17 Burst results for "Allen Levin"

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"But first, let's get a check on the markets green on the screen Wednesday. And Bloomberg's Charlie ties about Mon. Here's what's going on. We've got stocks higher on signs that Trump administration is working toward easing tensions with trade partners. Treasuries advance right now tenure up ten thirty seconds yield two point three seven percent. The S and P five hundred index up seventeen right now that is a gain of six tenths of one percent. Twenty eight fifty one on the SNP the Dow higher by one hundred fifteen up five tenths of one percent, NASDAQ too and that is a gain of just about one point one percent. So the S and P five hundred on track for its biggest two day gain in more than a month. After Bloomberg reported, President Trump will postpone up to six months a decision on car tariffs that was to by Saturday. The latest data on the American economy could be flashing a warning. And with that story. Here's Bloomberg's Vinny Del Giudice, the White House trait where with China is take. Tone. Of course cries factory output dropped in April down for the third time in four months Ashini Rian motor vehicles, the declined retail sales also fell April down for the second time in three months and make your Ethan consumer demand for building materials. Both weakened pointing to lackluster quarter any dice Bloomberg radio. And right now, again, we have got the SNP trading higher by seventeen points, a gain of six tenths of one percent. I'm Charlie pelletan. That is a Bloomberg business flash. Thank you, Charlie. Boeing has failed to turnover any records to house investigators about the flawed safety. Features on the seven three seven max implicated in two fatal crashes, according to committee chairman the FAA's acting chief told congress that regulators were directly involved in improving the flight control systems implicated in the two fatal crashes of the seven thirty seven max joining us out Levin. Allen Levin, Bloomberg aviation reporter in Washington DC, so Alan how how much grilling was done of Boeing and the FAA at the hearing. There was quite a bit of growing only a was here. However, so it was restricted just to the FAA versus, but, you know, Boeing looming in the background, and as you say German defines e o made a point at the beginning of the hearing of saying he hasn't gotten any records at all some bowling. It sounds like they're not quite ready to issue subpoenas seen a flurry of those, of course, related to the White House. They're not quite ready to go there yet here. But it is interesting that express frustration over that you say you say the Boeing wasn't there. I it seems that increasingly bowling has lots of explaining to do. Sure. And it it does seem that. That's the case least on the surface. I do think, you know in fairness at this point. The, you know, there are these two accident destinations going on as a criminal investigation and close to half dozen additional views and other work going on by different bodies. So Boeing is being asked for an awful lot of information and. You know for the for the. They're they're spot where they have to turn that information over at some point. So I think it's a little soon to to say that they're stonewalling or anything like that. Now, something this come under a lot of discussion controversy is this program that relies on employees at aircraft bound you factors to assist in certification. What did the FAA say about that? They attempted to defend the system. And it's been around for decades the way it works is the sort of experts at manufacturing companies like Boeing. Are signed to do at least some of the certification work. Leaving the FAA to do sort of the biggest items and the items that are at the highest safety criticality. The what we don't know in this case is whether or not. The. So called designated representatives were the ones that made some of the critical safety calls at an hindsight day questioned. That's going to be a very important part of the you know, all these probes. And all that one thing I would notice that the F A did not only give a full throated defense of this system. But they noted that FAA Representative had been directly involved in cert the safety feature on the plane. That's been implicated in the accidents and again to return to bowling. I it seems more and more. We're getting these little stories dribbling out if you will the latest one Boeing officials and airline pilots had a meeting shortly after the first deadly crash involving the plane, and there's this report that audio recordings reveal pilots asked Boeing. To take action to prevent another accident, then Boeing executives resisted, grounding planes at that time, and we know that they resisted grounding planes, even after the second crash is there a sense that Boeing is under increasing pressure here. Well, there's certainly under a lot of pressure. There's no doubt about that. And you know, they made a misstep that even FAA which has been very hesitant to criticize them spoke out against today. There's a small cockpit display little safety function. Is not considered a super critical to these accidents. That was interesting is supposed to come as standard equipment on the Boeing planes. The some thirty seven. But it was disabled and Boeing didn't tell anybody and for more than a year and essay was critical of them here today. It was disabled back in that it was disabled in made sort of an optional function that the the airlines had to pay for it. There's been some sort of rone's reporting on that. It was never an optional piece of equipment even though that had been reported a couple of times this is little display that showed one these two centers did not agree with each other. It was supposed to be standard equipment on the max. However, it was not activated as a software glitch. You know, a kind of took pains to say that that wouldn't wouldn't have been super critical to the accidents. But I think people are troubled at bowling didn't tell anybody about it. Thank you so much Allen. That's Allen Levin. Bloomberg aviation reporter in our Washington DC studios coming up we're going to be talking about Alabama passing the nation's strictest abortion law to try to force the supreme court to take up the issue. But I check on the latest national headlines. Bob moon has it June. He's not.

Boeing FAA Bloomberg Allen Levin Bloomberg aviation Washington DC Charlie pelletan White House SNP reporter Treasuries Mon President Trump Ashini Rian Vinny Del Giudice congress
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Upgrade following two deadly crashes. Allen Levin is Bloomberg news aviation reporter, Alan, what is this panel recommending. This is really the very first step in a number of similar sort of valuations that will have to take place before the seven thirty seven max is returned to flight. The this group of pilots took another look at the plane in the wake of these accidents and concluded that the plane behaves very similar old largely too. Earlier some thirty seven models known as the next gen group of of planes, and what that means is pilots transitioning from one plane to the other will not need extensive simulator training as if it were a brand new plane, they can do so with a relatively modest, you know, work at home kind of computer training in it. You know, it is a in the grand scheme of things it's a sign of confidence in the plane, but it's very early initial step, and and still subject to review very early in a sense that this would still need certification from the Federal Aviation Administration there multiple hurdles before the plane gets the essentially recertified, you know, there's a the this. So this panel's report, for example is now out for public comment such a normally. A technical paper. Like, this would get little if any public comment, but this is likely to get quite a bit. And then you know, you have to convince technical experts at the way that the plane the modifications to the plane are safe, but you have this sort of much more complicated layer of public confidence that you also need to get by as well, it's hard to define it. But it's clearly operating in the background people need to feel comfortable that the F as making the right decision in the wake of these two accidents and to do that though they've got to the. I guess one hundred percents are as close as they can be certain about the causes of these two crashes. What do they know? Now. Well, both crashes clearly involved the application of this safety system on the plane, the anti stall correct writing the nose down, and it was happening repeatedly. But they're both very complicated accidents in that at the same time. The pilot actions were also front and center, I don't think that's gotten quite as much attention as the flaws in the Boeing plane, but I do think it's fair to say that in both cases pilot actions exacerbated the situations there, there is at least in theory awaited to shut off the motor that was pushing the nose down, and that was not done properly in either case, but but these are very complicated accidents typically take a year or two sometimes even longer to sort through. And so it's hard to know. In great detail. Exactly what happened. Just now. Now when you say they normally would take a year or two does that necessarily followed the D would take a year or two to get this plane back up in the air. No. That's a very good question in the answer is no I mean, so they'll know within you know, ninety nine percent certainty with the major causes are takes a long time. As that last one percent of nailing down what the pilots were thinking why they acted the way they did. And I have to say fixing the plane is a relatively simple exercise compared to figuring out why the planes crash, the, you know outlet I'm not sure I understand the fixing the plane. Don't you have to understand what the problem is to fix again? That's a good question that so they know that the plane was driving the nose down due to a malfunction. And so if they for example, require that to sensors instead of one read the to push person knows down that will reduce the chances dramatically of a malfunctioning. From causing an accident like this. And then Furthermore, they're making it much less aggressive, and how it moves to nose down in that sort of thing. And so I I do think you can fix the plane without knowing one hundred percent of why the pilots did what they did in in these acts, so then fix the software.

Federal Aviation Administratio Allen Levin Bloomberg reporter Alan Boeing ninety nine percent one hundred percent one percent
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Isn't insurance policy nothing? No, nothing. The intention is to look for to be used. Every insurance police. Yeah. But at insurance policy that the house of Commons have demanded Mr Juncker saying that'd be no further. Negotiation says the US very concerned about peace for says it adds additional reassurances for the UK. He says Brexit will have to happen by may twenty third. So there's a vote scheduled for tomorrow as Doug said. But now the ER g deputy chairman Steve Baker says attorneys will have to look at the revision. So we'll see the timetable. We'll see how this plays out China, Indonesia have grounded the Boeing seven thirty-seven max, but the US will not in the US. The FAA has released a continued air worthiness. Certification with changes in the training manual by April. It says Bloomberg's Allen Levin. So at least for the time being. Not only do we not know what happened, but there's been no move to ground the plane here in the US and former FAA administrator Randy Babbitt says there are a number of ways around potential problems disarm the system and use some more stringent, limitations. You might have to operate the aircraft slightly differently to keep inside the safety envelope. The FAA says he'll continue to investigate. If it finds any problems will not hesitate to ground the fleet investigators at the crash site. NATO have recovered the black box. UN's anti-drug agency says production of methamphetamine is skyrocketing in southeast Asia. Prices dropping usage expanding special envoy to North Korea. Stephen big from the US today making a very clear from the US point of view, no relief of any sanctions before North Korea rids itself of nuclear weapons in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. Busy day. This is Bloomberg Douglas yet, it doesn't stop there too. Because the Bloomberg terminal we've just got this hothead now, Elon Musk is. Defending the tweets regarding tesla that the securities and Exchange Commission contends violated a court order. We're going to be talking more about that. As we roll on here on daybreak Asia. From Hong Kong right now we are joined for the half hour by Brock silvers. He's managing director. Also, a partner at KU on capitol, Brock always a pleasure. I'm just looking at the volatility that I've seen in the CSI three hundred. I mean Monday we were up two percent. But that was after a four percent drop Friday. The volatility has been just amazing. And I'm wondering what it says to you about the direction of markets going forward. Well, what it says is that markets aren't making that much sense out here right now, there's tremendous volatility we've gone in China from being the world's worst performing equity market in twenty eighteen to in the first quarter being the best not only that. But once once the Trump she kneading cancellation was announced last week. We suffered our worst our worst stay in almost six months. So there's lots and lots of volatility, and what it says to me is that the market is not is not particularly rational. Now that might mean that there's value to be mined out here. But it's still is an irrational market and investors should realize that should realize that going forward. What the the the thing? I think that that says to me is the market is completely overestimating the importance of a trade deal to equity valuations. You know, equities are having trouble in China because the economy is softening and the trade war itself is at best a secondary or tertiary caused. And the market is looking to trade talks to save the equity markets, and that's not really going to happen. But that leaves us with an interesting trade opportunity, if there are if there are good news and trade talks the market here is going to palm. And then it's going to give those games and maybe more wants to slowing economy reasserts itself. He broke really quickly investor that could. China. The government has sent a signal. They don't wanna bubble either quickly. How important is that signal to you? Oh, it's it's clear. They don't. But China's government also doesn't have a lot of very good options. Right now, they're they're caught in a very in a very difficult spa. So no matter what they do. They're going to have to make some decisions that they don't like. Okay. Yeah. We've got industrial production retail sales number for China this week. Maybe we could get a bit of a preview when we continue Brock. You can enlighten us on to what to expect in. How markets may respond. Brock silver, managing director. Also, a partner at KU on capital..

China US FAA Bloomberg Brock silver managing director Randy Babbitt KU partner government Bloomberg Douglas North Korea Asia Mr Juncker UK NATO Elon Musk southeast Asia
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On global news. Ed Baxter's there in the Bloomberg nine six. Newsroom. Ed. All right. Thank you may government. UK government says it secured a deal on Brexit. The may government says it overcomes. A major stumbling block now UK Prime Minister Theresa may flew to Strasbourg for last-minute talks with John Claude Yonker earlier in the day. German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the EU is preparing us at a significant offer. So the house of Commons has confirmed that there will be a vote on the revised deal tomorrow. Now, the primary hang up as you probably know has been the Irish backstop the Irish border, so the vote tomorrow, and if that hurdle has been overcome it could pass parliament, Indonesia, China have now grounded the Boeing seven thirty-seven Amax US, a different story with the FAA issuing continued airworthiness certification with changes in training. They say do in April focusing on training manuals former FAA administrator Randy Babbitt says the FAA has very very familiar with the max aircraft was certified it went through extensive testing. Extremely wide expansion of the flight envelope to make sure they are stable recoverable. Flight and he tells Bloomberg that systems can be disarmed and used meanwhile, Bloomberg's Allen Levin says investigators will focus on similarities to the Indonesian lion. Aircrash reason it's interesting here is that the plane in in outside of Addis Ababa did have some unusual dissents shortly after takeoff. Let's say very unusual. Now, we don't know if it's related it's way too early to say, yeah, the FAA says you will continue to investigate. We'll be ready to shutdown usage of the max if it becomes warranted. One of two women accused of killing Kim Jong UN's half brother by smearing VX, nerve agent on his face has been freed soon. Son, who is attorney for city Aisha..

FAA Bloomberg Randy Babbitt Ed Baxter UK Kim Jong UN Addis Ababa Angela Merkel John Claude Yonker nerve agent Strasbourg EU Chancellor Prime Minister Indonesia Brexit Allen Levin Son Theresa
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Marcus good morning guy. President Trump is set to follow three today on new rules to prohibit people who are legally crossed the US border with Mexico from claiming asylum. Bloomberg's Bob moon reports the US asylum system is overwhelmed with too many miracles claims. According to the departments of Justice and homeland security which characterize those crossing the border as aliens who place it tremendous burden on our resources. New restrictions on asylum claims won't take effect until the president issues a proclamation limiting or suspending entry into the US from Mexico in an official told reporters that is planned in the coming day Bob moon, Bloomberg daybreak Europe. Well leaders of line to France as Europe get set to Mark the end of the first World War. British Prime Minister Theresa may is in Belgium today with her Belgian counterpart and the French president laying a wreath at the grace of the first and last British soldiers killed in the conflict. The French president Emmanuel is meeting with US President Donald Trump tomorrow morning with Russian President Putin and German Chancellor Angela Merkel attending commemorations in Paris on Sunday. In Thousand Oaks, California last night, hundreds gathered for a vigil to honor those killed in the latest mass shooting, a former marine who may have had PTSD entered a crowded country music power and killed twelve people. He then killed himself. No word yet. What the motive may have been and the low cost carrier lion s suffered further embarrassment when a plane clipped a pole while taxiing at Bengkulu airport in southern Sumatra. Meanwhile, a Boeing safety bulletin to airlines racists questions about the new seven three seven max jet. An office clues about the line aircrash. Bloomberg's Allen Levin explains. Bowling says that a false sense of rating can cause the plane to dive steeply, and that's consistent with what happened on the line air flight that went down on over twenty nine with one hundred and eighty nine people aboard it's still too early to say what caused the crash Boeing isn't recommending fixes to the plane. So we'll have to stay tuned as the investigation progresses in Washington. Allen levin. Bloomberg daybreak Europe. Global news twenty four hours a day on air. Tick talk on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm Markus Karlsson. This is Bloomberg guy. Thank you very much. Indeed. Hey with the sport or William. Chelsea are through to the last thirty two of the euro per league with two games to spare. Borzov one nil and Belarus last night are smaller also three after a goalless draw the Sporting Lisbon, but the night was overshadowed by an injury to dining well by Celtic kept their European campaign ally for the two one victory over Rb Leipzig, but Rangers were left stunned by two goals in two minutes. Spartak Moscow came from behind to win their much in Russia for three England manager Garside get.

Bloomberg US President Trump president Europe Allen Levin President Putin Bob moon Boeing Mexico Marcus Thousand Oaks Angela Merkel Bengkulu Spartak Moscow France Markus Karlsson Twitter California
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In control activating the safety system on the majority of track. It owns outside the northeast corridor. Amtrak is working with railroads across the country to further implement PTC. Okay. But some of those railroads aren't installing technology fast enough. And now Amtrak is taking further action, Bloomberg news transportation regulation reporter, Allen Levin is with us now in our Bloomberg ninety nine one studios right here in Washington DC, Ellen what a great story on the Bloomberg terminal. And I have to say the headline on that story really says it all in. Here's the headline. Amtrak may put passengers on buses in the fight over the safety. Upgrade fill us. Those are words I never thought I would say about Amtrak, and I didn't think I would be writing them. I think it's fair to say this story, really encapsulates all of the tension and difficulty of running are kind of what you might call our troubled passenger rail system. Amtrak has had several fatal accidents two or three in just the past year. Several of which could have been prevented by this technology. They've been I think it's fair to say very Chason by that. And so they're trying to make good on. You know, an improved safety. But at the same time, they have this incredibly aging infrastructure that they operate on many thousands of miles of the track. They don't own and they're kind of stuck with it. And so they're trying to make these difficult decisions. You know funding is in the background to and in this particular case, they they've informed these communities they may have to bus around the their train stations. And it's really create a lot of tension anger. And this is about installing something called positive train control. What is the technology? And why is it? So important. It's basically an air traffic control system for it. Let me put it this way. It's half an air traffic control system in half Atanas driving for railroads. So the trains I'll have a little GPS sensor in them. And they can tell exactly where they are. And the overlaid on a little computer will show all the speed limits for the track on the entire route. And so the engineer accidentally is going too fast. The train Lottomatica slow itself down before it hits a critical corner. We've had two accidents in recent years that were fatal on Amtrak were engineers went to fast into corners and trains derailed. But even perhaps more important. It also tracks all the other trains, you know, a lot of these lines. It's a single line over hundreds and hundreds of miles and you have other freight. Trains operating, and we've had cases where trains collided with each other. And that's also preventable with this system. It does seem like it would behoove the railroads to get this installed as quickly as possible. And it does sound like a voluminous challenge. It sounds really daunting, particularly when you explain it the way that you did which is that Amtrak doesn't really own all of these tracks. So are we watching economics versus safety, and who wins out in this case, or is it way more complicated than that? Certainly an element of economics versus safety. What's also at play. Here is this system was mandated in two thousand eight after a really horrific accident in the Los Angeles area were two trains collided. This was a commuter rail. Not amtrak. And I think it's fair to say that at least certainly many members of congress believed that a lot of the railroads knew they had done stall this but sat on their hands. And didn't do anything about it. Now, they were you know, there were impediments to them putting it in like the problems with radio frequency, and that sort of thing. But nevertheless, here we are ten years later, and they still haven't achieve that goal. So so that's part of the problem. Now, you know, it's costing billions of dollars. That's also in the background. And then, you know, you have issues Amtrak's case, you know, they're they're operating their system on lines that may have slightly different technology. So all these railroads have to kind of coordinate and figure out how to how to make them work together. How many billions would it cost to get all the improvements in and where does the money come from? I do not have an exact figure. It's it's. In the range of five to ten billion. I believe over the ten fifteen years is going to take to get in place. The federal government is giving grants to help pay for this as given out several billion. And you know, in some cases railroads are paying for parts of it themselves. It's a good safety case that lowers their costs of these accidents are incredibly expensive, Allan. Thank you. That is Bloomberg news transportation reporter, Allen Levin. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on.

Amtrak Bloomberg Allen Levin reporter Washington federal government Lottomatica Atanas Los Angeles Ellen engineer Allan congress ten fifteen years ten years
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Amtrak is working with railroads across the country to further implement PTC. Okay. But some of those railroads aren't installing that technology fast enough. And now Amtrak is taking further action, Bloomberg news transportation regulation reporter, Allen Levin is with us now in our Bloomberg ninety nine one studios right here in Washington DC, Ellen what a great story on the Bloomberg terminal. And I have to say the headline on that story really says it all in. Here's the headline. Amtrak may put passengers on buses in the fight over the safety. Upgrade fill us. Those are words I never thought I would say about Amtrak. Am I didn't think I would be writing them. I think it's fair to say this story, really encapsulates all of the tension and difficulty of running are kind of what you might call our troubled passenger rail system. Amtrak has had several fatal accidents. Two or three in just the past year. Several of which could have been prevented by this technology. They've been I think it's fair to say very chasing by that. And so they're trying to make good on. You know and improve safety, but at the same time, they have this incredibly aging infrastructure that they operate on many thousands of miles of the track. They don't own and they're kind of stuck with it. And so they're trying to make these difficult decisions. You know funding is in the background to and in this particular case, they they've informed these communities they may have to bus around the their train stations. And it's really created a lot of tension and anger. And this is about installing something called positive train control. What is the technology? And why is it? So important. It's basically an air traffic control system for. Let me put it this way. It's half an air traffic control system in half autonomous driving for railroads. So the trains I'll have a little GPS sensor in them. And they can tell exactly where they are. And the overlaid on a little computer will show all the speed limits for the track on the entire route. And so if the engineer accidentally is going too fast, the train will automatically slow itself down before it hits a critical corner. We've had two accidents in recent years that were fatal on Amtrak were engineers went to fast into corners and trains derailed. But even perhaps more important. It also tracks all the other trains, you know, a lot of these lines. It's a single line over hundreds and hundreds of miles, and you have other freight trains operating, and we've had cases where two trains collided with each other. And. That's also preventable with this system. It does seem like it would behoove the railroads to get this installed as quickly as possible. And it does sound like a voluminous challenge. It sounds really daunting, particularly when you explain it the way that you did which is that Amtrak does it really own all of these tracks. So are we watching economics versus safety, and who wins out in this case, or is it way more complicated than that? There's certainly an element of economics versus safety. What's also play? Here is this system was mandated in two thousand eight after a really horrific accident in the Los Angeles area where two trains collided. This was a commuter rail. Not amtrak. And I think it's fair to say that at least certainly many members of congress believe that a lot of the railroads knew they had to install this but sat on their hands. And didn't do anything about it. Now there were you know, there were impediments to them putting it in like the problems with radio frequency, and that sort of thing. But nevertheless, here we are ten years later, and they still haven't achieved that goal. So. So that's part of the problem. Now, you know, it's costing billions of dollars. That's also in the background. And then, you know, you have issues Amtrak's case, you know, they're they're operating their system on lines that may have slightly different technology. So all these railroads have to kind of coordinate and figure out how to how to make them work together. How many billions would it cost to get all the improvements in and where does the money come from? You know, I do not have an exact figure it's it's in the range of. Five to ten billion. I believe of over the ten fifteen years it's gonna take to get in place. The federal government is giving grants to help pay for this as given out several billion. And you know, in some cases railroads are paying for parts of it themselves. It's a good safety case that lowers their costs. These accidents are incredibly expensive, Allan. Thank you. That is Bloomberg news transportation reporter, Allen Levin. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio coming up as America enjoys a.

Amtrak Bloomberg Allen Levin reporter Washington federal government Ellen Los Angeles engineer Allan congress America ten fifteen years ten years
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A leader in the installation of positive train control activating the safety system on the majority of track at homes outside the northeast corridor. Amtrak is working with railroads across the country to further implement PTC. Okay. But some of those railroads aren't installing that technology fast enough. Now Amtrak is taking further action, Bloomberg news transportation regulation reporter, Allen Levin is with us now in our Bloomberg ninety nine one studios right here in Washington DC, Ellen what a great story on the Bloomberg terminal. And I have to say the headline on that story really says it all in. Here's the headline. Amtrak may put passengers on buses in the fight over the safety upgrade fill us. And those are words I never thought I would say about Amtrak. I didn't think I would be writing them. I think it's fair to say this story, really encapsulates all of the tension and difficulty of running are kind of what you might call our troubled passenger rail system. Amtrak had several fatal accidents two or three in just the past year. Several of which could have been prevented by this technology. They've been I think it's fair to say very chasing by that. And so they're trying to make good on. You know, an improved safety. But at the same time, they have this incredibly aging infrastructure that they operate on many thousands of miles of the track. They don't own and they're kind of stuck with it. And so they're trying to make these difficult decisions. You know funding is in the background to and in this particular case, they they've informed these communities they may have to bus around the their train stations. And it's really created a lot of tension anger. And this is about installing something called positive positive train control. What is the technology? And why is it? So important. It's basically an air traffic control system.

Amtrak Bloomberg Allen Levin Washington reporter Ellen
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio earlier this week president trump reminded the american people about his anti regulatory efforts the american academy from washington overreach cutting twenty two regulations for everyone in new regulation the most and history by far we've cut hundreds and hundreds of regulations allowing people to have their businesses work that business businesses in our people some american workers who are protected by some of those regulations are starting to push back now against these efforts allen levin is a regulation reporter for bloomberg news and joining me now in the bloomberg 991 studios here in washington dc and allan listen to spoil it down a couple of things that we noticed in the past week the administration reconsidering those rules that protect coal miners from black long and some farmers who are actually protected by one of those regulations that the president wants to roll back some chicken farmer specifically are actually going to sue the administration because they say they need that regulation so bring this up to speed that these people who seem to be the president's basin who would have supported him are now starting to feel what's happening with the regulations and that's true and and there's a a truism in the role the regulation which is any time you act to do anything that helps one group of people you almost inevitably hurt another group and so in these examples you gave uh you know in the final days of the obama administration they passed rule that gave small farmers little little more leeway to try to sue the big producers and trump is now uh pudding that on hold but um and and in that uh it was sought by these big agricultural interests so they're very strong economic uh uh forces that want it but you have this other group of small farmers who feel that their ability to uh prospered now is threatened by this rule so so they filed suit we'll see how far that goes.

trump american academy reporter president obama administration washington allen levin bloomberg bloomberg 991 studios allan
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Earlier this week president trump reminded the american people about his anti regulatory efforts we've liberated the american academy from washington overreach cutting twenty two regulations for everyone new regulation the most history by far we've cut hundreds and hundreds of regulations allowing people to have their businesses work that business is on our people some american workers who are protected by some of those regulations are starting to push back now against these efforts allen levin is a regulation reporter for bloomberg news and joining me now andy bloomberg 991 studios here in washington dc and allan listen to spoil it down on a couple of things that we noticed in the past week the administration reconsidering those rules that protect coal miners from black long and some farmers who are actually protected by one of those regulations that the president wants to roll back some chicken farmer specifically are actually going to sue the administration because they say they need that regulation so bring this up to speed that these people who seem to be the president's basin who would have supported him are now starting to feel what's happening with the regulations and that's true and and there's a a truism in the role the regulation which is any time you act to do anything that helps one group of people you almost inevitably hurt another group and so in these examples you gave uh you know in the final days of the obama administration they passed rule that gave small farmers a little more leeway to try to sue the big producers um and trump is now uh pudding that on hold but um and and in that uh it was sought by these big agricultural interests so they're very strong economic uh uh forces that want it but you have this other group of small farmers who feel that their ability to uh prospered now is threatened by this rule so so they filed suit we'll see how far that goes.

trump american academy reporter president obama administration washington allen levin bloomberg andy bloomberg allan
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Earlier this week president trump reminded the american people about his anti regulatory efforts we've liberated the american academy from washington overreach cutting twenty care regulations forever you want a new regulation the most history by far we've cut hundreds and hundreds of regulations allowing people to have their businesses work that business is on our people some american workers who are protected by some of those regulations are starting to push back now against these efforts allen levin is a regulation reporter for bloomberg news and joining me now in the bloomberg 991 studios here in washington dc and allan listen to spoil it down a couple of things that we noticed in the past week the administration reconsidering those rules that protect coal miners from black long and some farmers who are actually protected by one of those regulations that the president wants to roll back some chicken farmer specifically are actually going to sue the administration uh because they say they need that regulation so bring this up to speed that these people who seem to be the president's base who would have supported him are now starting to feel what's happening with the regulations and that's true and and there's a a truism in the role the regulation which is any time you act to do anything that helps one group of people you almost inevitably hurt another group and so in these examples you gave uh you know in the final days of the obama administration they passed rule that gave small farmers a little more leeway to try to sue the big producers and trump is now uh pudding that on hold but um and and in that uh that was sought by these uh big agricultural interests so they're very strong economic uh forces that want it but you have this other group of small farmers who feel that their ability to uh prospered now is threatened by this rule so so they filed suit we'll see how far that goes.

trump american academy reporter president obama administration washington allen levin bloomberg bloomberg 991 studios allan
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio earlier this week president trump reminded the american people about his anti regulatory efforts we've liberated the american economy from washington overreach cutting twenty joe regulations for everyone a new regulation most in history by far we've cut hundreds and hundreds of regulations allowing people to have the businesses work that businesses in our people some american workers who are protected by some of those regulations are starting to push back now against these efforts allen levin is a regulation reporter for bloomberg news and joining me now in the bloomberg 991 studios here in washington dc and alan listen to spoil it down a couple of things that we noticed in the past week the administration reconsidering those rules that protect coal miners from black long and some farmers who are actually protected by one of those regulations that the president wants to roll back some chicken farmer specifically are actually going to sue the administration because they say they need that regulation so bring this up to speed that these people who seem to be the president's basin who would have supported him or now starting to feel what's happening with the regulations and that's true and and there's a a truism in the role of regulation which is any time you act to do anything that helps one group of people you almost inevitably hurt another group and so in these examples you gave uh you know in the final days of the obama administration they passed rule that gave small farmers little more leeway to try to sue the big producers um and trump is now uh pudding that on hold but um and and in that uh it was sought by these big agricultural interests so they're very strong economic uh uh forces that want it but you have this other group of small farmers who feel that their ability to uh prospered now is threatened by this rule so so they've filed suit we'll see how far that goes.

trump reporter alan president obama administration washington allen levin bloomberg bloomberg 991 studios
"allen levin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Then it's all things considered an kqed news the latest coming up at four thirty mm donald this is marketplace i'm car rebel president trump said this last month quote in the history of our country no president during their entire term has cut more regulations than we have cut and of quote that according to some tallying by bloomberg news is not entirely true allen levin wrote the story on walk into the program thank you uh it's interesting that you point this out at a time when the administration is still in a lot of ways looking for its first big legislative win i mean first it needs to be said that that the trump administration is very aggressively going after regulations there's no doubt about it when he look at climate change and financial uh oversight and that sort of thing but it was very important for the president to cite high numbers uh he's made some pretty dramatic claims and weeks part of it is uh it needs to be viewed through this prism of them not having this big a legislative victory on one of the things you point out actually just to that question of the trump administration actually going after regulations very hard because they are a and elections have consequences as omb director mick mulvaney said the other day a part of what's happening here in the regulatory space is the question of tone it's people being appointed to these jobs who are interested in whatever their regulatory agency uh happens to be doing less of what that agency does the epa for one is the beginning of people yeah and i mean there's no doubt that that is occurring uh one of the things i debt is look at the number of regulations that have been reviewed by the arm of the white house that uh sort of has a final signoff on regulations and they're down substantially from prior years of is about one quarter as many uh as uh the the obama administration did a year ago during the same period will you point out in this piece that there are laws on the books designed to prevent uh uh.

donald trump president allen levin climate change mick mulvaney regulatory agency epa obama administration kqed bloomberg omb director four thirty mm one quarter
"allen levin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up next day it's all things considered with the night before the alabama senate race mario but tali steps down and transgender truths all coming up next this is marketplace i'm car rozelle president trump said this last month quote in the history of our country no president during their entire term has cut more regulations than we have cut and of quote that according to some tallying by bloomberg news is not entirely true allen levin wrote the story on what can the program thank you uh it's interesting that you point this out at a time when the administration is still in a lot of ways looking for its first big legislative win i mean first it needs to be said that that the trump administration is very aggressively going after regulations there's no doubt about it when you look at climate change and financial uh oversight and that sort of thing but it was very important for the president to cite high numbers uh he's made some pretty dramatic claims in recent weeks part of it is uh it needs to be viewed through this prism of them not having this big a legislator victory on one of the things you point out ashley just to that question of the trump administration actually going after regulations very hard because they are a and elections have consequences as omb director mick mulvaney said the other day a part of what's happening here in the regulatory space is the question of tone it's people being appointed to these jobs who are interested in whatever their regulatory agency uh happens to be doing less of what that agency does the epa for one is the biggest jampel yeah and i mean there's no doubt that that is occurring uh but one of the things i debt is look at the number of regulations that have been reviewed by the arm of the white house that uh sort of has a final signoff on regulations and they're down substantially from prior years is about one quarter as many uh as uh the the obama administration did a year ago during the same period you point out in this piece that there are laws on the books designed to prevent uh uh regulations.

trump president allen levin climate change mick mulvaney regulatory agency epa obama administration alabama senate bloomberg ashley omb director one quarter
"allen levin" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Of our listeners think it should be alone so you're you're winning the argument morgan on it let's do in other second others later hey if you're an out of work insurance inspector have we got a job for you they are short insurance inspectors both in texas and and floored they'll fly you win you up and you can have four weeks six weeks were the work doing in shirts inspections not easy work though yeah it it's not easy work and in particular one of the biggest problems trying to find people who are qualified to do this work simply because you do have to have a background in this field in order to be able to make accurate assessments because if you walk into a home down in houston and you say well well you know they might be able to rebuild this place and then all of a sudden six months later there's a whole bunch of mold that you didn't realize because you didn't know what to look for all of a sudden the companies on the hook for more dollars and they would have been up front and so they are looking for people to go down the of their working for licensed insurance adjusters to go down and start visiting these heavily early damaged areas and you're expecting to see billions of dollars in claims paid out probe as is yet to know you're doing you do it's not something where you and i can go down there and say yeah the house looks like you can live in it you'll be fine they know how to walk through a house ran they can tell g lot of damage done did electrical system the hvac this hvac system is shot they know the approximate cost you have to be able to assess that damage and had to do with a drone no it's the the walkthroughs you can't a lot of the outdoor damages is drone base now and you're starting to see more of that as insurance companies views drone technology to to try to lower their own costs but in terms the walkthroughs you have to still do a yoke person by person house by house did you know that private jet owners are not paying their fair share of tax president trump talked about this earlier this year will be joined in the next segment by allen levin from bloomberg to talk about private jets and how they are our.

morgan texas houston the house insurance companies trump allen levin bloomberg president four weeks six months six weeks
"allen levin" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Alive so i will bet you irene left eyeball that it's idaho you can have it has less idle shot a thorough with the sport if you me i of live all israeli okay why why not an allen levin from you safe things incorrectly all the time correct you and your english is horrible the moment the mailman i say something incred you know more i'm in the eye wien hi you're out very high it's a pound see that sean sean you knew that you didn't feel again at a coveted correct the host now man i'm just chilling here right just doing my job i love you i love you so hard that's right stop thank you but i'm not in love with you there's a giant difference on blood a see now you're corrected the host of the well you know what you started this whole mess if this traffic report brought to you by sales more news here's the kirk adult god yeah here's the deal eastbound 520 just past mali watch for new collision that's gonna be following up things trying to get onto the bridge who calls heard troubles northbound i5 culture and towards five to six if you're headed into ever watching for a new collision the foul things up and so potentially seeing some slow and getting into downtown seattle southbound ninety nine just out of the batteries retaliate that a disabled vehicle that's hanging up in the right lane and that's going to college you that extra stress now drivers in the south and you're still just socked in from basically i5 worse than 512 all the way down through lacey and down towards nisqually and then heavy continuing in towards olympia nor five also backed a pretty steady getting into the nisqually area earlier troubles day and this has subsequently also backed up 507 and five ten right so getting from roy to hjelm down through mckenna that's all still just an absolute lockup really all the traffic getting in towards yoma by two 507 a 510 still seems to be pretty darn tough self give yourself an incredible headstart you're you're gonna need it this afternoon there's just no escape a hit all right there never radio realtime traffic about him griffey used to be one of the most beautiful analytical things in.

allen levin sean sean the deal seattle lacey roy mckenna yoma idaho mali olympia griffey
"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"allen levin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We'd tempted to answer that question what exactly is going to happen to society too these larger issues that are out there that are being crafted and regulation and so we looked at all of the pending a forty or fifty regulations in transportation world one in particular jumped out it would limit the maximum speed trucks can go you know trucks were involved in a much higher percentage of accidents on the highway them 'cause it's several thousand fatalities in europe and most of the developed world they already have this and what we see is that like so many of the regulations that sort of in limbo now's the new administration tries to figure out what to do so we are referring to is the regulation requiring this speed limiting device for further trucks like longhaul truckers exactly all our large trucks and some large busses would have automatic devices that limit the maximum speed the looking at probably limiting that 65 interestingly a lot of large trucking companies have weighed in an and said they support this a number of them already use it uh but it's been controversial because some smaller truck operators would prefer not to have the speeds limited but it would save lives in it would save money and it was a fuel yes but the smaller operators it's more of the garden well the there's no doubt that it would save fuel and lives i don't think the department transportation estimated that there would be billions in savings something like over 20 billion over ten years in terms of save lives the justice savings in fuel alone from going slower speeds would exceed what they estimated the cost to be in terms of a slower delivery of goods and whatnot and in about the minute that we have laughed you had already said it's in limbo it has it been eliminated but it is one of those things that sorta than this unwra unusual area so trump talked about eliminating two regulations for each 1 even more burdensome as you have to eliminate costs equivalent to the cost of any new regulation so they've got to go in and cut out of the book some regulation that eliminates billions of dollars in costs over ten years and that makes a that's a big hurdle to to get over okay as thanks so much bloomberg news faa reporter allen levin it's it's always great to have.

reporter europe trump bloomberg faa allen levin ten years