11 Burst results for "Alma Telescope."

"alma telescope." Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

05:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"With Bob Symon that keeps the website behind the black from the surface of the planet Earth, we're going to the surface. Of the planet Mars perseverance. Bob, you give us a A tempting vision of where perseverance is headed is this ingenuity is idea is ingenuity now running the mission. I wouldn't say they're running the mission. But the picture I've posted them behind the Black was one of the 10 color pictures that ingenuity took on its August 15th 12. It's always 15th. Scouting flight that was with its 12 flight, and they released those pictures finally, and this was one of those 12 pictures. The pictures were actually a set of six done twice from slightly different positions. The rover flew out over an area called South and as it flew, it took Uh, five pictures, every 10 seconds or so And then it shifted sideways about 5, 10 m or something like that. Five M. And then it came back, taking another set of five pictures every 10 seconds. So the pick the color picked. This is in between black and white images. But the politics is, therefore give them the opportunity to get stereoscopic images of those five locations and the reason ingenuity did this is because the section South said they were originally not sure they could drive over there. And so what? You know what he's doing is giving them a very close three dimensional look now of the surface to see if the road we can go over and I think the road we could easily go over this. This is a lot much less harsh terrain. Then you see that curiosity has gone across and perseverance got better wheels and a better design. So I don't think they have any problem, but it will. Initially I think being cautious because it just started the mission out. What this picture shows is small ripples, lots of dust and some small rocks, pavement rocks and what they're going to use this information to plan a very precise route in advanced And probably go there. That's a really good thing, And it shows the genius of ingenuity. They did not have this for curiosity. And maybe that led to the damaged wheels that They've learned. Now we go now we go to an unhappy story. I've allowed one today. Just what this is about The 30 M telescope that doesn't have a home. The poor TMT Bob. The last time we checked, TMT was rejected by Hawaii for political events. Now it's rejected by the Canary Islands. Why, Bob? Well, okay, so they they want to build the TMT on monarchy here in Hawaii, and there have been protesters that have been blocking its bill because Of a variety of reasons that I'm not going to get into. But I just really a block but box and the government, the democratically controlled government in Hawaii, basically their mouth support the TMT, But their actions have been to support the protesters, so it's blocked. And so TMT is consortium that's building it, uh, that went out and talked to the Canary Islands where there is already One of the biggest telescopes in the world. That said, could we build one TMT there? And they originally said Yes, and they made a deal. But this was a backup site. Well, there was a lawsuit by environmentalists in The Canary Islands in the Spanish government saying No, no, no, You really can't do this. This is on public law preserves. You can't build a telescope there and, uh, the court, a local administrative court in, uh in the Canary Islands has ruled now know if that permit was invalid. You can't build a telescope here. If you had a commitment to build it here when you made the deal that may be so, But the fact that you were only using us as a backup, and you really would just use This is a political ploy to force Hawaii to say yes, well, that's not valid, and so the kind that permits gone so the Zion attempt has no place to be billed. As far as I'm concerned, it's dead. I expect actually, that the members of its consortium, we're going to slowly fade away into other telescopes, the giant Magellan telescope or the European extremely large telescope. Both have been built in Chile, which means that we will probably not have a ground based large telescope in the Northern Hemisphere and that's going to limit observation. The idea of TMT was to cover the Northern Hemisphere. The I really think the real solution is to stop building ground based telescopes at all entirely put him in space where you don't have these political issues and you won't be blocked by the thousands of new satellites that can go up very shortly. The very cool, very famous, very mysterious Asteroids. Psyche. What have we learned Bob? Well, they're using a different telescope in Chile, the Alma telescope, which is a radio array of telescopes. They have obtained very high resolution images of the metal asteroids safety. It's metal. They think this is a very high contact metal, which means it might be the core of a dead planet We have and we have a project going there. Probe going there in 26. It will arrive So I have a picture up showing its I its shape. It's not round. So this object. The large is below planetary size. It's an asteroid, and it's distorted and so the pictures there and they have an idea that there's questions about it. They don't really understand the data they're getting. They're going to need the psyche Probe to arrive and take a close. Look, John, that will answer the questions. It's an alien planet, Bob. Okay, fine. Finally back to Mars. What are we glimpsing? More cool pictures? Yeah, This is another cool picture on maws of what looks like dark material being blown about and like, call it plain. And it's just there's a mystery here, and it's just cool image, and I've talked to scientists about it, and they give me some answers. But they contradict themselves as well. John Psyche the deadline. The The viewing date is nine is 2026, so we'll get there and the solid.

John Chile Canary Islands Bob Symon five pictures Five M. Bob Mars 2026 12 pictures 12 flight today August 15th 12 five locations six about 5, 10 m Both one twice 10 color pictures
"alma telescope." Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:45 min | 3 weeks ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on KGO 810

"A tempting vision of where perseverance is headed is this ingenuity is idea is ingenuity now running the mission. I wouldn't say they're running the mission. But the picture I've posted on behind the Black was one of the 10 color pictures that ingenuity took on its August 15th 12. It's always 15th scouting flight. That was, but it's 12 flight, and they released those pictures finally, and this was one of those 12 pictures. The pictures are actually a set of six done twice from slightly different positions. The rover flew out over an area called South Setting. And as it flew, it took, uh, five pictures every 10 seconds or so. And then it shifted sideways about 5. 10 M something like that. Five M. And then it came back, taking another set of five pictures every 10 seconds. So the pick the color picked. This is in between black and white images, but the politics is therefore give them the opportunity gets Stereoscopic images of those five locations and the reason in generally did this is because the sections South said they were originally not sure they could drive over this and said What do you know what he's doing? Excuse me have a very close three dimensional look now of the surface to see if the role we can go over and I think the road we could easily go over this. This is a lot much less harsh terrain. Then you see that curiosity has gone across and perseverance got better wheels and a better design. So I don't think they have any problem, But it will. Initially I think being cautious because it just started the mission out. What this picture shows is small ripples, lots of dust and some small rocks, pavement rocks and what they're going to use this information to plan a very precise route in advanced And probably go there. That's a really good thing, And it shows the genius of ingenuity. They did not have this for curiosity. And maybe that led to the damaged wheels that They've learned. Now we go now we go to an unhappy story. I have allowed one today. Just what This is about The 30 M telescope that doesn't have a home. The poor TMT Bob. The last time we checked, TMT was rejected by Hawaii for political events. Now it's rejected by the Canary Islands. Why, Bob? Well, okay, so they want to build the TMT on monarchy here in Hawaii, and there have been protesters that have been blocking its build because Of a variety of reasons that I'm not going to get into. But I just really conversion block but blocked and the government. The democratically controlled government in Hawaii is basically their mouth support The TMT, But their actions have been to support the protesters, so it's blocked and so TMT is consortium that's building it that went out and talked to the Canary Islands where there is already One of the biggest telescopes in the world. That said, could we build one TNT there? And they originally said Yes, and they made a deal. But this was a backup site. Well, there was a lawsuit by environmentalists in The Canary Islands in the Spanish government saying No, no, no, You really can't do this. This is on public law preserves. You can't build a telescope there and, uh, the court, a local administrative court in, uh in the Canary Islands has ruled now know if that permit was invalid. You can't build a telescope here. If you had a commitment to build it here when you made the deal that may be so, But the fact that you were only using us as a backup, and you really would just use This is a political ploy to force Hawaii to say yes, well, that's not valid, and so the kind that permits gone so the czarina TNT has no place to be built as far as I'm concerned is dead. I expect actually that the members of its consortium, we're going to slowly fade away into other telescopes, the giant Magellan telescope or the European extremely large telescope. Both have been built in Chile, which means that we will probably not have a ground based large telescope in the Northern Hemisphere and that's going to limit observation. The idea of TNT was to cover the northern atmosphere. I really think the real solution is to stop building ground based telescopes at all, and entirely put him in space where you don't have these political issues and you won't be blocked by the thousands of the new satellites. They're gonna go up very shortly. Job the very cool, very famous. Very mysterious Asteroids. Psyche. What have we learned Bob? Well, they're using a different telescope in Chile, the Alma telescope, which is a radio array of telescopes. They have obtained very high resolution images of the metal asteroid psyche. It's metal. They think this is a very high contact metal, which means it might be the core of a dead planet. We have, uh, we have a project going there, probe going there in 26 civil arrived. So I have a picture up showing that I It's shape. It's not round. So this object. The large is below planetary size. It's an asteroid, and it's started and so the pictures there and they have an idea that there's questions about it. They don't really understand the data they're getting. They're going to need the psyche probe to arrive and take a close. Look, John, that will answer the questions. It's an alien planet, Bob. Okay, fine. Finally back to Mars. Waterway glimpsing more cool pictures. Yeah, This is another cool picture on Mars of what looks like dark material being blown about and like, call it plain, and it's just there's a mystery here, and it's just cool image and I've talked to scientists about it, and they give me some answers. But they contradict themselves as well. John Psyche the deadline. The The viewing date is night is 2026, so we'll get there and the.

John Mars Chile Five M. Canary Islands 15th August 15th 12 12 flight five pictures 2026 Northern Hemisphere today 12 pictures six about 5. 10 M Both twice five locations Bob one
"alma telescope." Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Astronomers have discovered that those miss marauding spiral structures sitting planetary nebulae a generated by companion stars or planets orbiting around the dying star. The findings reported in the journal. Science based on an extraordinary set of observations of stellar wins around aging stars when stars like our sun run out of hydrogen for fusion into helium. They begin to contract under their own enormous grafitti as they can track regions around the still a co which still contain hydrogen move closer to the core and the region where pressures and temperatures allow hydrogen fusion to take place. This trick is hydrogen burning in a shell around the corner which causes the stars. Adelaide is dramatically expand and being further away from the core the stars fetters. Fear visible surface is noticeably cooler and consequently looks raider the start now quarter red giant experiences a massive increase in it's still a wind production as more more materials flow out from its gaseous envelope. May well the increase in pressure and temperature in the core eventually trick is what's called a helium flash fusing the core helium into carbon and oxygen stars like the sun. Don't contain enough mass. The fuse carbon and oxygen into heavier elements and so they still revolution ends the core now detached from its outta gas. He's envelope is exposed as a white dwarf slowly cooling over the of time and that attached gaseous envelope is referred to as a planetary nebula. But how do these punditry neighborly get stunning shapes well. The study's authors found that country common consensus stella wins generated by stars including the sun and that's vertical but have shaped similar to that of planetary nebulae. That's because of their interaction with accompanying stars or planets still a wins including the solo in coming from the sun a streams of particles expelled by stars which causes them to lose mass because data observations were lacking. Astronomers have always assumed that these winds were very like the stars they surround. fifth centuries. astronomers are in the dark about the causes. The extraordinary variety of colorful shapes of nebula that had been observed all planetary nebula certain symmetry better almost never round one of the study's authors professor lee indecent from the catholic university in laverne belgian. Wanted to know how round staff could produce the spectacular shape seen planetary neighbourly. Her team observed still a winds around cool red giant stars. Using alma the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array radio telescope in chile. They gathered a lodge detailed collection of observations each made using the exact same method allowing them to directly compare data and exclude biases descended colleagues. Found that still a winds answer metric around it can be disc shaped others can be spirals and yet others are shaped more like cones shapes all very similar to those seen in planetary nebulae. This is a clear indication. That shapes weren't created randomly suggesting that avalon stars or planets to small and dim to be detected directly are orbiting in the vicinity of the dying star causing the different patents. The form decent says these companions are a bit like spoon stirring cream into a cup of coffee and creating a spiral pattern. The companion sucks material towards it as it revolves around the star and shapes the stellar wind and computer models based on their hypothesis is confirmed that the stellar winds were being shaped by companions around the primary star and the rate at which the stars losing mass shooter still. A win is an important parameter. Decent says the new findings mean previous mass loss estimates of votes stars could be wrong by factor of up to ten and that would affect calculations of other crucial characteristics of both stellar and galactic evolution. The study also helps to envision what the sun might look like when it does seven billion years time. Jason says the lodge massive raven satin will influence the son's eventual planetary nebula with initial calculations. Suggesting lended states is a what twelve surrounded by wake spiral structure team international astronomers including quite a lot of my phd students and post. Docs from the kyw leuven. We have made breakthrough discovering stellar evolution. So what about you potentially know that our son not very little yellow star and in roughly five thousand million years from now to send will become a red giant star its size will increase. I factor of two hundred slim nause by factor. Thousands enter to become cooler and our search. It'll change from color from yellow to beds and during that phase we know that stars lose a lot of mass by celebrant now actually off the debt that china face a recession will become a planetary neighbor will die as a very little bite trump now planetary neighbor lie. You potentially have seen furby nice pictures on these these splattering neighbor. I have been enriched by for instance the hubble space telescope and you can see a lot of very complex. Fuji's we have disks. You have bipolar old flows. You have even planetary nebula look like a butterfly but already for more than a century. Astronomers are wondering how can a star soon which is not perfectly into than a billiard bill. how can get this complex phases. We have used the alma telescope in chile two largest radio telescope into roles to look at stellar winds of red china stars. We have seen that each of these winds off rich with thoughts in the past that there are fairly symmetric we have seen each of these swings. Horrors of complexities and that the more full ogies indie stellar rinse resembles are fully cheese. That we've seen the planetary nebulae and this led to the first conclusion that it should be the same physics that's shapes both the celebrants and this planetary neighbor. And thus such that we have called the in action but moreover could use all of this data to make categories in this tolerance morphology and that leads to the second and even most important conclusion that we finally could diagnose the cost of this smartphone cheese. Rethink that each of the stars do not live the life long patasse companion and then you can compare it to the cup of coffee and sawmill. Can you steer and into the with your little spoon can create a spiral structure in your coffee. Well actually the companion assuming the same. It goes volunteer threats giants star and it creates a spiral structure very complex spiral in stellar. Rent it can also create a disk for instance. So what does it imply for our own sun route. Actually our simulations show. That's unlikely our own art will be engulfed by our son. When the sun is a challenge star planets jupiter cancer fife and chip with our for winces will create very weak spiral structure in the stellar. wind of. The son wants giants store. So this research is a breakthrough discovery. Since changes are a few on how stars he falls at the end of the lifetime. That's professor lee. Indecent from the catholic university in laverne belgian and this space time. still the come cape canaveral. Renamed and later in the science report warnings that climate change could lead to irreversible sea level rise s temperatures increase all that and more still to.

laverne belgian lee indecent the journal catholic university Adelaide chile nause china Jason patasse Fuji giants store giants come cape canaveral cancer lee
"alma telescope." Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on Space Nuts

"Right okay. What is a lot. Easier is chemical formula which is c three h two three carbon atoms. Two hundred with a name like that. You'd think out you know. Dozens of different elements in oxygen and nitrogen. Rest of it. But no c. Three h two a cyclope Panel idea i think that And it's as simple carbon-based component as they say to to to talk about a combination but the the excitement comes from the fact that it may be a precursor to more complex carbon containing compounds which is all about life as we so often end up talking about How was it found by the alma telescope. once again the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array in northern chile. Not far from san pedro de atacama Way up that. It's about five thousand meters. Top end of the of the hill on which the telescope is mounted on what what scientists were doing was essentially looking at the spectrum of titan's atmosphere in the millimeter wave region And so he's find lots and lots of features the spectral features that either. Absorption or emission lines simon in visible light spectroscopy. Where you break things up with the prison to bit more complicated for millimeter. Wave spectroscopy but scientists will looking through that looking at the whole series of spectral signatures from alma and they found this chemical fingerprint is a lovely quote from connor. Nixon who's a planetary scientist at nasa goddard. Space flight center is actually a leader of the research. And he said when. I realized i was looking at cyclo. Penali- my first thought was well. This is really expect a understatement. It's very nice and so we have you know. In the world of science we we do know of the existence of c three h two elsewhere in space most notably in clouds of gas clouds Hit light nebulous essentially index pace. And the the the interesting part about it is this stuff tends to like to react with other chemicals and so hit in in deep space where you're looking at gas clouds nabulsi and you find date you can sort of e can come to terms with that because a these places are almost vacuum that that very very low density gases if you've got cyclic propel alighting practicing. I think that might be how you pronounce it. Just perfect it and then someone will give the throne. Yeah yeah yeah. I'll have to go find some chemists friends anyway The the the thing about these rat. Sorry rarefied gas clouds in space is. The molecules are a long way apart so even though the stuff loves to react with other molecules it can't find a and that's it. That's the rationale for finding in these Distant gas clouds in our galaxy but then a planetary atmosphere is quite different from that. You know some the on the much high pressure. It's rarified these outer edges but it's much higher pressure and so the a lot more molecules in titan's atmosphere in close proximity to c three h two so the question is how does it survive. Where does it come from. And the In fact the nasa press release puts it perfectly says dense atmosphere like titans. Hives of chemical activity a. That's why this this particular observation is of interest because it makes you wonder where the three inch to is coming from..

san pedro de atacama alma telescope. nasa chile connor simon Nixon scientist titans
"alma telescope." Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Okay. What is a lot. Easier is chemical formula which is c three h two three carbon atoms. Two hundred with a name like not. You'd think it out. You know. Dozens of different elements in oxygen and nitrogen all but no c three h two cyclope Panel i think that said And it's as simple carbon-based component. Does they say to to to talks about in combination but the the excitement comes from the fact that it may be a precursor to more complex carbon containing compounds which is all about life as we so often end up talking about. How was it found by the alma telescope. once again the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array in northern chile. Not very far. From san pedro de atacama Way up that. It's about five thousand meters top of the of the hill on which the telescope mounted on what what scientists were doing was essentially looking at the spectrum of titan's atmosphere in the millimetre wave region And so he's fine and lots of features the spectral features that either. Absorption or emission lines race assignment in visible light. Spectroscopy where you break things up with the prison today. More complicated for millimeter wave spectroscopy but scientists were looking through that looking at the whole series of spectral signatures from alma and they found this chemical fingerprint and is a lovely quote from khanna nixon who's a planetary scientists nassar's goddard space flight center is actually a leader of the research and he said when i realized i was looking at cyclo panel. Id i i thought was well. This is really expect about understatement. It's very nice. And so we have you know. In the world of science we we do know of the existence of c three h two elsewhere in space most notably in clouds of gas. Gas clouds. Hit light nebula essentially in space and the the interesting part about it. Is this stuff tends to like to react with other chemicals. And so Hit in in deep space where you're looking at gas clouds nabulsi and you find it you can sort of e can can come to terms with that because these places are almost vacuum that that very very low density gasoline's if you've got cyclic propen alighting practicing since i think that might be you pronounce it just perfect it and then someone will give the throne. Yeah oh yeah. I'll have to go find some chemists friends anyway. The the thing about these rat sorry rarefied gas clouds in space is the molecules are a long way apart. So the stuff loves to react with other molecules. It can't find any and that's that's the rationale for finding in these a distant gas clouds in our galaxy but in a planetary atmosphere is quite different from that sound on the much high pressure. It's rarified on these outer edges but the much higher pressure and so the molecules in titan's atmosphere in close proximity to c three h two. So the question is how does it survive. where does it come from. And the in fact the press release puts it perfectly it says dense atmosphere like titans hives of chemical activity. And that's why this. This particular observation is of interest because it makes you wonder where the three is coming from..

san pedro de atacama khanna nixon alma telescope. chile
"alma telescope." Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

06:55 min | 11 months ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"In the example I gave of Belinda by helping to rebuild stuff on the phone getting burner devices. So of identifying this type of use technology and it's abuse and ready to. Make people aware and how we can. Detect, and tell the signs that this is happening so. It's something that we have known about for for a while, but is at this stage. promisingly despite the Brian Cases, there is actually so what being done to really tryin. Of tackle this problem in in a serious and considered way. More the best steps for people to take if that concern that this kind of software might be being used against them how can they try and find out? What's the safest way to go about getting rid of it? All getting help and support advice can you give? Yeah, that's that's a really good point the obviously people's safety is a really important thing within this and if you are in this situation, no somebody maybe in this situation that may also be other. Factors play in terms of domestic abuse violence and things like that. So considering. The safest way to reach out and to get help is something is should definitely front of mind places like refuge very very good at handling these things very safely securely, and so of have helplines and places that people can reach out to in this and we'll put some details in the show notes around. So I think it's going going places have experience office to help out condemn one thing as the sort of things. I mentioned particularly around devices. If your phone is maybe not behaving in the way, you would expect it to behave. This could be a sign of. Having some store on their if is if the battery's going down a law if it's running really hot all the time. Ben Than least consider this type of thing maybe that I think the main thing that people is is to reach out in a safe and secure way. When whenever possible and as soon as possible it's a grim but fascinating story and as you say, Matt, the really important were being done to get on top of this rise and it's good to see the different. Parties trying to get together and make a difference podcast wire dot cody k. with your thoughts on that story or anything else on the show this week third and final story a few weeks ago you might remember. Big Headlines about the potential signs of life on Venus. Well, now, it turns out the that may not quite be true Vicki. Yes, I, think we got you covered it on the podcast as well as. Reynolds story I believe there was a lot of excitement in the scientific community about a paper that suggested it may have found life on Venus, which was very surprising because we've always thought you know if we were to find life on a fund NFL stem that wasn't earth, it would probably be malls. So, this was quite exciting news in the paper astronomers reported finding gas cooled phosphene in the clouds around Venus, and because phosphene can be made through biological processes. This they said could be a sign of life on Venus. It was not very big news, but now other scientists are starting to look deeper into the results and the some skepticism over whether we really have found a sign of life. I. Suppose. That's maybe not surprising when you think this is a planet that's very, very far away with looking at it from a distance the data might not be as clear as some people are suggesting hoping. So what was wrong in the paper and what was wrong in the data potentially? Well yeah he's Not necessarily anything you know it could be the all the results in the paper and everything is great a few things going on here. So I just to recap at about the original paper, it was published in nature astronomy, which is a very respected peer reviewed journal and to be fair the authors don't kind of come out and say we have found life on Venus. Paper. They put forward their findings of phosphene gas and suggest that in their words this could originate from unknown photo chemistry or geochemistry, or by analogy, with biological production of phosphene on earth from the presence of life. So they're kind of hedging their bets in the paper and despite the headlines of running with the whole. Venus has life headline. Onto the controversy at the first question is whether there actually is false feed in the clouds of Venus and. This, because it's actually really tricky to do this kind of science. It's not as simple as sort of sticking a piece of litmus paper up there or something and seeing if it comes back positive or negative, the finding comes from data collected by James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Atacama large millimeter array of telescopes. Basically involves a lot of complex mathematical processing of loads and loads of data, and that's what's given rise to this phosphene signal. So the some disagreement over what method should be used process this data and one new study which has not yet been pair reviewed. It's it's on a pre print server used a different approach on the Alma data from the Atacama large millimeter array telescopes and did not get the Fossey result. So they got something different. Yes another paper also pre print a comment article that hasn't yet gone for. suggests. That the fostering result could actually caused by another gas and maybe it's just been misinterpreted and actually sulfur dioxide. So this this this kind of debate over whether the data says what we thought that or what the authors of the original paper thought. It said because you may get different results. If you process the data in different ways, there's also the possibility that the data was maybe wrong to begin with. So people at the Alma telescopes are actually processing it to check that they didn't make any mistakes which might have led to different results. So it's basically a lot of complex work and processing and maths going on. And there's not kind of worn obviously shouldn't that's GONNA be one hundred percent correct. So this as you say, there's obviously like a lot of reanalysis new analysis scrutiny of the of the process which is. It's good in terms of like the way science works and that should be rigorous evaluation of these types of things but if we get to a stage where we work out. If there is false fee in Venus's clouds and there's some sort of consensus on this does not mean that we can confirm that there might be life on Venus or signs of life on Venus..

Atacama Alma telescopes Belinda Brian Cases James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Vicki Ben Matt Reynolds NFL
"alma telescope." Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"If hypotheses. Correct. It's kind of difficult to overstate how big of a deal this is. It would be the first ever detection of extraterrestrial life proof that we truly aunt alone in the universe. Now don't get too carried away. Nobody's theorizing little green men just yet. If we are looking at life year, it's very likely some kind of extreme microbial life tiny organisms capable of surviving in the harsh acidic environment Venus upper cloud decks. So, how did the team discover this? They used a technique discovered originally by Robert bunsen burner fame back in the eighteen hundreds, his breakthrough was to realize that different chemicals absorb and emit specific colors or wavelengths of light and a particular combination of colors is unique to given chemical compound. So by measuring the colors of light that the atmosphere of Venus or another planet absorbs emits can identify the cocktail of chemicals that present without having to actually go. The team turned the hawaii-based James Clerk Maxwell telescope and the South American. Alma telescope to stay at Venus and record the light coming from the planet's atmosphere. What out from the data was a signal consistent with phosphate at a concentration of about twenty parts per billion indicating possible life in the upper atmosphere. But phosphene isn't just produced by life. There are other natural chemical processes that can produce it, and it's been found elsewhere in the solar system before, for example, around gas giants like Jupiter. However. On. A rocky planet like Venus with the kinds of conditions exist that we aren't aware of any mechanisms for making phosphene other than as a byproduct of living organisms. So it's possible, this some new chemistry or some other as yet undiscovered mechanism, which is responsible for the presence of fos in the atmosphere of Venus, and it definitely requires further study to confirm. But for now, it's arguably the strongest signature of extraterrestrial life that we have ever detected. Exciting stuff. Then mcallister reporting. Hello I'm Chris Barrow bringing you a brand new podcast called naked gaming. This is where.

phosphene James Clerk Maxwell telescope Alma telescope Robert bunsen Chris Barrow mcallister
"alma telescope." Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

14:12 min | 1 year ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"It really helps support the show. Kevin Rigo Welcome to talk by thunder me thanks. I Hey have you guys. Both on the show. This topic is something that I'm both faceted with and actually not very knowledgeable about so it's awesome and it has a really cool bunch of python going on as well so I think we're GONNA have a lot of fun talking about radio telescopes in just processing ridiculous amounts of data. I think we're talking coming this the other day that kind of the site of how big this number sound because if you aren't always this realm you don- you don't realize that this is actually pregnant. Yeah that's an understatement. So we'll definitely dig into all the data and everything that's going on. It's pretty impressive. It's certainly well. I'll leave until we get to you but it's some crazy crazy numbers that y'all all are doing but before we get into that stuff. Let's just start up briefly with how you got into programming python. Maybe Kevin you go. I did my degree in physics back in the UK and then stayed around doing very languages. I programmed in C C plus plus prologue less small talk and from by. You can tell them quite old when I came to join it Carter in two thousand nine parthenogenesis of defense language for a little astronomy. So I learned. Yeah what was that? Learning Python experience like much easier Golfer and C. Plus plus the syntax. She's just so much cleaner it is and it sounds like you have experience with a lot of different languages right like scheme lisp. Small Talk C. Plus plus there's a lot of different examples and so you know you come to python and you're like Oh this is a weird language. It doesn't have any line breaks or it doesn't really love the Senate like a lot of syntactical elements in there. But Somehow Title I do find it funny that you can still write them. If you just feel the need you know. Just put him at the end. It's okay for probably between tell each. I apply challenge. Because it tells you you don't really need. Yeah exactly if you really need that comfort blanket. I suspect you could turn off. That Code Texan Code rule and chairman. Just just put this cold but you may not be accepted by your fellow. Pie Them Program. It's right it's right Rodrigo. Have I always liked computers so I decided to go on? I agree without really knowing exactly what competing wasn't doing. Learning design become became evil to be a stormy we have students who are doing honoration Sweden some observers I'm originally from Chile jillion around many observatories because conditions are so good for something. So there was this group of students. Equal rations wigs solve several. Tracy Taylor you go basically into business Latini. I moved into the European Southern Observatory Florida's in Germany. I worked for years and then moved here to e. cry you know spreading out to continue working in particular study doing some more by down hearing Show done capital basic scripts before by nothing much to it really got into their wits now. Weaver County using Python Well that sounds really fun. And certainly Chili's is one of those places where astronomy especially radio astronomy right is that where contact was filmed. No conflict was filmed the. Us in New Mexico south of Albuquerque. It was set though in like in that area right. In general I definitely South America somewhere. It'd be awesome CBO. Maybe I think so. Oh Yeah Yeah. Shelter to number civilian. Does he reco effort. Okay Yeah Yeah. Yeah okay. Puerto Rico okay. So it's not exactly the same one but there's definitely with the mountains there there's a bunch of observatories right yes yes very on the optical science will so for Optical Andrei destroy me you different set of requirements if you want for optical one lights super super clear skies whereas you can have clouds so delay in the north of tillers huge which is very very high perfect for right right right right so yeah. I hadn't really thought about that. Of course for optical stuff the higher the better but what are the requirements for Radio Telescopes? Ben's on on the frequency that the rate of frequency that you're serving is you are in. The high frequencies is basically amount of water in the skull Piombo or P. B. B. I forgot the time for altius. Romi is sorry for the lower. Prices of raiders for me is are fine. The radio frequency interference any Meeting Radio Frequency Wise. So you want very isolated places from us. Okay I see as will learn. You can measure things like water and stuff very far away with radio. Telescopes right just suspect having like water in the air as a problem. That's interesting microwave agitated Walter. It's the same basic principle. That's the Alma telescope. Which is in the desert is number. Bigamous thing has to be high that there is no moisture that the stuff we tend to work on generally convey down and a little bit higher. Okay interesting and what do you guys do day to day? Are you both doing Strana me basically day-to-day or code for astronomy me. Pretty much I mean. Most of my work is helping. Mohawk or storm is do things faster so every time for a group who were doing some multiple web it was taking full t two days to do something they then pasta over to us. We go down to eighteen hours. That's awesome that means you can do so much more science right. But as a classic divide and conquer problem at paralyzed line matt talks embarrassingly parallel and we Scott Shaw. We don't really do gathering till the very end Bassett. I see so. It's almost like you can almost do individual computation on a per pixel basis maybe the equivalent of a per pixel basis. We tench Wilkin Frequency Channel. Molden GAY but yes so. We would just purchase one particular or one of frequencies on one machine depend on another number on another world. Do quite a bit of machine learning. What Tech Team are affi- application wage doing corrections actually now moving? Some of our struggle me work into oceanwave investigations and transit or whether we can correct the swell so there's no way there's going to be a good idea right. Okay now. That would be a really unexpected consequence or outcome or capability from studying. Gravitational waves is better surf. Predictions obligation state has different quicken small. Yeah I guess so. Yeah the whole gravitational wave detection stuff is some pretty cutting edge science and it's really interesting and it's cool that you're using machine learning to try to understand that we have a smoke group working on it. We've got ten inches in the pump detectors. This is a very active area of research. There's a lot of groups around the world working on. Yeah I think it's kind of amazing. There's a Lotta stuff with gravity oriented things in astronomy right now. We have the gravitational wave detection for the Clintons Black Holes. We have the first picture of black holes in the last year and a half or so whenever that was going on around their medical field teaching. Sure I guess. If you're already university eventually you might end up. Interacting with a student or two very cool. All right Rodriguez. What about you got kind of similar? I on personal rights became evolving stormy. So I help a summer through the software in different languages for different purposes. Sunil only for me but also for Analysts form we also am theoretical group so people who simulations formation such so all over the place on we only me about all the people in the group we specialize comes kind of in this area of killing. Romans? Lloyd's mice also. On how much do you end up helping them with? Standard Software Engineering. Things like Hey. I need to teach you source control. This is get hub. Let spend an hour talking about that or are they pretty much. Good to go. The generation older durations. Aw It'd be harder to kind of move to sign a newer people like Jonker people come with all those concepts. Serie Computing Rights. They never give ray there so do help to push that. Far East most multi on their Meghan this offer the same side of thanks Entitled Opportune Opponent. How you organize it. Codes optimize things for the particular architecture on someone Okay cool and you're also working on this S. K. A. Construction the square kilometer array. Just this whole topic. I guess we'll talk more audits later. By one of the main institutions that are working on the square kilometer array yet. So it's interesting. I don't know if it's works for light. But it does for radio that if you put multiple detectors and sort of densely but not actually connected at one giant and tanner something you can put that together like a bigger detector right bigger lens in the radio world. So that's the idea right. Just that's exactly Gaskell interferometry you basically if you got three on tennis. Abc Do you do. Is You take measurements in the from from BSE. And then you correlate every repair so to correlate the from be from being from Do that correlates are. Which is the one voice doing all this mixing signals and out goes one correlated thing though which is as if you have one big content. So that's what happens in Vegas for me. I think I'm not sure by up to college. You can also from A to B. But I'm not sure how the kind of work in the science cool so this. Esca project is the square kilometer array which is International Project. That you all are working. On involving thirteen countries that are full members of the project in the Or others who are just participating right. Yeah that's right is the collecting. Because you know we're we're starting to run out of things off the screen. Where do we generally collecting area system is now missing in spite of the fun telescope which means belting countries so the life frequency components coming up to Western Australia and the Frequencies Gang South Africa? So they'll be speaking meat dishes in South Africa. I'm one hundred. One hundred and seventy two and ten is Western Australia so called Com fifty million euros just for the the first one. I don't know a hundred and thirty one thousand antennas bringing all this data. That is a huge amount of antennas. And it's your Joe decombis second five hundred fifty gigabytes a second. I don't really have a great way to understand that number. Honestly like you gotTa think of large cloud services like youtube or Netflix. Or something like that right and we say no orange them. Visualize it if you take your you know your how drives your five hundred heart ripe under throw it and you throw one of those second right. Yeah that's a lot of data also takes a lot of power right. Yeah that's one of the the the key things because we we would like Green as possible but we go cap on the moment to make a wall system on the planet. So that's still a challenge. We have to address. Yeah you almost need your own power plant. Tell me how much somebody call the ready down. Okay is it the blades that generate? Rfi Or is it the generators that generate. Yeah yeah this portion of talk python is brought to you by Leonod whether you're working on a personal project or managing your enterprises infrastructure..

Kevin Rigo South Africa UK Wilkin Frequency Channel Senate Carter Puerto Rico chairman Australia Chile Albuquerque Germany Alma telescope Romi Chili Weaver County altius Tracy Taylor Scott Shaw
"alma telescope." Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on Space Nuts

"Us. This process of tunnel friction slows down rotation of the Earth. It actually slows down both bodies about the LOONEY's already slowed down so he's already locked into facing us all the time. The is well on its way to that process in several tens of billions of years. One side of the willow was faced the moon but we're not that yet so what what what happens is that the rotation of the slowing down slightly and that's one of the reasons why every two or three years we put in a leap second into calendar our clocks either of the thirty first of December thirteenth of June. I'm that's to keep the atomic clock to the world in sync with the rotation of the Earth because of the fact that we now have atomic clocks that can detect that slowdown this rotation. We've got lasers that can detect the moon drifting away so it's all very neat untidy but to deal with it. We've sticking these these leap seconds yes one or the other things that's come out of. The Apollo missions is learning of the relationship between the Earth from the marine. I suppose we always wondered had how got there and why it is what it is but we we never been able to collect samples and do some comparative work but it also I've been up mystery as to why it is so that is us right so one of the popular theories in the Early Twentieth Century was that the moon came from the fact that Elliot's history the was spinning so rapidly that centrifugal falls on slide material from exequatur which formed the moon it doesn't work at does not theory because we we know from other you know their arguments that the the never rotated fast enough for that to happen would have had to go around once every two hours for that to to take place apparently never went round faster than once every four islands so it was winning but not fast enough for to be just centrifugal falls so since the nineteen sixties we've assumed that what happened was that the moon sorry the was hit by amass sized objects <hes> in the early history of the solar system with so confident of this. We give it a name we call it thea not it's the mother of Selene Greek mythology mother of the moon so this object hit the earth probably within the first hundred million two years <unk> narrowed down a bit more recently explained in a minute. I'm so you what you've got this huge cloud of daybreak which surrounds the ring and in fact then convinces into a moon last week there was some observations reported from the Alma telescope which is the Atacama Lodge military <unk> comet nascent federal the Atacama Chile. I was last week. The Alma <unk> has detected a cloud of material around the planet which is over take another style and that is thought to be a moon in the process of full nations the first time we've seen it that but we believe that happened in the case of our own with with this material from the colliding object coalescing into the present die moon the problem with that bottle is that there is something cool the oxygen region isotope ratio which is a daytime of chemical analysis but it turns out that old bodies in the solar system of different optical sorry different oxygen Isotope Ratios <hes> but the moon in the US and we know this from Apollo have exactly the same and what that suggests is that the mood actually came from material from the Earth whereas the collision theory suggests that what you get is material from colliding object druthers. Jane said everything should be different. Yes because there's only one percent chance there would have the same chemical <unk> isotope composition as the earth so you've got a problem that exactly as you mentioned a few people try you know different scenarios if you if you kind of fiddle the numbers of e can make it work but it was never very satisfactory because collision happening at some random angle would always produce material that tonight the colliding objects rather than the collide e the self until two months ago because in April the new and I spoke about this on space nuts but scientists in Japan and the United States. It seems to have solved the problem because they've they've done something which should have been pretty obvious but really not <unk> before if the collision happened early enough in the history site within the first fifty million years then the earth was probably was still covered by magma ocean was a liquid rock surface it so ought yet this liquid notion of material and if he then take something solid Zia was assumed it to be solid. It's much cooler much smaller so it would have cooled much more rapidly solidified more rapidly after its formation that binds into the with slushy al-As of what you get in that circumstance is the material the full moon <unk> material and it works really well. It seems like a big step in our understanding whether moon came from technically speaking living onto planets in a sense studies true because one can the other it looks like in the models that they scientists have made the the material that would get sort of plummeted out of the out of the mood system. It's still stream of daybreak but he's not captured Chad by the earth is actually going to the US escape velocity so yeah so we would a double planet just back to your coming at the beginning that somebody said is the first time we stepped on a on another planet. People have argued that the moon is is should be regarded as a double planet rather than a planet satellites and the argument as that the mood Zoa Bates is always concave to the south. Nobody realized that but as it goes around the sun takes them with it and so the jobs that is always concave accelerates. <hes> you know sort of Never Everett is is it connects to the something so strong cash this however most people rubbish that argument because that the real the real test the litmus for double planet it is if the Barry Center central massive the two is actually outside both bodies and that's the case Pluto. It's Mood Carolina Pluto of course he's a Dwarf Planet Pluto and Karen Really Repair of Dwarf Planets rather than rather than a a dwarf planet satellite because the Barry Center the center of gravity is outside the body of Pluto and the moon the Barry Center is inside the body of the so we are definitely a planet and satellite very good all right pipe. We've got to get through so we will move on. It's been fascinating so far talking about the Apollo missions and and the moon and the legacy of those Apollo missions you're listening into space nuts Andrew Dunkley with Fred Watson. This episode is brought to you by Xerox today. Xerox is all about enabling the era of intelligent work from industry leading hardware and software solutions.

United States Xerox Barry Center LOONEY Early Twentieth Century Atacama Chile Apollo Alma telescope Andrew Dunkley Zia Zoa Bates Japan Jane Never Everett Elliot Fred Watson Atacama Lodge
"alma telescope." Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on The Science Hour

"A been chicken but but how how did they translate all of this information into something useful well as i said they're looking at 12 from bed species and what they're doing is all the data they're a savings at all the ways that they limbs move and obviously you can see the ways that the lakes move the way that the wings extend all that belbey muddling this difesa and that should hopefully be alberta advised them on how dinosaurs moved as well brilliant thank you very much barbie now the annual meeting of the american association for the advancement of science lots of tongue twister held this year in austin texas completed this week on the agenda what topics that range from the difficulty of conveying science of climate change to those who need to know to the growing impact of artificial intelligence and the hunt for other earth like planets my lucky colleague roland pease was outlet soaking up the sun and the science and one session that court his i was on the study of planets caught in the process of being boon around newlyformed stars karen oeberg is an astronomer at the harvardsmithsonian center astrophysics she studies that growth process in lab experiments and also with a joint alma telescope a radio telescope set out in the atacama desert this piece of kit has sixty six detectives that compare count with incredible precision the molecules that build planets and perhaps even the molecules that could stall lonely form one she spoke roland pease at the conference it's amazing what alam unable us to do is rooted chemical pictures of their birthplaces of pilots and that has just been possible before alma threeday map out the chemicals structures were planas our current reforming going was picture a stall forming with his private may be huddling world it like a friday and you have the star of the middle but then you have a sort of this distribution a disk of swirling destined to rome yeah i think that.

american association roland pease harvardsmithsonian center alberta austin texas karen oeberg atacama alma threeday rome threeday
"alma telescope." Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"alma telescope." Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"We got oh yeah we can ensure that we got strong meant a strong black woman in the same women and and heard wait before we even start yucca they not be an oppressed by why people no no we review in a movie that people seem like and the black people rpn oppressed by wifo setting is embryo confident of an riot fillon and it's not about slavery in it whawhawhat home but before we okay it's not a right one movie did you watch is not about sleigh is that abaza's free with a big early and it's not about child soldiers in the congo wait who took choline we already smart and stuff i'll be like oh they're actually smarter that everybody a press her where army but they're kings and queens there is a key area kings and queens here and everyone seems the respect the black women the but i br i don't even at what is what we do we talk about we talked about that and i don't know actually you you probably don't know of a reviewing but we're reviewing the fell black panther marvels black panther starring chadwick boesman and a bunch of other people have course as we already mentioned michael heater repeat any ongo my could be jordan i heard daniel qaluwa was vital teeshirt right with my wife named latisha latisha latigo that i'm enamored with our battery the way you you have to share y'all laser eye share yeah i talk about latisha i know we're not get into a gaba could we talk about let let's talk about that that actress was so funny souls are rate sony was wrong rail she had on the show damn it may i want spinoff she she i wanna suri spinoff in the cotonou comics she would come to bypass the for quite some time like yeah okay within then we need to jump to that can we do have fastforward samoa damn man.

chadwick boesman daniel qaluwa sony abaza congo cotonou