4 Burst results for "Allison Layton"

"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:22 min | Last week

"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"But <Speech_Female> putting this knowledge <Speech_Female> on paper <Silence> is something <SpeakerChange> else. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Climbing up into the <Speech_Female> forest with her crew, <Speech_Female> they lend <Speech_Female> to the GPS, <Speech_Female> orient <Speech_Female> around a map <Speech_Female> and take note <Speech_Female> of important flora <Speech_Female> and fauna as <Silence> well as signs of <Speech_Female> wildlife. <Speech_Female> They begin <SpeakerChange> to plant <Speech_Female> trees and restore <Silence> parts that <Speech_Female> would degrade <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Female> After this <Speech_Female> day, in Indonesia, <Speech_Female> there were only <Speech_Female> a few patches <Speech_Female> of forest formerly <Silence> managed by groups <Speech_Female> of women. <Speech_Female> And <SpeakerChange> so many <Silence> of <Speech_Female> them. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> You might <Silence> sound awesome. <Speech_Female> <Silence> But the work is <Speech_Female> not done. <Speech_Female> The conservation <Speech_Female> work <Silence> is never done. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So many <SpeakerChange> and her themes <Speech_Female> still face <Speech_Female> many challenges <Silence> <SpeakerChange> every day. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And sometimes <Speech_Female> they are still being <Silence> patronized and <Silence> undermine. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But the power of <Speech_Female> this woman is <Silence> patience and <Speech_Female> persistence. <Speech_Female> They are embedded <Speech_Female> in the community, so <Speech_Female> they learn to navigate <Speech_Female> the tricky path <Speech_Female> of being a strong <Speech_Female> female leader <Speech_Female> in a conservative <Speech_Female> <Silence> patriarchal <Speech_Female> society. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Unlike a conservation <Speech_Female> expert that <Speech_Female> parachutes in <Speech_Female> from outside, <Speech_Female> so many and <Silence> her team are here to <Speech_Female> stay. <Speech_Female> So they're approaches <Silence> instantly <Speech_Female> different. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> At this <Speech_Female> point, <Speech_Female> we know that tropical <Speech_Female> forests are stabilizing <Speech_Female> force <Silence> for climate. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> And protecting tropical <Speech_Female> forests <Speech_Female> is one of the <Speech_Female> most cost efficient <Speech_Female> ways to <Silence> afford <SpeakerChange> climate <Speech_Female> disaster <Silence> and biodiversity <Speech_Female> collapse. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> the conservation world <Silence> needs an <Speech_Female> alcohol. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> We need <Speech_Female> more women <Silence> in the position <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Female> leadership. <Speech_Female> Women <Silence> from the grassroots, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> women, like <Silence> so many. <Speech_Female> <Silence> Women make up <Speech_Female> half <Silence> of the world population. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yet, <SpeakerChange> only <Speech_Female> a fashion <Speech_Female> sits at the decision <Silence> making table. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Women in the community <Speech_Female> are the <Speech_Female> guardians of incremental <Speech_Female> wisdom. <Speech_Female> Yet they are often <Speech_Female> an untapped <Speech_Female> source of knowledge <Speech_Female> underappreciated. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And therefore, <Silence> under resourced. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Community based <Speech_Female> alone is <Silence> not enough. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A study by <Speech_Female> show <Speech_Female> that most community <Speech_Female> forestry initiatives <Speech_Female> benefit elite <Speech_Female> village leaders <Silence> usually <Speech_Female> men. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And worsen gender <Speech_Female> equality <Silence> on the grassroots. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Silence> So how do we change <Speech_Female> this? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> First, <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> need to acknowledge <Speech_Female> that the problem <Silence> is complex. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> There are close <Speech_Female> to 85,000 <Speech_Female> villages in Indonesia, <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> 25,000 <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Female> them are located <Speech_Female> in and around <Speech_Female> forests. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Each have <Speech_Female> their own complexities <Speech_Female> and challenges, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> each of them <Speech_Female> also has its <Silence> own sumi. <Speech_Female> <Silence> It <SpeakerChange> is up to <Speech_Female> us <Silence> to find <Speech_Female> them, <Silence> work with <Speech_Female> them <Silence> <Advertisement> and infesting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> them. Thank you. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> TED Talks daily is <Speech_Female> hosted by me. Elise <Speech_Female> Hugh and produced <Speech_Female> by Ted. <Speech_Female> The music is from <Speech_Female> Allison Layton Brown <Speech_Female> and our mixer is Christopher <Speech_Female> fazey bogan. <Speech_Female> We record <Speech_Female> the talks at Ted events <Speech_Female> we host or from <Speech_Female> TEDx events, <Speech_Female> which are organized <Speech_Female> independently by <Speech_Female> volunteers all over <Speech_Female> the world. <Speech_Female> And we'd love to hear <Speech_Female> from you. Leave us <Speech_Female> a review on Apple podcasts <Speech_Female> or email <Speech_Music_Female> us at <SpeakerChange> podcasts <Music> at Ted dot com. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Music> PRX.

Indonesia Allison Layton Brown Elise Ted Christopher Apple
"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Our home country biases that cause us to allocate capital often too close to where we live. In order to increase investments to emerging markets, we need to first realize that two thirds of the remaining investments that need to be made to achieve the climate transition will need to be made outside of North America and Europe. Whereas too much are of our investments are being made here today. Increasing investments to emerging markets will mean advancing innovative structures like blended finance that can help to augment public private partnerships and collaboration with development finance institutions. But you know what? I think that we're also going to have to make some behavioral changes within ourselves. Like addressing our ambiguity bias that causes us to financially undervalue anything that seems foreign or complex. So I'm not as naive anymore as I was back when I was 20. But you know what? I still believe that changing the markets can be a way to change the world. Achieving the climate transition in a way that is just global and interconnected is the challenge of our times. And the finance sector has a critical role to play. But we need to do it in a way that is focused on serious science based solutions, not just in our investment portfolios, but out there in the real world. Thank you. TED Talks daily is hosted by me. Elise Hugh and produced by Ted. The music is from Allison Layton Brown and our mixer is Christopher fazey bogan. We record the talks at Ted events we host or from TEDx events, which are organized independently by volunteers all over the world. And we'd love to hear from you. Leave us a review on Apple podcasts or email us at podcasts at Ted dot com. PRX..

North America Europe Elise Hugh Allison Layton Brown Christopher fazey bogan Ted TED Apple
"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:59 min | 3 weeks ago

"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Are we so sure about that? Howard and Charlotte were 89 and 83 when they came forward. They both had careers as successful psychotherapists, and they had 6 college degrees between them. Years before, a receptionist from their eye doctor's office had showed up unexpectedly at their home and asked if she could borrow $300. She came back again and again, and offered she brought her small child with her. And every time she showed up, she had something new to tell them about why she needed money urgently. Eviction costs are lawsuit. Medical bills or surgery. She rarely left without a check in hand. And after this had gone on for some time, she had got almost $600,000 from this couple. And all the time they told no one. It wasn't until their accountant asked them questions that they really couldn't avoid. And then told them this was a crime and that they had to call it in. Even then they waited another couple of weeks until mortified. They finally took his advice. This case is also a great example of how delays inherent in the criminal justice system make achieving justice for seniors are really difficult task. Howard was already dying of heart failure at the time that this case was charged. His cardiologist said that he only had a few months to live. So trial might be a year or more out, and Howard was an essential witness, but he wasn't going to be around. We litigated to take his testimony ahead of time by a deposition. That's something that's really fairly rare in criminal cases. Finally, Howard testified from his home. And he spent the entire next day in bed exhausted. He passed away only 6 weeks later. And we were so lucky. If harrod had cognitive issues, important details might already have been lost. And this is what happens in these cases. The clock's running against us, and that clock runs out in cases get dismissed. The victims and their voices simply fade away. Let's talk about another problem that we face, which is based on fundamental legal principle. It's the confrontation clause of the constitution. This means that when someone is accused of a crime, they have the right to bring in their accuser and confront them face to face in court and to cross examine them. The person who's accused of abuse can insist on bringing in the senior to have their lawyer question them. As you can imagine, this is very tough in cases with older victims. I think of one case I prosecuted where the elderly woman sat in her wheelchair outside the courtroom for hours waiting to testify. Other cases overran. Eventually cold and tired and in pain, she just started crying. We really need to figure out better solutions. Sometimes we can carve out small exceptions to the confrontation clause based on public policy and the necessities of the case. Sometimes remote testimony can be a substitute for in person presence. Particularly if we build in due process safeguards, like having a person from each side present to make sure that there isn't any prompting or interference. During the pandemic, judges have sometimes permitted remote testimony based on the public health crisis and the elevated risks that that presents to seniors. There's one other thing that's really worth mentioning, which is that in other legal systems, where confrontation isn't quite so fundamental, they're really headed in an entirely different direction, special measures to protect vulnerable victims are becoming more common. And what's driving these changes is the focus on really getting the best and most reliable testimony from the witness. Which kind of makes sense. Also, in California, initiatives around specialty courts have been set up to address some of these specific barriers to elder justice that we're talking about. So we can make this system better. We can also take action ourselves to prevent those we love being affected by predatory behavior. It is time that we had the talk. No, it's not that talk. This is the talk that we need to have with our appearance or other older adults that we're close to. And it is every bit as awkward, because it goes against the grain of the relationship. Rules have changed forever. The person who used to be our protector might now need some protection themselves. So before we even start this process, we can reach out to family friends because they often have a great idea of what's going on. They may be able to tell us if they've seen signs and symptoms that concern them. Physicians or other professionals can help too. Then let's talk about tone because this is not an easy conversation. And it really needs a careful approach. What we can't do is go in there ready to judge. Because who wants to be judged, who wants to be made to feel less than? In my cases, I try to get a photograph of the senior when they were a different age in a different context. It helps me see more of that person. We didn't know our parents when they were our age. There is a lifetime of history between us, but there are still new ways to connect. And there are so many practical and unobtrusive fixes that we can put in place. Maybe it's doorbell cameras or text alerts from the bank that come to our phone. Or maybe we're just going to help out with that huge mountain of paperwork that keeps regrowing. There is a whole industry out there, and we need to find the solutions together. Also, this is a process, so we need to keep it under review. And if right now we're feeling overwhelmed, then nobody said it would be easy. And neither is getting old. But we can't wait because if we wait, we'll find out after something has happened. Like my family did. Or like Howard and Charlotte's family did. When I first meet with the victims of elder crime, it can feel really heavy. They've taken a big blow to their dignity and their self respect. They tell me that they feel tired and foolish. And sometimes they even say that they feel like they're done. We try not to make this process any harder for them. As in, wow, you've really been through a lot. But wait. There's more. And we get to share in their amazing resiliency and their humor. As we navigate our way through this messy system together. We can improve how the system responds to their mistreatment. We can ramp up prevention. We can raise awareness, and we can do a better job protecting our own friends and family. And who knows what lies ahead for our future selves either. But now that we absolutely know that algebra abuse can happen to anyone, it's time that we change that to make sure that it can't. And it doesn't. Ted-talks daily is hosted by me. Elise Hugh and produced by Ted. The music is from Allison Layton Brown and our mixer is Christopher fazey bogan. We record the talks at Ted events we host or from TEDx events, which are organized independently by volunteers all over the world. And we'd love to hear from you. Leave us a review on Apple podcasts or email us at podcasts at Ted dot com. PRX..

Howard harrod heart failure Charlotte California Ted Elise Hugh Allison Layton Brown Christopher fazey bogan Apple
"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

08:15 min | 2 months ago

"allison layton" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Children and the elderly to what we do with shopping malls, these are stories of everyday people trying to figure things out and where they're finding hope. Search for now what's next wherever you listen to podcasts. Do you remember when you were 12 years old? I do. I was on a mission, convinced that I could change the world around me. In 2013, together with my sister Isabel, I started a movement in Bali because I saw a problem that I thought had an easy solution. We wanted to do something about the growing problem of plastic pollution on our home island of Bali Indonesia. Now, when I first started, I had never heard of the word changemaker or activist. Today, I introduced myself as a full-time changemaker and movement builder. But it was not always delivered with such confidence. There is this saying, if I only knew back then, what I know today sounds familiar, right? I started full of passion and excitement, believing that I would achieve this change of making Bali plastic bag free before a summer was over and the school year started. And everywhere I went, I was met with, oh, so cute. So inspirational. And yeah, I guess two little girls and a bunch of friends trying to make a difference is pretty special. But you know what? Cute wasn't really what I was going for. I slowly learned to build a team. To gather evidence, create campaigns, develop a movement to stage beach cleanups. Collect signatures, speak in public and meet politicians. The more I learned, the more I wanted things to change. Passion quickly turned into obsession. And when change didn't happen as quickly as I expected at 14 years old, frustration settled deep in my soul. And soon after that, in my first years of high school, I experienced my first burnout. But having said that, I wouldn't have changed a thing, especially because in 2019, Bali finally did ban single use plastic bags. My peers and I created our own learning journey. Outside of the traditional curriculum and classroom. Building our own guidance and frameworks that could share with us what the next step should be. How to continue building the momentum we needed to achieve the change we wanted to see. I went through a lot of life lessons very quickly. And yet, there are things that I wish someone could have told me earlier back when I was starting. First, change does not happen as quickly as summer vacation. It takes a long time. And that is not always easy to accept. But that is why it is essential to create a clear goal with a timeline. Also, it takes a lot of people. Listen, and be open to learn but stay true to the mission. And it would have also been so helpful to know how to navigate collaborations with businesses and politicians. Someone has to address the elephant in the room, and finally, it's okay to take a break and step back for a second. There are many of us on the front lines who will continue the work while you rest and recharge. Today, many of us are getting involved at a younger and younger age, 16 year olds, 1514 ten year olds are out on the front lines. Missing school, drafting manifestos, organizing demonstrations, bringing governments and corporations to court, refusing to wait until we are older to start making a difference. But being a changemaker is not something anybody has on their bucket list. It isn't something kids aspire to become when they grow up. It's something that just happens, something activates you. An experience, an injustice that takes place. Big or small. Local or global. And then there is almost no choice but to get involved. In the last few years, I have spent more time in other students classrooms than in my own. Sharing principles of leadership, sustainability and change maker skills. And I can say with confidence that young people are aching for skills and knowledge that will allow them to act effectively today. Real change can start in the classroom. But the classroom has an increasingly distant relationship with reality. I think it is high time to ensure that what we learn in the classrooms reflect what is happening outside of them. And to ensure that every single student in every corner of the world has at least one hour a day of mandatory lessons about the climate crisis, the 17 SDGs and about any sustainable innovations about the realities of today's world from kindergarten through to graduation. And I mean, mandatory. I strongly believe that every young person can be a changemaker, but often they need help knowing where and how to start. And while we wait for the classrooms to adapt once again, my peers and I create our own learning journey. That is when I started a network called this circle of youth within utopia, a platform for young change makers to learn from each other. We need role models and positive stories with an impact. Real life examples of how we can take action, and we need to see this from people our age. I wish I would have known, refugee educator, Muhammad Al June day from Syria. Tree planter and entrepreneur Felix Fink banner from Germany, or gender equality activists faced him on junta from Indonesia when I was 12 years old. And I wish that I could have been able to jump on a call with them and share ideas and experiences. Now, I have to add that with the rise in youth engagement, a new scary trend has also set in. The best way to describe it is maybe to refer to the word greenwashing. You all know it. It's the process of conveying a false impression about the climate friendliness of a company Prada or actions. What I see happening a lot at the moment is something I would call youth washing. You don't want to know the emails and approaches we get on a daily basis from companies that want to use us for anything that sounds good or just to tick off a box. Associating one's brand with youth climate activist seems to be good for business, although the intention rarely extends to being good for climate too. So to the companies youth washing. I want to say. Instead of inviting youth for the photo ops and the applause, offer us a seat during the brainstorming meetings. During the internal workshops with no audience. Maybe invite us to one of your board meetings and ask us for some reverse mentoring sessions. You might be surprised. I look back at the last ten years and see an intense journey from a young, cute girl to a change maker. For the next decade, I see a whole generation that is rising, leading by example and taking action. Youth activism is more than an inspiration. We are serious about change. Thank you. Ted-talks daily is hosted by me. Elise Hugh and produced by Ted. The music is from Allison Layton Brown in our mixer is Christopher fazey bogan. We record the talks at Ted events we host or from TEDx events, which are organized independently by volunteers all over the world. And we'd love to hear from you. Leave us a review on Apple podcasts.

Bali Indonesia Isabel Muhammad Al Felix Fink Syria Prada Germany Ted Elise Hugh Allison Layton Brown Christopher fazey bogan Apple