21 Burst results for "Allison Thank"

"allison thank" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"allison thank" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Was a key player in the Palestinian issue. And this was really a diplomatic coup for Morocco, which was actually revealed during the Biden visit that when it came to a reopening of the allenby crossing easing the conditions for Palestinians from the West Bank to travel to Israel that Morocco, along with Egypt and other countries, played a leading role in negotiating this. So what Morocco has to gain from this also is raising its own diplomatic profile as a leader in North Africa and in the Arab world of general. Allison, thank you so much for joining us on the line from Tel Aviv that was Allison Kaplan summer. The time is just coming up to 7 29 here in London, a quick look at the latest world news headlines. Russia says it can not guarantee it will resupply gas to Europe, the key pipeline to Germany, Nord stream one has been switched off since last week for annual maintenance, but according to Reuters the Russian state gas monopoly Gazprom has declared a force major and it's now uncertain whether the supply will be restored. Western Europe continues to face some of its hottest temperatures in history, extreme heat warnings have been issued in France and the UK facing more sweltering temperatures later as a ferocious head heat wave now heads north. Belgium and Germany are expected to see temperatures around 40 Celsius in the coming days. The Russian forces have continued to bombardment of cities across Ukraine, has been an intense shelling of sumi in the north, because has been targeted by cluster bombs and there's been a missile strike in Odessa. This is a globalist stay tuned. We'll be looking at the newspapers in just a moment, but first earlier this month, the skeleton remains of more than 100 moriori ancestors. Those are the indigenous people of the chatham islands in New Zealand,

Morocco Allison Kaplan Biden West Bank North Africa Tel Aviv Allison Egypt Germany Israel Gazprom Russia Reuters Western Europe London Europe Belgium France UK Ukraine
"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR's Allison Aubrey Allison thanks a lot Thank you a Support for NPR health coverage comes from Procter & Gamble maker of a line probiotic a daily supplement to support digestive health containing a probiotic strain developed by gastroenterologists with 20 years of research More at a line probiotics dot com Thanks for listening to us on your member station for more news scroll through the latest stories and updates on the morning edition live blog at NPR dot org Or you can also follow us on Twitter Steve inskeep is at NPR inscape Rachel Martin is at Rachel NPR lela fatel is at Leila fadl and I'm at a Martinez LA This is NPR news Support for NPR comes from member stations and from proctor and gamble maker of metamucil a fiber supplement containing psyllium a plant based fiber for trapping and removing waste in the digestive system designed to be taken every day more at metamucil dot com and C three AI C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems C three AI is enterprise AI It's morning edition on WNYC at 7 43 today on the brine layer show Hearing how the culture wars have come to our local school boards with contentious elections taking place tomorrow in many New York suburbs Plus how social media have ripped society a part over the past decade and how we might be able to put it back together Tune in this morning at ten on 93.9 FM AMA 20 or live stream it at WNYC dot org Right now here's John schaeffer with today's giggler Wouldn't be Kim is more than a pianist she sees music as part of a larger cultural world that includes food dance humor and sometimes even tarot cards She brings all of that to the green space this week as part of her artist in residence series That series begins tonight with among other things the world premiere of this work by the Peruvian composer Pao Chi sasaki She calls this piece mother's hand healing hand.

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 4 months ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Saving time And pairs also Aubrey thank you Allison Thank you Rachel Support for NPR health coverage comes from hiscox committed to helping small businesses protect their dreams Quotes and information on customized insurance for specific risks are available at hiscox dot com Hiscox business insurance experts And from Procter & Gamble maker of a line probiotic a daily supplement to support digestive health containing a probiotic strain developed by gastroenterologists with 20 years of research More at a line probiotics dot com This is NPR news This is listener supported WNYC mid 20s and clear out there this morning expect some flurries this afternoon and the high near 33 gusty as well At 6 30 Support for WNYC comes from focus features presenting you won't be alone in a remote mountain village comes a deadly tale about a young witch who dares to take on other people's identities and discovers what it means to be human in theaters Friday Shepherd Mullen a global law firm with 1000 lawyers handling corporate and employment matters key litigation IP and complex financial transactions for companies in New York and beyond more at shepherd Mullen dot com If you believe democracy requires a free press your station is WNYC 93.9 FM and.

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 6 months ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And Pierre's Allison Aubrey thank you so much Allison Thank you laila Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana farber cancer institute working to develop new cancer therapies by attacking cancer through multiple pathways learn more at Dana farber dot org slash stories And from Procter & Gamble maker of a line probiotic a daily supplement to support digestive health containing a probiotic strain developed by gastroenterologists with 20 years of research More at a line probiotics dot com This is NPR news Support for NPR comes from member stations and from the Abe and Ida Cooper foundation Commemorating Fred Cooper by supporting public radio programming that highlights issues including diversity racism equality anti semitism and sexism and the catena foundation supporting the asylum seeker advocacy project providing more than 100,000 asylum seekers in the U.S. with community and legal support learn more at asylum news Today on all of it following this NBA all star weekend Alison Stewart speaks with two legendary basketball players Scottie Pippen and Chris Bosh still each talk about their recently published memoirs Plus he caught side tailed from the book blood in the garden the flagrant history of the 1990s New York Knicks they were competitive back then You remember Tune in today at noon on 93.9.

"allison thank" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

03:41 min | 6 months ago

"allison thank" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"And that's from Ken. Ken, thank you. What you said is right about the work thing. I also think there's enormous value for peers being with peers. And I think that we've lost something with our children with the time they have not been with others of their own ages. And you look at the huge uptick and screen time that kids adopted when they were in isolation at home and now that kids are back in school more or less most places, the screen time did not go back down. So they've adopted habits that I think are harmful. And as much interaction as we can get with kids, the better. And I think about and I know I'm going to sound like I'm 900 years old. But when I was a kid, when we were done with school, we played in the neighborhood with neighborhood kids, and we did we just were out till time for dinner if we were too young to be working. And the time that kids are spending in isolation on screens, I think is very harmful. I know there's lots of angles to this, but I do feel there's great, great value, people of similar ages, school kids, having the interaction with each other. A listener wrote in regarding her issues with her lender failing to pay taxes and insurance on time. You failed to mention that she does not have to ask her her taxes and insurance. As long as she has 20% equity, she can pay them on her own. Although the lender will, as you advised, eat the cost of their mistake, it's a time consuming hassle that can be easily cured by doing it yourself. Thanks for all you do, Allison. Allison, thank you. I should have mentioned that once you depending on your loan and the contract language in it, you may be able to a certain point appraise out of having the lender escrow your insurance and your taxes or you may at a certain point where you paid enough maybe eligible for that, but it all depends on the language in your loan contract. And those loan documents are quite long. So it's going to take some digging through. Do not take the word of customer no service. You want to know what you're allowed to do based on the loan contract you were in for your mortgage and the time reading those documents could be time really well spent. I was surprised to hear Clark say when discussing his tiny wallet that he only carries cash for tips. I'm sure Clark just forgot to mention that he.

Ken Allison Clark
"allison thank" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"What were their experiences. So i spoke to one sales associate for an internet marketing company in chicago and she prepared a bullet point list for her exit interview and talked about everything from a lack of paid time off to how the company's internal memos about racial justice seem to lack feeling and. She said she doesn't expect much to change but she appreciated the opportunity to get everything. Offer chest. I also talked to a sales manager at a retail store in nashville. Who loved his job. He didn't have a formal exit interview but he did an exit survey and on that survey. He said he wanted to work for a company that stood by its values. And he was referring to how his workers didn't consistently wear masks in the store and the response to the pandemic dismayed him so much that he was pretty eager to leave that job. I also spoke to a financial compliance professional who works in new york city and she said she spoke pretty candidly about the poor communication around the company's return to the office plan she also brought up the policies for employees who had tested positive for cove nineteen and. She said she felt compelled to speak honestly because she had some co workers who were hospitalized with cova nineteen and when they were released they had to come home and figure out whether they still had jobs waiting for them ahead of the people you spoke with feel about the interviews. After the fact overwhelmingly people felt really happy that they participated in the exit interview. A lot of them felt like they were able to find a balance between being honest. But maybe not too honest but in most cases they were able to get the main issues that they had in mind off of their chest and even if they felt like the hr department might not take into consideration every single element that they brought up. They appreciated the opportunity to be able to give that feedback or wall street journal. Reporter ellison poli allison. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks so much for having me. And that's your money briefing. Im jr waylon the wall street journal.

nashville chicago cova new york city ellison poli allison the wall street journal jr waylon
"allison thank" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"They say there's nothing quite like that new car smell if you can find a new car with prices well above. What's on the sticker. An inventory stuck in neutral. This is definitely not a buyer's market but a smart shopper. Can have an easier time. Maneuvering around those challenges and find something to drive home. A reporter alison. Poli is here with some tips. She's gathered for perspective. Car buyers. Allison thanks for coming on the show. Thanks so much for having me. So you know alison. Buying a car can be a big moment for individuals or families but for people going into the current market to make a purchase. How do they need to sort of set their expectations. I spoke to an expert. Who said everything you thought you knew about car buying from last year or whenever you last were in. The market has changed when people walk onto a car dealership. They'll see lower inventories and higher prices. That's because some of the components for cars most notably. The chips are in a shortage at the moment that means manufacturers can't produce as many new cars and that's driven consumers to the second hand market where they're looking for used cars. Prices have increased for both new and used cars last month. For example the average transaction price for a new car was about forty thousand dollars which is an increase of fourteen percent from a year ago. And that's according to the research firm. Jd power now for used cars. The average price was about twenty eight thousand dollars which is up twenty four percent from june twenty twenty so in this current environment..

alison Poli Allison
Small Businesses Struggle to Hire in Tight Labor Market

WSJ What's News

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Small Businesses Struggle to Hire in Tight Labor Market

"As more parts of the us fully reopen. The number of people seeking employment has been on the downturn but businesses are still struggling to find workers. Large companies like amazon and mcdonald's are raising wages or even offering signing bonuses for small businesses looking to hire. That's making it even harder to compete joining me now with more on this is wall street journal. Reporter alison praying. Hi allison thanks for joining me. Of course thanks for having me so often you've been talking to some small businesses who are looking for workers right now. What are they told you about. Some of the challenges they're facing it's a tight labor market. You know this is what big businesses are facing to we saw amazon is trying to incentivize hiring seventy thousand workers by offering some one thousand dollar bonuses. So we're seeing that. This is a really tough labor market across the board but small businesses. One told me for example. They found people but they weren't literate in using the computer so that was a problem. Another company i talked to is having a problem hiring armed security guards and has actually had to turn away business because of that or it eats into his profit margins and his profit because he's having to pay people overtime pay who do work for him. They're even going as far as rely on interns for helping when they're short staffed at the company so this really is impacting businesses. And it's they're just saying there's a lack of talent and one even told me that looking ahead to how big is company does need to grow. He's going to kind of tap out of the talent that's available in the. Us

Alison Praying Amazon Mcdonald Wall Street Journal Allison United States
"allison thank" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"allison thank" Discussed on KCRW

"Know, there's a much clearer picture that has emerged that shows you can limit the spread have very minimal spread within school settings. If kids are capped distance kept masked. I spoke to the pediatrician Daniel Benjamin at Duke University about this. He's been tracking it very closely. A year ago. We thought Children are just gonna be super spreaders. What's really been impressive about the last four months is that multiple investigators and independently shown that if you have strong adherence to mitigation measures You can succeed even if community transmission is high, as has been the case in some areas where schools have re opened now, the CDC director has said. Vaccination of teachers is not a prerequisite for schools to open, but Jenny Benjamin says there is value in prioritizing them. There is a strong value proposition to put school staff at the front of the line because when I vaccinate school staff, not only have I helped that person in their family, I've also helped 30 Children and their 30 families. So that is a force multiplier. You know for both safety, he says, And he says, for a return to normalcy, So we are expected to hear more about this issue this week as the CDC prepares new guidance NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey, always with very helpful guidance and information. Allison Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Support for NPR health coverage comes from Dana Farber Cancer.

Daniel Benjamin CDC Allison Aubrey Jenny Benjamin NPR Dana Farber Cancer Duke University Rachel director
Southwest Airlines Pushes to Expand Amid Pandemic Pressures

WSJ What's News

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Southwest Airlines Pushes to Expand Amid Pandemic Pressures

"The pandemic has devastated demand for air travel in response. Many airlines have pulled back offering fewer flights cutting jobs and rewriting the route maps yet. During all of this upheaval one carrier stands out. Southwest airlines is taking aggressive steps to expand. It's a high stakes gamble but southwest is betting. It'll help the company emerged from the pandemic stronger than before. Let's take a look at the company. Strategy and wide sky competitor's talking with the journals ala's insider who covers the airline industry for us. Hi allison it's always good to have you here. Thanks for having me so. Allison we should be clear. Southwest is facing plenty of struggles revenue in the third. Quarter is down. It's burning cash and it still dealing with the seven. Three seven max which won't return to service for a while yet but at the same time it's adding cities like palm springs. California steamboat springs colorado. It's also moving into big airports like chicago. O'hare is well. how can this be. yes definitely. there's no airline that has really escaped. The devastating impact of the pandemic and south west is no exception on track to lose money this year. You know really for the first time in in other breaking a forty seven year streak. It's a huge deal for the company. And they're talking about and seriously considering furloughs also for the first time in their history so you know. This is really unprecedented for them. But the strategy of being opportunistic a downturn. That's not that's not unusual for them. That's something they've done time and again in the past in sort of how they've grown throughout their history so in some ways it's it's not surprising to see them doing that again. Okay let's get into specifics. What's the strategy. What opportunity does southwest see here how they explained it was that the way their network is now. They have multiple flights day all of these cities. And that's been you know offering. That kind of schedule is sort of a big advantage for them but now that demand is down so much they just don't need to be offering five six seven flights a day in some of these places so they it means they have extra planes in extra people they need to deploy somewhere else so they sort of looked all over the country in thought like work and we really quickly move. That would kind of help bring in revenue right away for us. And that's how they picked some of these new cities as you mentioned. Southwest may break its profitability streak yet. It does have a lot of things working in its favor. It has less debt and lower costs compared to its rivals southwest. It's hard to say. Any airline is well positioned right now but southwest came into this crisis with a lot of advantages and they had a lot less debt than some of their biggest rivals so even though they've taken on a lot of debt during the pandemic they still they still have more cash than debt which is pretty rare position to be in for an and that's something that sort of gives them a little bit of a cushion and a little bit of flexibility to try things or the rivals like spirit and allegiant watching they offer low fares and find opportunities at empty your airports and is this. A big risk for south west. I was definitely watching. United executive sort of said at o'hare you know. They said we have the high grounds and they're not too worried from from what they said. But you know there are so few people traveling right now in the recovery expected to be so rocky. I i really think airlines are just competing over every passenger one. Great example of that is how the big airlines like united and american delta. Have done away with cheney's or most domestic changes. Anyway you know. That was a huge selling point for south west for years. So that's something that's going to make the competition even more heated. So what could that mean for travelers more options more competitive fares. Yes i mean over the course of its history. Southwest going into a market often brought fares down significantly and sort of got new people brought new people into traveling and something that the department of transportation once called the southwest effect. So i always tends to increase competition and bring down fares when a new entrant jumps into a market alison insider covers the airline industry for the wall street journal. Allison thanks so

Southwest Southwest Airlines Steamboat Springs Palm Springs Allison Colorado Chicago California South West American Delta Cheney Department Of Transportation Alison The Wall Street Journal
"allison thank" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"They said early on Mass will do nothing. And then they changed that sentiment and the whole year the whole the whole CDC remember that awful like before. Well, it hasn't been and then also the Baldy song, but it's already and so it's kind of one of those things that But also one of the big problem is because it's kind of not look. I will talk about people you II remember chickenpox. I remember actually. A whole summer working at this Jewish boys camp of the main and a parent. And this from knowing his twin sister had just said the chickens they bought. It can't hold eight weeks. Not a world about the fact you've been, you know, explosive chickenpox. And we were inside all formal with many, many boys chicken time that you could see that people I think what? You don't see it. And even the things like OK, the flow. It would happen in the winter. You would say all the person had a cost. They would this they were that But there are actually people that yes, I have a terrible and they die. But there are also people who had no sentence. And you know where they get really, really tired of supreme, but it's not something that you could see or feel. How will you know? And yet they expose it. Like that is already 11 that yes, yes, yes or the wedding in Maine a few weeks ago. The wedding in Maine three have died already from that Mari trying to pick out my map for this weekend because I'm going to a wedding in Connecticut. On Sunday. It's very small, small wedding but don't get mad, but I don't know what else for them were so better get goes well, it better be fashionable or we're not going to let you back into the W B z. Commissary anytime soon. The hellis on that note. I'm gonna hold you there because I'm not a great time. Thank you. Very nice to hear from you, Allison. Thanks for your information. I'm glad you got your Sounds like your niece in good shape up there in Vermont will take a very short break..

Maine CDC Mass Allison Vermont Mari Connecticut
"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have a color blind society. Things must be done for For people neither because of nor in spite of any differences between us in race, ethnic origin, religion, white people, always wanting their respect, like they deserve it for free. I'm a teacher. Doesn't matter What color I all about Color. That was Dr Martin Luther King Jr. President Ronald Reagan and a clip from the 2007 film Freedom Writers. They have three different takes on and three different ideologies when it comes to what is often referred to as color blindness. Which is a loaded term and my next guest will explain why. Using a very interesting example film Sometimes it's in the subtext. Sometimes it's out front and center. But almost always, it's a misdirection away from the realities of race in this country. The question is what impact has Hollywood's version of color blindness. Head on the way we think about race. Joining me now is duct. Dr Justin Gomer, assistant professor of American studies at California State University. His new book is called White Balance, How Hollywood shaped color Blind ideology and undermined Civil rights. Justin. Welcome to all of it. Hi, Allison. Thank you for having me. It's okay if I call you, Justin, not Dr Gomer. I insisted. Yeah, No, that's a semi wait. Grandmother told me. I'm not a real doctor, right that you know, real doctors are the one saving lives with Corona. You know people with covert and things like that, Mike. My grandmother likes to remind me that PhD is not a not a real doctor suggested this perfect. Grandma, always keeping it real. Let's let's define terms. It might be simple, but for the sake of this discussion, how are you defining color blindness? Yes, I think it's it's it's imperative to distinguish color blind rhetoric from the ideology of color blindness. Colorblind rhetoric is from the clip you played has been Posited or put up by civil rights leaders at various points throughout the first half of the 20th century, even going back further, most notably Martin Luther King in his iconic I have a dream speech. Colorblind rhetoric has been put about this with aspirational desire of one day living in a racially egalitarian post racial society, rightly in which people are judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. The ideology of color blindness uses some of some of the rhetoric of the civil rights movement. It sort of cherry picks has been co ops. Some of the rhetoric from Dr King's I have a dream speech in order to undermine the very legacies and victories of the civil rights movement and attempts at achieving racial equality through Race conscious policies or programs. So in that sense, the ideology of color blindness is a project that coop the language of the civil rights movement in order to undermine some of its very goals and objectives. At what point did color blindness. Even co opted and start being used to do quite the opposite of what civil rights leaders had hoped. Just that the ideology of color blindness really emerges in the middle of the 19 seventies and his emergence, emergence around to very specific civil rights issues, those being affirmative action. And school integration or busing. And so what you have is in the years down to the civil rights movement as You sort of racial integration and racial qualities is sort of efforts to achieve greater reasons of inclusivity of representation and things like employment, Higher education. And also efforts to continue to integrate America's public public schools. You begin to have growing opposition to those two names by the time you're in the middle of the 19 seventies. And what happens is that opposition to affirmative action and opposition to school integration was able to gain traction in support, increasingly through its ability to frame opposition to those programs, not as Being against civil rights not as being against the idea of racial qualities, but actually, opponents would say it's not that I don't oppose affirmative action because I object to civil rights. I oppose affirmative action because I believe in someone And I believe in the in the idea that Mark was except for that. We have to have a color blind society and therefore an affirmative action program. For example, it takes race into account when it's thinking about hiring people for jobs or admitting people to universities, and therefore it violates the color blind principle supposedly Of the civil rights movement, and therefore I you have to oppose affirmative action, if you know, support, civil rights, and so in the 19 seventies ended when you have that switch, where colorblindness comes from being something that was sort of aspirational something that was a goal for civil rights leaders to them being taken up by civil rights opponents. In order to oppose civil rights programs in the 19 seventies and and the thing to really note there is that the people that was most effective that sort of borrowing the idea of color blindness to use it against programs like affirmative action and like school integration with some of the very people that most steadfastly opposed civil rights movement in the 19 sixties. My guest is Dr Justin Gomer, assistant professor of American studies at California State University. His book is called White Balance. How Hollywood Shape Color Blind Ideology and Undermined Civil rights. Okay, So we have that Nice foundation that information. Let's talk about the thesis of your book, One of the films that you really went in deep on with this thesis about color, but was Rocky came out in 1976. Listen to bicentennial. And you talk about its anti affirmative action subtext in Rocky Please explain. Yes, Um, In sort of a general sense. Hollywood is essential to this sort of a sentence color blind ideology, which has been very effective that sort of undermining civil rights and reinforcing White supremacy and racial inequality in the decade since the civil rights movement Hollywood's essential to that process because it found ways to sort of give voice to some of the narratives of ideas and the logic of color blindness and anti civil rights sentiments through colorblind rhetoric..

Dr Justin Gomer Dr Martin Luther King Jr Hollywood President Ronald Reagan assistant professor California State University Allison Rocky Grandma Corona Mike America Mark
"allison thank" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Not for days NPR's Allison Aubrey Allison thank you so much all right thank you very much a new documentary series on Showtime gives a very human and heartbreaking look at the immigration crisis on our southern border the trade follows the lives of migrants and smugglers victims and survivors border officials and the undocumented living in the United States the filmmakers gained incredible access in on to the US and Mexico and with U. S. law enforcement to tell this story of human trafficking money got me on the side is one of the producers and she joins me now in the studio thanks so much for being here thank you for having me there are so many story lines running through these episodes because of course immigration is such a complicated issue one of the ones that you worked on that was particularly compelling is the story of mine now tell us about her Magda we met her it was really sick like terrible circumstances because we were with a friend sixteen and we heard about a young man who had been murdered it turned out he was married does husband who was shot and we went to the crime scene and she wasn't there because the story is that he was part of MS thirteen he try to leave many again many times several times and then one day he said I can't do this anymore they tried to migrate they were deported in Mexico he gets back in the M. S. tracks down and kills she was in another town in Honduras so it took her two days to get to some better so left for the funeral and two days later I met her at the funeral and she was with the baby monster the little girl and she said you know M. S. is going to kill me now because I know too much about the gank and they know we tried to leave we try to live with other gang members and I need to flee so I told her you know can we follow you what are your plans and she basically said I have no plans I need to go with a man turned out Rosny her brother in law you know set up I'm going to go in and look after you and the baby and they have very very little money they waited for two months to gather some some money for the.

NPR Allison Aubrey Allison Showtime United States Magda Mexico Honduras M. S. Rosny U. S.
"allison thank" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"When you get there they're more expensive than than the other boxes are but a question of how much of it well you'll see when you get online I don't know the exact price you know they might have some specials on two but Hey are deeper boxes so I don't know I mean when you change out your boxes your boxes do you ever run into a situation where it's all route yeah we are that's the problem that's a problem okay and you know I could not keep up I'm sorry I could you know five people I couldn't catch can't keep up with water and the things every single day you know I just can't keep up I mean because they they the the the automatic watering didn't work for me and I'm just I'm I'm water water water watering watering watering this one here it's tough to hold I'm done I I and I still get to use my hose clip put a double thing on it no one goes to the to the box of the farm Daddy and the other I still used to wash my car and stuff like that but both the other boxes are they always have water all the time I never water ever okay so Allison thanks so much for your time sure appreciate your all year knowledge on this and and everything else so we listened to it no problem at all Alaska good luck let me know what works out for you and tell me how that palm tree does I wanna see some upon us some coconuts grown okay all right yeah all right bye bye all right let's see I'm going to go to can here just a second but now I have some.

Allison Alaska
Trump hosts heated White House vaping debate

KQED Newsroom

05:27 min | 2 years ago

Trump hosts heated White House vaping debate

"On Wednesday ten candidates faced off in Atlanta for a democratic presidential debate no one candidate broke out of the pack reflecting his surge in the polls people to judge came under fire for his political and experience while calmly Heris tried to regain momentum meanwhile on Capitol Hill house Democrats heard from nine witnesses this week and they're impeachment investigation of president trump ambassador Gordon Tomlin and former White House adviser Fiona hill were among those who testified someone said there was in fact a quid pro quo for the release of military aid to Ukraine while Fiona hell characterize the pressure campaign as a quote domestic political errands with us now is Joe carefully senior political writer for the San Francisco Chronicle and founder and president of she the people Amy Allison thanks for being with us Joe let's start with you much has been made of south bend Indiana mayor Pete booted Chad and his recent rise in the polls particularly in Iowa and New Hampshire what was his goal on Wednesday night and do you think he achieved it was gold what was it for in it not to be a a peek down like everybody just the young people who just because he's the the poll leader he's got bigger problems he is the head in that state that's ninety percent white which is you know that's that's nice but when it comes to California the stats here say that you know half of Latinos don't even know who he is so he's got some real problems and when he goes to South Carolina and he's been a long time there no black folks there are not into his campaign at all it is it's really amazing about people the church is that there is no path to victory in the primary without winning significant black support to go around black women he's as close to zero as they come and so I thought last night or late this week was his opportunity to make his case an authentic way to really appeal to black voters particular black women who are the power house Democratic Party voters and he was challenged on his racial justice record in south bend and I feel like he fell flat and so he didn't gain momentum there and therefore I I think as it relates to black voters would you put a judge did not to gain and he says I I asked in this of the California Democratic Party convention were at those at last week about this and he said no I'm I'm looking for to making out reaches into the communities and then Latinos and blacks but he didn't show up to the to the like the to the African American caucus of the California Democratic Party convention so you know there's a gap right now between the rhetoric and the reality for him come here she called him out on that on the stage in Amy you were actually at the debate I was right there and I what was the mood like there it's interesting because of the tight it's Tyler Perry studios it said Lana this is a state that was electrified and literally transformed by the campaign is Stacey Abrams who did that the pre show rally you don't it was the moment where I was sitting among people it was very clear when we heard from the mayor of Atlanta is Stacey Abrams a congressman Lewis as well as Tom for as the Georgia is the middle of the middle of the battleground states there one point four points from being a blue state and they recognize that not only do they have to deal with voter suppression and we didn't hear enough about that on stage about the reality voter suppression in a state like Georgia but they they need to invest now in order to elevate turn out even more than we saw record numbers for twenty eighteen so there was a sense of people in the audience they're really looking for signals from the the candidates who was who is able to speak the language of a multiracial coalition they can be a man or woman of any race but are they going to appeal to people like in Georgia and some did did a very good job on that and others fell on their face and so that was a good measure of who's going to be positioned to reassemble the Obama coalition into twenty twenty one of the most striking things for me in this debate was that this was the first debate were all for moderators were women Amy and you can answer this also if you'd like to do you think that that that affected the tenor of the debate and what was talked about I actually thought it was good I I in the in the sense that child care was brought up that's a universal fit you know our concern of parents in terms of being a burden and there's not a lot really but national solution to this so we have we're able to really hear from the candidates much more deeply around an issue that affects a lot of us and I think having women on the stage did make a difference in that way I think the issue of abortion in in choice was addressed more than before but again there are there were many many more issues or round they talked about workplace harassment in the need to movement and right that was really funny talk about housing to which hasn't gotten a lot of play so far too which is which is another issue that we yeah we have but for five debates since the first time I've really have discussion about housing is interesting because if you look at women in particular women of color are going to be the that the swing vote in these battleground states for the white and battle the White House they're also going to be the vote that ultimately decides who is a standard bearer for the Democratic Party these issues matter and she the people just worked with us center for American progress on a report that basically said look if you talk issues with the good witch and issues that speak to the base like some of the issues were talking about those are things that excite people and get them to the polls this is this is what needs to happen more and more these debates are coming up well California senator Kamel Harris she came out swinging at this debate she's trying to revitalize her campaign and there was one particularly testy exchange between her and congressman Tulsi Gabbard let's listen to that it's unfortunate that we have someone on the stage who is attempting to be the democratic nominee for president United States during the Obama administration spent four years full time on foxnews criticizing president Obama

Atlanta Ninety Percent Four Years
"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:25 min | 2 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of it it's Friday and that means here and all of that we're taking a look at upcoming cultural events happenings and changes you can see in and around our city think of it as our Friday rundown and today we're starting off with an exciting recent decision to create a new monument honors an under represented history in the city that of Seneca village which existed on a site now occupied the Central Park Seneca village which was started in eighteen twenty five is one of new York's first communities of black property owners now the city is planning to build a monument that honors and influential family from that community the lions with this now explain history is Michelle commander and associate director and curator at the Schomburg center for research and black culture in Harlem doctor commander welcome to all of it hi Allison thank you for having me you're welcome so what did the city get in touch with the Schomburg about this idea and how did they presented it was around late spring and they just wrote to us engaged are interested in the possibility for having alliance monument and of course we were very eager I'm excited about the possibility for it what is most excited you about this I was caller of slavery in memory the thing that's been most exciting is that we now have the public kind of fifteen a lot of these last histories I think a lot of times we walk around on when I called hollow ground across this country and we don't know the kinds of histories and cultures that were there before us that literally pave the way for us it and we're now going to have that in Central Park and it's just fascinating and anything what can you tell us a little about the lions family sure although the lions family was a free black families that in eight eighteen twenty five or so purchased a lot from John Whitehead and what is known at Seneca village and that particular family just has this long history and this is looking at several branches of the family of abolitionist were social justice work there they were educators and so on it was just a kind of a kind of a way of thinking about being a citizen that was not just about you know up within themselves but also thinking about the black community at large don't know where was Seneca village religion is a roughly in the eighties the Central Park between seventh and eighth Avenue eighty first and eighty nine and I believe that the minute we place so that the thought is around a hundred and six around a hundred Essex street and it was it was a full community correct yes they were can you describe what that was like yeah from what historians and local public historians have fed it consisted of middle class business owners people who were service workers those folks who were trying to get on their feet as newly freed individuals over thinking about eighteen twenty five being the start of Seneca village from eighteen twenty seven when slavery ends in New York you also have folks are coming out of slavery for needing a place to to let see can imagine that this was a whole full time for people who were able to purchase planned a hopeful time for people who were nearly free but it was also likely very anxiety producing for them as well you have these people who are thinking about asserting their rights if they owned enough property they were able to vote but but also you're thinking about people who are living under kind of de facto forms of bias even racism at that time so eighteen twenty five eighteen twenty seven eighteen fifty there still some violence within the south and slave holding territory but also here in the north as well the people are living in the fear of being kidnapped and sold into the south as well so you could think about Seneca village I mean you can have to speculate little bit because we have uncovered all the stories about it but you have to think about what it meant to have this place finally that felt like a refuge from that kind of thing where you have kinship networks and the community where you feel a sense of oneness and protection in some ways my guess is a commercial commander she is assisted associate director and curator at the Schomburg center for research in black culture we are talking about Seneca village and the forthcoming statue of the lions fan monument of the lions family so Seneca village was destroyed why yeah it was destroyed because it does happen to be in this place where the city decided they wanted to have a park for recreation in some of the narratives that I've seen part of that idea was that New York wanted to really position itself as a modern city a lot of the city's leaders had known about or seen first hand what parks look like in European cities and so the city charted out a particular portion of the land which which we now know essential park and basically using eminent domain suggested that we need to use this for the government's purpose says and they not only raised Seneca village but also other communities that were there in the area did anyone site for Seneca village at the time yeah from what we can see people did fight they fought for their land they fought said ten to have the proper kind of payment so when eminent domain happens it's not as if the government just takes things and never pay for it for it but they do go to our prospects to value the land Ansel folks did fight but as we know it did not work out for them and when did Seneca village come back into the consciousness of people in New York well we have several organizations that are working on toward this we have folks who were public historians we have researchers an archaeologist and so forth who at least in the nineteen nineties we're doing some of that work and they were advocating for the city to passage he's lost history what impact do you hope that having a monument or a statue honoring the lions in this chapter of New York city's will have I hope that this just opened up the floodgates so to speak with folks conducting research with public programming with school curricula being updated with the local histories that are so very important to understanding how we got to where we are today and and I hope that that the public gets involved too in finding out more about these histories and sharing them with their family is and so on there's just so much that we still don't know that we can now no you know beginning with the finance finance you can make a decision about the creation of another monument that would represent another underrepresented history in New York what would it be all my goodness another monument in New York City perhaps something that has to deal with civil rights and and and in New York City thinking about that particular moment fifties nineteen sixties my guess is Michelle commander says he director and curator at the Schomburg center for research in black culture thanks for being with us thank you up next our Friday rundown series is a new initiative at the ninety second street Y. called a food summit it's happening tomorrow and Saturday starting at ten AM the day long event features conversations panels discussions and tips resume food industry's biggest names like Rachel ray deb Pearlman members the pollen family joining me now to tell us more about the event is the director of strategic programming for the ninety second street Y. Britta convoy Randall Britta welcome to all of it thank you so much so this is the ninety six you swipe first ever food summit how did this idea come about what inspired it well the ninety second street Y. is widely known for its talks in including a a su talk series with kitchen arts and letters bookstore and for decades the ninety second street Y. being all about building community and food is another way that we especially at this time of year come together and we build community around and so combine those two things and we've created this fantastic soon summit with thinking everyone eats in as so many things that are interesting about food to talk about the website describes it as close a tantalizing think tank for food lovers why that description of a think tank what we really wanted to go deep on food and its intersections with the world around us so food touches on many other topics beyond just what to eat for dinner it touches on gender and sustainability and immigration and history and race and politics and mental health so we really want to spend the day of of kind of diving into these ideas and it's another way that we can have the kind of thoughtful conversations on those important issues that we do at the ninety second street Y. niceties T. Y. as famous as a supporter of the arts is there going to be any sort of nod to the idea of food preparation and cooking as an art form I think the whole day is enough and and and and even more than that is the kind of the thought that that's what is behind the food the why and what we're eating you really lined up some of the very biggest names in the food industry for this summit how are some of the who are some of the participants you most excited to see and hear from one excited about everyone but we have Rachel ray one of the most popular personalities in the food world we think of her as the original suit influencer we've got Dan Pearlman a self taught home cook who started her blog smitten kitchen in two thousand and six and she has since written to cookbooks and she's gone over a million Instagram followers and she's really someone who has built a whole community around food we've got the pollen families sister is Traci Dana and Lori and their mother corky had their brother Michael Pollan is widely known for having coined the phrase eat food not too much mostly plants and that prompted them to write a cookbook based on that advice it's called mostly plants we have panels about Jewish food in New York we've got a panel about the future of me one about how immigrant Chester changing what we eat one about what it means to be a woman working in food and then me to era one about the intersection of Sudan design and we've got a lot more as well old can be fascinating it's interesting that you mention that panel is called the state of the culinary union women in food why did you want to address the recent turn toward holding the food industry accountable for the way it treats female employees as part of the food summit yeah will this panel that's one that features some of the food world's most vital female voices and and they're going to be discussing what it means to be a woman working in food and topics around gender bias in pay inequity and and hopefully an exploration of what's changed and what hasn't and and what month my guest is Britta Conway Randall we are talking about the first ever food summit at the ninety second street Y. tomorrow you mention the pollen family going to be there obviously they're going to talk about vegetarian vegan meals how many cooking styles are going to be represented on Saturday all my gosh that's a great question I think we've we've got a little bit of everything and and I would encourage you to to come on Saturday and find out what the topics to be covered in the panel discussion meet the future this one is fascinating this is kind of where we're exploring the thick quest to generate meet in the landlord meet out as you know the other things that are not meat and so it's got experts in the field of anthropology and nutrition and of course the emerging industry all cellular agriculture so they'll be looking at the implications and at alternate sources of animal protein and perhaps life after me and if someone wants more information about this where should they go they can always go to our website at nine two wide dot work more Randall's rector strategic programming at the ninety second street Y. good luck with your food summit tomorrow thank you so much.

ninety second
"allison thank" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We all here tonight what is going on with first of all we're right here on Hollywood Boulevard to tell my listeners like what we're doing right yeah we're standing on vine on I wouldn't find reading and not to kill cats we're we're right on the red carpet right on the sidewalk with all the all the cars going by right literally a Hollywood and vine the thing is I live buy lots of life a lot to like about the Kitty cat what is the mission was the real me well yeah I mean when it comes down to it it's like why kill cats yeah I know it's it's really exciting to be here I it's about what they're doing in the fact that so many people are banding together to help out this because it is one of the stars are banding together we gather in musical that musical cats got against I. which I love how many pets at home my family right now is actually during like for a little tiny tiny tiny you need to like bottle feed in white down with like little yes from the falcons yeah yeah yeah yeah and so but the funny thing is that both my dad and my sister are like very allergic to cats but they still he's getting anyway and every time like I come over to their house like my sister like her eyes are always super like puffy and she's like all covered in like tiny scratches okay so Nick and Allison thank you so much for joining us on live radio you'll have a wonderful night absolutely you're.

"allison thank" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Thank you so much Allison thank you president trump might want to re think those plans to buy Greenland CBS acepta don't explains line just above Greenland's glaciers and ice bergs NASA scientists are dropping probes into the ocean well the way trying to measure the temperature and salinity of warming waters Josh Willis of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory he's four years into this mission think of Greenland as a block of ice and your hair dryer but really the oceans are doing a lot of the work to Greenland's ice sheet is melting six times faster than it was in the nineteen eighties and while warm air is unknown culprit Willis's team is trying to understand the role oceans are playing they call their project oceans melting green light for a limb gene I disagree literacy levels by twenty five feet worldwide now we don't think it'll happen right away but just how fast it does is we were trying to figure out with with G. through these missions the learned how sensitive glaciers are the ocean and have mapped the sea floor identifying glaciers at risk of melting many more than initially thought sure tell us they're adapting to life with climate change longer summers and Wilder whether the NASA scientists explained that the melting ice means the water at the surface is colder in fresher their real concern is the influx of warmer water deeper down melting glaciers from below sixty one year old Jose Lopez is with his family feeling lucky CBS is Anthony Mason on why he lost touch with his family after he moved to Florida suffered several strokes and ended up homeless determined.

Allison trump Greenland NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Wilder Jose Lopez CBS Anthony Mason Florida president Greenland CBS Josh Willis twenty five feet sixty one year four years
"allison thank" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

11:44 min | 3 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"A sandwich Sweet Sixteen next weekend. I'm sorry. Fall sports ball clearly. I do the basketball I like beard food better. Yeah. Yeah. I'll be making my way around here in just a little crowded there for it. There's a there's a lot of humanity here a lot of humanity here. But it's it's fun. It's great fast. People are certainly enjoying themselves. I'm enjoying myself. You a guest I did not introduce me. So I have no idea where abouts talking about to get to it. If you'd give me a chance this is this is Allison Allison, thanks for coming on the show. Thanks for having me. Nice to meet you are the earth writer. That's correct. Give us a little introduction to I guess your experience in and started in the brewing industry. Sure. I was again, one of those professional brewers that came in from home brewing. So started home brewing, and and really got into that. And then I took over in two thousand twelve was there the head brewer there for five years left. Went ahead to help open up earth raider. You know, just blocks away and still superior Wisconsin. So. It's nice to see some folks from superior kinda represented here in the twin cities. It's not another. How many brewers are there in superior Wisconsin? It's just us and the pagan. Northern wisconsin. It's still so sure. And I mean, there's there's not a whole lot up there for why is that you think? I don't know. Little bit. Some of the rules are a little bit more friendly and Wisconsin. But I think it's just that state line. Kinda thing is there's a lot of craft beer in Madison Milwaukee area kind of fades as it goes north. Is it a is it a population thing because it is a culture thing. I think it is. But also, it is Wisconsin, they're still they're still pretty. Amazingly Davor in in their craft beer. But yet their love for Miller. Especially miller. It is Wisconsin. So they they love the the spotted cow in the Miller and then from there. Hon cabin beers up up north. So I mean, you like what you like there's nothing wrong with that. So tell us about earth writer, it's not how long has it been open now. Eighteen months believe about a year and a half. Good. So far. Been so far. Receive pretty well received. We want. World beer Cup medal. Bronze for our stout. Months into it. So we did have some success early on. So now just keep that level up. But I think we're getting pretty well received. We're up to shore north shore offshore of Wisconsin. Now getting down into the cities area. You know, it's going to ask you about that. You know, we we talk about frequently on the show the hell the markets kinda change becoming more, hyper, local, you know, tap room's. Kind of being the focus group kind of being the focus your your Burris made efforts to reach out to branch out with that distribution model. You're even in the twin cities now with cans. Can you talk a little bit about that decision to to kind of not so much focus on on the taproom model, but maybe more distribution wise. I still think that there is even in the north shore area, especially in Wisconsin. I I would say that we're very focused on that that notion that northern part of Wisconsin all the way across like actual Ashland Washburn Bayfield area. We're we are a local brand in in our area care carry your backyard. I right. If you if your neighbors don't want to support you then, you know, you're doing something wrong. So I think being able to just put out a a decent amount of of canned product, we're still self distributing. We'll do that as long as we as we physically can. But. It's always tempting let somebody else do the work for you. So. Yeah. I I don't really. Unfortunate not to get into too much of the distribution realm of it. But we do have a really strong taproom feel to it. And he's been in the cedar lounge, which is our taproom. It's still kansin pub. It's it's very much a tavern. When you go in there. Darts. We do have dark. Wisconsin. Really we have music many nights of the week. So we have. A really great music scene there. So everyone's day. We have a month along residents for an artist. So we'll have like woodlined or Charlie Parr or very nice. Feeding LeRoy coming in play every Wednesday in it's a really fun intimate. I mean, it's going to see Charlie Parr play bar for free. Pretty awesome. So we do still keep that hyper local thing, but we're still able to get the cans. You talked about how Wisconsin so they like their their traditional beers the beers that they've been drinking for while the bears grew up with maybe. How has that impacted like what you what you've been brewing? And what your customers come into order define yourself having to having to. But, you know, making sure that you have beers available that hit those pallets. Yeah. We have on our flagship line. We have a Munich Alice. So really nice well-balanced logger can be the introduction. Beer for somebody who comes in my. Might domestic. I mean, it's made right here. You can you get? But it's it's not too far out of their flavor range. It's not welding. Breezy. Lactic acid beers. We have. Showers. So I mean that's kind of but they're they're not super sour. It's really fun seeing industry guys caller. Welders contractors Trish in sitting at the bar drinking a pink clear. We also have just a regular that is a little bit more. I would say old school. I think we're kind of mixing up the little bit. We're still making sure that we have those more approachable for maybe the person wants to come in and drink what they're used to do. You find yourself converting some of those traditional light fans or defined to be a challenge to reach out to those folks and have them find their way into the cedar lounge. How do you how do you track? Those individuals. I just feel the pub walk in. They're not coming into something that looks like that fancy taproom authenticity. It looks like any other bar in our area. So it's not turning anybody off are kind of. For for somebody to come in and just feel comfortable. You know? And then our bartenders tenders have done much work. I think at this point I wanna say almost all of them first level of Cicero and subsurface servers. About how you talk to customers about the beer. Explain the beer. Don't get too nerdy. Or opinionated about it. You know, if somebody's has some questions about, hey, you know, what is this? Why do I wanna drink it try it? And that was one of my favorite things about when I worked at the brewery was just right behind a swinging door. I could go out and interact with people now are separate building. But I know that our serve staff is having those conversations and really inviting people in so tell us about some of the beers have coming out go seasonal releases flagships what can folks look forward to. So flex ships and cans that we have out you can find him on the beer finder. We keep that pretty up to date. So earth Reiter, beer. So our flagships earned are. It's an old school APA. It's clear. Caramel malted milkshake. No, it doesn't. We have a superior pale. Kind of fruity Denali or what used to be called? Denali now has has an experimental number because there was a recall. Denali, right. They decided they own the trademark. Some hop drama. Bronze-medal? Oatmeal stout. The Munich in cans, we also do sour tart. Immer rotating through free time that we've started releasing some seasonals. So our first one out in cans is pale. Oh nice. So we work with it's more of a collaboration with Duluth coffee company the actually came in. And we've had this whole long conversation about you know, what are some flavors of coffee that you would want to see an a beer we made this really light, beer and. It's actually without the coffee. It's really boring. Because we left we intentionally left these holes that coffee would fill it makes sense. So it's not overly bitter. You're making a pale ale. And then putting we actually backed away off on the hops on it. So it's intentionally being filled in with fruity herbal bitterness into it makes a lot of sense. Thank you so much for joining us. Alison, and and for folks who are looking for some beer, check out the beer finder earth, writer dot beer, beer. All right to beat you. I'm gonna go head upstairs here going up there and tries to the Northern Lights stripper. You're listening to the Minnesota beer Kass on thirty and one zero three point five FM. From the cremation society of Minnesota weather center. Overcast skies today with highs this afternoon. How did for the low forties partial clearing through the overnight hours with lows falling to the mid twenties. Partly.

Wisconsin writer Northern wisconsin cedar lounge basketball Charlie Parr Allison Allison Miller brewers Duluth head brewer Madison Milwaukee Burris Munich Alice Minnesota weather center Ashland Washburn Bayfield Minnesota LeRoy Alison Trish
Women sue California hospital that put cameras in delivery rooms

Armstrong and Getty

08:19 min | 3 years ago

Women sue California hospital that put cameras in delivery rooms

"Hospital management theater. I'm going to be the person that walks in and presents a problem in Joe is going to be part of hospital management came up with the solution. All right. I got it. Somebody stealing drugs we need to find out who they are. What could we do to catch the person who's going into these waiting these rooms and stealing drugs that are hospital? Security cameras are the answer. We need to put security cameras in every room in every every nook and cranny probably toilet stalls every examination room. We'll put motion activated cameras. So that any time anybody gets undressed or does anything in that room. We catch it on videotape. Well that makes a bit of exaggeration. But only a bit Alison warden joins us. Alison is a partner at the Gomez law firm that is suing. Hospital chain. Well, sharp Grossman hospital in LA Mesa California, specifically for their motion activated cameras set up in various spots. Alison, welcome. How are you? Good morning. I'm well. Thank you. So what indeed was drug thefts that spurred the installation of the cameras, correct? Doubts. What? Yes, the sharp is telling us. Okay. And and where did they put those cameras? They put them on the anesthesia carts in three operating rooms in the women's center in sharp gross my hospital. So how in the women's center in particular? Yes. So basically these three operating rooms or used only for women procedures anything ranging from unfortunately, DNC, what will lose the child to to belie- Gatien's and emergency c section so all kinds of surgical procedures with women conducted on women took place in these three operating rooms where they hid the cameras. The drugs were disappearing from I'm trying to establish whether this was just ill advised stupid, or if it was perverse. There were reports that there were drugs missing from the anesthesia cart in those three operating rooms. Okay. And so instead of taking less invasive means perhaps like locking the cart. Ahead and installed these cameras which would not be visible to anybody basically staff. Dr certainly to patient were unaware. So the patients didn't know which has got to be some sort of hip violation. The doctors didn't know and then who had access to the videos. Well, that's one of the major problems and hopefully throughout this litigation. We'll get to managers that we have been unable to get. This far sharp says that their security or the ones that were doing the cameras in trying to wash to see. One doctor was taking the drugs. However, they have not been able to provide any answers or sureties as to who within sharp organization or outside of sharp organization. Did have accents. So you're so you're hospital mall. Cops have access to the most private of of procedures being done on you and seeing you and everything like that that that makes pretty good sense. I see that you have Eighty-one women named as plaintiffs thus far. That's quite a number. We do and potentially. So the cameras were installed in July of two thousand twelve and they were not turned off in till June of two thousand thirteen so they were running during that eight basically eight months time period during that time period roughly eighteen hundred six procedures were conducted in operating rooms. So did they ever catch the person that was stealing the profile that ever happened? Well, you know, the doctor that they had identified is taking the drugs from the cart was brought up or was investigated by the medical board. Here's actually cleared of taking those drugs related to the reason that sharp said that they install the cameras. Okay. All right. Well, that's that's wild. So it could be hundreds of plaintiffs eventually. And what are you hoping for? Occasionally, it could be over eighteen hundred plaintiffs. There was a class action that was initially filed. And now it's been transitioned due a mass tort. And so the case has been. In litigation and we're trying within trying to get the identities of all the women that were victimized during that time period. And so as plaintiffs contact information their identities become available, and they decide they want to join in and participate in the lawsuit that we will continue to add plaintiffs. I can't decide did we skip over this. Or is it obvious did the cameras consistently catch images of the women in question? Or was it the operating? Well, it says here if I'm you know, it's your lawsuit, but you've held back on this. So I'm going to say it. Additionally, the lawsuit alleges the women were recorded as they undressed at times. Defendants patients, the dependence patients had their sensitive genital areas visible. Absolutely. There's a wide range. I'm just curious and I'm not criticizing. But I would think you'd want to not sensationalized go beyond. But I would think you wanna put in all the worst stuff. There is news. You kind of feel like to me like you're holding back. For that a legal strategy. Absolutely. No, well there because I stated earlier there was a class action that was fouled in may two thousand sixteen. Some documents have been ordered to be protected by protective order. So some information has not been released to the public. And so I'm not allowed to speak about okay? At this time. Yeah. So moyer's is you know, never wanna hold back on their best information. But whether that's why I'm wondering why you were saving there. They were videotaping them naked with their genitals exposed in holding that back from this discussion. So little we're done just say. Goes it goes above and beyond that actually, well, then hit us. It's not just you know, the women being exposed they walk into the room. Some of them are undressing, right? They're getting on the the gurney home and already wheeled in. But these are women that range from say some of the happiest times in their life. Scariest times in the worst times in their life. You have women that lost their baby in that room. That didn't never want to you know, they'll remember forever. But certainly now it's been memorialize and they're nervous to who. Else has had access to this very intimate in horrifying include this. This is what the hill is reporting that the lawsuit says several hospital staff members, including non medical personnel were able to access the recordings through desktop computers. Additionally, the lawsuit alleges the hospitals did not keep track of who could access the recordings wire win that seems like a big deal. She got naked women, and they're not sure who could access it. And how often they did. Right. Absolutely. And who has copies right now. And whether or not this is going to end up on the. Oh, of course, it will. You know, how the internet works. Yikes. Alison warden partner at the Gomez law firm. Allison, thanks for joining us. We appreciate it. And let's stay in touch is this progresses casually. Thanks for having me. All right. Our pleasure. She would have legal reasons. I don't understand. I just thought it was interesting. She was leaving out some of the juiciest stuff from the. You're right. Well, yeah. Yeah. There are some stuff that hasn't been released. So okay. Well, okay. But I didn't want that to not get in the story because I think you should go whole hog we restrained. In good taste. No. If you had video of women getting undressed in crawling up onto the table as as women have told me, that's like the most uncomfortable thing that happens to you. Emotionally before the physically uncomfortable stuff happens right now getting undressed in climbing up there on that table. There's video that in just kinda ran does get to access at there at the hospital. And whether or not buddy, insecurity, the hospital mall cop as you put it so charmingly, I just saw her and go down there getting that tape later on. No problem. You know that happened. Yes. Garin freakin t it.

Alison Warden Sharp Grossman Hospital Partner Gomez Sharp JOE DNC La Mesa California Gatien Moyer Allison Eight Months
"allison thank" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"allison thank" Discussed on 710 WOR

"All the stores and sometimes in the summertime you see them out front David also speak two years ago by. Mostly. Yes. Very sad here and disconnect community. Oh, I as I said, I'm watching I'm watching the buildings unit. Put a hook to the side of the building. So they can put up the black unpaying. Investigators back on the scene to piece together. What happened and a ceremony will be held here later this afternoon. You know, Alison, I'm thinking about this. How what happens? So he pulls up on the east side part of the mill basin page on the belt. So he wants to run over to the west side where the accent is. And there's a gap of three feet, and he goes through I guess twenty twenty hindsight. I mean, why why would it be a gap there? I mean, that's. I yeah. I can't even begin to speculate on that. Whether they were working there construction I'd heard that there was construction going on there. I mean, they're always working on these roadways, but I mean, a three foot gap. That's not a small gap. You know, he just wanted to get there. There were two victims of this to two people were seriously injured in this car crash from what I understand, and he was just determined to get over there and try and help them just very sad and very just just a a freak accident for a young, man. Thirty years old. All right W O ours Alice Stockton, Rossini out there on the scene in Brooklyn. Thanks, allison. Thanks, Sal, Dan. Niagara was the fire Commissioner, and he had these thoughts early this morning. So terrible loss for the department. To lose a member. Just.

Alison David Commissioner mill basin Niagara Alice Stockton Sal allison Brooklyn Rossini Thirty years three feet three foot two years mill