34 Burst results for "Allison Aubrey"

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Over 80% of Kids who use these cigarettes use flavored products. Eliminating those products would be the most significant thing you could do to reverse the youth e cigarette epidemic. He says he would also like to see the FDA removed products that deliver much higher levels of nicotine compared to cigarettes. Right. Some of the flavors are things like cotton candy. They seem directly designed to appeal to kids. So do you think it's possible that the FDA could take some products off the market? But just leave others there in in in? Yeah. Yeah, the agency is likely to continue to crack down on the flavor products. They've already denied applications for companies that market flavors such as apple crumble and cinnamon toast crunch clearly designed to appeal to kids. But it is unclear what the agency will do about mental, which is very popular jewel markets, a mental product, and many health organizations have asked the FDA to reject jewels application. Here's Erica's ward of the American Lung Association. We would oppose any jewel product remaining on the market. The history and their actions are clear that they're interested in addicting, a new generation and no jewel product, Whether it be tobacco flavored or menthol flavored should be allowed to remain on the market. Now the FDA could announce its decision any time now. Okay? NPR's Allison Aubrey. Thank you, Alison. Thank you, Noel. At the start of her trial yesterday, prosecutors described Elizabeth Holmes as a villain motivated by greed homes, is the founder of fairness. This is a biotech company that promised a blood test that would transform the industry. Home stands accused of defrauding investors of millions of dollars in deceiving patients. She though, maintains her innocence. NPR's Bobby Allyn was in the courtroom yesterday. Good morning, Bobby. Good morning. Tell me about Elizabeth Holmes defense. Yeah, and opening statements. Her defense team said Being a startup CEO is a tough job. You know, Holmes was working 12 hour 12 hours a day, seven days a week. She thought of herself as kind of this visionary, and she founded a company when she was 19 years old as a Stanford dropout and hustled for 15 years to growth their nose into a $9 billion company before it imploded. Now, when it comes to the fraud she's accused of her defense lawyers did some wide ranging finger pointing, they said the number two at the company sunny ball, Wani had more oversight than she did over some of the more dubious parts of the company and that laboratory managers, not her were ultimately responsible for the company's blood testing, which was exposed to be flawed and sometimes just downright inaccurate. One of the defense lawyers, Lance Wade said quote Miss Holmes made mistakes, but mistakes are not crimes have failed. Business does not make a CEO of criminal Okay, that's the defense and what is the prosecution say? Yeah, they zeroed in on a moment when Theranos was burning cash in on the verge of bankruptcy, prosecutors said Holmes got really desperate. They said she forged a fake report from Pfizer. That made it look like the drug company approved of Theranos written even on Pfizer letterhead when in fact Visor had said the exact opposite homes, then use this document to raise lots of money and get lots of glowing media coverage. Meanwhile, prosecutors say homes underlying technology these blood analyzers, there were a total myth. Prosecutor Robert Leech told the jury that Holmes lied and cheated to get money and quote. It's a crime on Main Street, and it's a crime in Silicon Valley. Why does this trial feel like it is bigger than Elizabeth Holmes? Even though it is very much about Elizabeth Holmes? Yeah, that's right. Look, you know, millionaires are minted all the time in Silicon Valley, And you know, many of these people are chasing that kind of money to tell a story about themselves about a product. You know something trying to change the world for the better, but that can put them at odds with regulators and the law and a lot of people out here in Silicon Valley. You know things that thinks that you know, I think it's okay to sort of push against boundaries and Elizabeth Holmes was Doing this in her own way. But prosecutors said the key difference here is that she broke the law in the process. Traditionally, you know, the Norman in Silicon Valley is to sort of move fast and break things. That's the motto. You hear a lot around here. But, you know, maybe at depending on how this trial turns out, if if the If the jury, you know returns a verdict that you know, says that Elizabeth Holmes is guilty. Then maybe that will temper some of that behavior could be interesting. Yeah. How long is the trial? Going to last? Any idea? Yeah, the judge says we should expect a three month trial. So a parade of witnesses, their nose whistle blowers, experts, patients, and even perhaps Holmes herself will be taking the stand to testify. At the end of the year, the jury should start deliberating over homes, guilt or innocence. And, if convicted, she faces up to two decades behind bars. NPR's Bobby Allyn in Silicon Valley. Thank you, Bobby..

Lance Wade Allison Aubrey Pfizer Alison Noel 15 years 12 hour Bobby $9 billion Silicon Valley Holmes Bobby Allyn Theranos American Lung Association Elizabeth Holmes Erica Wani yesterday NPR Robert Leech
"allison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Allison Aubrey tells us why also, the Federal Reserve meets this week as the nation's economic recovery continues. So what's next for inflation, interest rates and job growth and how one workplace that relies on face to face interaction is rethinking the office post pandemic. It's Monday, June 14th Boy, George's sick, Steve The news is next. Live from NPR News in Washington on Korova Coleman. President Biden is in Brussels for the next part of his European trip. He's meeting with leaders from NATO. NPR's Frank Langfitt says Biden has a wish list he'd like to take up with other NATO countries. I think what Biden would like to see is NATO looking at challenges like climate change, which can destabilize regions with lots of migration. Also cyber defense. And which neo has been putting more and more energy into, and then I think China, which you know Biden was saying this during the G seven summit over in court wall that he does increasingly see the world as this contest between autocracies and democracies like the NATO members, and the question to him is, you know, Will the democracy succeed and endure NPR's Frank Langfitt reporting. There are more negotiations set this week in Washington on infrastructure package is a bipartisan group of senators says it has an agreement on a package and it's worth about $1.2 trillion, but members have not released many details about it. Separately, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer says Democrats are working on plans to pass elements of President Biden's infrastructure package without Republican support. The Justice Department secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for account information of then Trump White House counsel Don McGahn. McGann's wife account information was also subpoenaed. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports Apple informed Don McGahn and his wife about the subpoena last month, the company did so only after a gag order secured by the government had expired. That's according to a person familiar with the matter. It's unclear what the Justice Department was investigating, or whether prosecutors actually obtained any of McGann's account information. The news, which was first reported by The New York Times, comes days after it emerged that the Trump era Justice Department had secretly subpoenaed Apple in 2018 for communication metadata belonging to two Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee, as well as staff and family. In that case, the department was investigating leaks of classified information to the media. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington A woman was killed in Minneapolis last night after a man drove his vehicle at high speed into a crowd of demonstrators as man Sepik of Minnesota public radio reports. Protesters detained the alleged attacker until police arrived. The demonstrators blocked Lake Street in the city's uptown area to protest the killing of Winston Smith. Sheriff's deputies on a U. S Marshal Service Task force fatally shot the 32 year old black man June 3rd while trying to arrest him on a firearms warrant. Local activists, D J. Hooker says a driver accelerated through barricades and hit several parked cars, one of which struck and killed a woman sitting on the curb. A card came at us going like 70 or 80 Miles an hour. It hasn't got through the first Street even spread out as it got to the car and hit the car video that hooker.

Allison Aubrey Frank Langfitt 2018 Don McGahn Steve House Intelligence Committee Ryan Lucas Brussels McGann 70 Lake Street Minneapolis June 3rd NPR Monday, June 14th D J. Hooker Washington Federal Reserve George Democrats
NPR Health Correspondent, Allison Aubrey, on the COVID-19 Vaccine for Kids

Short Wave

02:02 min | 1 year ago

NPR Health Correspondent, Allison Aubrey, on the COVID-19 Vaccine for Kids

"Aubrey. We've been hearing for weeks now that this age group twelve to fifteen year olds are next. What do we know about how the vaccine works for them. Scherer we'll scientist at the fda have been reviewing the clinical trial data that included more than two thousand kids and it appears to be all positive children in this age. Group develop a lot of antibodies. They have very mild side effects and pfizer says older participants in the trial will continue to be monitored for long term protection and safety for an additional two years got it so as far as efficacy and side effects are concerned it's basically affecting them just like it as adults. Yeah pretty much so. I spoke to patricia stench field. She is a nonvoting member of. Cdc's advisory committee on immunization practices. This is the group that makes recommendations she says from what's been released so far. The vaccine appears to be very effective than this age. Group seems to be one hundred percent effective. No child in the study. How on that. Twelve to fifteen year old. Adolescence got kobe. Very few kids. Got a fever. Many had arm pain just like adults and stints field says the benefits seemed too far outweigh any risks. That's kind of incredible one hundred percent effective right. And that's what was shown in the trial setting now in the real world. We might come to find out. Isn't one hundred percent but certainly early suggests it's very very effective but it appears that some parents are hesitant to get this vaccine for their kids. Right yes a recent survey from the kaiser family foundation found only three in ten parents of children in this age groups they would they would get their child vaccinated as soon as the vaccine is available. Many say they'll wait now. I spoke to dr li beers about this. She's the president of the american academy of pediatrics. She says she's not surprised that there's hesitancy out there. And she says pediatricians are going to be working really hard in the coming weeks and months to reassure parents and help answer questions.

Patricia Stench Scherer Aubrey Advisory Committee On Immuniza Pfizer FDA CDC Kobe Fever Kaiser Family Foundation Dr Li Beers American Academy Of Pediatrics
"allison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Allison Aubrey reports, The FDA is expected to authorize the Copa 19 vaccine developed by Fizer for emergency use. This week. Some pediatricians plan to offer the shot in their offices and more than 15,000. Pharmacies will be ready to vaccinate 12 to 15 year olds pending the authorization. Dr. Lee Beers is president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. We it Pediatricians feel incredibly confident in the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. Some surveys show many parents may not opt for vaccination as soon as it's authorized. Some will wait. Data released by vaccine maker Fizer found the vaccine was 100% effective in preventing disease among Children in this age group who were enrolled in a clinical trial. Allison Aubrey. NPR News Stocks opened mixed on Wall Street this morning after hitting record highs last week. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose by more than 200 points in early trading. Stocks in Asia were mostly higher overnight, while European shares are mixed. Last week. Both the Dow and the S and P 500 index closed in record territory. Despite a disappointing jobs report, Investors took the lackluster employment gains is reassurance the economy is not in danger of overheating and that interest rates are likely to remain very low. This week. The Labor Department offers its latest read on consumer prices, which have been climbing amid strong demand. April's figure is likely to be distorted by the big drop in prices a year ago when the pandemic struck. The Federal Reserve anticipates somewhat higher inflation this year, but says any sharp run up in prices is likely to be temporary. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Doctors have started using a revolutionary gene editing technique to try and cure some disease is NPR's Rob Stein reports. The landmark experiment could restore vision for some patients with genetic disorders. Scientists are using this gene editing technique called Crisper, which is already showing promise for blood disorders like sickles out disease, and it's being tested for cancer. But in those experiments, doctors were taking cells out of the body, editing them in the lab and then infusing the edited cells back into patients. The experiment Knighton Calver volunteered. For it's the first time scientists are modifying DNI. Inside patients bodies with crisper NPR's Rob Stein reporting. The White House says it plans to restore health care protections for gay and transgender people. The decision reverses a trump, You're a policy that sought to narrow the scope of legal rights involving medical care. Dr. Trading mixed on Wall Street at this hour, the Dow up 234 points. This is NPR news. South Korea says it plans to use its upcoming summit with President Biden to restart diplomacy with North Korea. South Korean leader Moon Jae in, says the Biden administration's recently completed North Korea policy review includes a diplomatic phased approach to resolve the North Korean nuclear crisis. Women's rights activist and Saudi Arabia, who's best known for her successful campaign for women to drive in the country has been summoned by security officials. NPR's Ruth Sherlock says they reportedly informed her of a Supreme Court decision that upholds a conviction under which he spent years in prison. Delusional, have flu, was arrested in 2000 and 18 and convicted on charges that the United Nations and rights groups have called spurious. She spent almost three years in prison. She was released in February this year, In a move that seem to coincide with President Biden's decision to reassess the U. S. Is relationship with Saudi Arabia on more closely watch Saudis human rights record. The terms of her release include a five year travel ban and three years of probation have flaws. Family had appealed the ruling. Now, though they say she's being called into a security officer at the Saudi Interior Ministry and told that the Supreme Court has upheld her original conviction on the travel ban remains With Sherlock NPR NEWS Beirut Protesters in Japan are calling for the upcoming Olympic Games to be canceled amid 1/4 wave of the Corona virus pandemic. Japan has extended a state of emergency in Tokyo until the end of May to contain fresh outbreaks..

Scott Horsley Rob Stein Ruth Sherlock Allison Aubrey 12 American Academy of Pediatrics Last week Asia 2000 Moon Jae Olympic Games FDA Tokyo three years February this year 100% NPR Japan last week April
Johnson & Johnson rolls out single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson & Johnson rolls out single-dose COVID-19 vaccine

"Four million doses of a new vaccine for the Corona virus or shipping out across the West. Today, the single dose shots developed by Johnson and Johnson received the green light from the FDA Saturday. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports with the third covert vaccine in the U. S demand still exceeds the current supply. Nearly four million doses of the one Does Johnson and Johnson vaccine are ready and will be allocated to states and local jurisdictions. Some doses will go directly to retail pharmacies, mass vaccination sites and to federally qualified health centers and could make it into arms this week. So far about 20% of the adult population in the U. S. Has received at least one shot and 25 million people have received both doses. But many more who are eligible are still waiting. More mega sites at stadiums and civic centers are set to open and supplies are expected to expand in the coming weeks. Johnson and Johnson is expected to deliver 100 million doses by June.

Johnson Allison Aubrey NPR FDA U.
Storm, power outages impact vaccine distribution

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Storm, power outages impact vaccine distribution

"From NPR news. I'm Jack Spear about 1.7 million vaccine shots or big administered every day in the U. S. As NPR's Allison Aubrey explains, there may be a temporary reductions in some areas due to weather and power outages as winter storms have disrupted vaccinations in several states, including Missouri and Texas. Biden administration officials say governors may extend hours when sites reopened to keep vaccinations on track with more than 55 million doses administered. Dr Anthony Fauci says the vaccines will not only protect the people who received the shots but also help slow the spread over all when your turn to get vaccinated comes up. Get vaccinated. It's not only good for you, it will have a very important impact on the dynamics of the outbreak found, she says. It's also

Npr News Jack Spear Allison Aubrey Biden Administration NPR Dr Anthony Fauci U. Missouri Texas
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners and supporters of KQED. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning, More than 41 Million doses of covert 19 vaccines have been administered in the U. S. And as the pace of vaccinations accelerates, the number of new infections continues to decline. Meanwhile, though, in South Africa there's growing concern over the effectiveness of the vaccines against a new strains circulating there, leading to a halt in the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine in that country. We're joined now by NPR's Allison. Aubrey. Alison, Thanks for being here this morning. Good morning, Rachel. Let's start in South Africa. They started administering that AstraZeneca vaccine and now they are not what happened. Well and new study there. It hasn't been published yet. But it found that the AstraZeneca vaccine may provide only minimal protection. Now this is against mild to moderate infection. Caused by the variant circulating there. That's why the country will temporarily hold the roll out of this vaccine. Now the data come from a very small number of patients. Rachel's so it's not conclusive. But the results are concerning because this variant has been identified in a bunch of countries, right, including in at least two states here in the U. S right. So that is right. What it mean for us. Well, you know, the AstraZeneca vaccine is not authorized in the U. S. But if the South African strain were to spread here, it could impact the effectiveness of all the vaccines. Now there is another paper out just this morning in nature medicine. It's a lab study showing that the Fizer vaccines still elicits the kind of immune response that can protect people against the South African strain. Bottom line. The vaccine manufacturers do have the ability to retool the vaccines. Here's former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb on CBS yesterday. I do think that the existing vaccines are gonna offer reasonable protection against his new variants, and we also may be able to develop in a timely fashion. Maybe in 46 months, consensus stringing the bakes in a lot of the different variation that we're seeing have boosters available for the fall. So I think that there is a reasonable chance that we're going to be able to stay ahead of this virus as it mutates. So there's some optimism there. So this is why there's such urgency to get as many people as possible vaccinated quickly. I mean, it was already a priority, but these new strains are are making that even more urgent. Absolutely, and the paste of vaccinations is picking out for certain more vaccination sites are up and running about 32 million people have received at least one dose. So far now, Rachel, there had been talk of changing up the strategy to get the shot into more people faster by holding off on a second toast, you know, give everyone one to stretch the supply. But over the weekend, Dr Anthony Fauci threw cold water on this idea, He says there is just not enough data to support the strategy. From a theoretical standpoint, it would be nice to know if you just give one dose. How long the durability last and what is the level of effect But what we have right now and what we must go with. Is the scientific data that we've accumulated and it's really very solid, which is for two doses spaced 3 to 4 Weeks of heart, But you need supply for that, right? I mean, is there enough vaccine to do that? Well, you know about 60 million doses have been delivered so far, and vaccine makers are expected to produce millions more every week. They say they can. And will. There are many channels of distribution. Now everything from mega sites of stadiums, hospitals, and this week about a million doses will go out to more than 6000 pharmacies. So you know, I spoke to Alison has said guy singer about this. There are health care provider based in Pennsylvania. Administering more than 2000 shots a day at their four sites. We have a lot of people that are vaccine shopping, so they're putting their name on a couple different lists, and that means that they're no showing at locations where they had appointment. So it requires a lot of shuffling and kind of end of day scramble to make sure that we're not wasting any doses on then they were also instances when people make appointments to get there and find out the site is temporarily out of their weekly supply. So you know there are still plenty of snags matching people with appointments, but overall, the pictures improving So we talk about Anthony Fauci, reaffirming that the best strategy is for these two shots spaced apart. Let's talk about those the second shot in particular. Millions of people have have now gotten that second dose. What do we know about that experience in terms of side effects? Yeah, You know, it's variable for people who generally there are more side effects with the second dose. And because many people have been told to anticipate this, some people are taking Fever, reducing medicine, such as I'd be proven before they go get the shot. I spoke to Dr Stanley Martin, He's director of infectious diseases at Geisinger Health. As a general rule. We would not recommend taking any anti inflammatories or pain relievers prior to coming in for the vaccine. We know that there's a least in theory, a concern that those kinds of medications could Blunt the immune response to the vaccine. Now, he says, it hasn't been studied with a covert vaccine, so it's more of a theater radical risk. But he says after the shot if you do get a fate, fever or aches than it's typically okay to take medicine to treat those symptoms afterwards, he says. If you can get some extra rest, you may feel knocked out by the shot. Okay, so one more topic I want to touch on in this conversation schools. The CDC is expected to release more guidance on how schools should re open. What have researchers learned in recent months. You know, there's a much clearer picture that has emerged that shows you can limit the spread have very minimal spread within schools settings. If kids are kept distance, kept masked. I spoke to the pediatrician Daniel Benjamin at Duke University about this. He's been tracking it very closely. A year ago. We thought Children are just gonna be super spreaders. What's really been impressive about the last four months is that multiple? Investigators have independently shown that if you have strong adherence to mitigation measures You can succeed even if community transmission is high, as has been the case in some areas where schools have re opened now, the CDC director has said. Vaccination of teachers is not a prerequisite for schools to open, but Any, Benjamin says there is value in prioritizing them. There is a strong value proposition to put school staff at the front of the line because when I vaccinate school staff, not only have I helped that person in their family, I've also helped 30 Children and their 30 families, So it is a force multiplier. You know for both safety, he says, And he says, for a return to normalcy, So we are expected to hear more about this issue this week as the CDC prepares new guidance NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey, always with very helpful guidance and information. Allison Thank you so much. Thank you. Rachel. Support for NPR health coverage.

Rachel Martin Allison Aubrey CDC NPR Dr Anthony Fauci Alison NPR News director South Africa Rachel nature medicine Fever KQED Sasha Pfeiffer Benjamin FDA Daniel Benjamin
"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Million have been injected. At the same time, the CDC has released a new study that finds statewide mask mandates are linked to a decline in covert hospitalizations. NPR's Allison Aubrey has that story. Researchers evaluated data from hospitals and states that had masking mandates between March and October of last year. They found three weeks after a mandate had been implemented. Hospital growth rates declined nearly 6%. During a White House press conference, Dr Anthony Fauci says it's critical for people to continue masking to prevent more contagious strains from emerging viruses will not evolve and mutate. If you do not give them an open playing field to replicate, so found, she says. It's important to double down on masking. It will still be many months before everyone can be vaccinated. Allison Aubrey NPR news States are making plans for how they'll handle undocumented immigrants as they try to get everyone vaccinated. Blake, Farmer of member Station W. PLN reports. Some states are prioritizing non citizens. Some states like Nebraska have indicated undocumented immigrants will be at the end of the vaccine line. Arizona, on the other hand, has named non citizens a priority, since they've had higher infection and mortality rates from Cove. It Legal status will have no bearing on whether someone gets a vaccine in Tennessee, says the state's health commissioner, Dr Lisa Piercy. If they made the age criteria or health care work force, this is a federal resource. And if you're in this country, then you get of accident. There has been hesitation among some undocumented immigrants about covert testing for fear identifying information will be shared with law enforcement. Here, she says states will need to work with trusted community groups to vouch for the process for NPR news. I'm Blake Farmer in Nashville. President Biden says his plan to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour is unlikely to survive as part of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package because of Senate rules, But he tells CBS evening news he's not giving up on a hike, even if its gradual I'm prepared as president of states on a separate negotiation on minimum wage.

Blake Farmer Allison Aubrey NPR Allison Aubrey NPR Dr Lisa Piercy President Biden Dr Anthony Fauci Arizona CDC Nashville White House Senate CBS president Nebraska commissioner Tennessee
Mask mandates can work, CDC researchers say

Ask Me Another

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Mask mandates can work, CDC researchers say

"The CDC has released a new study that finds statewide mask mandates are linked to a decline in covert hospitalizations. NPR's Allison Aubrey has that story. Researchers evaluated data from hospitals and states that had masking mandates between March and October of last year. They found three weeks after a mandate had been implemented. Hospital growth rates declined nearly 6%. During a White House press conference, Dr Anthony Fauci says it's critical for people to continue masking to prevent more contagious strains from emerging viruses will not evolve and mutate. If you do not give them an open playing field to replicate, so found, she says. It's important to double down on masking. It will still be many months before everyone can be vaccinated. Allison

Allison Aubrey Dr Anthony Fauci CDC NPR White House Allison
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Emmy eligible comedy Syriza upload from creator Greg Daniels, writer and producer of the office and Parks and Recreation. Episodes are available for TV Academy members at Consider Amazon Com. I man, Let's stay with me. We're gonna get into news from NPR just for a few minutes and then we'll get back into music. Two more hours of morning becomes eclectic on KCRW. Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi saying the Biden administration has announced a $231.8 million deal with an Australian company to ramp up the production and availability of the first at home Rapid test for coronavirus available without a prescription. It provides results within 15 minutes on the user's smartphone. Meanwhile, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on the acceleration of vaccinations. According to the CDC, about 30 million doses have been administered, and many cities and states are expanding capacity from hospitals and pharmacies to mobile clinics and mega sites. Many now say they're waiting for more supply. Meanwhile, given the more contagious very instead of emerged, Angela Rasmussen, who's a virologist at Georgetown University, Says it's important for people to stay vigilant. Viruses cannot evolve if they don't have the opportunity to replicate. So if people stay masked and socially distanced, she says, it's possible to slow the spread and reduce the likelihood of additional variance. Allison Aubrey NPR news. Congressional forecasters say they expect the U. S economy to rebound to pre pandemic levels later this year. But as NPR's.

NPR Allison Aubrey NPR Greg Daniels Allison Aubrey Emmy Parks and Recreation Biden administration TV Academy Angela Rasmussen Georgetown University CDC writer producer U. S
US officials express concern over possible shortage of COVID-19 vaccine

Morning Edition

04:43 min | 1 year ago

US officials express concern over possible shortage of COVID-19 vaccine

"More more than than 3000 3000 people people dying dying from from Corona Corona virus virus every every day day here here in in this this country. country. There There is is a a sign sign of progress. Though the number of new cases is declining significantly, vaccines are the key to making sure that trend continues. But getting the vaccines where they need to go has been problematic. NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us now. Hi, Allison. Good morning, Rachel. All right. We're gonna start with some numbers about 22 million shots have been given which is good. That's about half of the total doses that have been distributed across the country, though. So you've got 20 million other doses available. And yet some cities in hospitals say they're running out of the vaccine. How is this disconnect? Explain this, right? Okay, so I know it sounds counterintuitive, but they're actually two things happening at once. Right? Okay. So manufacturing is accelerating. Visor and Madonna have distributed more than 40 million doses around the country to every county, every state. But many more people are now eligible to get the shot at a time when states are just figuring out logistically Rachel how to scale this up, and that's creating a bottleneck. I mean, some places they're doing better than others. I spoke to Dr Mark Boom, he's CEO of Houston Methodist, part of the colossal Texas Medical Center system. Now they're using doses as fast as they can receive them. But it's not enough. Each week. We run out waiting for our next shipment. It's really a supply constraints issue. We coordinate across our city's about doing this as quickly as possible. So we're confident we can do this. As a community. It's just a matter of getting more supplied more quickly. Yeah. So at this moment, the vaccines are still think of them as a scarce resource, and that creates anxiety. It creates confusion right and this helps account for all these stories. We're hearing about people who get an appointment to get the vaccine, and then they get a phone call or an email saying your appointment's been canceled or postponed. So, I mean, can the vaccine makers just produce market they produce enough to help meet the demand and the Biden administration's goal of 100 million doses in 100 days? Well, you know, administration officials think so and look to be fair, even as the new administration came in last week about a million doses a day were already being administered, which is what's needed to meet that goal if we stay on track, but there are now lots of head winds to keep this going, White House Chief Chief of Staff Ron Clean said on NBC yesterday. There are multiple challenges. It's a very complex process that needs help on all fronts. We need more vaccine. We need more vaccinate whores. We need more vaccination sites. So he's saying there's a lot of challenges there, including the need to produce more vaccines, huh? That's right. We got to go back to that. I mean Fizer of modern it need to deliver millions of more doses per week. Rachel to stay on track, and this is tricky. These companies have to scale up factory capacity deal with supply chain issues. And remember this is brand new. It's the first time I am already technology has been used at this massive scale. I spoke to Dr Josh Sharfstein of Johns Hopkins University. He's been being considered for the top posted the FDA, he says. Given how complicated this is the urgency, Majorino, Fizer and other companies may need help, including maybe the use of the Defense production act to boost shortfalls. Just hoping that the company's alone will come through may not be enough. And so one of the key aspects of the Biden plan is to roll up the government sleeves and say, How can we make sure you have the supplies? You need the machines you need and potentially even expand your production capacity. So big picture here, Rachel, this is going to take some time. Many months. I mean, another potential challenge occurs to me. What about folks who've gotten their first dose? Right? This is a two does vaccine So they've gotten the first shot. But what if they can't get the second shot on time? Is that okay? What? Mm. The CDC says the second dose should be administered as close to the recommended intervals possible, which is three weeks for the fire, Sir vaccine four weeks for the Madonna vaccine. However, if this isn't feasible, that agency says the second dose can be delayed administered up to 42 days after the first toast. I spoke to physician Gabe Kelen at Johns Hopkins University about this. He's overseeing the vaccine distribution there at the university. So in their preliminary studies, you know when they looked at what is the shortest reasonable time to give a booster turned out to be three weeks and four weeks? That doesn't mean giving the booster at six weeks isn't justice affected for longer term? Community. You know, he says there is limited data here, so no one knows exactly how long this gonna extend out. But it makes good sense that there's legal room here.

Allison Aubrey Rachel Fizer Dr Mark Boom Houston Methodist Colossal Texas Medical Center Biden Administration Chief Of Staff Ron Clean Corona NPR Allison Madonna Dr Josh Sharfstein Majorino Confusion Johns Hopkins University NBC White House FDA Biden
US coronavirus death toll reaches nearly 400,000

Morning Edition

01:31 min | 1 year ago

US coronavirus death toll reaches nearly 400,000

"Hopkins coronavirus Tally finds the United States just below 400,000 deaths as of this morning 400,000 debt that's like eliminating the entire population of New Orleans. The whole population of Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is roughly equivalent to every single person in Arlington, Texas, and close to every person in Minneapolis. We reached that number of 400,000 almost exactly one year after the first case of coronavirus. Was identified in the United States. NPR's Allison Aubrey has joined us live every Monday throughout the pandemic to talk things through Alison. Good morning. Once again. Good morning, Steve. I got to tell you is pretty hard when the numbers were a lot lower to imagine we would ever be at this point. You know, that's right. We went from the confirmation of the first case almost a year ago to the virus quickly spiraling out of control. Steve, You might remember this. I'm gonna play some archival tape from one of our segments early on. Something just happened to the document on the computer screen in front of me. Just a moment ago, it said There were 31,000 coronavirus cases confirmed in the United States and then in instant the number changed is our editor made it 35,000 coronavirus cases. And here we are a year later with about 24 million documenting it cases in the US around the globe 95 million cases and over two million people dead from the virus. Yeah, We looked forward to far lower numbers than we're at now and found them horrifying.

Allison Aubrey United States Hopkins Tulsa Arlington New Orleans Steve Minneapolis Oklahoma NPR Alison Texas
"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Tanya, mostly in Los Angeles, and I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D C. It has almost been a year since the U. S registered its first case of the Corona virus. And today the pandemic is as deadly as it has ever been. We now have effective vaccines. But the country faces a dual challenge on that front, speeding up delivery of the vaccine to the millions of people who are waiting and convincing people who are hesitant, including some essential workers and nursing home employees. Getting the shot is the best way to protect themselves and others. We've got NPR's Allison Aubrey with us this morning to talk about all these things. Hi, Alison. Good morning Regional. It's still important at the at the beginning of these conversations to mark how deadly this virus is. What are the numbers right now? You know, the U. S is averaging about 250,000 new cases a day. That's an increase of nearly 40%. Compared to just a few weeks back. We've seen A record number of deaths in recent days, more than two people dying every minute in the U. S. And there's a great urgency to speed up the vaccination campaign as some governors open up access to more people. There just aren't enough vaccination sites up and running some states, including Massachusetts, New Jersey, Texas air opening mega sites. Many others are scrambling on my own mom who's 75 caught wind that a local pharmacy had extra doses left over from vaccinations at a nursing home. So she hurried over there to find this big crowd of people. There were only a few shots available, she said. It was a bit chaotic. People got really frustrated. She did not end up getting your shot. And that's playing out in other places, too, which is something that Biden administration is worried about. They want to make sure demand not to supply and vice versa. I mean, President Biden's advisers said They want to try something different than the Trump administration, right. They want to release almost all the available doses of the vaccine at once. Tell us Yes. So the idea is to release more doses, not the hold them back for the second shot, and this could be helpful going forward. I mean, the Biden advisers tell me that supply is not the issue here. Millions of doses are being made. That thinking is there will be plenty of vaccine for everyone to get a second dose. On time. I spoke to one adviser Zeke Emanuel, He says the challenge right now is really to improve coordination and increased capacity to deliver more shots now. There cannot be a higher sense of urgency so nothing should be taken off the table sports stadiums, convention centers, schools parking lots that have been set up for testing and can be adapted to Backseat administration. That's the philosophy. He says the higgledy piggledy approaching these initial weeks just needs to improve. So, I mean. Meanwhile, as we've said, the virus rages on l A is being hit Especially hard right now. Can you talk a little bit about what those hospitals they're facing? Yeah, it's hard for them to keep up. I mean, ICUs ers are stretched thin. I spoke to nurse Karen grimly. She's chief nursing executive at U C. L A. Now they have multiple ICUs there. They've taken a lot of patients from other facilities to they have been expanding their covert beds just to keep up with the search. It's almost like a chess game every day identifying how many covert patients do we anticipate are going to come in. Where are we going to put them and it's a different type of care. It's labor intensive. And you and I also have both spoken with health care workers over these many, many months who haven't even had a day off. I mean, some of these people are logging just, you know, more than 100 days of dealing with us. Exactly a many. You're exhausted, and not only do they have more patients to take care of, But there's this physical told to Rachel. I mean, for example, nurses have to prone the covert patients, meaning flip them on their abilities over onto their bellies and back again multiple times a day to help them breathe. So nurses they're running ragged. Some of the big people take six people to turn somebody over onto their belly. And then you start looking at the equipment. They probably have eight or nine. Intravenous is running into them. And you know, you've got to keep all that from getting tangled and then you've also got to be dressed out and all your protective wear. So stress coupled with ours worked can be really tiring. And you know, amid the surge, the number of people ending up in the hospital is still increasing as we speak. I mean, this vaccine cannot stop the current surge, but it's another reminder of the urgency of getting more people vaccinated. So at this point, health care workers who were in the first round of people who were allowed to get the vaccine are now up for their second dose. What we know so far about how those folks are responding to this to the booster. You know, overall, very mild side effects, If any, in the clinical trials, there were more instances of low grade fevers, chills for a day or so, with the second dose, sometimes a headache. I spoke to Patricia Gardner. She's a nurse at Hackensack Meridian Health in New Jersey. She got her second dose last week, she says It was really no big deal She experienced none of this. The only side effects that would say that I had was the aching at the injection site. I did take ibuprofen pry into the vaccination, so I feel good. I'm excited, And she says she's been talking to some of her friends and her family members who are very hesitant, urging them to get the shot when they can. So let's talk about that. I mean, it's great if you could get a vaccine and get big distribution sites set up and it doesn't really matter if people aren't willing to get it. That's right. In Ohio, for instance, about 60% of workers and long term care facilities offered to shot have opted not to get it at least so far. Now. That's just one data point. But public health officials nationwide are concerned, Rachel. Some polls do show that hesitancy has diminished a bit among the general public. But there are plenty of people who think that this fast vaccine was rushed and multiple factors play into hesitancy with in minority communities, Nurse Patricia Gardner says there's lingering mistrust in the health care system and within the Jamaican community, she says there's messages being spread on social media that the vaccine will give you The mark of the beast. It's It's a biblical reference linked to the end of times. This message has also circulated among some evangelical communities. My wants is that she doesn't want to get it because they're saying now it's the market of East. It's so there's a lot of skepticism going out there and they believe it. Unfortunately, But I my message to my community. My friends is we are the people who are suffering our culture. Our community has a high percentage of people dying from Covitz. Well, and she tells them getting this vaccine is the best way to protect themselves. I mean, she's trying to sway the people closest to her, and the research really suggest it's these wonder one or peer to peer conversations that can help overcome hesitancy with seconds remaining. I do want to ask you one more thing. There is concern over Newer, more contagious variants that may be circulating around. Could these variants get in the way of the vaccine? You know, so far, it seems the answer is no. A preliminary report found that a mutation shared by both new variants of concern did not alter the activity of antibodies produced by people who received the vaccine..

Biden Rachel Martin Nurse Patricia Gardner New Jersey NPR Zeke Emanuel Alison Los Angeles Backseat administration Washington Allison Aubrey Tanya Hackensack Meridian Health Massachusetts Rachel ibuprofen Covitz President headache Karen
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Saying Vice President Mike Pence is rallying conservative Christians in Georgia to ensure the Republican incumbents win the Senate run offs, which he calls the last line of defense. Against the Democratic takeover in Congress. The election's tomorrow A day later, Pence will preside over congressional joint session where lawmakers will affirm the electoral College count that affirms Joe Biden's election victory. However, Some Republicans are pledging to protest that count there by supporting President Trump's persistent campaign to overturn the election and the will of the majority of American voters, Penn said quote We'll have our day in Congress, but he did not say exactly what that meant. Well ahead of a pro Trump rally on Wednesday. The District of Columbia is putting the proud boys on notice. Firearms are not permitted. Repeat firearms are not permitted. D C police chief Robert Conte's warning today too far right activists with a male only group known to engage in political violence. Police chief says he's bringing in the National Guard for crowd control in order to free up his officers to arrest any protester who breaks the law. There's concern about a post holiday surge in Corona virus cases. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports that health care resource is are already stretched thin. The T s a screened millions of passengers at airport checkpoints Amid the holidays. There were also road trips and gatherings. Here's Dr Anthony Fauci. My concern is that it could get worse. Over the next couple of weeks as we see the lag that happens when an event occurs like the Christmas and New Year's holiday found, she says there's usually a couple of weeks lag before an additional uptick in cases, which is followed by more hospitalizations and deaths. US is averaging about 200,000 new cases a day and there's concern that a more contagious version of the virus may be circulating. Allison Aubrey NPR News Iran has fallen thrown its warning over the weekend that it would begin enriching uranium up to 20% purity and NPR's Peter Kenyon says. State television is now reporting that Iranian forces have seized and arrested the crew of a South Korean flag oil tanker in the straight off removes ratcheting up Mideast tensions. Iran initially said the tanker was seized do the oil pollution issues, but the seizure comes as Iran in South Korea were due to begin talks over Iranian assets frozen in Seoul. Separately, Iran confirmed its latest violation of the 2015 nuclear agreement, beginning uranium enrichment up to 20% purity and its underground forego nuclear facility. Iran began violating limits in the nuclear deal, a little more than a year after President Donald Trump pulled the US out of the accord and re imposed sanctions on Iran. The International Atomic Energy Agency said it would inform member states about the developments in Iran's nuclear program. Peter Kenyon. NPR NEWS Istanbul, You're listening to NPR knees. Beijing says it has inoculated more than 73,000 people in the first two days after China's first homegrown cove it 19 vaccine was approved for commercial use. NPR's Emily Fang reports. These vaccinations come on top of hundreds of thousands of emergency vaccinations even before testing ended. China's capital, has said it more than 200 vaccination centers around the city to Dole out the two step vaccine. The elderly in frontline medical workers will receive the first doses. The shots are made by Chinese state vaccine makers sign a farm, which said on Thursday that its vaccine is 79% effective. State regulators cleared it for broader use the same day. However, China Farm has yet to release detailed clinical data from its latest human trials that has not stopped sign a farm in another vaccine maker sign of AC from injecting hundreds of thousands of Chinese state workers since last summer under emergency use guidelines. I'm leaving. NPR NEWS Beijing Millions of people encountered a jarring disruption to their first day of the new year back at work or work from home when slack went down today. Messaging service says it's suffered a global outage. NPR was among those affected. The U. S outage started mid morning on the East Coast. Disruptions were also reported in parts of Europe and Asia..

NPR Iran President Donald Trump Mike Pence Allison Aubrey NPR Congress Peter Kenyon Allison Aubrey Beijing China Vice President Joe Biden Dr Anthony Fauci Senate Penn
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Seat belts, driving it safe speeds, and we need to do more of that 100 times more of that, in terms of trying to make sure that we don't get infected with co with him that we don't pass it on to someone else. And amid this holiday season, the CDC continues to recommend the people postpone travel. Stay home. I know it could be disappointing to cancel your plans, but as one psychologist put it, Noel disappointment does not kill. But Covad can. NPR's Allison Aubrey. Thank you. Thank you. So this pandemic, some school districts have been returning to in person learning, But staffing has not been easy. Their teachers who don't feel safe with the shift, and they feels if they've been left with no good options. It's slimmer from North Carolina. Public radio has more In YOUR journal for today share a memory that you have of a drill that could be an evacuation drill. It could be a fire drill high school teacher case. Then eight weeks this fall, leading classes from inside a sound booth in her school's auditorium. Her students tuned in from home or the theater rose below. I come in in the morning. When it's still dark, and there's no one around and I don't touch any surfaces, and then I get into the booth and I shut the door and I stay there. She stayed there because she has underlying health conditions that put her high risk of severe illness if she gets cove in 19. Among them chronic heart disease. She has a pacemaker, and she gets easily winded when her school in western North Carolina reopened for hybrid learning. Her district denied her request to teach remotely, despite her serious health conditions. There is no question for me that I would qualify, and so when I got the letter from Charlie was really surprised Case the nickname her students sometimes use. She asked the NPR not use her full name because she fears speaking out could hurt her job. In mid December, Kay got some good news. Her school board voted to shut down in person learning, and till mid January, I've felt glued to my seat and couldn't really process at first. The amount of relief that I was experiencing and then almost a split second later. I realized that it was only gonna last until January, and then the sense of powerlessness. K isn't the only teacher feeling powerless, Media reports show teachers around the country have been denied request to work from home, including in Texas, Florida and Ohio. Many of these teachers wanted to work from only because of the risks to themselves or people in their households..

North Carolina NPR Charlie school teacher Covad CDC Allison Aubrey Noel Kay Texas Ohio Florida
"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Allison Aubrey NPR NEWS The logistics of delivering more vaccines and building public trust will fall to the Biden administration in a matter of weeks before that the Electoral College takes a crucial step today in voting to officially recognized Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Here's NPR's Tamara Keith. A total of 538 electors are voting mostly in state capitals, taking the results from November and translating them into votes in the electoral College. They're chosen by state political parties. And in most states, electors are required to cast their votes to reflect the winner of the popular vote in their state. It's a vestige of political compromise at the time of the nation's founding and typically occurs without much fanfare. But President Trump is still disputing his loss, falsely claiming fraud. Tweeting debunked conspiracy theories and pledging to fight on President elect Biden is set to deliver a speech after the results are in. About quote the strength and resilience of our democracy. Tamara Keith NPR News ExxonMobil's publicly committing to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions over the next five years today, the old giant announced Would decrease the intensity of operated upstream greenhouse gas emissions. 15% to 20% by the year. 2025. This is NPR. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York on David first as we were just hearing a queen's nurse has become the first person in the United States to receive the Copa 19 vaccine outside of a clinical trial. Sandra Lindsay is a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens. She received the Fizer vaccine early this morning shortly after she was inoculated. Queens Borough President Donovan Richards spoke about the significance of the moment with WN Y sees Brian Lehrer. Winds of the future, and I thought it was a powerful moment. Brian to see black Doctor give a black nurse Thebe first vaccination in the country and It speaks to where we need to go as a country of the city. Lindsay was vaccinated by Dr Michelle Chester, the director of employee health services at North well, Health. New York City's ban on indoor dining goes back into effect today..

Joe Biden president NPR Sandra Lindsay Tamara Keith NPR Tamara Keith United States Brian Lehrer President Trump Allison Aubrey New York City Queens Borough Long Island Jewish Medical Cen ExxonMobil Queens fraud New York Donovan Richards
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Allison Aubrey NPR news, the logistics of delivering more vaccines and building public trust, will fall to the Biden administration in a matter of weeks. Before that. The Electoral College takes a crucial step today in voting to officially recognized Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Here's NPR's Tamara Keith. A total of 538 electors are voting mostly in state capitals, taking the results from November and translating them into votes in the electoral College. They're chosen by state political parties. And in most states, electors are required to cast their votes to reflect the winner of the popular vote in their state. It's a vestige of political compromise at the time of the nation's founding and typically occurs without much fanfare. But President Trump is still disputing his loss, falsely claiming fraud. Tweeting debunked conspiracy theories and pledging to fight on President elect Biden is set to deliver a speech after the results are in. About quote the strength and resilience of our democracy. Tamara Keith NPR News ExxonMobil's publicly committing to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions over the next five years today, the oil giant announced Would decrease the intensity of operated upstream greenhouse gas emissions 15% to 20% by the year. 2025. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what the state's public health officials are recommending that starting today hospital's test all health care workers weekly for covert 19. Since the start of the pandemic testing of health care workers has been inconsistent. Some in the field say blanket testing is a necessary and could create a shortage of tests or backlog around results. Pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr Yvonne Maldonado says her employer, Stanford Health Care has been swapping workers when they are exposed or just requested test. We are not concerned about hospital transmission where we really want to focus our efforts is making sure that our health care workers If they feel like they've been exposing their community have access to testing through us, and that's absolutely something we've been able to provide. For all of them. The latest state Health Department snapshot shows so far more than 59,000 health care workers in California have tested positive 228 have died. Another Cal football game will be canceled PAC 12 Conference officials announced yesterday. The next week's game between UC Berkeley and the University of Arizona is off the league says That's because neither team will be able to field enough scholarship athletes to play. This is the fourth Cal game to be canceled this season. The previous three were called off because of covert 19 next weekend's game was supposed to be the final game for the team. Long time Stanford basketball coach Tara VanDerveer has tied the late Pat Summitt as the winning nous winningest women's coach in NC, double a division one basketball history. The top ranked Cardinal beat Kao 83 to 38 yesterday. That marks VanDerveer is 1098th.

Joe Biden president Tara VanDerveer Allison Aubrey NPR Tamara Keith NPR Stanford Health Care NPR Tamara Keith basketball President Trump United States Dr Yvonne Maldonado Pat Summitt ExxonMobil Kao fraud
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"To save the sickest patients. The U. S is averaging about 2000 deaths per day. Allison Aubrey NPR news Some civil rights groups were saying they have not been consulted enough is President elect Biden assembles his Cabinet. NPR's Asia. Roscoe reports Biden will hear directly from the N double A C P Tomorrow. W. P ahead. Derrick Johnson says his group is not asking for a certain number of post to be filled by African Americans, he said. What's most important is that the interests of people of color are represented within the administration. We didn't want to get, uh, lost in the mix and be an afterthought. They were right should be at the table in the front in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus has also called for more Latinos elections. So far, half of the Cabinet post appointees and intended nominees announced by Biden have been people of color, and he has named a number of women for post Biting his pleasure. His administration will be the most diverse in American history. I shall Roscoe NPR news. Georgia's secretary of state bread rations. Burger plans to re certify his state's results of the general election following the latest recount that confirms more people voted for Joe Biden than Donald Trump. Margin was slim. Robin's Burger saw to put any doubts about the state's election system to rest come January when control of the U. S. Senate rests on two runoff races. We're working with the counties to assure their safe and secure election for January, 5th We will continue to take steps to sure that only legally registered Georgians will be casting ballots. Many Georgians who supported Trump still question the integrity of a system that the president has claimed without evidence was compromised at his expense. However, elections officials in multiple states and Attorney General William Barr Have confirmed there is no evidence supporting Trump's claims of widespread fraud. At last check on Wall Street, the Dow was down 186 points, or more than half.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Roscoe NPR Allison Aubrey NPR NPR President Burger Congressional Hispanic Caucus Derrick Johnson Attorney General William Barr Cabinet Asia U. S. Senate fraud Georgia Robin
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To save the sickest patients. The U. S is averaging about 2000 deaths per day. Allison Aubrey NPR news Some civil rights groups were saying they have not been consulted enough is President elect Biden assembles his Cabinet. NPR's Asia. Roscoe reports, Biden will hear directly from the N double A. C P tomorrow in the boy's head, Derrick Johnson says his group is not asking for a certain number of post to be filled by African Americans, he said. What's most important is that the interests of people of color are represented within the administration. We didn't want to get lost in the mix and being an afterthought. They were right should be at the table in the front in the Congressional Hispanic Caucus has also called for more Latinos elections. So far, half of the Cabinet post appointees and intended nominees announced by Biden have been people of color, and he has named a number of women for post Biting his pleasure. His administration will be the most diverse in American history. I shall Roscoe NPR news. George's secretary of state bread rations. Burger plans to re certify his state's results of the general election following the latest recount that confirms more people voted for Joe Biden than Donald Trump. Margin was slim Rapids Burger saw to put any doubts about the state's election system to rest come January, when control of the U. S. Senate rests on two runoff races. We're working with the counties to assure their safe and secure election for January 5th way will continue to take steps to sure that only legally registered Georgians will be casting ballots. Many Georgians who supported Trump still question the integrity of a system that the president has claimed without evidence was compromised at his expense. However, elections officials in multiple states and Attorney General William Barr have confirmed there is no evidence supporting Trump's claims of widespread fraud. At last check on Wall Street. The Dow was down 186 points or more than half a percent at 30,032. This is NPR news live from KQED.

Joe Biden Roscoe NPR Donald Trump Allison Aubrey NPR NPR President Burger Congressional Hispanic Caucus Derrick Johnson Cabinet Asia U. S. Senate KQED George William Barr
U.S. hospitals at breaking point amid COVID-19 surge

Morning Edition

01:07 min | 1 year ago

U.S. hospitals at breaking point amid COVID-19 surge

"That are part of the surge right. Yeah, the most alarming numbers the significant increase in deaths about a 50% increase compared to just two weeks ago. You look at the number of new cases the rising hospitalizations. It's clear the situation is getting worse. It's my doctor, Anthony Fauci and Dr Burke's both say some parts of the nation may need to take more drastic or stricter measures just slow the spread in California. We're seeing lots of that strict limits on businesses. Yet Dr Burke's says We're not seeing enough restrictions in other places. Right now. Across the sun belt. We have governors and mayors. You have cases equivalent to what they had in the summertime. Yet aren't putting in the same policies and mitigations that they put in the summer that they know change the course of this pandemic across the South. So it is frustrating. Because you know, as the virus circulates so widely know out there is a real concern. We see this rising hospitalizations and hospital re sources are just being stretched thin. NPR's Allison Aubrey. Thanks, Alison. Thank you, Noel. Alright. So Alison measured

Dr Burke Anthony Fauci California Allison Aubrey NPR Alison Noel
Biden Virus Advisers Press for Access, Say Delay Is Dangerous

BBC World Service

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Biden Virus Advisers Press for Access, Say Delay Is Dangerous

"Death toll now tops 250,000, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University. Experts advising President elect Joe Biden on the pandemic and vaccine distribution plans say it is critical that the General Services Administration recognize who won the election. Until that happens, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports that the official transition process is stalled. Biden's advisers say they do not have access to real time pandemic data or to the scientists and administrators within the government who are working on vaccine distribution plans. Biden adviser Rob Rodriguez and the ER physician at UC San Francisco. Pointed to the urgency. Given the toll of the pandemic, The current administration needs to step up. I really need it. Think about the help of the American people and start granting this full access, a vaccination program and tails complicated logistics, and Biden's advisers say they need to begin collaborating as soon as possible. Allison

Allison Aubrey Biden Johns Hopkins University General Services Administratio Joe Biden Rob Rodriguez NPR ER San Francisco Allison
As COVID-19 Cases Soar, El Paso Convention Center Becomes Hospital

Morning Edition

03:10 min | 1 year ago

As COVID-19 Cases Soar, El Paso Convention Center Becomes Hospital

"Everything is bigger in Texas, and that now includes the pandemic. It's the first state in the U. S to have more than one million confirmed coronavirus cases. Among other places. El Paso is in crisis intensive care units across El Paso County. We're reaching capacity more than two weeks ago, Things have grown so much worse that the city has turned its convention center into a field hospital. Remember when things were that bad in New York in the spring will cases across the U. S R lot worse now than they were then Mallory Falk of our member station. K E R A is in El Paso. Good morning to you. Good morning. As best you can tell what makes Texas different from other states. Well. Texas doesn't have tight coronavirus restrictions and place like in some other states. The governor issued a statewide executive order on Cove it and it doesn't allow individual communities to implement their own restrictions. Texas very much is a place that lets people do what they want to do. And I should also point out Texas has a high rate of residents who are uninsured or live far away from hospitals and medical care. So there are many people here who have the type of untreated underlying conditions that mean they'll get sicker if they get Cove it and that's part of the problem, too. So Texas is taking a sort of freedom first approach to the pandemic, but what is being done to try to limit the spread? Well, it is all mired in politics here, and Al Paso County, the judge who's the top elected official. Last month, he ordered a temporary shutdown of nonessential businesses. But several restaurant owners and the state attorney general sued. And on Friday, a court sided with them and blocked the order, saying cities and counties can impose tighter restrictions than what the governor allows. And I should mention geography to El Paso is right on the border with New Mexico and the governor there just implemented a two week statewide shut down something that hasn't been done here and I'll pass. So is right on the border with water is Mexico and in that city has a nightly curfew there tighter restrictions in place. Then an El Paso. And so there's this delicate balance because people are moving across various borders with different rules and restrictions. You know, I'm remembering that just a couple of weeks ago we checked in on El Paso and found the hospitals filling up a couple weeks ago. And now Allison Aubrey is telling us that things are infinitely worse than just a couple of weeks ago. What's that mean for the hospitals? Yeah, Hospitals are at capacity. There 10 Mobile morgues here that are now needed because so many people are dying so quickly that the regular Margus full and in fact, some inmates are now being paid $2 an hour to help move the overflow of bodies at the medical examiner's office Funeral home's air overwhelmed I spoke to a funeral director right to convert one of his chapels into a storage cooler. Um and nurses have been speaking out publicly pleading with people to stay at home to suspend family gatherings. For now on, they've also been pleading with state officials to let El Paso leaders respond to the crisis and implement that. Shut down. Okay, let me stop you there if I can. Mallory fuck of member Station Ktrh in El Paso, Texas, Thanks for the update. Thank you.

Texas El Paso Mallory Falk U. Al Paso County El Paso County Allison Aubrey New York Margus New Mexico Mexico Ktrh Mallory
U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

Morning Edition

04:46 min | 2 years ago

U.S. health experts, officials warn protests may add to virus spread

"Good morning so I was walking around a protest outside the White House yesterday thousands of people were there many if not most of them wore masks but social distancing six feet apart not so much public health experts worry about spreading corona virus through protests and as the nation is told to continue practicing social distancing some experts also say messages from the trump administration may undermine their efforts NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us now either Allison good morning Steve how if at all could protests across the country affect the spread of the coronavirus well it's too soon to say but when you have groups of people concentrated together as we saw this weekend you have some of the key ingredients for transmission mainly prolonged close contact and the images of protesters shoulder to shoulder as you say some with masks which is good some not this certainly raises concerns Washington DC mayor Muriel Bowser spoke on NBC about it I'm concerned that we have mass gatherings in our streets when we just lifted a stay at home water and what that could mean for spikes in our coronavirus cases later in fact I'm so concerned about it that I'm urging everybody to consider their exposure if they need to isolate from their family members when they go home and if they need to be tested there is also disruption of covert testing in Los Angeles they announced a temporary closure of local testing centers over the weekend due to the unrest so a lot of concern given the close contact the lack of social distancing can people who choose to protest feel a little more safe because they are outdoors when they're protesting yes being out brick doors reduces the risk it's clear that confined indoor environments are more dangerous but you know in recent weeks have been how breaks linked to places we may not expect it's not just meat processing plants or hospitals in Arkansas there are cases linked to a high school pool party in the town of Paragould public health officials there tell me contact tracing is likely on going so they don't know the total number of cases but it's a reminder that and help break can happy anywhere where people are in close credit spaces I spoke to leaf van Boven he's a professor at the university of Colorado boulder and he points out that when you don't know personally anyone infected with the virus it may be harder to stay vigilant because the threat just seems distant so far off it and your cities it's under kinds of workers it's other ethnicities and it's hard to be compelled by something that's totally invisible and of course one of the greatest challenges is that here we were to experience the spread of code in our community would take a couple of weeks to show up so we wouldn't know right away and by the time we realized that something has gone wrong it will very much be too late the virus will be spreading so staying vigilant on social distancing wearing a mask in public spaces these are both important and he says if there were strong leadership promoting these messages in a consistent science backed away that would be helpful Alison I'm glad you mentioned science because when it comes to masks there is science but there's also politics they're people who are upset about being asked to wear masks who are refusing to do it for political reasons or maybe you just aren't very comfortable putting them on what is the evidence sure well I it's because I'm clear there's a fair amount of eighty symptomatic or pre symptomatic spread of this virus and masking helps prevent the release the virus so it's beneficial there are multiple studies to back this up new studies yet to this point about needing strong leadership to reinforce this I spoke to former CDC director Tom Frieden he says people may get mixed messages he points to the day that the CDC face covering our mascot guidance was announced at the White House the CDC recommended that everyone wear masks in certain circumstances at the same press conference the president said he wasn't going to wear a mask so this really does make our response less effective it makes it more likely that we'll have more spread of disease because some people may be less likely to comply I mean other examples in Plano of theirs the president has promoted the re opening of churches with the administration removing warnings about the risks of choirs in the president has made it known that he'd like a crack held when he speaks at the Republican can and later this summer yet per the CDC guidance we should not be gathering in crowds and we should continue social

White House
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"A new test that gives results in about ten to fifteen minutes rolls out this week NPR's Allison Aubrey reports expanded testing is key to understanding the scope of the corona viruses spread in the U. S. as social distancing remains in place through April the trump administration points to new tests that could help understand the spread of the virus the new test is made by abit and works on the same platform as rapid flu and strep tests already performed in doctor's offices the administration's Brett Jr wire says test will be made even easier now that the federal government has green light itself swapping so a patient can swap their own nose so literally put a swap certain kind of swap foam swab in your nose put in a plastic bag give it and drop it Abbott says it can do about fifty thousand tests per day

Washington NPR Allison Aubrey federal government Abbott John bel Edwards korva Coleman president trump White House Brett Jr Allison Aubrey NPR Louisiana New Orleans
FDA Approves 15 Minute Coronavirus Test Kit

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

FDA Approves 15 Minute Coronavirus Test Kit

"A new test that gives results in about ten to fifteen minutes rolls out this week NPR's Allison Aubrey reports expanded testing is key to understanding the scope of the corona viruses spread in the U. S. as social distancing remains in place through April the trump administration points to new tests that could help understand the spread of the virus the new test is made by abit and works on the same platform as rapid flu and strep tests already performed in doctor's offices the administration's Brett Jr wire says test will be made even easier now that the federal government has green light itself swapping so a patient can swap their own nose so literally put a swap certain kind of swap foam swab in your nose put in a plastic bag give it and drop it Abbott says it can do about fifty thousand tests per day

NPR Allison Aubrey Federal Government Abbott Brett Jr
Doctors collect coronavirus test data

BBC World Service

02:31 min | 2 years ago

Doctors collect coronavirus test data

"There's a lot we still don't know about the transmission of coronavirus how long does it live outside the body is it airborne there's new evidence that it can live on some surfaces for up to three days the which surfaces here's NPR's Allison Aubrey the new study looked at the novel coronavirus in a laboratory setting and found the virus can survive up to seventy two hours on the stainless steel and plastic surfaces and on cardboard up to twenty four hours Jamie Lloyd Smith of UCLA is one of the authors we're talking about potentially days of infectivity on some of these services this study gives a range of possible survival times but keep in mind in a lab all the conditions are stable in the real world factors such as sunlight can kill off viruses faster Lloyd Smith collaborated with scientists at the rocky mountain laboratories a federal lab to do a series of experiments they picked up bits of virus from services that have been contaminated they then put the virus in cell cultures to test whether it was still infectious they also tested how long the virus remain viable in the air what these experiments showed that the virus can remain viable floating in the air for some number of hours the experiments went out to three hours and you know there were still viable virus was present Lloyd Smith says this experiment definitely does not prove that people have been infected this way by particles of virus that float in the air what scientists call errors allies transmission he says what remains unknown is what dose is needed to infect someone there a lot of things we don't know so we do not yet know how many viral particles need to get into somebody's there way to initiate an infection in all these tests and the new coronavirus tends to behave a lot like an older one sars that led to an outbreak in two thousand three in fact a new study shows both viruses remain viable about the same amount of time but that leads to an important question why has this virus spread much more widely Lloyd Smith says that there could be multiple reasons things like the apparent ability of this novel virus to be transmitted instead by people who are showing severe symptoms or may not be showing symptoms at all which makes this virus much harder to contain and given all this the advice that we've been hearing for weeks now remains the same wash your hands that's still the best way to protect

NPR Allison Aubrey Ucla Lloyd Smith Jamie Lloyd Smith
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Not for days NPR's Allison Aubrey Allison thank you so much all right thank you very much a new documentary series on Showtime gives a very human and heartbreaking look at the immigration crisis on our southern border the trade follows the lives of migrants and smugglers victims and survivors border officials and the undocumented living in the United States the filmmakers gained incredible access in on to the US and Mexico and with U. S. law enforcement to tell this story of human trafficking money got me on the side is one of the producers and she joins me now in the studio thanks so much for being here thank you for having me there are so many story lines running through these episodes because of course immigration is such a complicated issue one of the ones that you worked on that was particularly compelling is the story of mine now tell us about her Magda we met her it was really sick like terrible circumstances because we were with a friend sixteen and we heard about a young man who had been murdered it turned out he was married does husband who was shot and we went to the crime scene and she wasn't there because the story is that he was part of MS thirteen he try to leave many again many times several times and then one day he said I can't do this anymore they tried to migrate they were deported in Mexico he gets back in the M. S. tracks down and kills she was in another town in Honduras so it took her two days to get to some better so left for the funeral and two days later I met her at the funeral and she was with the baby monster the little girl and she said you know M. S. is going to kill me now because I know too much about the gank and they know we tried to leave we try to live with other gang members and I need to flee so I told her you know can we follow you what are your plans and she basically said I have no plans I need to go with a man turned out Rosny her brother in law you know set up I'm going to go in and look after you and the baby and they have very very little money they waited for two months to gather some some money for the.

NPR Allison Aubrey Allison Showtime United States Magda Mexico Honduras M. S. Rosny U. S.
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Allison Aubrey thanks so much for being with us thank you Scott good to be here despite coronavirus here's rocking the stock market the economy overall still appears strong the job market in particular looks good South Carolina with the democratic primary is held today the state's unemployment rate at a low two point three percent in pairs Danielle Kurtzleben reports that presidential candidates are pitching policies geared toward job quality instead of job quantity the CBS news democratic debate this week started with a question for Bernie Sanders but it's a question any nominee will have to wrestle with we haven't had a national unemployment rate this low for this long in fifty years how will you convince voters that a democratic socialist can do better than president trump with the economy of course the other candidates don't call themselves democratic socialists but Donald Trump is running for reelection amid strong indicators something he likes to trumpet at his rallies like in Las Vegas last week since violence in over one hundred and twenty five thousand new jobs have been created right here in Nevada the early primary states are a test of Democrats economic messages South Carolina has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation along with two other states New Hampshire and Iowa also have among the lowest rates Sanders for his part has been standing by an economic pitch he has made for years here he was at that debate you're right the economy is doing really great people like Mr Bloomberg and all the billionaires but you don't want to be ordinary American things are not so good and there is some evidence for this workers are not sharing in growth nearly as much as they used to more of that new income has gone to shareholders for example to Jessica bright South Carolina state director for Sanders the strong economy may provide some space to argue for sweeping changes you can kind of see the the structure is the the opportunity so definitely this time the time is right to change structurally change the systems that we're going up against for a lot of Democrats concerns about the economy aren't about their own situations but about others that's the case for South Carolina voter Kenneth McAllister I'm sorry for me you know I work three or four jobs so you know that calm inside of me but there's some other people that are actually suffering because of the economy but he hits on a major part of many Democrats economic messages in twenty twenty S. Sanders tweeted this week it is not acceptable for Americans to need two to three jobs to put food on the table talking about economic change can also mean talking about persistent racial inequities as businessman Tom Steiner highlighted that the CBS debate every single policy area in the United States has a gigantic subtext of race yes we're talking about education we're talking about criminal justice we're talking about housing we're talking about loans selling an economic message isn't just about policy ideas it's about showing voters you feel their pain lawyer serene Carter went to Elizabeth Warren event ahead of the Iowa caucuses clutching a print out of her student debt totaled two hundred and eighty thousand dollars seventy four dollars.

Scott Allison Aubrey
Teens Are Still Vaping Flavors, Thanks To New Disposable Vape Pens

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Teens Are Still Vaping Flavors, Thanks To New Disposable Vape Pens

"The trump administration's partial ban on flavored e cigarettes is in effect but there's still plenty of vaping sticks cartridges on the market in fact there's an array of disposable products that come in many appealing flavors and delivered just as much nicotine. Here's NPR's Alison Aubrey. If you've raised a teenager. You may not be surprised to learn that. Teenagers and young adults seemed to be a step ahead of regulators by the time the FDA announced new enforcement efforts and jewel had pulled most flavored pods from the market. Many teens had already moved on jewel as a product for teens is almost now old school. That's Meredith Berkman co-founder of pave parents against vaping e cigarettes. She says disposable products are the new thing and for now they're exempted from the FDA's enforcement efforts there called disposables because they're designed to be tossed out after one use and among those disposables which are the most popular. There's puff bar there stig. There's Vigo they're all exempt from that guidance. Go to get a reality check. I asked my own teenage son. If he'd heard about these disposables and he said Yeah. Like Puff Bar Matt Meyers of the Campaign for tobacco-free kids showed me how it works here. I'm picking up one of the newer products. It's called a puff bar. This one comes in pink lemonade. It's vape stick and it. Looks like a three inch long thumb drive and when you inhale it. It has a sweet sugary flavor bars and extremely popular product. That's Bonnie halpern filter. A developmental psychologist at Stanford. She says it's hard to know how many teens are using them but she points to a bag. Confiscated vape sticks and pens that a high school principal in northern California collected. Recently I laid out and you can see there. The majority of them are these disposable products they come in lots of flavors lots of colors and it's very attracted to youth and that's what we're seeing them using the most right now. They're easy to conceal. Have about three hundred puffs in them and contain the amount of nicotine found to three packs of cigarettes a lot of Nicotine Christine. Del navo directs the Center for Tobacco Studies at Rutgers University. She says given the survey data showing nearly one in four high school seniors has helped. The data do indicate that there are young high. School students are addicted to these products. She says the e cigarette industry has been very creative despite efforts by regulators to stop young people from vaping to bit of a game of whack a mole when policies are aimed at one particular product another product to kind of pop up to kind of fill the void there and as for all the newer flavors that cover up the harsh taste of nicotine mango ice pomegranate ice. You'll see the word lush used a lot. I'm not sure what lush tastes like Matt Meyers. As parents and others concerned should be aware of how easy it can be to buy vape sticks and e liquids despite the partial ban and age restrictions. Right now you can buy e liquids online often in in websites that are not really protected increasingly in convenience stores and gas stations narrative. Berkman of pave says her group and others offer online resources to help parents. Stay in the loop before you even sit down with your kid. You have to read up on. The latest products. Know what they look like. No what the Lingo is. Because the landscape is changing quickly. Allison Aubrey NPR news.

Nicotine Matt Meyers Meredith Berkman FDA Alison Aubrey Allison Aubrey Npr NPR Vigo Bonnie Halpern California Co-Founder Pave Stanford Del Navo Principal Rutgers University Center For Tobacco Studies
Is CBD Safe? The FDA Can't Say

Short Wave

10:27 min | 2 years ago

Is CBD Safe? The FDA Can't Say

"NPR. Health correspondent. Allison Aubrey. Hey Alison Hey Mattie so today we're talking about a topic that a lot of people have questions about. CBD Yes can dial or CD as you say. It is compound found in the cannabis Hannah-beth plant so you find it in marijuana and hemp and it has exploded in popularity. It is touted as an elixir that can do everything from relieving Zaidi to to help. Ease your aches and pains. You've heard about it right now. Oh yeah so. There are a lot of companies from big operations to mom and pop shops selling it. I can tell you having been in truck stops in rural Pennsylvania and on the freeway and Silicon Valley. No matter where you are in the country right now you are likely seeing ads for CBD. But here's the thing last week. The Food and Drug Administration came out with some fairly strong warnings. Yes basically they came out and they issued warning letters to fifteen companies selling CD products. And they're basically saying you are violating FDA policy they say you are not allowed to market CBD products as a treatment for any condition or disease. You cannot sell it is a dietary supplement and you may not put it in any foods that are fed to people or animals now just because the FDA has says this is not allowed does not mean that you'll stop seeing products marketed. This way and we'll get to that in a little bit the same day that they weren't all those companies the FDA also updated their consumer guidance for CD there what you need to know about CBD page citing some pretty serious safety concerns. It's a lot of warnings. So today on the show we're going to break down with the FDA DA says about CBD and how some of those warnings might be more valid than others so alison give me the CBD one o one sir can abba dial or CD for short is a component of cannabis. That means it. It is extracted from the plant. Pulled out the plant. It does not contain the psychoactive component. THC that we all know about that makes you high but it still Ella works on your brain in ways that scientists don't completely understand yet. I have reported on studies that are currently evaluating. CBD's potential role in curbing anxiety. There are federal grants. I should say to evaluate whether CBD could be used as an alternative to opioids. But so far there's only one. FDA APPROVED CBD drug on the market. It's approved to treat very specific childhood epilepsy disorders. So we have this weird situation on one. Hand everybody's using CD. There's all this research going on and then the FDA is saying we can't conclude that CD is safe. Yes you're right. It seems paradoxical ago. So let's step back a moment to give some context make sense of this basically CB has been and what I would call regulatory limbo. I mean big time for a longtime. The production of hemp was restricted. It was considered a controlled. Substance Hemp and marijuana are varieties of the same plants cannabis then lashed year under pressure. From from Congress and hemp farmers these restrictions were lifted as part of the two thousand eighteen farm bill and Ben Distri said Alleluia. This is great but the FDA quickly weekly stepped in and said hey wait a second here we have regulatory authority over CBD. And there's a lot we still don't know. Remember this compound kind of came out of nowhere. I mean right have ah you heard of CBD three years ago not really. I mean this year. I wouldn't be surprised if it's one of the more popular items and Christmas stockings around the country. So is it fair to say the FDA might have been a little bit caught off guard by this. Yes this boom of. That's right and it's well within their purview. To regulate it when it's used in foods or as drug but they say they just don't have a lot of data to go on yet right now. The agency is in the midst of writing some specific rules to regulate but before they do. They WANNA know that it's safe. We should also point out that even though the FDA just said we can't say CD's safe the World Health Organization another giant public health three-nation put out a report last year saying CBD is generally well tolerated and has a good safety profile. That's right from what they've seen so far the. Who is saying there can be some adverse effects from drug interactions. But there's no evidence of any public health related problem associated with that. That is what they say. They point to the fact that several countries have modified their regulations to allow the use of CBD as a medicinal product. But again the FDA playing it safe saying it needs more data now one area where they say they need more is on the potential for liver damage from using CD. And you've been looking into that right. Yeah so that is actually one of the things. The FDA warns people about in what you need to know page. I looked into it a bit and some of the state came from when the FDA DA was reviewing the epilepsy medication that we've talked about Basically they found that taking. CBD has the potential for damaging the liver and that was very dose dependent meeting most of the troubling results happened at higher doses And that makes sense right. There's a good bit of data out there. Supporting this and a lot of the serious damage was seen when people were taking other other drugs that also impacted the liver and that brings us to another warning which is potential drug interactions does CBD increase or decrease crease the effects of other medications. You might be taking. Does it. Increase side effects basically the FDA saying they are concerned about the potential safety of taking other medications at the same time. You're taking CD. When you're not being monitored by a healthcare professional and the most interesting warning they put out to me at least was there mention of this potential for male reproductive toxics? Okay Yeah So. The FDA warns that CD led to decreased testicular size mess with the growth of sperm and Development Minton and decreased circulating testosterone. But the thing is alison. All of this data came from animal studies including delightful study on Sea Urchin Sea Urchin Yup. Yep Okay and in one of those studies. They weren't even testing on actual animals just cells isolated from animals okay and even the FDA acknowledges that stuff that happens in animals almost does not necessarily happen in humans right and I asked the FDA for more information about this and they sent me about twelve studies. And I looked at a good bit of them and some of them used I really high doses of how high like ten times the maximum recommended dose for the FDA approved drug that. We've already been talking low which is already a hider the right and to be fair doses researchers using animals are sometimes more than they use in humans but I saw some real variability in the studies. Some found differences and in sperm. And how they're moving around how much there is. But another didn't and it seems to depend maybe on the type of animals that were studied so a lot of inconsistencies. Here a little bit. Yeah and in one of the studies they did show that. CBD Treatment Lead to a decrease in testosterone but it was still within the normal physiological range. So you think these studies might be a little week more like the conclusions at the. FDA is drawing from this group of Studies. There weren't that many of them and I find it odd that the FDA put out this kind of scary fertility warning warning based solely on animals. So those are the specific warnings. The FDA has mentioned here but they also say that they have some concerns about a special populations like the elderly children pregnant women and also a very special population are pets dogs cats. You see all kind of marketing around doggy. CBD for your anxious pup but the FDA says that they can't say whether this is safer effective they also I want to look into the cumulative effects. Meaning what happens if you're using multiple CD products at one time. This was my favorite government warning. Okay let's see Jason Literally said what happens if you eat food with few skin cream and take other CD products on the same day. I am sure there are people out there doing I meant. I know where where they're going with it but it read to me like what could happen if you put it in your eyes and your ears in your mouth and you rub it on your but in the same day what could happen. Alison we we know. But okay real talk. Allison you have been reporting on the FDA and FDA related things for years. What are your feelings about all this you no I think the FDA is in a tough spot here? I mean these are fair warnings. If you consider what they know and don't know the agencies just trying to communicate that the CBD products haven't all been evaluated for safety or efficacy meaning whether they work or not and you know the CD you buy online or over the counter sir depending on who made it might not have the amount of CBD in it it says on the bottle it might not actually contain CBD. I mean given given the current state of regulation. You just can't be sure or you know there could be other stuff in there that you don't want right well. This is the perennial problem with supplements. Right I mean the FDA has this dividing line between how it regulates prescription drugs and how it regulates supplements when something's prescription drug. There's a rigorous amount of testing that it goes into it right when something is regulated as a supplement. It's kind of a wait and watch situation if something goes wrong. The FDA certainly has the power to take it off the market market. But you often don't know what's in the products or if there might be contaminants in there so there was always a buyer. Beware message when you're talking about things that are are you buying off the shelf like dietary supplements and so what do you think about from the safety perspective. You know I really do think it's interesting. With the world. Health Organization Organization has said. I mean they're basically saying from what we've seen so far. The safety profile looks to us. Pretty good I think one possible resolution solution to all of this as the FDA ways exactly how to regulate CD. I mean. Let's face it. CBS Not going away. But I think there could be some tiered system. That's certainly something you hear. The industry talking about there could be high dose products which would be restricted and require a prescription then. Low dose products like supplements Lancer Foods. which would be more widely available makes sense so the PR person that I talked to you said the FDA will have more to say about CBD in the coming weeks so we will be looking forward to another CD UPDATE

CBD Food And Drug Administration FDA Cannabis Alison Marijuana Allison Aubrey Zaidi Pennsylvania Npr. Epilepsy Testosterone Silicon Valley Liver Damage Ella Sea Urchin Sea Health Organization Organizati
"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"allison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Or proposal that would allow extradition of criminal suspects back to mainland China and for her to step down from her post activists want to follow up today's demonstrations with a general strike tomorrow yesterday. Lamp suspended, the contentious Bill, but did not withdraw altogether crew members from one of the tankers attacked in the Gulf of Oman Thursday, have arrived in Dubai after spending two days in Iran and peers, Peter Kenyon reports that Saudi Arabia is calling for a decisive response to the attacks Washington blames Iran for the attacks that damage to tankers releasing video, the US military claims shows Ronnie, and revolutionary guard corps members removing unexploded mind from the hull of one of the ship's, Iran denies any involvement in the attacks in Tehran. Some in the UK ambassador to protest London's agreement with Washington that ROY. On was responsible a total of six tankers have been attacked in recent weeks in a newspaper interview. The Saudi Crown prince said, a decisive stand must be taken by the international community in order to guarantee the security of Gulf energy supplies. Riyadh also says it foiled a drone attack. Launched by Iran backed Yemeni rebels. Peter Kenyon, NPR news is STAN Bill, US military cues, Iran of trying to shoot down a US drone that was observing the aftermath of the attack on one of the two tankers statement from US central command says, Iran used a surface to air missile missed the drum starting today. India, imposing retaliatory tariffs on some products that imports from the United States and move raises fears that a new front may be opening in the Trump administration's trade wars, and pure Soren Freyer reports from Mumbai these new tariffs, covered twenty eight categories of products. India imports from the US, including apples almonds, and some metal goods New Delhi announced this last year in retaliation for the Trump. Ministrations steel aluminum tariffs, but India kept delaying the date for the new duties to take affect last month. Washington dropped India from duty-free program. India has a trade surplus with the US now. Delhi is internal lowering these tariffs to take affect. They cover about one and a half billion dollars worth of US imports by comparison. President Trump has levied tariffs on two hundred fifty billion dollars in Chinese imports. It will nevertheless be on the agenda for talks when secretary of state. Mike Pompeo visits. India in about a week's time. Lauren fryer, NPR news, Mumbai, Oregon stores back to normal after technical problems yesterday that prevented cashiers from scanning merchandise, targets, as outage was caused by an internal technology issue that lasted for about two hours and from Washington. You're listening to NPR news. I'll the campaign trail this weekend. Four of the democratic candidates for president spoke at a forum in South Carolina dressing concern. So the African American community Elizabeth Warren was in Charleston for the forum. So it was better Rorick. Peter Buddha, edit and Cory Booker who noted he lives in the low income community himself, these experiences where my family is where my houses. These are things are going to compel me to use every single second of my time as your president to make things better for people are in communities, that aren't the margin Booker said he wants to address any qualities across all sectors of the nation of the debate stage later this month is the next big event on the democratic schedule today, Father's Day and a new poll of fathers from the university of Michigan, finds many dads say they face criticism and second guessing about their parenting choices NPR's, Alison Allison Aubrey reports have most of the criticism comes from the child's other parent or grandparents when it comes to. Parenting choices over diet, and nutrition, and disciplined, styles, or some of the top things, dads, say they're criticized over. Here's the university of Michigan's Sarah Clark co director of the poll about two and five of the fathers, said that the criticism is often or always unfair clerk says moms, and other parenting partners should recognize that criticism can backfire while some dads they respond in a positive way, the poll finds about a quarter of fathers say the criticism, makes them feel less confident as a parent. Allison Aubrey NPR news trial, Snyder, NPR news from Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Viking dedicated to bringing the traveler closer to the destination Vikings new custom-built ocean fleet offers a small ship experience with all verandah state rooms and shore excursions in every port Viking, cruises dot.

India United States Iran Washington NPR president Peter Kenyon Allison Aubrey NPR New Delhi Cory Booker Mumbai university of Michigan Gulf Saudi Arabia Riyadh Tehran Saudi Crown Mike Pompeo
Philadelphia, Diabetes And Allison Aubrey discussed on Marketplace

Marketplace

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

Philadelphia, Diabetes And Allison Aubrey discussed on Marketplace

"A new study finds sales of sugary drinks dropped significantly in Philadelphia after the city imposed a tax of one and a half cents in Paris Allison Aubrey reports the tax is part of a bigger strategy to curb obesity and diabetes one year after the implementation of the soda tax Philadelphia sales of sweetened drinks declined by thirty eight percent. This study finds Christina Burto of the university of Pennsylvania is author of the study, this is probably the single most effective policy to reduce purchases of these drinks. We got a really big affect in Philadelphia. And that's great news for public house. The taxes part of a broad strategy to help combat obesity and type two diabetes. It also raises revenue for early childhood education.

Philadelphia Diabetes Allison Aubrey Christina Burto University Of Pennsylvania Paris Thirty Eight Percent One Year
Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

Morning Edition

04:18 min | 4 years ago

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lars Sterling Thirty Weeks Four Inches Three Weeks Six Hours Ten Years One Day
Trans Fats Should Be Eliminated From All Food Over the Next 5 Years

NPR News Now

01:16 min | 4 years ago

Trans Fats Should Be Eliminated From All Food Over the Next 5 Years

"The signatories to the agreement and considers renewed us sanctions on iran illegitimate iranian foreign minister mohammad javad zarif arrived in moscow from beijing as he tries to win the backing of other participants in the two thousand fifteen deal russian foreign minister sergei lavrov said unfortunate washington is trying to revise key international agreements speaking russian news agencies after the meeting zarif said level gave him assurances that moscow would hold up it's part of the nuclear deal the us is threatening to impose sanctions on european companies that do business with iran as the remaining participants of the accord strengthened their resolve to keep the agreement intact the world health organization is releasing a plan to help eliminate trans fats from the global food supply in the next five years and peres allison aubrey reports trans fats are found in processed snacks and baked goods around the globe there's far less trans fat in the food supply compared to a decade ago in the us the fda has nudged food companies to remove them and replace them with healthier oils many other countries have crackdown to but globally according to the who trans fats are contributing to the deaths of more than five hundred thousand people worldwide each year who have cardiovascular disease trans fat.

Iran Moscow Beijing Sergei Lavrov Washington United States Mohammad Javad Zarif Zarif Peres Allison Aubrey Five Years