32 Burst results for "Alistair"

"alistair" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:44 min | 4 d ago

"alistair" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Alistair last characteristic us. I've got bangs like antique flows a abilities wrong on the one before I use all three, but they don't agree one of them. Wants to love you Another one. I'd love two club, I guess. Smiled. Nature's like English is You will become a mother. Wait. You're listening to coast to coast Am with George Knapp. The artist Stuart Davis. My guest tonight we're going to talk to him about that song. Um, how would relate store subject matter He's.

"alistair" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:04 min | Last week

"alistair" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Alistair has told many stories of the moth from slams to the main stage, and here's one from an open mic story slam We produced in Denver. Where we partner with public radio station Kunc a note that the story contains the use of a homosexual slur. Here's Alistair Bane live at the mall. When I was 13. I got my first horse. His name was Bo. He was a half inch over pony class. Chest that With serve anonymous breeding history. Not very well trained a little bit mean and shaggy coded, but I didn't mind because he was mine, and I was willing to put the hours I knew it would take to train him in Because he was the one part of my life that didn't feel dark and dangerous. At that point, my dad had dropped me off with my mom is small town in central Illinois. She had enrolled me in a Catholic school where I was the only native person otherwise white school. Felt different, but that wasn't the only reason. The kids had another name. For the reason I was different Words like fag, queer it and freak. I heard that all day. The teachers told me if I didn't act so weird, maybe I won't get in trouble being bullied and when I went home, although my mom's words work quite that crude Her sentiment was the same. Everything I did how I walked, I talks and disappointing Every afternoon. I would get to go to the stable. And to settle a bow and go for a ride. I spent so much time grooming him and training him that within a few months, the first time we went into the church size ring. He was for this, and we walked out with a long, shiny satin blue ribbon in front of everyone who had thought that we were misfits. For just that moment, Everything felt good. Like story every temptation Over the course of the next few months As I entered a third grade, it seemed like the bullying got worse. And at home, I had decided it was time that finally Said it out loud to my mother came out and her reaction was everything I feared it would be and more worse. You could almost feel her disapproval through the walls in the house. And at that point it seemed like even when I was at the stable with Bo, those rights that time I had with him where it enough and there's this darkness. It was Encroaching on my very spirit voice inside me that said, Maybe there is no place I would ever belong. No use going on one Saturday morning. I found myself in the bathroom looking in the medicine cabinet and my mother's newly Refilled prescription of tranquilizers thinking that would be so easy that night before bed to take them all. Kids with no one to bully on Monday. Weather would have no one to say was embarrassing the family I left him there doing they'd be there and went out to the stable. I saddled up Just say that Dad's gonna do something good for him something and make him happy because even if I felt like I couldn't feel happiness, same or he could, so I wrote him down by the airport, where there's a long dirt road. Take him down there and let him just run to his heart's content. As we got near, I could feel him getting excited. He knew what was coming next. As we turned the corner onto that road, I step in my stirrups like I was a jockey and the Kentucky Derby. I let him have his sprains and he took off. Had heard someone say wants that if your true horsemen there comes a day when the communication between you and your horse ceases to be the tug of rain. Where notch of Andy and you simply become one with that animal. And as he ran flat out down that road, I began to feel that happen. Was dance if he and I could speak Without any cues from myself. He ran faster and faster, And as we approach the end of the road, there's a dead inside by then have to ring them and he knew what to do. He slid to a stop pivoted on his back legs. And ran back to the other direction. And as he did, it felt almost like that little horses, joy of being alive on a fall day, running full out under Chris Blue sky with the smell of the dried corn in the field next to us. Came up through those reins. And ran through my body like electricity. So everything was suddenly quiet. In clear and beautiful. We reached the end of the road. And standing. There was a woman outside her car. She stopped and was watching us. She smiled, waved at me and said You and the horse. You're the most beautiful thing I've ever seen. Thank you, I said That was enough. In my culture, we say horses have the ability to heal. And I know that that's true..

Alistair Alistair Bane Denver Monday Andy first horse central Illinois 13 Kentucky Derby third grade half inch first time one part one Saturday morning Kunc next few months Catholic Bo one
Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

Morning Edition

02:12 min | Last month

Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

"Years ago today, a massive earthquake and tsunami devastated northeastern Japan. Nearly 20,000 people were killed, entire towns were destroyed. Disaster triggered multiple explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, sending radioactive material into the air. It was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The power plant was built near a town called Okemah. MPR's Cat Lawn Store went back last year. Well to show that there are only old people here, which, I guess includes me, so that's why young family would want to live here. Any school hospital or grocery store is miles away. That's resident Kazuko Endo, who launched or from that gardening outside one of oh comas, newly built homes. Over the past few years, O Koma has slowly started to open back up after sitting empty for years less than 200. People Now live in the town that used to be home to over 11,001 person and moved back to O Koma. Masato sake. He's nearly 100. The construction company he owned, helped build several of the nuclear reactors at Daiichi Cuckoo on in this town needed nuclear. We co existed with it, and I profited from it. But now look at the town will never be the same real. You quit the name the old downtown. Oh, coma is still abandoned, and Japan's government is still figuring out how to completely clean up Fukushima's damaged reactors. Alistair Gail covers Japan for the Wall Street Journal. He's gone back to the region over and over in the decades since the disaster. Gail's latest trip found a mix of massive engineering and empty streets. So I went with a colleague to the city off because then Toccata, which was one of the worst hit cities by the tsunami in 2011, it's on the northeast coast of Japan. On But you just really felt like there weren't many people around. And part of that was because of covert. But really, it's because you know, in the main part that a lot of people have just left that city.

Okemah Cat Lawn Store Kazuko Endo Koma Japan Tsunami Daiichi Cuckoo Earthquake Masato Alistair Gail Coma Fukushima Wall Street Journal Northeast Coast Gail
"alistair" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"alistair" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Alistair Adele. Excuse me, has asked to retired Superior Court judge To review the charges against the 16 defendants here, never more than 15 minutes away from today's top stories on Arizona's news station, K T a R news coronavirus in Arizona. Well, that that bill that statistic I hurdle earlier if they rang the bell once for every covert death in the United States, it would take 28 days, 28 days. So as we mark the half million milestone yesterday a half million people killed by the disease. Is that the novel coronavirus causes and confused why? We're arguing about non covert related items in the covert relief bill. I mean, it's bog in this thing down. Why are we? Why did they even have things in here that would bog this down? I mean, we've sat here and scratched our heads. If we're going to do this, if we're going to provide relief to people for who suffered a job loss, or maybe the loss of their business or these other things You know if we're going to send money to people directly from the government to give us give them relief, why we bargain it down with stuff that doesn't have anything to do with covert. And how can President Biden asked this of people who are concerned about the gargantuan nature of his $1.9 Trillion proposed plan? What would they have me cut? Would that be leave out? Shall we not invest $20 billion to vaccinate the nation. Should we not invest $290 million to extend unemployment assurance for the 11 Million Americans are unemployed so they could get by. Yeah, But if you believe in those things, why is the president Biden saying that when there's definitely pork in this bill at least $100 million for an underground train in the Bay Area? That's in the House version of this bill. You know that there's nothing more important to curing coded and stopping the pandemic than building a tunnel from San Francisco to Facebook. That's our D. C. Insider, ABC News political analyst Alex Castellanos talking with US last hour 100 million I think that we need to highlight the lawmakers who are adding these pork items to the relief bill. Well, you know, they're basically just delaying relief to Americans. I think that's a great idea. You know, I really do, especially when Congressman David Schweikert of Arizona says that the Democrats when it comes to You know, getting what they want, Including, you know, non covert items in the covert relief bill never been a time back in D. C, where you can cut the tension with a chain saw. The Democrats have basically made the decision that it's scorcher. They barely hold a majority in the house in the Senate, but they're going to do everything they can to destroy the Republican Party. So it turns out Lip service to bipartisanship, But zero actions the head that direction all right. Maybe Congressman Schweikert is overstating it a bit. But we have reached out to try and get Congressman Greg Stanton on this morning for his side of the negotiations it in all fairness. We reached out this morning, so him not having gotten back to us before Seven o'clock is understandable. But we're hoping to hear the other side of things because Wow, Why any pork in this? Why? Just doesn't make any sense. Yeah. Pay for the vaccines, pay people who have lost their jobs. All these other things. You could make a really great argument for But you can't make a good argument for building a train to, uh, you know, the crosses the bay. You might be returning a favor for a big donor or something. But you are not helping the American people by putting stuff in there. That just gonna delay aide But there is good news. Good Johnson and Johnson. They should. They could actually get FDA emergency approval by the end of the week for their vaccine, which, while it's not as effective as the Madonna and the Fizer just adds another, you know it's another bullet in the chamber. Well, if you will for for us to fight covert. So, uh and they're saying they could deliver 20 million doses by the end of March. So eyes Jamey's been reporting this morning. That would be enough doses, then. Bind in five weeks to vaccinate about half of all adults in the country, So that's the goodness. Let's focus on those things..

Alex Castellanos Republican Party United States David Schweikert $1.9 Trillion $290 million $20 billion 28 days D. C Alistair Adele 16 defendants five weeks Greg Stanton 11 Million San Francisco Facebook ABC News 100 million Bay Area yesterday
Ken Jennings pays tribute to Alex Trebek on "Jeopardy!"

Steve Trevelise

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Ken Jennings pays tribute to Alex Trebek on "Jeopardy!"

"Today a little bit of a sad moment. Steve. What? Do you know what aired today? No. It into the first episode of Jeopardy with Ken Jennings, guest hosting for the late Bring Alistair back. Really? Yes. So I was watching the video during the boy is total said Oh, my gosh. He does a brief, You know little thing when setting up the show paying homage to Alex Trebek like saying how we get We can't replace him and he starts choking up during It was just so depressing to watch because they have been airing the last few that Alex Trebek had hosted when they taped him. And then this was the first one for their first guest host, Ken Jennings. I like how they say, first guest host as if they're not going to give him the job afterwards. Anyways, I told you, John, Stow it. If he doesn't get it, Jersey's own Jon Stewart. He should get it. I could see Johnston, Jon Stewart. Would be a great host for Joe. I think you might be. Hey. Might be might be a little too funny for no. You could work with him. Yeah, I guess we'll have to wait and see

Ken Jennings Alex Trebek Alistair Steve Jon Stewart Johnston Jersey John JOE
New Years Eve Festivities

Extraterrestrial

04:40 min | 4 months ago

New Years Eve Festivities

"Happy new year listeners. We made it as finally less than twenty four hours left in the year. Twenty twenty if you're just joining us. Welcome i'm alistair myrddin. And this is superstitions a spotify original from podcast in this podcast we use short stories to explore the ways in which human beings interact with luck and fate in each episode. We peel back the layers of mystery surrounding peculiar rituals totems and practices. Today's episode is a very special one. C. you may not believe in santa claus leprechauns or the easter bunny. But new year's eve is the one holiday where everyone becomes a little superstitious because the future is uncertain and new year's eve is when we take a moment out of our lives to face that uncertainty head on according to cultures around the world. What you do on new year's eve will determine the trajectory of the next three hundred and sixty five days for good and ill. So maybe don't relax on this. Last day of twenty twenty after ruled a whole new year is at stake coming up. We'll see some practices from people around the globe and hope none of them drop the bowl. Time never stops it. Never waits never stand still for anyone throughout human history. We've given it to name a face a persona. Even cronos carla banged goon. Bang rune the knowns father time all these deeds he's only there to moscow truth. That time is the one thing that will remain forever out of human control when our story starts time is running out all over the world. It was already january. First in the area known as ut. C plus fourteen the earliest time zone senator earth but in the western hemisphere it was still december thirty first and all manner of hustling and bustling was afoot in. London beleaguered playwrights. Emily jordan would receive a parcel from her irish mother containing a single sprig of mistletoe. And a note saying. Please put this under your pillow when you go to sleep tonight. Emily knew what this charm was supposed to mean. It was a way to ensure a single woman found romance in the new year in atlanta georgia griffin. The hair murphy was also rushing out for some last-minute groceries. He found himself laying. Low the business partner darius who insisted they have collard greens and black-eyed peas. Dinner who was griffin to deny a southern tradition. Farther north america's central hub for new year's new york city was teeming with activity there. Ruth oltman gathered dozens and dozens of confetti poppers and blowers of various sizes. She was once told that noisemakers with scare off evil spirits and in her haunted brooklyn apartment complex. She wouldn't take any chances at the same time in midtown manhattan. A man named thatcher refused to loan out any money to his friends. He saw on a logistical online. That it was bad luck too low. Now money new year's eve it lonely guarantee they'll keep coming back to you for the rest of the year. Each of these individuals was engaged in different superstitious ritual. They followed wildly different rules. That had originated in different parts of the globe yet. They all had the same purpose to ensure good fortune of one form or another in the coming year. What none of these people realized indeed. What very few people understand is that it wasn't just their personal luck on the line. For new year's eve is special. It's a gateway in time a moments when all humanity takes a deep breath then walks hand in hand into the future and it's in moments like these that anything can happen

Alistair Myrddin Bang Rune Emily Jordan Griffin Ruth Oltman Carla Moscow Darius Emily Murphy Atlanta London Georgia North America New York City Thatcher Brooklyn Manhattan
"alistair" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"alistair" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Realized how important internet is an israeli great on the internet as well but that diversification sort of a few of us through this year. You know the ones who already done that. This has been a lot easier for than if you go. I've never thought anything online. And yeah i have to do nothing. So yeah we do after being aware that you can't just have all your eggs in one basket. You know going to have good to have both of those things because they will be. It will be a big boom in in in comedy again. What we put up you know everyone call wait to get back out and stuff and do stuff but i think this stuff is not going anywhere either. Now it's like another thing as you say is good to happen have handing bucks things. I think yeah yeah well. I think that's something because you never dreamed that your entire livelihood will just be taken away with weeks notice you know. It's absolutely heartbreaking and awful and and you know most. Comedians seem to have you know at least have found a way through the clubs and of will still be there like what think march realistic me. Maybe he might be back in march. And i hope in this club's opening december on the better think. Yeah what is the difficult somewhere. Somewhere not edinburgh be difficult to know what to do without any certainty. the yeah. Yeah maybe clubs elected marshall. I would have often that the either nannu whilst the capacity out sir norway the talking about vaccination program how well. How long does that. Yeah right look. I'm going to let you go. You've been absolutely fantastic. Do ask degreen. i haven't got a guest. Next week's podcast. Some turn and allen harris twitter thursday nights seven thirty pm at the moment. god. I've just recorded to getting up and doing sketches in them. Now it's gone down. He's got a pro back a character from twenty five years ago for tomorrow so do check that out on thursday. If you're watching this live or go to youtube and thank you very much less genuine. The amazing mr. Thank you see.

sir norway degreen allen harris edinburgh marshall twitter youtube
"Jeopardy!" pays tribute to Alex Trebek with heartfelt message

Hammer and Nigel

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"Jeopardy!" pays tribute to Alex Trebek with heartfelt message

"To the Death of Alex Trebek of pancreatic cancer battle the cancer for a number of years kind of emotional Last night, the executive producer of Jeopardy Pay tribute to Trebek. Before last night. Shona Hammer, he said, quote Alex Love this show and everything it stood for. He will forever be an inspiration for his constant desire to learn here is a little bit more from the tribute last night. I'm Mike Richards, the executive producer of Jeopardy. Over the weekend, We lost our beloved host Alex Trebek. This is an enormous loss for our staff and crew for his family. For his millions of fans. He loved this show. And everything it stood for. In fact, he taped his final episodes less than two weeks ago, he will forever be an inspiration for his constant desire to learn. His kindness. And for his love of his family. We will air His final 35 episodes as they were shot. That's what he wanted. On behalf of everyone here at jeopardy. Thank you for everything, Alex. This. Is jeopardy. No man that's pretty emotional. It's emotional response right there and like he said, it's not the last last night was that the last episode they've got, like 35 more in the can. I believe around Christmas time will be the very of the official last jeopardy episode. Well, you know, we had a poll up yesterday. Who's the greatest game show host of all time? Whose are we about the inn that pole? Or was it a 20 fire pole or what? It was a 24 hour pole. It's done now by a vote of 53% to 47%. It was close. Alex Trebek beat Bob Barker. Oh, wow, because Bob Barker was in the lead there for a while. But these more votes came out of Atlanta for o'clock in the morning and pushed Alistair back over the top. All

Alex Trebek Shona Hammer Alex Love Pancreatic Cancer Mike Richards Cancer Alex Bob Barker Atlanta Alistair
Emergency Rooms And Health Clinics Become Voter Registration Hubs

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:02 min | 6 months ago

Emergency Rooms And Health Clinics Become Voter Registration Hubs

"So medical schools, clinics community health centers in North Carolina are now giving patients the option to register to vote check to see if they are registered or request a male invalid the nationwide initiative known as vote Er to boost voter registration in hospital and clinic waiting rooms founder an emergency room physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Dr Alistair Martin says, university, and University of North Carolina Chapel Hill medical schools have registered hundreds of people to either vote or. Request. A mail in ballot using ipad kiosks and flyers with Cannibal Barcode patients can access using their smartphone boating is now public health issue because of COVID nineteen who better than healthcare providers physicians nurses other healthcare. Workers. Martin. ADDS that across the country voter registration rates are down largely due to the pandemics shutdown of public places such as the DMV or community outreach events where people are most likely to get registered I'm Nadia Ramlogan

Dr Alistair Martin University Of North Carolina C North Carolina Massachusetts General Hospital Cannibal Barcode Nadia Ramlogan DMV Founder
"alistair" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

02:25 min | 8 months ago

"alistair" Discussed on Ariel Helwani's MMA Show

"Do. Those were great. Maybe for the last fight you bring it back. Do you think? GonNa fly around it again, just one time. For old fenced. Hanson. It's been so long ago right? Well, I don't know I didn't even know if they allow that to happen to us. It's I have. Yeah it is. It's actually I didn't let me show you no way. This is incredible. Alistair is going to show us the famous sledgehammer from the old days. This is a treat for old school fans right here I, feel like I'm to witness his era. All my gosh that is amazing. Walk up to action please. Please please this is wonderful Jim Toby's there. What does that you're at your trophy? Room? At this guy right here, a living legend one of the all time greats in not only made kickboxing, showing us his trophy room what an honor this is. Here is the hair. Oh, my gosh. Real piece of combat sports right here. Oh Yeah. Look at their. So is this your trophy room ouster? Yeah. Trophies. Strikeforce oh my gosh. Kenny one grand. Prix. This is my first trophy. Again. This is my second. Fifteen ninety seven and is the number twenty, one, Ninety, eight. This dream. His K. wound has morsel strikeforce while. Well. Some RABS. I'm in all of this great. Remember wait. Yup. Todd. This. Was My first world title. To a five. Too Hot to handle. Doesn't for. stripers lows private. Best. He adults great. The Blue allaster. This has been amazing. Thank you so much for this. I feel I you have reinvigorated me just look at this stuff. It's always a pleasure my friend seeing that wonderful smile of yours and congratulations and enjoy the victory with your family and we'll talk soon. Okay. Like.

Hanson Jim Toby Alistair Todd
"alistair" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

13:04 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

"Not embarrassed me yet again. Yes Sir Oh God looking. Good Alistair Yeah. I'm forty right. You'll feel happy. Happy Birthday Club. Yeah thanks I mean it was yesterday but yes there was traveled. I was in a plane three different flights for different airports so going back. How was it going back like leaving the kind of the safety of the hotel? Or whatever and dealing with the public and masks and everything. Young people were wearing masks so I had flown to the Netherlands and this is like five weeks ago. Six weeks ago at the height of the pandemic and that was that was weird because then there was the belief that it was the end of the world right yes afraid keeping totally distance liber depressed. Planes were like ten fifty percent capacity. Airports were totally mt like totally empty and immigration. Lanes are just walking food now. There was more activity. I would say it was like yeah. The plane was like thirty forty percent and there was people at the airport. So let let me back to back to normal. Now what's what's not normal for a Lotta. Ufc fighters is this whole fighting without a crowd. But a gentleman yourself. You're so used to fighting Japan all those years. Does it remind you of that with that? So Japan the definitely is a crowd right and the people. The biggest crowd was eighty. Eight thousand people have fought for two thousand. And what was it? Two thousand three two thousand five whatever so. The Japan audience is different. They're quiet but they make noise. You know they do. They won't pick cheer. They're very polite very nice. So no audience or Japanese audience. You cannot compare it Radha compare this to my one of my like earner fights all the way back ninety seven by kickboxing matches. Where I would try for two three hundred people audience and this kind of reminded me of that because it's like a small and it was different because this was like huge arena. No audience right there and then back in the days it was like yeah my own cities everybody kind of knows you two hundred three hundred people so it was all different but that is exactly what motivated me electrified me a different setting new setting. Hey I'm curious. Let's let's let's go. Let's not forget I including the wall side. I now have ninety fights keep mock CNN. Mail up front one Paul so for me. The the new impulses is very current. Nice. I really love fighting abroad fighting going to Beijing Card right China now. They're never never fought there. It does sort place you go often go so those things new experiences that really energize me seemed to be the amazing thing about you is you. There's nothing you haven't seen in the octagon as far as what somebody's going to do and you seem to be able to no matter what somebody is going to throw out. You seem to be able to stay calm. Adjust Harrison like. He had you in deep trouble in the first round. And you just you just knew what to do. You didn't panic. How bad was it. when he was on top either at that time. You don't know right because you're I mean you know your blood blood blooding all over the place but I was there. I was sharp. You know I'm still moving. I'm still fighting. I'm still trying to get up. He was definitely trying to To to to to hype Tranmere. I just just to me and just flower bunches. And that doesn't look good for the judges right so in my case it was just like we're not going to accept this. We're going to keep fighting and back to my feet or get on top. Whatever but we're not going to accept this. When he threw that kick and fell. That was a big turning point. I it just of course you knew you. You pounced Did you realize in that moment? That's a critical mistake that he just made. She grabbed his leg and kind of tripped him. let's forget. Walked is is a boxer. He's he's a strike. He's a boxer but he's not kicking so people that are not really used to educating Kinda Grasberg. Take him now. That was libertarian. Conrad I feel a little bit. Fatigued was also factor. I know you're listening. You said ninety two fights been in the game such a long time after everything that Walt Harris been through was it was it heart signing the to fight him because you know even like we love you like and people love you but because every because you knew. Everybody was going to be rooting for him. Because he's been such a horrible situation. He's such a horrible thing. That happened to him what his daughter was it was it was it any hesitation signing the fighting where you're just like look no. It's your personal tragedy for share right and We must we must stand still by that but we have to also continue and not for one moment. I was occupied with that. You know. Of course you'RE GONNA promos you're gonNA see the the emotions and stuff but To me I really approaches his sport. I do my best to prepare as best as maximum possible for for the fight events and Everything else is just you know. I try not get distracted. I just tried to stay focused point. Of course it's a personal tragedy for him but Yeah you know. It's a sport as well. I even hug most when you came in. You seem like you were. You were very respectful and you give them a hug when you were taking your first lap around the cage but also he came in way to sixty four point five. I think I mean I mean you have to. He's there to knock you out so you obviously have to be ferocious in response to stay sharp but at same time. Waltz Guard Had the opportunity to brief medium Before I Glen Match in December so we did a PR to Arctic here. We're GONNA go online. We spoke a little bit Super Cool. Dude actually intently. We clicked and we're like trying to get off the pilots. Just get this over. Let's fight then. Of course the tragedy happened You know I did. It did send a message of best wizards because of course you know. I'm friggin myself. Yeah then if I didn't happen then they re book for this event you came up with is not my request shoots. I'd just tried to approach his sport. You don't want your bothers me and I don't want to talk about the past but you were. You were talking about possibly like title. Run you delicious by this fighting over the weekend. Fantastic before this fight you list three fights before rose strike which. I'm going to get to in a second. You took out all the neck. Hooters looked great and Pavlovich. So you took out those two guys first round. Tko's and then you had to fight roses strike which you were clearly ahead and then you had the controversial stoppage if it wasn't for that bullshit which means you think is bullshit. I mean we like to strike. It's not its fault but he did it was it was a stoppage and I might even look into kidding that undone because if you look at the fight. He's waving offers zero seconds left. There's no threat. There's no it was a it was a bad stoppage. Anyway look at it. The only the only argument that you would have is ida busted lips but then when you look at the Robbi lawyer Sam bus live. They just loved back on show. Yeah Sorry Matt. If it was the busted lip would they have a doctor look at it? I wouldn't they call an doctor look at something. Before was a stoppage medically waves and all. This is intriguing as well so I'm giving it to discuss legal team because he waited zero seconds. Let's actually zero seconds left. We you know those segues. Yeah so defied was so I'll have looked into them but listen in Anyhow. I would not have any problem running back. He probably wouldn't want any of it. Because you know I bet she schooled him in that fight and again you know. Take away from the fight under finish skies and that was what. I was focused on Walt. I'm getting a call from a different number but now should I was living my takeaway going into the wall. I winning Senate she scouts. We need to finish him around to around fray whatever we need to finish these guys because then there's no argument. And what was the difference between you? And Walt came in to sixty four and a half into a little bit where you looked lots more than him was that just where you alive to fifty okay. Not Bad for fourteen minutes too much now. Speaking of running running it back I mean France is gone us. Been looking like better than ever steamrolling people and you know. There's some people saying that although if he meets a crisper more technical striker because a lot of times he's not it's it does look at technical just Harajuku but he's so damn powerful. What is your take on that because my thing is yes. Striker could strike and five to one. But it's that one strike. He's so damn powerful. You are a better strike in your more technical. What is your take. You see anything in there where you want another crack out. I definitely want another crack at him. But yeah I. I'm going to enjoy some weeks off. Francine GONNA look very impressive in in his fight with stock getting better and better right. Yeah can't say anything about twenty-second there's not much the really dissect when it's twenty. You can't say anything about it. I think Francis insanely strong. I think have has insane reflexes. Ride speed and reflexes and he's definitely a force to be reckoned with. Yeah that being said he's on there. I'm in right and you want another shot at the title. You said you'd like to take another title. What do you think it's going to take for that to happen? Well okay so. The landscape is alluded tricky right. But I don't know things have to kind of fall exactly in place I think. Also with the current situation. That's a little bit delayed slow. That could be an interim title. Maybe coming up somewhere to me. Injuring tidal or real titled to me. The same thing it's about right. Try would be very motivated for that but listen we have to. What's what's up. No rush folks on the things at hand. That's my health. My Dad all those things. The trainings excellent team is excellent cumulus station in Denver Colorado and just one piece at a time. An we'll come Lord want but we're just going to stay focus and you you've You switched can't before in the past. You're staying with team a ovation. Yes I I. I had four fights now serve. I think reform very strong performances. It was actually victory. We're beating the guy for five rounds you get clipped. I'm not out on not sleeping. I'm getting back to my feet actually spoke to Dan Burglar. Outta this week about it. Then we're such a good guy right. He doesn't he doesn't mean bad but yeah it was a bad call right when you're waving office. Zero seconds left with no fret. I'm back on my feet and basically just The string legacy of that. We know we're going to have a look at what we can do about that because it is it is annoying me a little bit and otherwise this would otherwise next time. It'll be alright if we take all those things in the council general. I think it was the fact that he walked away and left you there and then the time was up. I mean I don't see how you lose that fight. I thought that was a very unfair stoppage. And it does stop the momentum of of a potential title forty still.

Walt Harris Alistair Yeah Japan Ufc Birthday Club Netherlands CNN Denver Fatigued Radha Harrison Paul Beijing Card Dan Burglar Conrad Arctic Hooters Tko Colorado Sam bus
Undruggable Drugs

a16z

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
‘Taking Money Away From Schools’: California Lottery Under Fire After ‘Ellen’ Giveaway

Tim Conway Jr.

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

‘Taking Money Away From Schools’: California Lottery Under Fire After ‘Ellen’ Giveaway

"California lottery is tonight under fire for being a part of Ellen's twelve days of giveaways one California state senator says a giveaway took away funding from public school should I take Alistair Donte is live in studio city to explain the controversy Serra Serra don she lets go Susie and Jeff obviously the water is very very popular a lot of people play it and a lot of people play it this way using scratchers are all different kinds are very popular to buy and very popular to give

Ellen Senator Alistair Donte Serra Serra Susie Jeff California
"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

The Screenster Podcast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

"Lifestyle. Wise acting can be a vicarious industry and I've certainly struggled with the rejection side of it and we were talking briefly before Abou- how having other strings to your bow to keep yourself entertained insane in the meantime how do you stop yourself from from flagging at times when you're not walking is I mean. It's such a bizarre industry in the industry rejection baseline and then as actors. We ought to be intended to be sensitive to emotional situations A Lotta time demands that on so to be you committed word that we did. We need to sort of be able to our emotional box of tricks when Bene- fries which which can lead deter expires parts of Canada. It's it's sort of a custom battle but again I think there's a lot of you touched on earlier about some people who swim their way through this business. Nobody believe anybody does. And we'll talk about that but lost a job. One of those classic. Come down to the last two massive job and it was arbitrate. But I didn't get it and it really in really had to find a way through. I broke it down into its constituent. Parts is it. You didn't. Why is it because of the shooter's either? The plane is part of giving you thankfully figured out the not just missed out planes characters desperate to investigate but I still didn't get her paw. There's no point in second place in this job. You WanNa get a job search and finally to the point where I just looked my son said you can and get a job. It's it's okay. Didn't job and enough people afterwards involved in the Carson Prices Vary Sweetie Gordon. Tyson said it was paper. Thin said we're so safari okay on the person that's playing the part. Yeah I would have cost them. I get it and so again. August one through life with just you know thirty five scripts. I still do that today tomorrow next year. Do that fiamme so again again. It's all bollocks but it's yeah how do you deal with. I think he has to do as many things as you can. I think if view if your if your life is defined by a word that I think that way kind of madness raid is that so much easier servants strive easy to sink contain. How do you do that? I think of all the Tony App all the time. A lot of it's really farm to think about it it when you're having to make decisions about decisions about the play or your you'll researching something but sometimes you're thinking shit. Do I mean. He's good a friend. London as on the negotiating something agreed with the highlight. I feel so to cloudy. And and I'm luckier. I my wife and I you know we're together with twenty years A boy growing up as really really fine. Young men in the healthy and that's a good day. Remind but I I'm like God I don't have it down until I think about what all the time all the time either work or thinking about not look all the time but I would say I'm about to direct shoot film which is kind of fabulously fallen into into my lap. And I'm sort of doing an interesting discovery about how I feel about. That goes quite wants to direct the notion sitting in a room with fourteen actors putting apply apply to meet with Tara. Just brakes do that. But equally had to reach the day on six actors and we had to do that at the table looked to me and it and we talk about it but then God she comes in the same good humor. What I'm GonNa do my practice going to do all this things and the one thing that did say to them which was on to the process and if if you ask a question and you hear me talking and unfunny on fudging a much if you could just up and saying coup bullshit because the passing and I didn't know but but I think I sort of feel landed and I'm really excited by they find out whether it's something to do but Easterby oh it's going to be director now but no not a tool not a tool but I think it's a nice tatum really enjoying and producing as well I set up a company with an exam. Today goes journalist who this. Yeah and we. We wanted to do so for loan time. We tried to write something twenties of that but we just kept into the notion of finding zoning and very short we option to novel. Good Brandy I mean we're talking twenty long twenty twelve so this thing seven years. We're making that out of America next year. which is amazing with talk because you only puns and we're doing a show of the UK which just started program developing funding and everything which is really exciting? That amazing racing writer. He's stacks was no respite. which is useful as doctor who was in writing but also a trickle oracle is a practical thing but thankfully the sensibility of work to the pieces? second-to-none so that's exciting. So I feel really enthused by that so to me but when I tape taping about work all the time that's also now part of the work that I think and there's no revenue stream now known as the great but it's more about and so we didn't loss on on on our dine but equally. You know there's this great house in the room which is which is really nice and so that feels important so so I mean if I did too young access just to find find him to collaborate. I think that's a now I think putting that way the toll thanks was one of the first people to look before then under the newest privilege working with him and I was asking him about terrible so sorry to increase but and he. He was the biggest advocate of being a kind of a policeman so he he produces and creates and yet okay. Is Tom Hands. You know if he wants to tell the story about some probably got great and student but equally passionate. He was into the word that he wants to do and also he said no he said I get stuff turned down. I which is really interesting seeing cheever. Steve said if you want want to make an fill about pets let's that's like the Yoga A.. Also he wants to do stories that he's not always in and they're like him mm-hmm so but I think it comes down to the same thing create create trying create. I should say but that's an increase create. Create some watches it. You are creating all the time and I think we should be doing all of that and more and just being part of a big old conversation and I think that's where we feel happiest couple with finding a way to pay the rent which yeah just as more and when you harm hard question. It's hard to do. He is so hard and I've often struggled with the numerous side jobs. I've had to do which then overtake take much of my time. And then I lose faith in the acting because I'm spending so much time having to do why don't want to do and I find it hard and resigned. Recently the press came out about actors talking more about the side jobs. They had to do my thing. It's really healthy because not everyone's making an income from acting mood time and always incomes like by the end of the month you know what interesting to be able to earn and GONNA pay mortgage and save and think about if you want to do that thing that you could work together to sort of make bliss things happen so yeah it's it's a really really ready hard profession and I think sometimes it gets a funny rally the going thing when you go get the all GonNa get a Prophet Jones. Always want to have those stocks to hand where you say the income uh-huh and the G. paid the film television. The Arts create for this lucky to can have create table. This wealthy Boston like any industry imposed by any stretch of the imagination. But yeah it's it's IT'S A it's a battle in fact the other day someone else me said how many of you will year Jones with twenty years said how many of you here is still doing it. I'll go. We were yearling. Twenty Twenty eight hundred seventy seven.

Jones Twenty Twenty Canada Just brakes Boston Thin Tyson London Easterby cheever America UK Tom Hands writer Steve tatum director
"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

The Screenster Podcast

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

"Someone is some hands over a Coffee Cup to you. The first thing we try and do is think it's Coffee Cup. Would if I look at it from the different angle is there a way of doesn't always work work but there's there's a line in season there's a scene in season two which I think will come of really explain what it is but there's a season to any it if you look at it on the page it was designed to do one thing. It was very clear what it was. It's basically he accuses of something I'm actually mind. Stink to reactions to itchy accusing them of something or is he almost just asking a question. and afraid of hearing the onsite. It's I'm sorry considerably butts and then and then starting point rather than the the accuser to things. Suddenly it became much more interesting seen about these people and the May not necessarily surly of been obviously right in front of you but then as soon as the director to win. That's really great. Let's do that so you. You always doing job examining and they could have turned around and it's not what you're seeing is about. Okay note I wanted to try it so Sort of doing multiple things could train for that sort of that discovery. Because I think a good day were screening is when you go out and you think we go. We got it and we got three versions of and then it's a direct as medium ultimately if they're really good at what they do in the editors great and they'll go away and then they'll piece the story together and if it works as a whole grain dozen okay but at least we've we've mind perhaps tax into the opposite of war. The intention was when he was a writer. You know. Agendas access generally is to to to sort of elevate elevate material and bring bring a whole new layer of something to to a piece of Web so I find that fun as princess thinking is it. Is it goats. Yeah absolutely. It's so interesting. I think the the the show just brings up so many different wonderful things that people can relate to. I also just spoke to intimacy onset coordinator. You weren't onset patients. Name is either O'Brien and she worked with lots of the actors who had those these kinds of seas and it was just interesting. 'cause you could really then see the variety across the different characters my relationships and how that plays out wonderfully I it's just one of those few productions to explore that in really kind of different and fun and vibrant and interesting way and and. I think it's wonderful we were. I thought we were very early on in the whole intimacy coordinator sort of thing. Yeah it was. It was very new and it's amazing out to think one was this is because and so each came in and untrue billion. She'd probably be the first Osama. I think she was sort of figuring it out as well tell me what the end goal was which was to make say. SX SAFE for everybody to make sure at least retreated in a professional professional manner rather than anything Kinda slutty weird and so figuring out what the training process for that has really quick took the forefront of this which is brilliant but. Now it's it's a given and I think maybe the beginning people like hello. Yeah no absolutely. That sounds like a good idea. Idea has Iowa and of course it works beautifully and even I think everyone was like well. Yeah I mean we love you people working with us and it'll be a fine environment. It'll be safe rest of it but of course we lock him yet. Show that's US but there's dozens of others where but now it's really uncomfortable and it's really badly handled not intentionally. But that's just the way it is and it's horribly vulnerable and some of the scene Sunday. I mean the very opening opening senior season WANNA sex education. You're asking young people to be. I mean as vulnerable as you can public in many ways. It's extraordinary and the event of any a call with just so thankful that had been put in place But it's it's just it's it's you think wise is not yeah. What did people do it before I can? I can oh interested in waiting through it and found Vance things would have happened emotionally. You know. It's the ads really Graham Now there is thankfully much more to quality to not say generally probably not generally but I think in in in well done productions. That secure safety is now in place. But you know if anyone's naive to think that that is a true true true across all aspects of the industry as a long way to go content Eats it was a fabulous addition into the old.

O'Brien US coordinator writer Osama director Vance Graham Iowa
"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

The Screenster Podcast

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

"Donald Stage and screen. What do you have a friends on the process? It's it's it's a thing I do think about a lot I I love off. I never aspired to a film career. I never sort of when I want to be in the movies I thought film was you could tell a story on film On you could tell the story so very successfully on filming in one thousand nine hundred and twenty minutes or whatever but I sort of instinctively knew that while being a film is lovely sounds great but the kind of films that were being made in the ninety s confused merchant ivory films and I can the feminist you a source of nothing great in this country and so I thought well he managed to be films. Anyone can see it where I always loved the idea of television on the screen side of things. Because I thought well you're doing story long fall great time to explore story and then at least it will be put in front of an audience. The story that you working on tell we'll be told hold and people will see it. They make is entirely up to them. So film was never a thing. I was particularly interested in. I didn't make from for ages as an ages and ages television. I love the idea of it. For the sort of storytelling Williams reach the states. I I almost Conoco's to battle. Annoying is soothes sometimes. beat myself up about the notion of if if I didn't jump up and say the state state Tough and whether that's sort of Head but it's it's I do you. I love the price of it. I love the price of racing. I love the idea of being on some level all of that aspect I do struggle with repetition asylum and actually there was this brilliant quote recently and I think this great truth visit and he described it and I will paraphrase polling. He said what an audience. We'll see in a piece of this is the sort of dying in Mizzou sheeting star terribly dramatic but I think that that storm remain that way. You catch US something. Russell which is really instinctive and truthful in rehearsed I it takes everyone by surprise on stage and then you have to cross it into something which needs to sustain for weeks six months and I do I find that difficult so so do I prefer. It's such a tough question. I didn't as the reason not to it but what I do about working on camera is the capturing lightning in Hawaii where it is like a rehearsal in the sense that e everything will though the signing around we'll let alone since but the point. Appoint someone yells action in the point. Is someone else. Caught is the only true time that it's absolutely devoted to to the actors in the same and it feels extraordinary and it all depends on the material mostly doing but if it's good material than it can it can it. I can give you something so if you're in good hands as well I don't know I do I. I lost my. I lost my job for a long time after doing apply for a bunch of bunch of reasons just didn't feel the drawback to it actually and then I did go back and I loved it for a whole bunch of reasons because it was really fun to do the audience of the show. It was a success Blah Blah Blah. But I do. Struggle with the repetition and I love instinctive nature of working on camera especially on television can do because what's she's acquitted. which is great because so you you've got to be ready and I love all the love? The investigative nature of the script and the Chattan the discussions and I love all of that in the hot weather that demands that kind of gold. Mine accident something. Kind of extraordinary can happen. Doesn't always been a cab. Yeah throwing so. It's it's an internal struggle to dramatic a word that it's it's presence but do I want to get get back on stage. Yeah absolutely but but I think the final point of this is the fact that actually now. I think it's hard to find the right part. The right play at the right place with the right people that you will to collaborate with an is not gift. Anyone really gets the gets that gift. What do you want to do when you want to do it? The rest of don't and so I think that's tricky and why do any job the second doing apart from the fact that sometimes you good money we live so we'll see but yeah I would of course to play again. I don't think it'll be an amazing when I do but does the most books is to take and the chances of that happening for anyone pretty slick. And we'll see I think it practical terms and think maybe longevity in this very fickle business relies on an engagement and yeah with with the stage butts. I'm electoral like I do know that genuinely love doing stakes. I just don't get terry that don't as in don't don't particularly enjoy the experience but I've been very lucky in the sense that I've been able to play is easy to say. CEO Love Doing Television. I love doing television because sometimes people give me really nice parts to play on television. That's very different from just doing television because actually coming in for a day or two is is really really hard here know anyone there. Isn't that sense of cameraderie. There isn't one of the things things that they will give you if you're doing play whether you are playing a tiny honeypot and understudying and playing the lead so recently privileged very privileged position so my argument is very skewed in many ways. Plays bought being given interesting part. OCSTA- play in things to discussing tons of playing a palm. I love doing mm television for the very specific moderniser seventeen action caught but I know from semi sort of very privileged position because ninety deals to play uh oxen to join a company as well. So it's it's a the M visit complexity in which I shouldn't indict absolutely you brought incredibly big budget productions as mentioned before you were in the might manager which with a huge final playing the fandy and you act on rogue one as Geno driven. Do you notice the difference on the process when you're on these types of projects. Yes two things I'd say one big budget features versus television Is is two things scale but primary speed pace of which work generally film as much slow. Big Budget film film is is much slower on the machine to grind up to sort of running speed during the day is always is always seems to be slow. Nine manager was shot at tenny pace. We did we did. We had an interesting because we arrived on day. One of shooting and we were instead of the price of the unit base breakfast. Better make up about bit in some of eventually Cooley to do something this was home straight to sell to us. Mac and I think we're going. We're scrambled eggs wismer. This isn't what this is we every so we and it freaked everyone out. I the actors who might this is weird. And then the crew again will go to base in love and have lunch until reckless. The someone says we're supposed to do anything can really do anything. Because we were in the space just onset the producers over the CADS ADS and it was a complex scene involved five six seven people we rosenman off to your house and then of course within about a minute of this. We is access where this is great. We sing we getting this bit figured out for anything else and so. We didn't give a monkey's whether we go back out to you to base and it was a story conflicts a soggy we've nailed. It was rigged democratic process to because of the nature of the stories that that we were getting a lot of scenes involved. Hugh Laurie intolerant. Edelstein me and Tom Holland and Mike and hoving the bodyguards Elizabeth becky because we were around to get logged and so it was a very democratic process. Everyone had a voice in the Russo. Then she's on a beer organizing director for for the sheriff you know. She knows her run-ins my God. She's amazing and so it was a very different process equally. Sometimes you didn't unto into lunchtime but we didn't go down and we.

Donald Stage Conoco US Hugh Laurie tenny pace Hawaii Williams Russell Russo Mac director CEO Geno terry Cooley Elizabeth becky Edelstein Mike Tom Holland
"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

The Screenster Podcast

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

"I was the Patroon Thank you so much for joining me. Oh It's such a pleasure tabby and honestly you've worked extensively across the stage and screen from plays with Royal Shakespeare Company to run. How Film Rush Rogue One Star Wars story the might manage on the BBC to the ever popular sex education on Net flicks just to name a few foot one of this? He studied acting Nanda an stodgy grew up in different parts of the world. Because your father was an Aria pilot so how on why did you then end up in London John Yeah my my dad's a pilot so we moved every three years as is the common the way of being being services your station so you move on an as as a family sort of move along with to sort of follow dad in he because he was a pilot in the Rif when there's lots of different jobs within the orient including support in engineering and a million other things and his because he was a pilot he was sorts of useful in various different parts of the world. When you fly out of so uh yeah? We traveled to be three years. which is A? It's a sort of a matic lifestyle which it is but it's a comfortable lifestyle you know on the run and you probably well the tough too so I- i- smutty student Amit automatics while we were abroad and so it was the best way to sort of assimilation. Is very good at us when we think that was sort of doing what they need to do with mum was very very good about just throwing yourself into everything that the community of wherever we were in around the world versus off but she thought the best way to Sorta get involved which is a kind of a wonderful legacy ready because I think my sister-in-law sort of taken that notion on game volt seeing her on stage doing production section two of total. She played as a policewoman in total total. And I think it's a false memory. I think this is true. I was taking this aged about six. We're in Germany at the time and She had a line in the play. Mister toad is in the dock some crime or other anyway. She was was playing police when she was the witness and the line she had was. I think the lawyer or something says to her. Can you tell me what he called you. And he called me fat face and the audience just fell about after. I didn't get the context job particularly but there's no afterwards like what is this. What is this magic maintenance? I liked I too. There's no way to disprove. That's sort of a true or false memory. It feels very real and I think there was something weird when this is this this is what is this man now and then because she did other place in other places like in Lagos Nigeria. Where we were? She didn't play there and we were naturally dragged along to go and see them and I just remember a little snippets of these. Some of these plays he did by spirit and I was just like wow and there were people that were involved in amateur dramatics. The stocks were reading. They did a really good really good. And I think that's where it Kinda began and and then I just knew us what I wanted to do. So I've always wanted to do and then drama school because my my dad was school in Aberdeen in Scotland. He he would have been. The first member of his family had the opportunity university but didn't take because he knew what he wanted to do. He had they fought. His father died in died when he was about eight and a and so was my grandmother and my dad and his siblings lived in in this small flattened in Aberdeen but he. He was bright and very talented as a sportsman and so he had the opportunity to go to university returned. Now I stay team too because you wanted to do which is flyer plans for the military apart from war service obviously but no career. It was a great traditional the financial and I think truthfully eight sixteen when I turn around and with my dad and said I wanted to be an actor he I think he instinctively understood. Dude subconsciously really understood. Because he didn't understand the world of actual he didn't he was sort of suspicious of scientists in Flouncy flouncy outfits. That's where he would sort of that was his baseline bows is just make on all but I think that constantly understood. What's he recognize himself in the sense on? You do said something very I want to do this and he said Oh you committed you said yeah okay then also. I wasn't expecting that so then but there was still a sort of a bump in the road because there was an expectation expectation about. I should go to university so I sort of capitulated and went went to London. University study languages drama. which truthfully I had a great? I thought you were going to say you didn't do no bull not because of the modern languages because he was so much fun. Actually I go through out of university. We strangely raw rubber Provo. When did you get through train out quietly? The university I started to audition for drama schools. Pay The twenty quid. must've that together but working evenings not audition for an essential in Atlanta and the day. I got a boat from land with an acceptance letter day. Go Chuck Todd Bizarre Day. It was really odd so do to be in a basically have turned up to the first set of exams. Say Wait near that you wanted to drum in school even whilst being investing ultimately wanted to do a knocking glorious actress Natasha N.. Strong school on the sly to start the next September bringing amount and the the professor. He's down some of me and he said you basically didn't turn a tough times twenty one seven and one of them so I have no choice but to send you down which I think is really policy to say this inaugural Cambridge nine okay. Well I'm going to land anyway so much and he was. You could see the color he was expecting this. This weird pollen trip never came because I was just okay. I'm out things were basically Often University that's great now. I spoke to another actor who said it took him his first degree to realize that it wasn't what he wanted to do to then go and Ramos himself and the drama school. But it's also interesting. What you said about your dad and how? He didn't quite understand acting but he recognized that same passion in you because I think that for my dad. He does not understand industry tool but he was so passionate about flying the I could relate to them on that level. I think that's exactly it. It gets completely completely subconscious. It wasn't a conscious thing Messiah. My Dad's is I mean he's now he's now is known but he identity they get some infanticide these very linear. You know it's things in black and white very linear a and and I think it was it was was it was yeah. It was an understanding. He just sort of recognized it and to his full credit once he started to understand the world of what I was sort of doing doing peeling back the layers curtain. Whatever cliche you want to use he come a totally gone it which which was great really? Yeah I mean now. Because he's he's in the home and he's dimensional. Fortunately so he doesn't have these sort of recognition anymore. But the one side of that I have to say this is a huge amount of. He now doesn't keep asking me so word. When you up to anything you say anything on tick all? That's fine. Thanks Dad them and say you should. You should cool casualty. You should get into. That showed off. His tail does exist but Christmas lunch. So how'd awesome oil until you should cool actional so those days ago sadly in many ways in many ways the pressurall it sure of that so sweet. I just like to caveat that. We've got a bit of background music by the piano because the school an undisclosed the one thank you because we're surrounded by actress so it seems quite fitting raining. What was life like fee when you graduated? Did you find yourself in quite quickly I I was lucky I go to play just before he left Which Genesis man she was I think then of either Chad Woman or the vice chair of lander line president maybe and I went to her and she was directing a French. False tenzing Greg. uh-huh me bringing actress. CASSANI mates. There was eight of us. Nine of it was the Chelsea Center theatre which still exists and it was proper page up and an I just great on Breen. I'm working with genesis amazing. TV's bringing Thompson Greg. Although then she wasn't just a brin actress on their nitrous timing Greg and we had it was it was great and fast being just so technically difficult Janet Webb incredibly honed. She would. She gave us not James Notes every single performance. We are two intervals every single performance and she was giving notes on the seconds. You can't every show on the second interval of the final performance he was giving knows. I mean my go-to shy. That she can and it was great. It was really good introduction but I I should've see young actors now in this so on the so good I I think I was having a struggle. I would like a focus but you know it just finish strong school you sort of in a very healthy way when you're h you didn't really see be on the end of your nose thing. Go enough money to pay the rent into the week on the pocket for fags in a pint and maybe some eggs then and I'm great Roman and I think that's brilliant. You sort of need that. I think primarily. I think I was figuring out who was anyways. I didn't really know the drama school helped a lot so yes I did I was I worked. I was Roydon sort of the back end where the excitement of leaving drama school which is probably different now but leaving drawn John School and getting a job anywhere was breathed an accompanying less slightly early to play the Oxford Stage Company. Or whatever so I was at the back end of kind of going downturn La went to Exeter Norwich someplace and yes I did work consistently now now which was not then. I always thought I was told. I was quite specific constant because my heights connery will you're either going to be right over wrong. Consumers still cling onto that type of costing did.

Aberdeen London Thompson Greg I BBC Nanda Royal Shakespeare Company Germany Lagos Flouncy flouncy Amit Chuck Todd Mister toad John School Natasha N connery Chelsea Center theatre Ramos Atlanta
NTSB Begins Investigation At Kobe Bryant's Helicopter Crash Site

Mark Levin

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

NTSB Begins Investigation At Kobe Bryant's Helicopter Crash Site

"Update unnatural transportation safety board has joined the investigation into Sunday's helicopter crash that killed LA Lakers great Kobe Bryant is thirteen year old daughter and seven other people recovery of the victims continues so far three bodies have been removed share of Alex Villano eva has moved to protect the crash site from paparazzi and curious citizens Alistair parameter and now we have it on horseback in ATV and we're going to maintain ain't that presents twenty four seven until the entire area is done Brian's death is generated a massive show of support from the community CBS's Dana Jacobson we fans have flocked to this plaza across from staples center all day long to mourn together they also reduce the news the NBA has postponed tomorrow night's game between the Lakers and clippers what would have been the first since the accident for his former team and news from the basketball hall of fame Kobe Bryant will be inducted this year postion right was a five time NBA champion and two time

Lakers Kobe Bryant Alex Villano Eva Brian CBS Dana Jacobson NBA Alistair Clippers Basketball
Billie Eilish has a history-making night at the Grammys

The Breakfast Club

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Billie Eilish has a history-making night at the Grammys

"Mac Philly Alex had an amazing night last night she actually swept off four of the major categories and he's only the second artist in Grammy history to do that she's the first woman to do that to take home the big four awards at the album record a song of the year and best new artist the first artist ever do that with thirty nine years ago and that was Christopher cross local grass doesn't youngest album of the year winner in Grammy history she's only eighteen years old yeah now she went on stage revelling a couple to write a if we do so yeah yes all right now for this year while she was on stage she was as saying that she did get album of the year but she felt like someone else deserved it can I just say that I think Arianna deserves thank you nice got me through some and I think it deserves like more than anything in the world I love you so much I'm not going to waste your time I'm really not I love you thank you for this so she's into grams got a wrong per per usual I understand this is a pretty big guide is there my daughter loves of this you're going to know that they'll do the same thing with when she when I'm years you may I should one lemonade I'll listen I have heard you wanted so I can pull it Billy Alistair one Arianna Grande would win but if I artist gets up there and say what Yeltsin one that let me know that maybe somebody got to be humble right in like a lot of kids a lot of people like

Alex Christopher Arianna Grande Yeltsin Grammy Billy Alistair
"alistair" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"alistair" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And and high voltage circuitry and things of things around that and so I didn't give a lecture and he would show what would happen if you got into some of these situations you shouldn't be in what what can happen if you if you don't pay attention and follow the rules because people get hurt and so we try to help students to be aware of those risks physical risk associated with that now you could argue well what about financial risk our our emotional risk you know of risks that are are less physical and more no less there are more or less transparent you know they can happen to you either emotionally or or in other ways financially and otherwise those are two things you have to talk about are you have to have those conversations in class and and help them understand what can happen and so that's engineering has a set of principles that should be followed as you're developing and testing out thanks and if and if you follow those principles you tend to minimize those risks at least in the vine now reduced to society if you're trying to do is social subtle impact we also have a lecture modules that cover that as well so I think that I'm I'm actually pretty proud and I have to have a shout out to my colleagues for their number well I'm pretty proud that in most of our departments we work to try to expose the students to those soft skills those skills that are not driven by raw technology that outside of physics chemistry and biology Alistair here the skills of ethics right the skills of communication skills of of being able to interact those are important skills if if students have the technical skills and they can explain to you the pros and cons of the technology their differences those are the ones you want right everybody can design this which is but if I can explain to my mother and she gets it now that person is a little bit more value right they can go on and be the leaders right and so we try to give them some of those soft skills as well just to make sure they can try to understand the risks so you know I I I appreciate you giving me this time I appreciate you coming out on this yesterday Mr drive it is nice to have.

Alistair
A Romantic Revival

Where Should We Begin? with Esther Perel

08:56 min | 1 year ago

A Romantic Revival

"For the purposes of maintaining their confidentiality names and some identifiable characteristics have been removed but their your voices and their stories are real a couple four a romantic revival. I became an instant parent when I got married. Four to two loss. Birth months to suicide My first wife took her life on Saint Patrick's Day a twenty one year later we met and And we've been picking up the pieces. This next couple has confronted death in their midst for the past six years disadvant- has been at the center of their family life over the now six years that I've been in their lives not survival mode. It has been the most hurt wrecking profound experience of weather my entire life. I they are now ready to live again. As a New Year's resolution the couple apple chose a word for themselves an espionage revive and I have a sense that Dick. She came to work with me so that together. They can transition from not dead to alive and from survival to revival this is where should we begin with Alistair Brown. She's not like anyone I've ever met. Which is why I knew I needed to get a ring pretty quick? I thought if I don't someone else's can sweep her off her feet when you say she's not like anyone you've ever meant well the depth the types the things that she that stir her her heart and her soul. It's refreshing. That's what drew me. Tour was her ability to go there to take you to take me there. It's caused some friction along the way because it's tough to learn when you haven't grown you to it doesn't come natural to you to me right. And so there's there's been times where she has talked about wanting to connect deeper or go deeper and I'm thinking we already are. This is suspect more connected than I've ever been before And so in that sense there's some difficulties. What other important part of your lives? Do I need to know who I guess. One of the reasons. We've come is the the long arduous journey after a suicide and the impact that that's had on me and on the kids he's been gone a lot through the years with the military just knowing that I've missed a lot of things and Hamilton family histories is an interesting one Mom and dad divorced when I was two years old and they both got remarried and had kids and so I kind of bounced between the two. The two families and my stepmother was not particularly wonderful. Stepmother have Was Not a very nurturing person. And the understatement. Yes she she was. She wasn't a good person. You know She was very manipulative. She was verbally abusive and a couple times physically and then after they divorced. My Dad a had custody of me instead of my mom. So come The simple terms that I was told that I went with my dad was because she he wasn't ready to settle down and he was. There's a lot that's probably buried in that statement and and I haven't really wanted to know the why theme of children that are abandoned by their mother. uh-huh runs through generations fair Nice we have saying she wasn't ready to settle. Now you were and children you think were abandoned by their mother. Oh sure when she then by suicide absolutely. How do you think your experience with your mom translates leads into what goes on between you and your kids? vis-a-vis them I don't know that there was was a deep attachment with my mom. I might have got that up until the age of two but I don't remember that and then the stories I've heard with my step mom as as a three year old when she came into my life. My Aunt said she remembers seeing me. Try to crawl up and my stepmother's lap and you know pushing me away and so I had that being pushed away from her and then my mom just wasn't there for the first I know from age two to six probably so there's a gap there That I don't really remember much time with her. And we have two kinds of memory. We have explicit memory and implicit memory and explicit memories kind of conscious awareness of Thaksin but implicit awareness and implicit memory. Lives in our body and the body remembers the value remembers particularly when you try to get close to your wife. You connect those dots. You probably have. It's so clear. Same say more. I think that's the root of a lot is what happened with his mom and step mum the root of a lot of what disconnection between us for a while. I thought it was what happened. Happened with his former wife. But then the more I learned was kind of a like. Oh this isn't it just continued eared through her. He couldn't trust his own mother but the mother figure in his his stepmother so he built up a wall law. And I'm not going to trust or or be confident in pursuit of me Secure knowing that it's not gonNA be a rejection. I think sometimes I I struggle with coming in to the level of connection that she's she's desiring not out of fear but simply out of not down on what you're talking about. It's almost like speaking a different language. Have a a good example. If I'm upset to me the natural sponges come in and hug me like comfort me or and it's he just stands Alexa me stairs. Feels like where I want connection. There's no movement you freeze. I do freezing reason those situations but It's not a fear it's not feeling that's what freezing okay. ohka tracking the brain's response to trauma. We are often familiar with fight and flight. But we also have freeze and sometimes it seems to me that a freeze points to an even more overwhelming set of experiences winces that way just simply too much to absorb and left the person frozen helpless and in a state of terror

Saint Patrick Disadvant Alexa Alistair Brown Hamilton Dick Apple Six Years Twenty One Year Three Year Two Years
Defiant UK lawmakers move to bar 'no deal' Brexit

BBC World Service

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Defiant UK lawmakers move to bar 'no deal' Brexit

"With covering the fight in the house of Commons over no deal brexit dramatic events yesterday opposition MPs and twenty rebels from the governing Conservative Party uniting to defeat the prime minister Boris Johnson he says he's going to call an election that's what we've been talking about constitutional niceties parliament the shape of politics in Britain economics and elections as well here to round things out for us in the next few minutes at Stephen bush political editor for the New Statesman and Alice but one of those conservative rebels Alistair a just a just one Oski both where this leaves us in terms of how close we get to a no deal brexit that's what the prime minister wanted that's what he was promising now parliament is trying to stop it after all these events let's just go back to that fundamental things even a week closer or further from a no deal breaks it do you think at the moment further away for two reasons the the first is of course we all now moving to one will be from a just a little perspective further away because that will be a month long extension with further way too because one of the reasons why no deal looks so likely is this parliament can only say what he doesn't want they can say it doesn't stop brexit on one to have the with your agreement which eventually to the automatic correction of little leads to a no deal brexit I think we can see now upon off to only the a slightly different Commons which can resolve it one way or the other election foster actually your situation where the government looks at the prospects for election will break his own result and decides to swallow anything to get some form of brexit over the line I just about what you think is most likely a week closer or further away from an ideal bricks of my own. I come visual and I do know that what I would do this morning is in number ten I'd rip up the plan because

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Conservative Party Stephen Bush Political Editor Alistair Britain Alice
Boris Johnson loses his majority.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson loses his majority.

"Coming up on the News Boris the Johnsons Conservative Party loses its majority in parliament. UK currency volatile as investors try to gauge Brexit exit risks and cancer is now the biggest middle aged killer in rich nations. It's Tuesday September three three. I'm Anthony Davis British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and suffered key defections from his party today losing a working majority in parliament and weakening his position as he tried to prevent him piece from blocking his brexit plans plans claiming that rebels would diminishing his chances of negotiating a deal with the EU on the day of high drama in the House of Commons politicians return from the summer break to confront Johnson over his insistence that the UK leave the e U on October thirty first even without withdrawal agreement to cushion the economic blow many shouted resign. Johnson's tenuous position became clear even as he spoke in parliament for the first time since it reconvened gened Philip Liam P rose from his chair on the conservative benches and sat down with a Liberal Democrats defection that meant Johnson lost his slim working majority of one that makes Johnson vulnerable should. MP's opt to try to oust him in a vote of no confidence and will complicate the passage of legislation. Leah today to other prominent conservative signalled their intention not to seek reelection rather than bend to Johnson's will all former cabinet minister justine greening and former Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt also signalled their intentions to stand down Jeremy. I mean Coleman leader of the main opposition. Labor party lambasted the weekends Johnson accusing him of riding roughshod over the constitution in order to crash Britain out of the EU without a deal widely considered to be Johnson's preferred outcome changing the government would not be simple a no confidence vote would would spark a fourteen day period in which Johnson could try to overturn the result. If he failed there would be a general election The pounds today touched its lowest level against the dollar since one thousand nine hundred eighty five as international investors fret over a political showdown over brexit this week the British currency fellas low as one dollar and nineteen cents down almost ascent on the day before aw recovering somewhat to one dollars twenty the pound has become the main indicator of international investors confidence in Britain's economy. It's effectively makes British people poorer as they can spend less on travel and foreign goods which become pricier but it also helps British exporters as well as the many multinationals nationals that are based in the country but most of them money in other countries and currencies oil companies like Shell and BP make them money in Dulles around the world converting that back two pounds when they report earnings so the pounds drop is generally a boost to them. That's why the main stock index the footsie one hundred and has actually held up well in the face of the brexit chaos while the pound is down almost seven percent this year the stock index is up eight percent stocks focused based on Britton's own economy however fared more poorly leaving the European Union without a trade deal would cost Britain at least sixteen billion dollars in in lost eighty you sales and probably far more after accounting for indirect effects and other markets. This represents an approximate seven percent loss of overall. UK UK exports to the EU that would include five billion dollars in motor vehicle exports two billion dollars in animal products and a further two billion in in apparel and textiles cancer now causes more deaths among the middle middle aged in higher income countries than cardiovascular disease study suggests globally heart problems and stroke is the leading cause of death at this age but the researchers say people in rich nations a two and a half times more likely to die of cancer than cardiovascular disease in the middle years is in poorer nations. The reverse is true with cardiovascular disease three times more likely to claim the lives. The study published in the Lancet is he's drawn from a global research program following the lives of thousands of people from across twenty. One countries research is led by a team from Canada's McMaster university looked at the fate of one hundred sixty thousand people enrolled in the program between two thousand five and two thousand sixteen cardiovascular disease caused more within forty percent of deaths in middle and low income countries but less than a quarter in high income countries. The researchers say this could be because rich countries trees provide more medication and treat more people in hospital. You can subscribe hi to the news with your favorite podcast APP or ask. Your Smart Speaker to play the news with Anthony Davis podcast leave us a review on I tunes and follow us on twitter attack. At the news underscore podcast for daily updates. The news is an independent production covering politics inequality health and climate delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Boris Johnson European Union UK Johnsons Conservative Party Anthony Davis Britain Brexit Britton Minister Alistair Burt Justine Greening Leah Prime Minister Foreign Office Labor Party Coleman Twitter Cabinet World News Canada Shell
Alistair Bathgate Alistair, Founder And US discussed on Financial Issues

Financial Issues

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Alistair Bathgate Alistair, Founder And US discussed on Financial Issues

"Now, let's turn to our next guest and joining us in the studio. We've got blue presumes C E O and founder Alistair Bathgate Alistair, welcome. So we've heard this morning that blue prison is buying Tony for a consideration of up to eighty million pounds of British tech firm. You released your half year earnings this morning as well reporting, a thirty four million pound loss in EBay, da, that said sales, and revenue climbs. Now analysts were expecting as much with Marion global investors saying that blue prism. You're an automation software maker could remain a high growth business for many years. So growth is one thing profitability is another Alistair. When do you expect to become profitable? Well at the moment, we see a vast global market, and we're expanding in a whole range of territories and that requires investment in mocks in an insane. I'm not comes in revenues. So this is a great British global expansion story as you say revenues up by eighty two percent possibly US, revenues doubled. We secure at three hundred forty nine new customers, and which means customer base has gone up by a third in just six months. So this is a rapid growth story. And for the moment, we feel that investing in growth is thing to do, but you have been around for quite some time, and I suppose, that's why the questions although bound for feasibility. I mean I'd love to know what you think is going to help potentially drive the turnaround in profits. Ability, I noticed expanding in new countries. And so how do you. You, how'd you basically turn turn that story around him and you've been around for more than a decade now where we know we have a fundamentally a profitable business model. We were profitable in the year before we I appeared on one of the reasons that we went public with today's funds to grow and to invest ahead of that growth, as you can imagine when you went to a new temporary. Let's say the Middle East where we have recently you have to make investments in marketing and people in sales. People also we have to make investments in product as well ahead of that growth coming back. So that's the story of why and how we invest in right now. Yeah, the acquisition of full Ptolemy announced this morning and tell us the rationale behind that is that because you're concerned that you're not going to be able to achieve that profitability through Ganic growth known of has been a partner since twenty fifteen. The product that Bill is based on technology is built on the platform. So it's a very logical acquisition for us, what they've created as a off an intelligent, automation platform based prison, plus other technologies combined. They've turned into a software as a service cloud, offering based on Microsoft has a not is particularly suited to the mid tier. And so this is a new product for us. Okay. So that's the autonomy acquisition. The is also an issue around. Around short interest in prison. When you look at the amount that you have route edgy mentioned that, that you are. You've run a two thousand two hundred percents. This thing is a huge rise, but short interest in prison has actually climbed above five percent in the past month, what he make that I think, when you were highly wretched stock as you say, the people will bet on some volatility on, you know, you just have to live with that went on building a short term, shot price hair. We're trying to build a business for the long term. Those show interest, though, did reach a record last month. So what would you say to convince those that may be on just simply betting on volatility, but actually have concerns around the stock? What would you have to convince them again back to this issue of the lack of profitability? I would say, look at the graph look at the figures look at the growth in revenues look at the growth in customers these three hundred and forty-nine new customers have valid that toes in the water and we've got so many of our customer base at the early stages of adoption and then look attention on manuals rights renews, extraordinarily high, and then look, up selling a stars, and that have very strong as well. This is an engine built for growth and global growth. And so our choice to invest and go underwater on the line because we think it's going to generate gripe for the future. But some point we can get uptight off on investment, and very quickly, when the company will become a customer from profitable also, very interesting, of course, because your UK gray story, not just a u k one not actually a London based company, but base in the north of England in Warrington tapping into a university of Manchester university. So with that in mind, you're not basis, Silicon Valley, although your tech firm, how'd you see Brexit at this stage? What does that mean in terms of bringing on new people? So proud of you obviously coming from the north west of England monkey union university as where the computer was invented. And so. Yeah. I bullish sorry. Thank you so much for joining us that was pretty prism, CEO, and founder, Alison

Alistair Bathgate Alistair Founder United States Bill Marion Global Ebay Middle East England Monkey Union Universit Ptolemy Microsoft Brexit Ganic CEO Alison UK Partner London
Dalai Lama meets alleged victims of abuse by Buddhist gurus

BBC Newshour

01:26 min | 2 years ago

Dalai Lama meets alleged victims of abuse by Buddhist gurus

"Of abuse. In the Roman Catholic church from Germany to Chile to the United States would be making headlines for years now and continue to do. So as we've seen this week. But what about abuse within Buddhism? Well, today, the Dalai Lama the spiritual head of Tibetan Buddhism has been meeting alleged victims of abuse by Buddhist teachers in the Netherlands, it was organized in response to an urgent appeal. The twelve victims sent to him the alleged perpetrators are said to be active in a number of countries. I'd be speaking to the Dutch investigative journalist. Rob HOGAN, Don his spent years looking into this festival. How widespread is abuse in Buddhism? It's very widespread. And it's under reporters. It's only now that's investigative reporters. For instance, are starting to look into this. I've done so myself for some six years now, and I've been very active in the Netherlands collaborating with other reporters, and I'm working on twenty. Three fouls on twenty three individual abusers. And we have fifty thousand Buddhists in the Netherlands. So that's a very high incidence of abuse and still I'm not covering everything there is because new cases pop up, you know, every month. Does that include sexual abuse? Then all of these cases are sexual abuse cases. So these are twenty three separate sexual abuse cases in the Netherlands alone. And I'm pretty sure that wants

Netherlands Volkswagen Germany BMW Editor BBC Roman Catholic Church Europe Autocar Magazine Rob Portman Rob Hogan Beetle Delilah Lama Alistair Darling Autocar Bbc Bbc Lehman Brothers United States Engineer
China, Cape Town and Botswana discussed on A Public Affair

A Public Affair

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

China, Cape Town and Botswana discussed on A Public Affair

"The headmistress of a Chinese nursery school in Shenzhen has apologized after inviting, a pole dance to perform. At a ceremony to welcome youngsters for the new academic term, the scantily clad women danced around a. Pole, bearing the Chinese flag in front of three to six year. Olds carry Allen is the BBC's China media analyst they decided to invite this. Pole dancer in a number of other dances to welcome Paran son children to the, school I mean this sounds absolutely bizarre but these events do happen in China where you do have these very novel ways in which parents think. That their kids can come to this, school because it's very different but there's been outrage online some people have been. Saying that they think that this kind of dancing is not appropriate for Chinese

China Cape Town Botswana Africa President Trump China Africa BBC Michel Temer Pole Dance South Africa Yemen Abu Dhabi Johannesburg Aden Alistair Leaf Salvator Mundi Rwanda Beijing Greece
"alistair" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"Charles kennedy died and alistair campbell release via twitter at about a discussion that they'd had straight after the referendum and i think charleston cooled alastair said defense assessing up a pro united kingdom pro european policy in scotland and because he who he was there in scotland making case when an irate here as a petition corden lot univer took some nick to sturgeon doing the anti supports no matter which way we try to paint over it or one of the discussions that the eu is having with us now are precisely the ones ones that we would have happened if it left isn't if there's an if there's a single market here then we have to have the same regulatory standards the conversation would be transposed so it is it's very hard to come up with a consistent argument from scottish national view that is brexit in my opinion i remember when you had i was listening to the show my efforts the hotel just grumbling nonsmo of course there was no one to hit me but i think if toes in says it's only affects the way they see brexit and how brexit should be resolved on pre amazed that the smp haven't put got behind the people's vote on the on the deal but then you actually remember always because they've got their own problems about how when they put forward indirect to their sole purpose for being i don't really hold that against them but that's their primary concern and then there's department at wonders is the best as you center is the best route to independence for them that cially england or the government in london imposes a deal on startline they don't like and then you cope without a people's though on the brexit issue that opens the door to what the snp would argue is the more important referendum on scottish independence they they gonna were gonna be be of of abide abide and i was the one that only put the whole of the united kingdom into the brexit tom cop show us the things i think because i think this is so klutzy likely the socalled unionists posse ends up destroying the union well yes we say that noise a conservative union well there's nothing of that of their past the heritage that they that they want to keep the single market is made by thatcher you know the strasbourg is a church billions of invention the basically the current price of the tory paci is to dismantle all of the ways that we british bodies across the across the the continent annan country they're gonna bring back folks hunting and smoking let's go with a who would that be what would swing yeah clean.

twitter alastair scotland nick eu snp strasbourg Charles kennedy alistair campbell charleston corden sturgeon london
"alistair" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"They do something like that basically i mean you know alistair that our bodies got these negative feedback chambers and i was tell people your body doesn't have brain in you know people they don't understand what it mean it's on top of my net but the truth is is that we know that we can go to store anytime we want we can go buy food we know that body doesn't know that you know so there'd be no reason for it to hold onto body fat you know if new that there'd be no reason for for it to do that if if a fighter new like hey if the body new like we just got to release this water and then we're going to go on a scale and it's game over you know it doesn't know that you know it's like you're just amazing survival mechanism so we go out in the desert you know you buy start sweating now that the first thing he wants to do is wants to pull it off that's the first thing he wants to do that's the first basic stimulus he's steamiest sweat and then what happens crap now is not getting water back in what's more important off or keeping from getting dehydrate it's it's hormones you know so everything is based on like going over these these negative feedback signals you know what i mean right and when it comes to you know some of the things that i'm sharing with people i'll say hey there's going to be times where you're going to want to go through periods where you eat more and there's going to be some times where he goes through some periods where you eat a little less there's gonna be some times where maybe you do add in some cardiovascular training training maybe there's some points where you kick that stuff out maybe there's points where you lift less maybe there's points where you focus in on some.

alistair
"alistair" Discussed on Final Games

Final Games

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on Final Games

"Yeah so picking off daves final games than the eight games that he's going to take with him to the deserted place in which will talk about a little later on kicking off the first game is a a series i really like as well at a sort of nb darling that came out of nowhere on xbox live a few years ago based around flash game that it appeared on pcs a couple of years prior and just a of blew up in the early sort of two thousand eight i think two thousand nine with the first game got released on experts live with alistair cells by right yeah he has around that this game was developed by red links and sort of in tandem with ubisoft i think it's himself shanghai and on some of absolves other studios it's the coolest published by resolved it released or playstation 4 xbox one and pc back in 2014 answer leaves quite an early game in this generation cycle it's a platform racing video game although racing is canada unique word for this game does it does require the use of motorcycles saw motorcross bikes if you will it sold off gangbusters for being an indy title is trials fusion data centres why taking transfusion with you so like i'm i think one or maybe a couple themes running through my game list okay okay wanna one of them is i'm kind of fascinated with the notion of videogame mastery right of like becoming so good at something so second nature that like what was previously impossible to do and very complex is now really easy to do great yes the and like is like trials is a great game it's you know so fusion is not the hardest game in the series like the previous game was probably a lot harder but.

alistair
"alistair" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the take away arms todd's will iq more than three hundred million people visited the national park system in the united states in 2016 but that's a system that is now under threat the guardian newspaper has a new investigative series it's called this land is your land they're looking at threats to america's public land's in their latest report delves into the national park systems infrastructure in dire need of repair alistair g is public land's editor for the guardian alistair welcome back heights out thanks very much saturday well you and the guardian had been reporting on the national park system all over the country from yosemite and california to harpers ferry in west virginia alistair what's the overall state of the park system now well nestled parks are warm parts of this very dramatic am special tapestry all public lands that are held in trust but the american people and managed by the governments and as he said they are also very much loved by the american people but for several years now that has been this very very large backlog of maintenance that the pomp so this has been able to accomplish in the park there is now approximately eleven billion dollars of what's cold deferred maintenance which basically means that it was a repair that the park service wasn't able to carry out in a given year so basically had added to a backlog and so what this means in practice is that you have trails that out clothes you have in one case a cab in that collapsed in another case you have waste water systems that are in dire need of repair oil pipelines supplying drinking water to keep bursting and so as one expert describes the national park service is in.

todd united states editor yosemite california america alistair g west virginia eleven billion dollars
"alistair" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on 790 KABC

"From cafe alistair winfrey yeah no doubt anyway we'll talk to duck drew about that later on in the hour but first there's been a a surge in flu cases that have been keeping southern california hospitals very busy held officials are saying the flu outbreak is the worst they've seen in fifteen years nazis the flu these are like almost eur almost at death's door there was a young other guy with four kids and his wife inch he was like oh i feel ache he i don't feel right and she said wool go to lie down he liked down for two days finally need to go the emergency room and his whole renal system was shutting down and she said we didn't get flu shot sincere he was completely he's on death store right now and he's he's like in his forties apparently nobody's getting flu shot because they're not very effective that's what i've heard on my friend got one today she sixty four kathleen yes she said you know what i did it i i wha wha how the do the kolomanski me whatever the heck that is and i feel i thought will give you the flu shot and i said how you feel she goes fine but i thought when you've got the flu shot you sort of feel sick because it gives you the flu symptoms and i think that old wives all okay now the you should the doctor to k a b c back with disneyowned us okay and they would do the flu shot at the office but it wasn't a shot it was the greatest thing i've ever seen or online at higher lows no has had a gun like it looked like a glove gunboat yeah and they put it next to your arm yeah and they pull the trigger pull the trigger and it just went yep and it shot this serum at your at your arm so fast that had penetrated your skin and went into your blood system and you felt nothing that's fantastic yeah well you know i up out pretty fast dr drew i do the he'll dot com and they'll company door.

alistair winfrey blood system flu california fifteen years two days
"alistair" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"alistair" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"What's shaken fire nation jld here and welcome to episode 1800 an eighty six eofire where i am chatting with a hunter per newroz on fire a seven days a week and if you're ready to accomplish that one big goal fire nation check out of the freedom journal and you'll kharbash at one goal in one hundred days to now let's chat with today's featured guest alistair clay alastair are you prepared to ignite i'm ready to bird journalists in p r director alastair is cofounder of class p r the number one source of pr wisdom for starved and entrepreneurs and inventors of the famous formula alice or take a minute fill in some gaps from that intro and give us just a little glimpse of your personal life okay so i live england in the southwest of england right now i'm i'm father to a very small loud baby and a toddler as well we around class beyond my wife and i run it together and yeah yeah things pretty pretty full on in the moment and fun and we are on learning how to build a business whilst on three hours sleep a night so it's it's all good well you'll get their brother and i will say you have to be pretty good in an expert at something to be restored get things done on three hours of so kind of hurry hata hata down for us what would you say today you're an expert in what's that area of expertise so it's really it's it's pr its public relations in journalism and but i guess what links all that together storytelling so what we were arm an expert at a storytelling and.

freedom journal alastair england alistair clay director three hours one hundred days seven days