are promoting it and pushing it in urging it. Go ahead. It's important actually, for those of us in uniform. To be open minded and be widely read. And they're not really and what else should be read Mine Comp. Is that okay? Widely read. Course people should be widely read. We're not talking about wide Larry. He gave out a book list. Least in the Navy. They did that include out an ALP. Racism. Marxism. Go ahead. Diversity and it is important that we train and we understand and I want to understand white rage and I'm white and I want to understand it to understand white rage. What is white rage? What is that now? Mr. Producer of You heard this before? White rage and he wants to understand. Hey, look, I'm the head of the I need to understand it. Why don't you just resign? And go off. Maybe become a monk or something and study it and understand it all you want, but not on. I've done, you idiot. We're facing serious challenges

General Mark Milley Joint Chiefs Of Staff Mr. Producer Larry Navy
"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"alps" Discussed on Cloudbase Mayhem Podcast

"Keep going right and finally was working. I not sure if if he was fast or not. But at this time this place it was for me easy to decide because of storm. They come so an awesome often. I don't know exactly what to i. On the end. I followed the easiest way crinkled. Thank you always such a pleasure and thank you for being so open and sharing of all your knowledge and Terrific wind today. congratulations. And i can't wait to do this again with you. Thanks thanks so much and look forward racing with the on sunday yeah. I'm very happy for me. It's also nice to see that you are here every two years to keep up the motivation and emmy for us. I give you some look forward. Fifty often people are journalists. Asked what you do after Not fly anymore and It's another to treat at another twenty years that would fly orchid sixty one. Yeah it will do this for a long time. Had hoped that the next guests are simon and thomas combined. They're my age. They're so young today he degrade aptly really fast. Ask tastic to see now. it's. I'm very happy to to start a new adventure everybody knows at or everybody's not now But they they gave me the feeling that i will win for sure but i told the no. It's a new race to challenge things happen and you have to go so careful. Yeah and not only for one. Today's it's for for. That's all day until the goal in. It's gotta stay healthy for a long time. Yeah it's a really big challenge in a competition. Sure and nobody. I think nobody understands that. I don't think so. I think it's very hard to understand. Let me i was gonna ask. Were more after six wins. Do you still see this. As a he'll do five or ten word you do is just keep doing as long as it's interesting and challenging. I say as long my body not doing too much problems as long i. I feel good motivation as long. I like to do because in this second flight sport. A really do only what i liked to do. And i like to work with persons with companies for sponsors. I like to do the The media work will. Because i can share the the good feelings the motivation and i think the most important for all the people in the world is to have a goal to feel the motivation to to be happy to and also to reach a goal to feel that the good them feeling.

thomas twenty years five simon Today six wins sunday today ten word second sixty two years Fifty often people one
Cable Car Plunges to Ground, Killing 9 and Seriously Injuring 2 Children in Italy

The Duncan Duo

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Cable Car Plunges to Ground, Killing 9 and Seriously Injuring 2 Children in Italy

"Cable car in the Italian Alps has plunged to the ground, killing nine people, according to authorities to Children are hospitalized. The cause hasn't been determined, Officials say. The cable line was renovated several years ago and recently reopened after coronavirus lockdowns were

Italian Alps
Avalanches in the French Alps Leave 7 People Dead

Wealth Without Risk

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Avalanches in the French Alps Leave 7 People Dead

"Day of the mountains turns deadly in France. Local authorities say two separate avalanches in the French Alps killed seven people. The first avalanche took place around noon Saturday in the area of the story Ski resort and killed four hikers between the ages of 42 76 3 People died in a second afternoon Avalanche

French Alps France
Are You Actually Kinky?

The Cut

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Are You Actually Kinky?

"Lately there have been some truly salacious stories on the news about powerful celebrity men who've crossed some lines with women they were dating and these have been sort of aftershocks of the metoo movement. Where these new accusations. I'm thinking of armie hammer. And the allegations of abuse and resume or marilyn manson's rape room brought back this important conversation on the ways that power and fame can be abused but the fascinating thing this time as the way. These celebrities have responded to these accusations because the reply is essentially. Oh no you don't understand. That was consensual. We are kinky kink is one of those things that's hard for people to understand myself included. Because i think for a long time i was like whatever you have your shit you do behind closed doors and that's your business. I don't really feel the need to interrogate too deeply beyond a basic sort of understanding. That shouldn't shame anyone else's kings you know and so when the internet seized on the gripping details of army hammers supposed cannibal fetish as like. Should we even be lampooning. This is this a legitimate kink. Would there be a right way to do this. But then i realize everyone was talking about. What a wild fixation this cannibalism thing supposed to be and there was much less focused on what army hammers accusers. Were actually saying about their relationship. Which was fetish or not. Their relationship started one way and then it took this turn we at the cut. Believe these women who are making these accusations and we believe that the men they were involved with are hiding behind the mantle of kink because kink isn't an excuse for abuse but in order for us to understand where the lines actually get crossed as a culture. We're going to have to engage with the ideas of kink much more fully in all of its richness and deep deep complexity. We understand that like you can be like vicariously like excited by violence even though real violence is disgusting. And you don't want to actually hurt people but it gets like framed in this way where it makes it sound like if somebody is kinky there beyond criticism and that's not what it means. This is lux traum. And i am a longtime sex educator and an abuse survivor someone who thinks a lot about abuse kink i think people think oh la king is choking people and kids like leaving bruises on people and can be but that's not really what it is so what is case. Everyone i talked to had a different way of explaining it. What keep means differs for different people will kick is a very specific subset of the arabic and it can mean a lot of things. If one feels that one is kinky then one is kinky for lux alp. Traum kink is very much about consent in a kink. Situation it might. It might look like the dam has all the power control but the real control lies with the submissive person. Because it's not the purest iteration of like safe consensual kink. Unless you can say no or say you're safe word or say whatever and make it all stop immediately. This is a very clear dividing line right for armie hammer. The women said stop and he kept going for marilyn manson. It was an entire lifestyle. Where if you said. Stop your punished more. But just like an all consensual sex kinky or not. There's a lot of nuance and negotiation. That needs to happen between the people involved. And it's all within this context of wanting to be giving there's so much pressure on you to be compliant too. Please your partner to do all these things. That has nothing to do with king but when you are in a kink environment that can like be taken to the nth degree because so much of kink about exploration about going into a known taboo terrain you have to be on the same page. There's these moments where i'm like. Oh or like. I would be surprised with the thing that i had never expressed interest in. I maybe didn't wanna do it. Don't think there is this bright dividing line between abuse and kink. All this stuff is just like there's no like three step guide for like dealing or there is but it's like talk to people have conversations like be willing it's the easiest thing in the hardest thing to hurt the ones you love to act out scenarios aren't normally like you to play with power. It's playing with fire. Really and yet culturally kink doesn't talked about with gravity until something goes horribly wrong gets whispered about as the super freaky unspeakable thing or it has a reputation of being a gonna dorky form of adult dungeons and dragons. You know like something. Couples try to spice up their marriage after reading fifty shades of grey. I think it's almost jumped straight from being arm. Something that's forbidden to being a cliche and being a joke and we skipped the part where we look at. It has to be taken just as seriously as anything else would do as humans. And i think that was part of what we were hoping to do with this analogy

Armie Hammer Marilyn Manson Lux Traum La King
Pile of Junkers

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Pile of Junkers

"On the morning of the third of august. Two thousand eighteen. A two day tour run by you. Air began taking its passengers from dubai. Dorf north of the alps to the canton of chino on the south side of the alps. Both the outward flight on friday on and the return flight on saturday were scheduled to take place on the dick yonkers. You j. you fifty two. We're just going to say j in this case Three mg four e commercial aircraft registered as h. b. dash hot Hp ht conducted as a commercial air transport operation under visual flight. Rules pilots a. m. b. had been entrusted to want to perform both flights alternating the roles as commander or pilot flying and co pilot or pilot monitoring. Pardon the interruption. When we're recording the show live. The only person who can hear me is captain jeff. Now he's decided to include my audio here in the post. Show edit lucky you enjoy. Here's something important from my haul boxes here jeff okay. I'm directing my attention to something in the chat room. oh yes okay. and s. u. s. T. would be pronounced dee schweizerische since your highs soon dares schramm geshe gel. La is guess. Us brave. I have one full year of highschool germany under my belt high school during german. I spoke german nailed. I haul boxes playing steps role. That's what she says. Yeah all right. Thank you very much for that Little interruption i think that was worth it and now i just have to figure out where i was. Okay switzerland's and i'm not gonna pronounce that again s. u. s. t. released their final report concluding the problem was going to mention that in the really really nice little video that the s. u. s. t. Put together kind of an expert explanatory video of the accident. The talked about the fact that both the captain and co-pilot both pilots here were previous military pilots and then they were also previous airline pilots. Kinda like nick. And i if we ended up doing one of these two are thing. Nice nice little retirement gig. They were in the early sixties. Yeah it's beautiful. I love aside. Finally young jay fifty two around on your new leisurely days on fortunately did go very well for the direct cause on the final report. The accident is attributable to the fact that after losing control the aircraft there was insufficient space to regain control thus the aircraft collided with a train The terrain. I should say no there wasn't a train. Evolved like to. The investigation identified the following direct causal factors of the accident the flight crew piloted the aircraft in a very high risk manner by navigating it into a narrow valley at low altitude and with no possibility of an alternative flight path. The flight crew chose a dangerously. Low airspeed has regard to the flight path. Both factors meant that. The turbulence which was to be expected in such circumstances was able to lead not only to short term stall with loss of control but also to an unreliable. I don't think i looked at word. Thought on rectifiable. Don't think there is such a word and there isn't So a not rectifiable situation Directly contributory contribute contributory factors. The investigation identified the following factors as directly contributing to the accident. The flight crew was accustomed to not complying with recognize rules for safe flight operations and taking high risks. Just like naked. I would do. I'm sure The aircraft involved in the accident was operating with a center of gravity position that was beyond the rear limit. Who that's not good. That's never get ya. This situation facilitated the loss of control. Systemic 'cause the investigation identified the following systemic causes of the accident the requirements for operating the aircraft and commercial air transport operations with regard to the legal basis applicable. At the time of the accident. Were not met Some other systemically contributory factors the investigation identified the following factors as systematic systemically contributing to the accident. Due to the air operator's enact inadequate working equipment. It was not possible to calculate the accurate mass and center of gravity of its j. You fifty two aircraft in particular. The air operator's crews who were trained as air force. Pilots seemed to be accustomed to systematically failing to comply with generally recognized aviation rules. Who to get free potted bank ever employee mac down on the air force over here. I know and a taking high risks. When flying j fifty two aircraft

Captain Jeff Jeff Okay Dee Schweizerische Jay Fifty Chino Schramm Dubai HP Switzerland Germany LA Nick United States MAC Air Force
St Augustine: Teacher and Author

5 Minutes in Church History

03:19 min | 1 year ago

St Augustine: Teacher and Author

"After agustin's conversion he resigned his post as teacher of rhetoric in milan and he left for several months to villa in the area of lake como right at the foot of the alps. You should look it up. It's a beautiful place and here augusta his first books as a christian he was writing books since three eighty all of those early books is pre conversion books are lost to us but now and three eighty six. He began a whole new writing career. I a quick word on his writing he would dictate to notetaker who used a system of note taking called tirrenia nets that this was named for tullus. Tirico he was the scribe for cicero. And these ian or shorthand notes would then be written out into longhand and they would be edited and they would become a book. There were not commercial publishers in those days but there were networks of scribes networks of scholars and friends. And you would make a few copies of a book and you would distribute it to these associates to these friends and they would make more copies and then from those copies would come even more copies and it was just a case of supply and demand and there was a great demand for books from augusta and there was a steady supply. But were these first books that augustine wrote as a christian. What were they all about. We called them dialogues. They were recorded conversations that he was having with himself there at this beautiful place in lake como. He would personify this dialogue with reason. And so it was augusta. And reason having these dialogues of course. He was drawing on this genre of the dialogue from that. Great greek philosopher. Plato and these dialogues covered such topics as truth and the immortality of the soul and unhappiness in in them we see the themes that will come to dominate agustin's teaching. He was after all a teacher and so he taught first of all the nobility the value for the pursuit of truth. Let's not be satisfied with lies and falsehood in mere shadows but let's pursue and pursue it relentlessly the truth. Secondly he helped us understand the relationship between faith and reason too often reason is jettisoned. Combatant of faith will not so argued augustine. God created us with a mind. He created this world as a rational world. Any wants us. God wants us to use a reason to know him. And so faith and reason and guston had a wonderful way of talking about the relationship of those two and then finally augusta taught us that all everything begins and ends in god this world our very lives all of our efforts human history truth wisdom happiness. All of this is found in god. He is the beginning. He arches over every moment and aspect and god is the end. He is the and the

Lake Como Agustin Tirico Augusta Milan Cicero Villa Augustine IAN Plato Guston
Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

All Things Considered

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

"To Pluto's, if you could mail folks back home, a scenic postcard that featured white capped mountains. That's because Pluto's Pluto's thie thie only only place place in in the the solar solar system system other other than than Earth Earth that that is is known known to to have have mountains mountains with with white white peaks. peaks. As As NPR's NPR's group group Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfield voice voice reports. reports. These These mountaintops mountaintops aren't white because of fallen snow. A tourist on Pluto's could take in all the sights that NASA's New Horizons probe discovered five years ago like a big, heart shaped glacier made of frozen nitrogen, methane and carbon monoxide. And just to the west of Pluto's icy heart. There's mountains. Tongi Betrothal is an astronomer at NASA's Ames Research Center, He says thes mountains are made of water ice. Whatever I some pretty is so cold that its hard Just like a rock on Earth. So that's why you can make mountains off. What Ison Pretty. The mountains are about 2.5 miles tall, like the Alps. They're mostly dark brown and red because they're covered in particles from Pluto's Hayes. The peaks, however, are bright white and because they look so much like white capped mountains on earth. Initially, it seemed logical that this this high high altitude altitude first first first call call call call from from from from like like like like on on on on years. years. years. years. But But But But now now now now he he he he and and and and his his his his colleagues colleagues colleagues colleagues say say say say in in in in the the the the journal journal journal journal Nature Nature Nature Nature Communications Communications Communications Communications that that that that Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's Pluto's mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops mountaintops got got got got their their their their white white white white in in in in an alien way on earth. Snow collects at mountaintops because at higher altitudes, thie air and ground or colder as a moist wind approaches a mountain it rises up slope, and it could On water condense their two from snow on clouds on top of the mountains on Pluto's. It's completely different. It's not snowing on Tito, he says. They're the atmosphere actually gets warmer at higher altitudes because of heating from the sun. The surface of these water. Ice mountains remains super cold, however, and because these tall mountains peak in a region that's full of methane gas, the methane becomes frost on the cold surface, so you you have have no no formation formation of of clouds. clouds. Onion. Onion. You You have have no no formation formation off. off. I I see see particles particles in in the the atmosphere. atmosphere. Every Every single single kills kills directly directly at at the the surface, surface, he he says. says. Something Something similar similar might might happen happen on on Triton Triton Moon Moon of of Neptune, Neptune, But But Triton Triton is is kind kind of of flat. flat. So So Pluto's Pluto's a a and and earth earth maybe maybe the the on on ly ly spots spots in in the the solar solar system system to enjoy white capped mountain scenery. Nell Greenfield's Boyce NPR news

Nell Nell Greenfield Greenfiel Triton Triton Moon Moon Nature Communications Communic NPR Nasa Nell Greenfield Snow Tito Heart Shaped Glacier Ames Research Center