19 Burst results for "Alison Stewart"

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it. I'm Alison Stewart with gatherings at Union Square in McCarren Park last night protests continued over the decision by a grand jury not to charge any officers for killing Brown, a tailor. On Wednesday, Louisville Police officer Brett Hankinson was indicted on three charges of wanton endangerment, one for each member of a family in a neighboring apartment. The bullets had entered but who went unharmed. None of the charges apply to Briana Taylor, who was struck by six bullets. It's unclear if any of them have been fired by Hankinson of the three officers who fired their guns during the raid in March. Heck isn't the only one to receive charges and the on ly one to have been dismissed from the force. As Benjamin Crump, the prominent civil rights attorney who was representing Briana Taylor's family tweeted on Thursday. We've been saying her name for six months and hashtag Briana Taylor's name was never mentioned in yesterday's indictment. In New York. Protests following the decision have been relatively non violent. However, Louisville a 26 year old man was arrested for shooting two police officers and there is video of a truck running over a protester in Los Angeles. It's morning, Briana Taylor's family held a press conference where Taylor's aunt, Bianca Austin Red remarks written by Taylor's mother. Camera alone didn't feel hurt. But it ended with the lack of investigation failed her. The officer who told a lie to obtain a search want filled her. The judge who signed the search warrant failed her. The terrorists who broke down her door filled her system as a whole has filled her. You didn't just rob me of my and my family. You robbed the world of a queen queen willing to do a job that most of us could never stomach to do a queen willing to build of anyone around her A queen. Who was starting to pave our path. I hope you never have to know.

Briana Taylor Brett Hankinson officer Louisville Police Alison Stewart Benjamin Crump endangerment Louisville McCarren Park Heck Union Square Los Angeles Brown New York Bianca Austin Red attorney
Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

The Takeaway

12:36 min | 1 year ago

Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

"Threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security is just I mean, it's amazing I wouldn't have imagined in my wildest dreams. That people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don't like what you and I say it, namely in the word of science. That they actually threaten you. That's Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, speaking to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, about threats he and his family have received because of his work. And Dr Fauci is not alone. Public health officials across the US are also receiving threats from people who are against the policies they put forth to combat the corona virus. Things like recommendations to wear masks and practice social distancing. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and she's been researching this exact topic. Michelle, Welcome to the show. Happy to be here. Shall you wrote an article about the attacks on public health officials during covert 19. What was it that prompted you to even look into this? Well, it happens that one of my bosses that Stanford is married to our Santa Clara County local health officer here in the Bay Area, So I do have a personal connection to somebody who's experienced these kind of attacks. Tell us a little bit about what kinds of attacks were talking about. All across the country. We've really seen a number of things that made your audience seem pretty shocking and are unusual even in the American context we have seen, you know the usual Internet trawling, but the attacks have taken on a highly personal and almost violent dimension. Across the country. We've seen health officer subject to dock, saying the exposure of their personal information like their addresses or loved ones, names on the Internet. Angry and sometimes armed protestors showing up at their private residences, vandalism of their offices and homes, lots of harassing telephone calls and even death threats to the point of having to have private security details assigned to their families. Michelle, one of the things that prompted me. I'd saw the research here and then saw that Dr Anthony Fauci has needed to get his own extra private security because I believed his family had been threatened. Are we primarily talking about high profile figures like that, Or are we talking about? Anyone who's sort of on the front lines dealing with Corona virus cases. In particular, we're talking about people who ordinarily are about his low profile. As you can get local public health is thean visible angel that keeps us all healthy. But most of us until this pandemic you never heard of or seen our local health officer. They have been in the news lately on television and newspaper a lot, so they're no longer such private figures. But these are not high profile figures. They're not national figures. In most cases, they're not. They don't have a political agenda. There are doctors trying to do their jobs. Who are making these threats. Well, it comes from a variety of quarters. Ah, leader in Catalyst in this movement has been the anti vaccination movement here in the U. S. That has all of a sudden pivoted from their usual agenda of attacking public figures who advocate vaccination to going after health officers who are advocating masking and the extension of state home or business closure orders, But it's not on ly these groups. They've been joined by thousands of people across the country who are just really disgruntled and incredibly stressed. By the long term economic impact and social isolation that has stemmed from public health orders during the pandemic. Medical professionals are take a Hippocratic oath to serve whoever it is that needs their help. So like this, this feels like doctors and nurses didn't necessarily sign up to be. In such a political battle, You know, it's interesting the politicization of first responders because those on the front lines were actually caring for covert patients have been politicized as heroes in this pandemic. But the same groups of individuals, doctors and nurses who are working in the public health sector have been demonised as villains. They're all working toward the same goals, and we need to understand that, although they execute their objectives in different ways, they're all working towards a single and so are we. So it's really striking to me that there's been this polarization and how folks have viewed First responders and public health doctor's Michelle. Stick with us. We'll be back in a moment. This is the take away. On the next. All of it, looking for a job thinking about switching to a new one will discuss how to navigate the remote workforce in our series, the future of work, and we meet the director of the new documentary Boy State, which goes inside the weeklong mock government exercise that gathers more than 1000 high schoolers to create their own state government. I'm Alison Stewart. Join me for all of it weekdays at noon. We're back and you're listening to the takeaway. I'm tansy. No Vega. Michelle Mellow is on the line with me. She's a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and we're talking about recent threats against public health officials all around the country. Michelle. Have we heard anything from the Trump Administration or other politicians at any level of government about this? Because recently in New Jersey, there was a federal judge whose family was attacked. Now there are talks of increasing protections for federal judges. And I'm wondering if this is now transferring over to medical professionals and health professionals. Well, yet we have to distinguish between medical professionals who are on the frontline response like the ones who are working in hospitals and the ones I'm talking about. Are those were working in public health departments. I'm not aware of specific problems involving the folks who are working in hospitals other than nobody wants to stand next to them at the grocery store. But the public health officials really have had to have protection stepped up. Unfortunately, most of our elected officials to the extent that they're speaking to this issue at all have been joining in the attacks. You know, there are folks who are making their name for themselves politically. By joining in the chorus of attacks against public health officials. In some cases, their own public health officers, you know, saying things like their anti Democratic their tyrannical when in reality, those same health officers are the only people in that state who can issue these orders. They're executing. Planning done by other elected officials, who then sort of hide behind this rhetoric, So it really is, in my view, despicable that instead of offering support to these hardworking, underpaid under attack health officers State and local officials. And in some cases, congressmen and the president have joined in the attacks, and the president himself has been the foam enter and chief here Retweeting such statements as everyone is lying. The CDC media Democrats are doctors, everyone we're told to trust That kind of statement fans the flames. Michelle did your research show whether or not there was a difference in health officers who are in red states versus blue states or our folks that work in these positions across the board, subject to this type of harassment. You know, we really have seen it in all kinds of communities. Certainly there is a red and blue divide in willingness to accept public health measures like masking and to the extent that you're leading a community that's more red than blue. You might have a larger segment of the population going after you. But some of the people who have been under attack are in heavily blue communities were actually most of the population really supports what they're doing. Polling is very much in their favor. But there is a vocal extreme of vocal minority that is dominating attention. Is there anything that public health officials Khun do to protect themselves? You know, to protect themselves. Many of them do need security details, and they need elected officials to stand up and indicate that when these actions crossed the line into illegal forms of harassment, they'll be subject to prosecution in terms of self defense strategies. You know, I think it may be late in the game for this, but there are some things that I think We know help to cultivate public trust and buy in to coerce of public health legal measures. Polling shows us that when people feel that they have a say in public health policy agendas when quote unquote people like me can influence agendas in public health policy, they're more likely to accept laws, even the ones that they don't love. So I think there are opportunities for some health officers to double down on the transparency and candor in their public communications. We do have examples of where this has been done Extraordinary. Well. I think it helps to humanize health officers to telegraph that they're really struggling with these decisions. They don't take them lightly, and also that they have the support of consultation of a number of other people. Well, they're not acting alone and imposing these orders. Do you know of any health officers who have decided to leave? Ah, the job as a result of this because it doesn't feel like you know, the virus is not going away. Assume as many of us would have liked, and people are going to have to make policies and an implement policies until we've got some clarity on where what the next phase of this is so have folks that you know, decided to leave their jobs as a result. Absolutely. I think the count is up near 30. Now, health officers who have either resigned or been forced out by their elected officials since the start of the disease pandemic because of the politicization of their orders. And that includes Oxiris Barbeau, who was the New York City health commissioner. It includes Nicole Quick, the health commissioner of Orange County are most affected County in California. In terms of covert cases it includes West Virginia health officer for the state had the slam so lots of folks who are dealing very, very difficult situation simply, it's just not reasonable to expect them to go on month after month. In this kind of climate, especially when they're not getting any support from other officials mentioned Oxygen's Barbeau and I know that was a big issue here in New York, particularly because she clashed with Mayor Bill de Blasio. Are we seeing a lot of that? A CZ? Well, just internally among Officers and public health officials, and also just, you know, the other officials that they're dealing with. It feels like I don't know if that was very specific to New York City politics or if that's also happening across the board. I think that is happening in a lot of communities. Yes, where you have a schism between elected branches of government that represent communities that have a particular ideological bent and help officers who have been serving you know for many, many administrations many many years and you are You're acting on the science a TTE this point of the pandemic. People are fed up with the science. They want a balance of between health concerns and economic and other concerns. And again. Some health officers have been very good at explaining how public health orders balanced. Those concerns and others who are maybe less transparent, really have been confronted by a lot of attacks from Ah, elsewhere in government. But, you know, responding to local political pressures themselves you mentioned earlier. We we are having to differentiate between threatening health officers and health officials and making and threatening frontline workers like doctors and nurses. But Our doctors and nurses subject to any type of politicization and threats right now, because of the role that they what they could possibly represent, or have they gotten off Have they sort of not been in the cross hairs? If you will. You know, I'm not aware of those kinds of attacks. I think it's more just that What we hear from them is the difficulty that they have in their personal lives Because people know they work with sick people. They don't want to be around him. They don't want to be around their kids. So it's the usual story in any pandemic, where You're the child of somebody who's working with an affected patient. Nobody wants their kid in school with you. I think that causes some difficulties for them, but it's a different quality and caliber of attack than what we've been talking about with public health officers. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and a professor of medicine at Stanford University. School of Medicine. Michelle. Thanks so much, Thank you.

Michelle Mellow Officer Stanford University Dr Anthony Fauci Professor Of Law Professor Of Medicine United States Sanjay Gupta Bay Area CNN Santa Clara County Stanford New York Alison Stewart New Jersey CDC Social Isolation Vandalism
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC on Alison Stewart coming up we're taking a trip back to the big baseball news in the summer of ninety eight director AJ she's not going to discuss his new ESPN documentary long gone summer about Sammy Sosa and mark McGwire battle for the home run record then will there be any sports to watch this summer we'll get an update on summer sports in the time of coded for ESPN SportsCenter LA co anchor stand dress and later pride celebrations are happening online and IRL throughout the city this month W. NYC culture editor gave in after stops by to share some of her favorite picks we'll get to all of it I'm Alison Stewart and I'll meet you on the other side of the news live from NPR news I'm she Stevens a white former Atlanta police officer is facing felony murder charges over the killing of a black man during protests against police killings of black people Guerrant role faces eleven counts and all for fatally shooting Bechard Brooks in the back his former partner Devin Bronson faces lesser counts including aggravated assault Fulton County district attorney Paul Howard alleges Ralph kicked Brooks as he lay bleeding on the ground while Bronson stood on the suspect shoulder does this public health director Bruce tartar surging crowds converging on the city this weekend to wear masks to guard against covert nineteen like other areas of the country dart says Tulsa is seeing an uptick in corona virus infections from June sixth to June thirteenth report we reported a hundred and sixty percent increase in cases over the previous week black community leaders say they fear violence during president trump's rally and counter protest this weekend the rally will coincide with two events commemorating Juneteenth when union soldiers notify Texas slaves that they had been free two and a half years earlier the World Health Organization has suspended trials of hydroxy clerk when as a cook at nineteen treatment and Pierce Jason Beaubien reports that the W. H. O. also has a warning about another drug that appears to help patients with severe cases of the disease the W. H. O. says it's abandoning testing of hydroxy Clark went to treat because of it because it just complete a review of data from its own solitary trials shows the treatment was not benefiting coronavirus patients the W. H. O. welcome news out of Britain that steroid called dexamethasone appears to cut mortality and severely ill patients by a third when Mr properly the drug helps long scope with the infection but the WHO's Mike Ryan warns it's not a cure if it cannot be said strongly enough this stroke is purely for use under close clinical supervision he also cautions that this is only one study in more research of dexamethasone is needed Jason Beaubien NPR news Senate Republicans released a police reform package that calls for an enhanced use of force database restrictions but no ban on choke holds and the study of law enforcement and race the Senate's lone black Republican Tim Scott led a task force of GOP senators in compiling the package and spoke of his own experiences being stopped by police house Democrats have introduced their propose police reforms say that the GOP plan has no teeth a federal judge says the state department must recognize the daughter of a game Maryland couple as a U. S. citizen the girl was born in Canada via circuit last year the state department argued that the baby was born out of wedlock because only one parent had a biological link the case is one of five challenging how the trump administration applies its citizenship policy to same sex couples this is NPR the upper blue about police brutality has the music critics association of North America best new opera award this year as Jeff Lunden reports the production set in Harlem is about a black police officer whose teenage son is killed by a white police officer when The New York Times reviewed blue in its premiere at the Glimmerglass opera in Cooperstown New York last summer the critics.

NYC Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:44 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It I'm Alison Stewart right now it's a fitting time to think about how loss affects the way we look at ourselves and our families in a new young adult fiction novel clap when you land two sisters one in York city and another in the Dominican Republic where their fathers died in a plane crash and left a gift in his wake each other the story follows teenagers Yajaira and communal who discover their half sisters one living in NYC and one living in the DR they must navigate their father secrets their relationships with their grieving mothers and the unavoidable pull of being in each other's lives their curiosity about their father's lines in each other's lives force them to grapple with what kind of family they want to be calm and where in this world they want to be as we spend so much time at home the book is a reminder of how much a feeling at home is about identity and how shaken or empowered we can become when that identity is not what we believed it to be open land is written by poet writer Elizabeth Acevedo she won the two thousand eighteen National Book Award for her previous young adult novel the poet X. and she joins me today Elizabeth welcome to all of it hello thanks so much for having me Allison so this book is inspired by something so many new Yorkers will remember that the tragedy of American Airlines flight five eighty seven a flight from New York to the D. R. the crash in queens killing two hundred and sixty passengers many of them Dominicans so you were about thirteen and you became obsessed with this this story what aspect of the story did you become invested in I think that the thirteen year old it was a lot of loss to have to try to contemplate in a very short amount of time right if this flight happened two months after September eleventh which was already incredibly jarring as a middle schooler in Manhattan but then two months later to have a flight that really reflected the life that I had been on I mean I was traveling to the Dominican Republic once a year I was visiting my family I had family members who would come from the arts in New York and so I think it just felt like the massive tragedies we're getting closer and closer and and really joseline every community I was a part of that the New York and into the Dominican American and I just couldn't let go the comparisons between how how these tragedies were treated and what felt like grieving and isolation because we we didn't have a wider scope are wider I on to what happened once it was determined that flight five eighty seven was not terrorism his interest in the new York times coverage from that time in November two thousand one a local credit thirty min was quoted and he said this he was consoling families he said quote Dominicans who live in New York do not in any way sever their ties with the Dominican Republic there is much a part of the delight Dominican life as if they lived there how does this play out in your novel I think it's so true I mean even growing up where we shop where we ate where we went was all very much a recreation of the Dominican Republic in New York right and and in this novel we see that there's a father who has lived in the US for close to twenty years but still have business and relationships and you later learn an entire family in the Dominican Republic and that kind of back and forth that that between connection is big and so when it is severed one of the characters does not believe it does not have that same connection it is very clear that something happened to make that choice and I think you know it is reflective of of Dominicans that I know that come to the U. S. and if they don't they do it or don't have those type connection it's often because of the trauma right because you know the desire to want to go back to return to want to buy a house too you know you're saving up so that you can go back to the place you love at least at that thread was one that the neighbors in my building that my family very much was on par with and so I you know I completely agree with what that clergymen observed there's something that during times of tragedy it makes us think about identity who we are what we want from life what are you doing with the lives that we have how does the death of this parent to these these young women make them each think about identity yeah here I think Camino I think each one had their own relationship to their father and it was either wanting to impress him and be the fight of his life or wanting to rebel right wanting to push against some of his tenants and and each sister is navigating that differently communal you know heavily relies on her father and his ability to to pay for school and so kind of keep her safe monetarily in order to stay out of danger and so you know at an absolute level her life is jostled to the extent of she is in danger now that her father has passed yeah hi IRA has had to grapple with very different questions what is the need to to deal with forgiveness can you forgive someone who doesn't ask for it how do you like identify yourself if there were secrets that you kept from your father conversations you didn't have you know it's almost like can you count yourself out of grief and so their identities are very much affected by by how this this parent who is now gone has had what he left behind by each one of them is also coming into their own and I think one of the questions I'm often asking in my novel that what it means to become the hero you need and I think he each character has to manifest the part of themselves they wasn't they weren't sure they had my guess is listed off several poet and author of the new book clap when you land how did you choose the names of these two young women I've always loved the name your height and I grew up with a lot of the highest I always wish I had a mortgage is the nameless I mean there were like four of us every class that you had to go by initials I think it was awful but you hide away with such a beautiful name and I love that it meant light I love the sound of a I like that it's a little difficult for some folks who say it makes you work income you know there was a girl growing up who would visit my neighborhood I think her mom was a salon in the area she would bring her on the weekend and her name would come you know and I he wouldn't make fun of because of her name but I always thought it was so beautiful in and an incredible metaphor of like the path beginning your child the path and fell when I was coming up when you hide who initially the novel was just that one character just the sister in New York this is what I knew what you get yeah I I I didn't know what the book was going to be at first and I thought it was gonna be this one perspective but when I realized that the second simply you have to be a part of the story that idea of the path in the name that is a little unusual but also has all of these layers kind of came from my memory and from that kid I remember I mean I asked you to reset read a passage before I do would you for our listeners who have read the book just use a few adjectives to describe your hero and a few attitude described Camino okay you know is the fear tender and I would say she's looking into the powerhouse complete power house yeah hi res is steady she's she saw and I would very imaginative notably the two that are the however described the two characters okay so listen if you've got the descriptions now Elizabeth is going to read a passage from class when you land and this is when the two young women meet each other her eyes are like a hazel her lashes long she's supermodel faint where I am curvier and for a moment I want to smack her heart for wearing my face for looking like a yeah hiring like version of me first though clearly being my father's daughter the one he left me for and then Gilkes wants me I am the one he left her for she said on videotape he called thirteen D. Aileen Dodd and I wonder what he saw when he looked at her I still but I know she won't cry she seems like the kind of girl who can will her eye on make here you look just like him except for their your I. Bobby never knew how to hide what he felt but you know how to draw down window shade and I know she means that all the anger I feel is locked inside that I am blank space the way I was at the chess board we looked just like him you must have gotten your coloring from your mother she nodded and sucks in a deep breath the mention of her mother wiping the softness from her face she dropped her hand we both take a step back that's exactly please continue no no there's a passage from your high rose perfected the first CD coming you wrote this in this this and this poetic prose and verse tell us why I like that virtually allows for you to get really close to a character birth of it have a lot of room for dialogue with these massive moments of action birth really forces the reader and a writer to develop interiority to think about what is this character what's happening on the inside of her two young women who are prophesying massive Greek for the first time in their life or at at this level it felt like getting close to them and trying to tell this story that rocked my entire community from the hyper specific perspective on what what happens when something like that occurs what happens to your body what happens to your thoughts what happens to your heart I I wanted that kind of proximity and I wanted the reader to be that close to to these young women let's talk about their father poppy he is complex he could have easily been a villain but he's not right but he did cause pain in the family how did you want to look at poppy as a character what did you want him to have I wanted him to feel human I mean I I I've had a very complex relationship with my own father and I I've observed the kinds of you know relationship with that is that my best friends and and women that I know have had and so he was just mad when you first hear about all the secrets he kept in the ways that he was believing in himself in order to appear perfect but had a lot going on I I knew we could be using to pay him a villain and in a novel for children where they're already you know kind of the parameters that against the the parent is the is always the antagonist or the teacher the adult figures are the attacking us I wanted to be a bit more complicated than that that they wanted him to be the entire lives but they also have to grapple with all of the good times with the things that he did did do with the way that he galvanized this community that we are not just simple beams and my books tend to have a lot of intergenerational aspects to them right I bringing grandparents have going in on views it's important for me to build character relationships that are multi faceted across eight ever Bobby it was you know he was the the best father he could be but he was not always a great husband he was a complicated man and I think that by observing that and by coming to terms with that I am hopeful that the characters didn't realize that they too can be complicated and don't need to be perfect and are loud you know to fail and work and move forward but I am interested in the idea of of how we create heroes of our parents and the moment when we have to wrestle with the fact that they are not they are only had maybe cannot be the hero we need we learn the IRS a girlfriend and when she talks about the beginning of her relationship she says I didn't come out in the way the jury wanted me to she said we shouldn't hide that we what we are.

Alison Stewart York city
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it I'm Alison Stewart over the course of her four decade career Grammy nominated singer songwriter pianist and composer Tori Amos has released fifteen albums and a memoir it all started when she was a child piano prodigy accepted into the prestigious Peabody conservatory at age five the youngest student ever accepted and she was asked to leave at the ripe old age of eleven because of let's call it an independent streak her independence and intelligence and intensity are part of what made Amos a revered artist and a beacon for some in her new book resistance a songwriter story of hope changing courage during this week's her personal story in some of her song lyrics into a call for action to artists to stand up to power and speak out as she writes what follows in this book is my journey to engage examined and then reassess the artist's role in society by doing so to create a way forward for us as we commit to resist those dark forces that would wish to subjugate us instead of lifting us up and giving us a voice to be the best in us is a mission to reckon with how the current moment is truly one of now or never is the mission to recognize the power of the muses and the strongest of our creative impulses that Marie transform this moment of crisis into a future of promise join me on the path of resistance of the art that will set us free tranice welcome to all of it hi Alison thanks for having me so this is the most basic one one question but I know you're going to have a great answer to it why did you choose resistance as the title I love that word it means so much and have my whole life Terry being complacent to resist giving up Kerry's creating that's not something I wanted to I don't want to re creating ever and sometimes so we become overwhelmed so I really wanted to write about that and the idea of what that word means especially in times right now when was a time in your life toward the end of your career where you knew that resistance really serves you and it serves you well I think going back to the piano in the late eighties after I've had a failed record called Y. Kant tori read and I can't the truth is after having so many rejections of my work I decided to a lot I guess what what I call it to go after what I thought would be more of a commercial path but that wasn't really the agreement that I had made with the music when I was little that didn't work for me and I had experienced failure the failure of that record and how some people in LA failure as contagious and don't want to get near it so I really had to find my turn north artistically it was a personal crisis with an artistic great and I made this commitment to the piano and she welcomed me back with open arms and said okay then that means we serve the muses always and when we create music even if nobody chooses to play it so that was really the commitment that I made that day this is a follow up to that idea is you know it when I hear resistance sometimes I think about in physical therapy they give you resistance bands to help strengthen a muscle or something that's that's not working properly how has resistance made you stronger well you know its it's been one of those careers bye I've had to sometimes battle to do the next project it isn't that much right this moment right now but I'm not wait for a long time whereby if you don't write the same record that perhaps people are hoping you're right at the label then they're not ready to repeat that so I've had to stand my ground work even when people have read the work I've had to resist picture lading and changing it to make it more I don't know how pull pull for some years not every thing that I choose right posted P. listening and some of it is supposed to make people feel it feel pretty uncomfortable that might get please continue you you you cut out although my guess this Tory Amos the name of her new book is resistance a songwriter story of hope change and courage so it's in the book is so interesting because you really give us a peek into your early life and it was fascinating to hear that I should listen to the audio book I I love hearing you tell me your story about your your front row seat to politics that when you were a teenager your father was a reverent brought you to DC and you played in piano bars on M. street in Washington DC hotels were power brokers frequented in the side deals happening and overheard snippets of conversations how did that time shape you socially and politically well it was one of those things where my dad I think was pretty devastated when I got kicked out the conservatory picture directory had been that by thirteen I might be a concert pianist although I was riveted by the music from the late sixties and early seventies and the effect that this music with having on teenagers I was five when I was first accepted and I had these amazing classmates that were showing me teenage culture and so I thought I think I want to be more a musician that documents their time instead of playing music for musicians that document at the time a hundred and fifty years ago or two hundred years ago so that was really waking I guess an awakening I should say of of what kind of musician I wanted to play and so when I got kicked out I think my dad was really deeply depressed about it and so he said come on get dressed in your sister's clothes everybody was away at the time for the weekend and we went down to Georgetown and nobody would accept us but the the final place had a guy with media study necklace on and he got the manager and the guy said if you're any good you can play for tips and my dad didn't realize till much later on in his ministers outfit that we were in a gay bar so that was the beginning of that life which then lead on to happy hour and and underscoring the liquid handshake but a lobbyist working in Washington when you think about that time what what impact did it have on you but you think really carries three today in terms of your politics in terms of the how you view the world I told the nation go from I'd say allergic to war that kind of ceiling voting for Jimmy Carter to then it completely having a one eighty flat turn supporting Ronald Reagan I was playing three blocks from the White House right around election time in nineteen eighty and saw how a country could change and there were circumstances and then we talk about it in the book the circumstances with B. E. Ronnie and kicking off the Americans and the American hostages and not coming back and how the public felt that they needed more more of a war type of leader Dan what we had and I help people change before my eyes people thought I knew and that's really stayed with me my whole life in the house somebody from the Americans and then control of that narrative and then you know any of that can be ground into somebody else's narrative and and we might not even know it I know that I certainly can and I've I've tried to you know sharpen up the intention of somebody and what they're trying to tell me it's very interesting in the memoir because if you get a get a good dose of history you're telling your story and also the story of an artist trying to engage in the world and it is side by side by with historical events and and deep explanations of historical events you go low you go deep into the Iranian hostage crisis why did you want to organize it in that way I think when we asked the question how are we where we are when it comes to this election year and what we're really being asked to decide we're not being asked if we really drilled down to vote for a person we are voting for a system of government which is in my perspective having cut my teeth in Washington from thirteen to twenty one playing for these people is we're either going to vote for democratic government or four door Terry in government that's how I see it as a songwriter and so that's why the stakes are so high from my perspective and the music that I'm beginning to write he's trying to document that in the songs my guess is Tory Amos the name of her new book is resistance of songwriter story of hope change and courage we do have this big macro view you give the world an artist's role in it but there's also quite a lot of of personal stories in it and ones that are deeply profound the book is dedicated to your mom Mary Ellen Copeland Amos who passed away while you're in the process of writing it and reflect on caring for her and grieving for her and this moment that moment with caregiving for a parent to be a very profound experience what impact did it have on you as as a grown woman and as someone who is a mother now my mother I can you could say somebody who gave unconditional love and that hyperscale it's so rare and special and I've not seen it a lot in my life this idea of unconditional love that love if you no matter what and she would say to me I may disagree with you I might not like what you just said I might not polite that very much but I love hue and I will love you for anything and so once he passes a year ago there was such a void that I really didn't know how to move forward and so I went down the dark path just mentally and it was my daughter he said to me mom I know you've lost your mom but I'm losing my right in front of my eyes because I don't know where you go when you stare at grandma's ashes I don't know where you go but I need my mom back and she said to me we all have a grandma and not just even if it's a little piece she's with us and we owe it to live like she taught us to live and that began my turn around and tactic and the writing of the merry chapters my guess is to ram is the name of the book is resistant to songwriter story of hope change and courage in the book you.

Alison Stewart Grammy Tori Amos Peabody conservatory
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it W. NYC I'm Alison Stewart we're kicking off this week with some perspective from former astronaut Mike Massimino will tell us why he never gave up on his dreams of going into space and give us some insight into how to cope with isolation then the guy time out is now rebranded as time is editor will Gleason joins us with some info on classes we can take in specialty food you can order in and later Veronica Roth's bestselling author of the divergent series of dystopian novels for young adults join us to discuss her first five five filler for grown ups titles chosen ones also our segment officially get the title now I need a minute you'll set aside sixty seconds to meditate together we'll get all of it I'm Alison Stewart and I meet you on the other side of the news live from NPR news I'm Lakshmi saying the nation's top infectious disease specialist Dr Anthony Fauci says that the US economy could see rolling re entry as early as next month but he is cautioning that health authorities must have the ability to identify and isolate people who are infected with corona virus one way to do this is through contact tracing which involves finding a person who is infected in tracing every other person they came into contact with and peers you're from Phil says that process will require an enormous number of medical personnel in the field nationwide we're talking about hiring tens maybe even hundreds of thousands of people treating doesn't require super specialized training you can have people who've never done it before do it but they do need to be plugged into some sort of system that system needs to include widespread and this is important rapid testing so that tracers know who to call and could call them before they make other people say that's NPR's Geoff Brumfiel South Korea is crediting widespread testing and aggressive contact tracing for fewer new infections in that country however sorties are worried about people lowering their guard and possibly undoing the progress south Korea's me to slow the spread of coronavirus the president is warning against complacency the U. S. navy confirms a sailor from the USS Roosevelt aircraft carrier has died from covert nineteen Tom Bowman says a service member was found unresponsive and was admitted to the intensive care unit last Thursday the sailor tested positive March thirtieth it was removed from the ship and placed in an isolation house with four other sailors from the Roosevelt the sale was found unresponsive on April ninth during the daily medical check the sale was admitted to the intensive care unit at the US Naval Hospital on Guam on April ninth in died on April thirteenth the name of the sailor is being withheld until the family is notified this sailor is a second service member to die from the virus a New Jersey National Guard soldier captain Douglas Lynn Hickock died on March twenty eighth Tom Bowman NPR news against the backdrop of this health crisis residents across the southern US are also dealing with the aftermath of destructive storms including tornadoes Tony Gonzalez of member station WPLN reports in Tennessee a suspected twister touched down in the eastern suburbs Chattanooga damage one hundred fifty structures and said at least fourteen people to the hospital Chattanooga is fire and police departments are going door to door through neighborhoods over about a twelve mile stretch east of the city and not far from the local airport authorities say homes and businesses are destroyed and numerous trees and utility lines came down leaving sixty thousand without power the local energy company says its system took on catastrophic damage which could take days to.

NYC Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all of it I'm Alison Stewart now I want to take a moment to turn fairways over to some voice mails we received from you dear listeners you see we've been thinking about the show what we want to do and how we can help people work through this time we've been doing things like recipes or what to stream on TV taking a minute to meditate and one of the ideas that came up was to just invite you to tell us about the people you love but we weren't able to see right now especially this week with Passover and Easter and says it's been a few weeks now that a lot of us have been keeping indoors we get it the separation might be hitting extra hard right now so over the last couple days we've been collecting messages from our listeners with shout outs to the people they mess right now and we're going to place some of them now up first here's Mauricio hi my name is Michelle and I'm calling from Miami to sent a loving message to my wonderful girlfriend Priscilla who is back in New York what initially was a one week trip to visit family in Miami has turned into a two month stay so I can avoid traveling up process taking care of our border collie terra and is being super patient and supportive so maybe I'll be home soon and I love you very much thanks thank you Marie Selby Essie Priscilla and Tara really soon this message is from Carla hi this is Carla I'm a professor at John Jay college and also the academic director for a college in prison program at new York's Otisville prison right now I am missing are amazing incarcerated students my message to them is this stay strong stay healthy all our staff and processes are thinking of you we are still working on your behalf and we all look forward to being with you again on the other side of this thank and Carla I'm sure they appreciated that message next up we have a somebody named Jordan who works on a certain radio show hi this is Jordan I'm a producer on team all of it and I'd like to give a shout out to my grandma dated June Demian who I miss terribly especially because I really love seeing her during the Easter holiday but I just sent her up with a big stack of books to get through well wrong quarantines and data once against nice on the skin on your patio reading with you love you can't wait to see you in person georgianne was so sweet this message is from Evelyn hi my name is Lauren may live in New Jersey with my husband Brian this Easter Sunday will we're gonna be missing our small little congregation at Pottersville reformed church it's such a small group that when one person is not there you really do feel that it's a what all of us not being there it's going to feel strange you don't just get together to hear the word we get together because we love each other I'm gonna try to do as soon service but it's not really going to be the same the thoughts and prayers to everyone out there everyone stays safe and remember that the church is not just brick and mortar it's the people that that attend blessings it is such a lovely sentiment and happy Easter to everyone celebrating and Pottersville we have another message this one is from a mother who misses her son hi I miss my thirty one year old son he's autistic and lives in a group home and they're not allowing anyone to visit and he can't leave so we're doing face time but it's still very hard thank you and of course sounds like the home is taking precautions so they keep everybody safe but of course wishing her son a speedy reunion we're going to go to another my voicemail this one is from Shane hi my name is Jane and I'm missing my husband Michael he is currently stuck in Denmark and I am currently stuck here in Brooklyn and New York and he was in Denmark where he's originally from helping his mother unfortunate just recently passed from brain cancer and he was just back here beginning in March and he was supposed to be back here last week and beer through Easter eastern a really big deal and then market is here but in Denmark the whole countries and shuts down for a few days and celebrate and so I'm missing him I'm here with our dogs are popular puzzled valued AT and we facetime every morning so that he can sing with them up because they're very lazy and we talk all the time but just not the same because he needs so many thousands of miles away so missing them and that thanks for doing this and I love your show take care bye so glad you could have that shot out shamed by the way listeners if you're just joining us we're playing some voicemails from all of it listeners who are giving shout outs to people they wish they could be spending their time with right now but obviously can't let's go to Maisie in Brooklyn I needed from Brooklyn and I really miss hanging out with my BFF Georgia we are we can't believe packed together but it was canceled I'm really looking forward to having sleepovers again and here's to you down bye bye Maisie hears you bouncing around again with Georgia it's going to happen soon UP next another all that producer this is Catherine I'm really missing right now with my brother who is in Cincinnati Ohio every spring for the past two years I've flown out to Cincinnati to run with Andrew and the flying pig marathon we run a ten K. and his wonderful partner windows always chooses on we go to our favorite brewery use and we eat a lot of trees and we get in some quality brother sister bonding time anyway I miss him and disappeared we can't wait to go next year Katharine thank you so much for calling and I'll talk to you later on the planning call later plan exam next up another Brooklynite this is Anna hi I'm missing my daughter Erica and my grand dog Edward this morning and he stepped aside for a brief moment to take out the trash and there was a little little puppy that came running up to me and I just could not stop crying of happiness and how much he has and how sad I was that I miss them we live only three miles apart from one another in Brooklyn and I haven't seen them in over a month and I just missed it so much so I love you Erica in Edward monologues eighties by thanks for calling in Ben and Gabby your next when you're young family you take for granted the time you're together the fun and even the squabbles then when the kids are out of the house holidays become the rare times were all over again we still have tiny home from college and the dogs but robin in Red Bank Ryan in Manhattan and event in Brooklyn you know we may issue but now you sent us pictures of grade you based in meals you prepare learned watching mommy in the kitchen on the every days and the holidays it'll be different this weekend facetime S. and you know as we think you do that we are so proud of who you've become friend and Gabby in brick New Jersey Ben has an amazing voice I think pension get into radio if he's not and let's get in one more this is Bridget from Madison New Jersey yes cool you can't there are her cousins and she misses them thank you hi Tessa and Ryan and thanks Brigitte and family and thanks to everyone else who left us a message that we were able to play on the air there's Andrew is missing his friends from comedy and his childhood friends and she misses their mom who passed away in March this chick flick says I miss everyone that I thought I was too busy to spend time with before Moore says I love and miss my parents my mother is master gardener I keep facetiming her projects Kitson says my sister Jacquelyn and blue says Simon exclamation point then that Simon by the way is one of our producers he's actually the producer who put this whole thing together so shout out to Simon for doing this so Simon gets an extra shot out Simon wants to shout out to Peter Jonathan blew his mom who makes really great cupcakes go to our Instagram to check them out there on believable we have lots of pictures of them and his grandparents Wally and Ruth also he says thanks to Sarah and Lisa and Joe for giving him a place to stay the last few weeks and for everything else thinking of all of you out there and thanks to all of you were sure whoever you're thinking of is thinking of you to now we'll go on with the show coming up after the break hit the music Matt.

Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Alison Stewart I'm you on the other side of the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Shea Stevens president trump is urging Americans to continue following social distancing guidelines but says he hopes the nation can get back to business by Easter infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci of the national institutes of health says that may be optimistic and that daily evaluations are needed county says the situation is very serious in New York where coronavirus infections are doubling every three days the idea if you look at the statistics it's disturbing about one per thousand of these individuals are infected that's about eight to ten times more than in other areas which means when they go to another place for their own safety they've got to be careful monitor themselves if they get sick bring it to the attention of a physician get tested Florida's governor is mandating that air travelers from the New York area self quarantine for at least fourteen days after their arrival the US stock market jumped sharply as members of Congress and the White House made progress on a corona virus rescue bill NPR's Scott Horsley has more investors snapped up stocks encouraged by prospects for some two trillion dollars in federal financial help for struggling businesses and individuals the Dow jumped more than eleven percent well the broader S. and P. five hundred index climbed more than nine percent the Dow is now back above twenty thousand though it's still down about thirty percent from its peak last month the blue chip index got an additional boost from Boeing whose shares rose almost twenty percent the jet maker's CEO says he expects the seven thirty seven Max to resume flying by the middle of this year even though air travel is severely depressed by the pandemic Max yes were grounded a year ago after two fatal crashes Scott Horsley NPR news Washington U. S. futures are lower at this hour while Asian shares are higher India's one point three billion citizens are under a mandatory twenty one day lockdown and here's Lauren Frayer reports on what may be the most severe coronavirus countermeasure in the world in a televised address prime minister Narendra Modi's announces that no one is allowed to leave their home after midnight local time I did odd Bob I did say he said this is quoted to see India to save every Indian to save you to save your family India has about five hundred confirmed coronavirus cases in a country of one point three billion people the world health organisation has said this global battle depends on what densely populated countries like India do next most of India's cases or people who travel abroad or had contact with those who did and authorities want to minimize community transmission especially in slums where hundreds of millions of people live with inadequate sanitation Lauren Frayer NPR news in New Zealand the country's under a national state of emergency as residents prepare for complete four weeks locked down this is NPR news the food and drug administration is warning the public about dangerous malfunctions involving a limited number of MP pens that emergency injectors are used for severe allergic reactions the malfunctions can prevent or delay the devices from injecting epinephrine or calls them to Egypt prematurely the agency says drug makers Pfizer and Mylan had notified medical providers of the problem Fizer manufactures epipens for Mylan which sells them there is around the world closed because of the corona virus pandemic prompted Warner brothers to postpone some of its big summer releases NPR's mandalit del Barco has more from Los Angeles Wonder Woman nineteen eighty four was originally set for June fifth now it will hit.

Alison Stewart NPR
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Man's search connection I'm Alison Stewart joined me for all of it we are W. Y. C. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm Rachel Martin the first three contests in the democratic primary seem like a lifetime away Joe Biden did so badly in Iowa New Hampshire and Nevada the political plan and started to talk about whether he would ever be able to turn it around he did just that on super Tuesday and again in primaries last night I we are a step closer to restoring decency dignity and honor to the White House that's our ultimate goal so the former vice president decisively won four of yesterday's contest and that includes Michigan that states hundred and twenty five delegates were considered a must win for senator Bernie Sanders to keep up in the race Biden is now even further ahead of Sanders and at the end of the night Biden tried to make it sound like the nomination is a done deal I want to thank Bernie Sanders and his supporters for their tireless energy and their passion we share a common goal and together will defeat Donald Trump and your national political correspondent Mara lias and was watching it all and joins us this morning hi Mara hi there I mean we said this after super Tuesday we say it again what a turnaround for Joe Biden what a turnaround for Joe Biden this race is not decided yet but Joe Biden's coalition appears to be broad and durable his lead if not insurmountable is getting very very hard to overcome and Bernie Sanders coalition once again failed to show up particularly young voters he had said that he was going to be able to turn them out in huge numbers but they just haven't been doing that right so we saw both campaigns actually last night Biden Santander's cancel big rallies that were supposed to happen in Ohio because of the corona virus that did not stop Biden though from giving a victory speech in Philadelphia last last night let's listen to more of it this is so much fear in the country there's so much fear across the world we need American leadership we need presidential leadership that's almost trusted truthful and steady huh so he clearly wants to make this a two person race now himself against Donald Trump did you take away from a speech last night well I think that clip played at all you know we have it set at all we've seen a lot of different types of Joe Biden speeches some of them are ram believe some of them are shouty but this one was purposefully com sending a very clear message in a crisis he's going to give a whole speech tomorrow on the corona virus but that speech was meant to stand out as a contrast to Donald Trump sometimes chaotic leadership style the speech was calm purposely steady and serious it was a presidential speech even down to the atmospherics he gave it an constitutional hall constitution hall in Philadelphia he and his wife Jill were dressed a little more formally than they have been another primary nights everything about his speech last night was meant to meet the moment the moment of course is a public health crisis not just a primary right so talk about Bernie Sanders I mean he he did not speak last night no he went home to Vermont he didn't speak it's hard to see a path ahead of him given that the state's next week are also hard for him in particular Florida where his praise for Fidel Castro has created a backlash but if we've learned anything there can be big unexpected curves ahead so this race is not over yet and here's my allies and thank you appreciate it thank you will.

Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:33 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Alison Stewart thank you for sharing part of your day with me on the show today the very funny Maeve Higgins joins us to talk about her supernatural and very funny new film extra ordinary I will continue the theme of ghosts with the Daffy and smart play too macho about a nasty demon who try to take over a small town actress Phillipa soo John Ellison Conlee and play right you can lift in we'll be here as well that is all on the way but first let's keep it one hundred on this Wednesday after super Tuesday yesterday a whopping fourteen state hill the democratic primary in the former vice president Joe Biden did well winning at least eight states there still some counting as we went on the air he's showing that Mike Bloomberg to drop out of the race this morning the AP reports that Biden quote enjoyed an advantage among women and college graduates the fact that dovetails nicely with our next installment of our series recognizing women's role in maintaining democracy we call it keep it one hundred Hey we've been celebrating the hundredth anniversary of women's suffrage this year and while nineteen twenty is the year most associated with suffrage our next guest is taking us back another seventy five years in history to the beginnings of the movement it's incredible to think that it took almost as long to secure women's right to vote as it's been since the nineteen member was ratified in August nineteen twenty after a protracted battle in Congress professor emeritus at UCLA Ellen Carol dubois ace is the author of several books on the history of women's suffrage in the US and her newest book is titled suffrage women's long battle for the vote the book is full of stories about the work of activists both famous and unknown and divorce explains how the women's suffrage movement became divided between those who supported black rights and those who rejected stolid Verity and the division between black and white women within the suffrage movement itself I began by asking asking professor da boys what narratives about suffrage she's hoping to up end with her new book well I certainly first and foremost want people to understand that votes for women was not something that was a single issue movements that are women but that is that its advocates only only advocated for thinking that getting the right to vote was what their goal was their goal was to get the right to vote so that they can achieve their political goals and all of these suffragists over the seventy five years had other visions larger visions for social change all ranging from the abolition of slavery to temperance because they believed that alcohol was a particular scourge for women and children to peace to labor rights too at the end birth control these were all goals that we man sought once they had the greater power of the vote and it's why I think it's important if you ask what I want and I want to make it clear that this struggle is part and parcel of our struggle to use our votes to maintain and extend democracy R. as women it's as you said that my next question was you wrote you see the history of women's suffrage as evidence of the fragility of democracy how so well when I started to write this book hi I've been working as she said on this issue for since I was a baby in arms for half a century but I started to write this book I guess would be five years ago I knew that you know we have a centennial and everything would be celebrated and somebody was going to write a book that covered everything and they were going to use my books to do it so I thought I might as well be me but I thought celebrating having the vote would coincide with a woman president instead of it has coincided with a I don't think this is too controversial one of the greatest it's an era of that in which we are witnessing a tremendous threat to political democracy of perhaps the greatest since the civil war in which a one after another of our constitutional protections seem to be falling aside and in which there is a concerted effort to to restrain and undermine and restrict the right to vote especially when it can hurt the man in the top office we call that voter suppression I think we can see voter suppression specially when we realize how many women are crucial to it St the great Stacey Abrams the upsurge in upsurge of women voters in twenty eighteen that voter suppression is of a piece with women's suffrage I mean we can think that keeping women of fighting against suffragist political leaders fighting against suffragist for three quarters of a century is voter suppression I don't know if you knew this or not our other series this year is protective about voter suppression you just created the action for us all right so you win the vote and then and this is what I think the coincidence of the centennial and of the current state of American political affairs reminds us something that would not surprise the suffrages switches political rights are never secured beyond attack that winning them and defending them are of a piece my guess is Ellen Carol do boys than for book is suffrage women's long battle for the vote so you take us on a history tour we start with Seneca falls the convention that happened there in eighteen forty eight I think this is a last minute convention why was it last minute and and who was expected to attend well the people who attended were local people maybe they came from as far as fifteen miles in their in their wagons adding that detail reminds us how long ago it was ice up I mean of the women who look who's in the champions is to lead this movement their parents had fought for the revolution the revolution was fresh in their minds when they took the declaration of independence and rewrote it is the declaration of sentiments in change of all men to all men and women of the declaration of independence was very fresh to them in fact actually I discovered in writing this book the word convention was new it was just beginning to be used for public meetings of political significance of it the women's rights convention was held on July sixteenth who attended were we now know by looking at the list were disproportionately Quakers that probably had to do with the fact that the headliner was when it was the most famous Quaker women in the United States Lucretius Mont and also because western New York was the home of a kind of radical wing of the Quaker movement I and those were the people who came the leadership was Lucretius mine and a thirty three year old mother and wife who lived in Seneca falls that's what was in Seneca falls her name became much more famous later Elizabeth Cady Stanton she was the wife she was the relative both the wife and the cousin of nature abolitionists and she it was her I I I insist it was her who had this vision of taking the first convention to address women's rights and moving it into the political realm by insisting that women's rights must include political rights once the civil war comes around what happens the suffrage movement the result of the civil war besides the the near destruction of the nation and then it's a reunification and the destruction of slavery was arguably the rewriting of the US constitution there were three constitutional amendments the first abolished slavery and so that's the thirteenth amendment the first ten amendments to the bill of rights are they happen at the same time as the constitution the next two amendments our technical so finally we get to an effort to you to change the constitution in a way that affects the social character of the country and it was it was suffragists including Stanton and Anthony and Lucy stone who formed the first popular movement for constitutional change they collected over a hundred thousand signatures are arguing for the thirteenth amendment to abolish slavery and arguably that was what did it then comes the fourteenth and the fifteenth amendment the Fourteenth Amendment importantly up establishes national citizenship and does it in a way that doesn't exclude women says all persons born in the United States are citizens it was the fifteenth amendment that blew open the alliance between up black freedom and women's rights Hausa it it was the Republican Party which was in control I knew that in reconstructing the southern states if it was going to have a chance to hold on to power it would have to enfranchise the former slave population were to be specifics former slave man all right so that there was a partisan advantage there that never in the whole history of women's suffrage ever ever obtain two in franchising women no party could count on women's votes to the Republican Party pushes forward the fifteenth amendment which says that no state can dis franchise on the grounds of race color or previous condition of servitude and suffragists who had worked so hard for all of these goals at least one wing of them why were enraged and they wanted that that amendment to read our notice franchise man on the grounds of race color previous condition and sex which is what they call gender and so when it came to the fifteenth amendment they came out against it because I stand said once this is done the constitutional door will slam shot and it did my guest is Ellen Carol do boys never book a suffrage women's long battle for the vote I would ask you that if you have you said names the people I think learn or no I want to ask you about a couple of names of people we don't know and what their contribution work Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Frances Ellen Watkins Harper she was African American woman born free in a slave state Maryland I she was a writer and a poet and she was one of the earliest of what was a growing number of African American women to come out in favor of women's suffrage she did so at meetings conventions in eighteen sixty six and sixty seven sixty nine but when the conflict between women's suffrage in black suffrage exploded she took the side that said well I I have to take the side of my race and so she went on to continue to fight for the vote and did so I think this is interesting in the context of an organization that we don't usually think of as being very important for suffrage and this was the woman's Christian temperance union the woman's Christian temperance union which was by radical suffrage standards quite moderate actually in the eighteen eighties leaded more black women albeit in a segregated overcall unions but this is where a whole generation of women right after the abolition of slavery learn some of the basic political tools you write about the split the split hobble the suffrage movement for the next three decades the split between the suffragists and abolitionists how so well I would say in some ways it hobbled the movement for the rest of its life it's a split maybe that you're mentioning is it split the suffrage movement into and it remained that way until eighteen ninety when it re unified so now we're at the or the end of reconstruction now we're into Jim crow we're into lynching we're into disenfranchisement defected interest disenfranchisement of southern black men and.

Alison Stewart Maeve Higgins
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Alison Stewart thank you for sharing part of your day with me on the show today you may have read some of the rave reviews of Brandon Taylor's debut novel real life about a grad students intense weekend as midwestern university will brand it will be our guest in studio later on today and also will have some suggestions on how to spend that one extra day of twenty twenty tomorrow February twenty ninth that is all on the way but first a store you may have read about in the times when your time's reporter Benjamin Weiser started investigating allegations of abuse and approx group homes for the developmentally impaired he noticed that one name kept coming up over and over again Willowbrook the notorious Staten Island institution that was shuttered in nineteen eighty seven following documentation of severe abuse and neglect of the patients the what classes these victims became known have since been placed in various facilities and institutions across the city the band's reporting isn't covered that many former Willowbrook patients have continued to suffer abuse at the hands of their new caretakers in fact been reports that in two thousand nineteen alone they were ninety seven reported allegations of physical abuse by group home workers against Willowbrook alumni bush's findings in a piece for the times titled beatings burns and betrayal the Willowbrook scandal's legacy the store was also featured in last week's episode of the weekly which you can catch on Hulu and FX and Benjamin Weiser joins me now from Washington DC Ben nice to speak with you thank you for having me awesome so then you cover Manhattan federal court you made a career covering criminal justice how did you find yourself reporting about abuses at state institutions I have covered the federal court in Manhattan for a long time and some years ago several years ago a lawsuit was filed there on behalf of three residents of a group I'm up in the Bronx on union Avenue and these were all adults three women they were all as as everyone in that home had developmental disabilities none were verbal most were in their forties and fifties and had been approved have been abuse there at least according to the lawsuit and the suit eventually led to a big settlement with new York's state of about six million dollars was paid to the families of these three people but as I did reporting on that lawsuit hi as you had mentioned I started seeing in documents references to Willowbrook and the Willowbrook state school as it was known you know it's hard to overstate how notorious a place that was in the fifties sixties seventies and even the nineteen eighties you know thousands of people then then described as profoundly retarded we're just warehouse there by New York state from babies all the way up to the elderly you know they were the you can you've seen some of the photos of Willowbrook and the young people it's a lot of people associate will brook with Geraldo Rivera he went in with a team to investigate what's happening there can you describe what they found yes exactly you know there have been other newspapers and magazines at that have tried to do reporting on Willowbrook the Staten Island advance for example but it was really not until nineteen seventy two when Geraldo Rivera then a young reporter for a local a New York T. V. station entered with with cameras at the invitation of a doctor who had just been fired and and sort of just started filming and his graphic footage which aired locally and then just sort of exploded into the national psyche showed you know just get it and he particularly wanted to a children's ward just showed scores of of children being you know left unattended as we've written many naked or in rags some were strapped in beds or chairs many in isolations almost solitary confinement confinement many you could see we're just rocking endlessly on these filthy words we are with feces schools spread over the walls and it it really exploded and and a few months after that civil liberties groups the New York civil liberties union on the legal aid society filed major lawsuits class action lawsuits you know essentially asking that will both be closed that the conditions you know be changed it while while the institution was closing and that the residents and then more than five thousand be moved into community based settings like group homes around New York state and being given and be given much higher quality services but those photos and and people who've seen them and recorded one you know it all it almost echoed a concentration camp people were not being exterminated obviously but that many people were dying and and the abuse the views of conditions were just untenable and although I think many states have their own version of a Willowbrook Willowbrook itself will brook in New York became known globally as as as as a kind of symbol of how the United States warehouse some of its most vulnerable people were there any penalties for the staff working at Willowbrook the staff at Willowbrook were the place was understaffed to start with you would have fifty sixty children on one ward and one attendant there were there were investigations back then local investigations by the authorities but I'm unaware of any staff who were actually punished it was more a question of how the state was actually running the institution even that it had the institution and it wasn't really until several doctors there and other staffers tried to organize parents and siblings of the Willowbrook residents to try to demand better conditions and ultimately led to the lawsuit that the change will ultimately began to happen although it was very slow what do we know about where most of those in the Willowbrook class ended up after the institution was shut down right and and we use the term liberal class because there was a class action and in nineteen seventy five there was essentially a settlement a consent decree in which New York state agreed to move to the five thousand six thousand Willowbrook residents into residential settings around New York state a judge had also found that all the Willowbrook class members of the residents have the constitutional right to the protection from harm and and those two events sort of push things forward when you look at the photos of Willowbrook back half a century ago today and certainly in my case I never thought those people were still alive today I mean I just sort of thought that that was an issue that have been solved and and and many of them have likely passed away and yet in my reporting that began a few years ago in the Bronx or or with the lawsuit that began a few years ago in the pros I found out that roughly a third of the Willowbrook class was still alive that they're actually about twenty three hundred surviving former residents of the Willowbrook state school as the institution was called and many are in group homes run by both New York state or by its contractors and one of them was the one in the Bronx I was actually quite surprised to find that and sadly because so many family members have passed away many of those residents really don't have active support from family or or or friends there is an organization that that looks out for them but you know it's it's a difficult situation to start with and then to find out that many of them are suffering abuse or neglect today what was really horrified my guest is Benjamin Weiser from The New York Times were talking about his reporting the name of the piece is beatings burns and betrayal the Willowbrook scandal's legacy so you've brought us back to union Avenue and I want to play a bit of a clip from the episode of the weekly that covers this story it shows you speaking with two women whose sister was formally in Willowbrook and now lives at the institution in union out on union Avenue you refer to her as am let's take a listen these are copies of the questions and answers when.

Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We really need you to this is all of them and W. NYC I'm Alison Stewart what's been good for the music hasn't always been so good for the life that line comes the beginning of the song phone a pool often falls last album so there it also appears repeatedly in a new memoir by the piano virtuoso called a dream about lightning bugs a life of music and cheap lessons Ben folds is written a detailed account of his unusual life and that of his family for examples grandma was a teenage bride who married a not very nice man twenty years her senior bank of a North Carolina right then always fit in he could be a little excessive the tiny boy he spent like hours eight hours in front of record players the book traces his life through a difficult adolescents dropping out of music school twice as he puts it in his book on page sixty five at school I was a part time overachiever and part time loser I took all the Advanced Placement college credit classes by twelfth grade I was flunking math classes but for not showing up I was a hard worker the class clown and accelerate student the token poor kid the token rich kid a jackass of all trades he went on to sudden success with his nineties piano rock band Ben folds five the memoirs written with the blackness that fall somewhere between comforting and cathartic the kind of clever but since you're riding Ben folds has staked out his entire music career then thanks for coming to the studio thank you thanks for having me you start the book about your family telling interesting stories quirky stories what is it you wanted the reader to know about your family at that time well what I wanted the reader by the end of the book was hopefully to have think about creativity and think about how one person did it because there's so many different lives in ways of being creative people are naturally creative and I found in order to talk about creativity was best for me to just be very specific about how it happened for me that really necessitated my going back and sort of having a an ethnographic backdrop to the whole thing like what you know a child is born into an already sort of storm you know like like the momentum is going so I went back further than most people do back to my grandparents and I yeah I don't think I get to come in in a famous music stuff until three quarters of the way through the book it wasn't really ever my point my point also wasn't really too kind dwell on my childhood but I started to realize that these are the things that are why I can't help creating what I do and so hopefully I I told the story as you look back on it now that Europe and a parent and an adult what was going on with little man and and what would you what if you had a kid like that I think it would be difficult to have a kid like me but I also think that I was the product of a a lot more chaotic time and younger parents in Iowa when I was became apparent I mean in my era of being a parent in my into income tax bracket you have everything set up very organized for a kid to step into I showed a nice picture of me in a cardboard box in there which I think is really funny my mother doesn't think this one is I do but I think it's awesome because that's all you really need never my parents were like nineteen twenty years old like that when they had me and they didn't really have a plan which is part of why I am like I am I am very undisciplined but I'm hard worker my parents were hard workers and there was no schedule no schedule was necessary there was no organization to our to our life that I remember of my mother even let me go late to school if there's a song on the radio I liked I might skip some school do you think that that sort of you have to see the creativity and all of that space let it grow yeah I mean I think some of it is the space I think some of it is that actually maybe for a kid it can be a little scary not have boundaries and you know when you want to escape or check out of something that you don't understand even if it's doesn't matter what it is the creativity is a space you often go into I describe in the book yeah hours upon hours of waiting for my father to be finished with this construction gig you know I get dropped off after school walk on a mud a lot well you know now kid might spend time on sci phone or something like that I just had my brain so I walked around imagining songs if I hadn't had years of hours a day imagining songs walk around money lots I wouldn't have the ability to for instance make up a song on the spot with the symphony orchestra dictate them parts that's a skill that was cultivated people like wow that's amazing was not amazing that's what I practice while the kids Apraksin jumping you know obstacles with their bikes and stuff you know my guess is Ben folds the name of his book is a dream about lightning bugs so I think most people does a piano on the cover your percussionist that's right first yeah yeah when you say with question well I really did I mean is the mood one thing I really stuck with there was a moment in of mice never draw on the go well you know if there would be a I love drums but I as or as a songwriter you know that the the piano was much more was much more useful for writing songs the turning point in there was sort of comes in a chapter in the book called an accidental mentor and really I was a percussion major and a a piano teacher who is about to retire after you know being there for thirty or forty years discovered I played piano in a certain way I was joking around in his class trying to fool with something and he called me after school a thousand troubling so would you like a scholarship so I switched to piano so as a pivotal moment that could be a thing I don't really completely think was that dramatic but is sort of like that yes Mister now yep Robert Darnell in your book you really honest about being in some I was a troublemaker markets as a troublemaker but you just we may trouble yeah the truck maker is a difference between the two interesting during a trouble maker and someone who makes trouble what was behind you just wanting to to do things your own way sometimes you know we were were in society you grew up in the south you're in school people are telling you you need to do this X. Y. Z. and you very clearly was like no I'm going to do a BNC for his Excellency some of them might have been because I saw that those formalities in rules weren't really being followed at my house and no one no you know nobody was harmed in that experiment so why we take that the school and also you know like that this could be seen as a criticism of my parents is probably a combination of praise and criticism my teachers knew that they weren't going to get any traction of complaining to them about my behavior I actually had some really funny disciplinary slips because we had stacks of them because I was sent home and stuff all the time we we left one of them but there were a bunch of them that would really dwell on I've talked to his parents his parents say that it's not their problem and stuff like that you know he actually include one of them yeah yeah I left one of the men we had a bunch of them and they were taking up too much space I mean it was like it could have been a centerfold of my disciplinary slips and yeah I'm I'm I think that what you're saying but between a trouble maker and someone who makes trouble that feel like a trouble maker in school was the kind of kid who met bad like they they they were bad bad will you know if they break things I never want to hurting my a break things I just wanted to see something exciting happened some mischief and and a lot of stuff I mean if I'd want to make the whole book about that I've got way too many stories it would just probably bore people tears I'll I left most of them out it was the editing process tough I found the reading process tough yeah because as a songwriter your for the first allusion in writing a book is that you have space you don't I had to be very economical in writing this book but I thought at first like over yet well but okay so here's one of the slips it says Ben is making strange very strange sounds with his mouth this is been going on for some time and yesterday after a long lecture Ben has continued again today but understand that he is not to make unnecessary noises during class yeah and that's a pretty tame when it does the same thing about me calling out the window in some of the other stuff my guest is Ben folds the name of his new memoir is a dream about lightning bugs a life of music and cheap lessons let's talk music so a lot of great sense of humor people know that it's it's in your music as well let's take a listen to a song called boxing if that clash between the lyrics the sound that you like to play with let's listen to boxing somebody who really loved comedy as a kitten yeah who are some of your favorites and and why I have this one thing I enjoy it I took out some of the comedy stuff in the that is references to comedy in in the book because I didn't want to overstate it but I did leave in a chapter about comedy albums from the seventies which were kind of rock and roll to me because that way I felt about it was that you know like looking back at the sixties was rebellion in rock and roll by the seventies he was big business was big stadium business but the comedians were still in small spaces do in the real punk rock we're here you know and that was so appealing to me as a kid and I would hear these things you know like a crazy stuff like Richard Pryor and and and George Carlin and Andy Kaufman was a favorite of mine I would take the stuff to school you know quoting it and force you get in trouble you know it's not advisable to quote almost anything Richard Pryor said on stage in school and and and but but if it moves me because the audience kind of it was on the audience kind of gave me chills the audience on on on the comedy records is kind of it's a cathartic thing like they've just gone through Vietnam and Watergate and post civil rights have gone to this era and in the seventies there's this kind of almost anger almost release a knowing laughter and I just think it's really moving and I think that when you're talking about comedy if you don't recognize how serious the other side of comedy is and what it implies to make a joke even to distract from something that you would rather not think about comedy is serious business if you most comedians that you may relatively serious people you know they don't sit around like take my wife over time you know stop them my guest is Ben folds with talk about sort of your humor your hit song with Ben folds five is very is about a very serious subject is about your girlfriend at a time having an abortion you guys were kids yeah people know the song break let's play a little bit of it.

Alison Stewart
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The best in for Alison Stewart coming up the name is Mitchel singer song writer and creator of the smash hits Tony Award winning musical Haiti's town stops by to talk music meant and wrote to Broadway then Shannon must defer beverage director of Gladys Caribbean in Brooklyn and author of modern tropical cocktails will join me to talk about shaking things up behind the bar and worth we'll take your calls and W. NYC's Planning editor Kate Hines checks in on what our newsroom is closely following today is what's going on from power outages to last night's storms and flooding I'm should be the best see you and we'll get to all of it after the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm she Stevens president trump is on the defensive as Congress prepares to question the former special counsel about his investigation into the twenty sixteen campaign NPR sprinkle or Dona as reports the trump shared his concerns at a conservative teen summit president trump says the investigation has gone on too long and that it's bad for the country he also says it makes it harder to deal with Russia another nuclear power that the United States should be trying to work with it goes on for years and years no collusion no obstruction that's not good enough let's go more forty million dollars interview five hundred people they got nothing Robert Muller will be answering questions for the first time about his investigation of Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election and whether or not president trump did obstruct justice trump calls it a witch hunt Franco or down yes NPR news the White House president trump is suing the house ways and means committee and officials in New York state to prevent house Democrats from obtaining his state tax returns the move comes weeks after New York's governor signed a law that makes it easier for certain elected officials to obtain that information the ways and means committee has a pending lawsuit against the treasury department and the IRS for refusing to hand over several years of trump's federal returns treasury and the IRS cited a lack of legitimate legislative purpose we're getting the information severe storms swept through parts of the northeast Tuesday unleashing a tornado in parts of Cape Cod Yarmouth police department chief Frank Fredrickson says the twister damaged roofs trees and power lines leaving tens of thousands of residents without power the storm impacted west Yarmouth and self down with mostly along the route twenty eight corridor multiple trees down power outages about four thousand people without power the sands hotel in west Yarmouth the roof came off of that all the people there were safe there are no reports of serious injuries from the storm in Arizona gusty winds are fueling the spread of a two and a half square mile fire in a forest area north of flagstaff AZ cage ACC's lower moralis reports two dozen homes have been evacuated while thousands.

Alison Stewart writer Mitchel forty million dollars
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The best in for Alison Stewart coming up the name is Mitchel singer song writer and creator of the smash hits Tony Award winning musical Haiti's town stops by to talk music meant and wrote to Broadway then Shannon must defer beverage director of Gladys Caribbean in Brooklyn and author of modern tropical cocktails will join me to talk about shaking things up behind the bar and worth we'll take your calls and W. NYC's Planning editor Kate Hines checks in on what our newsroom is closely following today is what's going on from power outages to last night's storms and flooding I'm should be the best for you and we'll get to all of it after the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone the man who led the U. K.'s leave campaign three years ago is about to take office as prime minister of Great Britain Boris Johnson former Foreign Secretary to outgoing prime minister Theresa may and former mayor of London defeated rival Jeremy hunt in the conservative leadership contest winning two thirds of the votes in the value of that a hundred sixty thousand party members across the U. K. he'll be installed as prime minister tomorrow a dispute has erupted between Russia and South Korea over an entire confrontation with regional implications NPR's Lucy and camera ports the Russian defense ministry denies charges that its war planes violated south Korean air space even as officials in Seoul insist there were incursions Russian TV the statement by the defense ministry fine then I'm not sure why not give them so the loss that I think you just can't restrict organ from two to pull off ninety five bombers were in the area action of the A. fifty command and control plane at which South Korea says it fired warning shots the ministry said the bombers were flying over neutral waters and that south Korean fighters made no attempt to communicate with the Russian pilots and conducted unprofessional maneuvers later the ministry said the two Russian bombers were holding the first joint long distance air patrol together with two Chinese bombers at the exercise was not directed at third countries Japan says it scrambled aircraft intercept the planes both South Korea and Japan are key US allies in the region this young Kim NPR news Moscow the Senate votes today on whether to extend funding for the nine eleven victim compensation fund NPR's Wincer Johnston reports the house approved the extension earlier this month the fund pays out claims for deaths and illnesses related to the attack the new measure would replenish the funded through the next seventy plus years essentially ensuring benefits for the lifetime of first responders speaking ahead of today's vote president of the uniformed firefighters association Gerard fitz Gerald said he's optimistic the fund will be extended it should go through it's the right thing to do over the weekend we lost that you wonder if the member of the fire department two nine eleven related disease over the weekend the NYPD.

Alison Stewart writer Mitchel three years
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Alison Stewart we're talking about the New York City tap festival which is going on from July sixth through July twelfth we have in studio dancers rush me writing drawn across the room and Tony back artistic director of the American tap dance foundation but Tony is also a tap dance we've gotten out of the board is Vic us and you guys are going to perform the sham jam the shim sham let's do it all right.

Alison Stewart Tony director Vic New York City
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Alison Stewart and I'm joined in studio by WNYC's program director Jacqueline Cincotta. Hello, jello. Alison all the money in half the time. I think we can do it. You do. I do I have faith in our listeners on the pessimist. I'm often which is good. So good. We hear together. Right. Yeah, it's all the money in half the time. So the serious part of this is that we took the risk, and we said before this, Dr started we said, that's it. We know that this the new cycle is, is very hectic right now. There's a lot going on. We think this is the right time to do all the money in half the time fundraiser, we're gonna cut the pledge drive in half, and we're gonna have faith that our listeners will come through for us and help us raise literally twice as much money each day. That's basically what the math ends up being. So that's why we're here. That's what we're asking for. We're asking for you to think about that. Think about how you ask us to be creative in how we do fundraising, and this is certainly one of the ways that we reduce the amount of on air fundraising, but in order for it to be successful and in order for us to do it again. We need to know that it will work, and that's where you come in, and hopefully will make a call right now to eight eight three seven six nine six nine two eight three seven six WNYC or make. That secure e pledge online at WNYC dot org. And let us know that we made the right decision by cutting this fund drive in half. We still need to raise the same amount of money would in a normal length drive, but do it in an accelerated fashion. So if you're a fan of all of it, now's the time to show us that by making a contribution. We're waiting to hear from you at eight three seven six nine six nine two, and we have lots of different incentives for all levels because, of course every amount counts. No donation is too, small. So I if you have time today and you have a few dollars spare, you can get an all of it. We're calling it a carry all of it. It's a large book bags not quite tote back. It's kind of just so I said, the, the department I wonder where people can put all of it in one big bag. It's a cool color. It's, it's good for summer waterproof. So any amount of money when you call one eight eight three seven six nine six nineteen and get these special carry all of it now. This one's new. This is I'm excited about this. This has a sound effect, the WNYC bike bell for twelve dollars a month. I think that's a yes. Donation of one hundred forty four dollars. That's twelve dollars a month will thank you the brand new WNYC bike Bill chrome bike bell with that awfully ring. And it has a WNYC logo in nice read that we like so much around here show, your support of your favorite station, while biking around the streets. Call now to support WNYC all of the programs.

WNYC Alison Stewart Jacqueline Cincotta program director twelve dollars one hundred forty four dollars
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Alison Stewart coming up writers Jimmy breslin and Pete Hamill captured New York City in very different ways. But with a similar nuance and care that helped define the city a new documentary about the two legends of New York branches out in the film makers will join us, and we'll take your calls. Do you have a favorite breadwinner Hamlin story? Hamill story, did, you know her work with either man, do you have questions for the filmmakers are numbers two to four three three nine six nine two two two four three three WNYC or tweet to us at all of its WNYC. There's a new play called the convent and it features an off emails cast whose characters go in search of themselves at a folk convent, and what they learned about love, sexuality and motherhood is both eliminating in difficult. The playwright Jessica Dickie joins us. I'm Alison Stewart. We'll get to all of it. After the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The US budget deficit is on track to hit nearly a trillion dollars this year reporting on new government, data NPR's Windsor. Johnston says analysts also project a slowdown in economic growth. The Congressional Budget Office report says the deficit will hit eight hundred ninety seven billion dollars this year. And predicts the economy will grow by two point three percent. A slowdown from three point one percent last year. Mark Zandi the chief economist at Moody's analytics says curbing, the deficit hasn't been a priority for either party establishment Republicans were all about fiscal discipline. And they kept the line on the fiscal situation. But there's no one out there. Now in Washington, that's focused on this as an issue. And because of that these deficits are likely to get a lot than the longer address them the bigger. The problem is going to be the report comes on the heels of a five week partial government shutdown that cost the economy about eleven billion dollars Windsor Johnston. NPR news Washington a framework for ending the US led war in Afghanistan is on the table. The New York Times quotes US on voice all may Khalilzad saying that US officials and the Taliban have reached consensus on some points of a peace deal that has yet to be independently verified, the Taliban say there is no agreement the securities and Exchange Commission is seeking information from Nissan as the automaker. Grapples with a scandal involving pay to its former chairman NPR's Camilla domino ski has the latest. A Nissan spokesman said the company has received an enquiry from American regulators. The company did not provide any details but said Nissan is quote, cooperating fully the SEC declined to comment on the nature of the investigation. Carlos gone. The former head of Nissan titan in the auto industry. He simultaneously lead. Nissan, Renault and Mitsubishi. He's currently in jail in Japan where he has been accused of financial misconduct for. Allegedly concealing some of his compensation from authorities after his arrest Goan was ousted as chairman of Nissan and Mitsubishi and resigned as chairman and CEO of Renault. Camilo domino, Ascii NPR news..

Nissan NPR US Alison Stewart Washington Pete Hamill New York City Nissan titan chairman Carlos chairman and CEO New York WNYC Congressional Budget Office Taliban Camilo domino Hamlin Windsor Johnston
"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"alison stewart" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart when David Sheff realized that his eldest son Nick was not just rebellious kid experimenting with drugs but had become a full blown addict. He rejected common wisdom that suggested that he should let Nick hit rock. Bottom on zone said David spent ten years trying to save his son's life seem overdoses relapses and homelessness now Nick is sober and healthy and both father and son have decided to share their stories with the world Knicks memoir tweak and David's memoir. Beautiful boy served as the source material for the two thousand eighteen film, beautiful boy, their new book. Hi, everything you want to know about drugs alcohol and addiction hits shelves tomorrow on January eighth. Congratulations on the book, you guys. I don't think so much think you're going to help a lot of people after having read through it. It's interesting because I was just we were just talking off Mike earlier about what your book events are like, and how people just wanna talk to you about their experiences. Can you describe that for me? Yeah. I think that you know, if you're dealing with most problems people, we talk about them to our friends, and our neighbors and somehow when it's around drug use and addiction. We don't I think there's a lot of shame and guilt. Was like that for me. I just thought people would judge me. What would they think? I must be a terrible father that my son had become addicted. So I think that what has happened is especially at a time when addiction is just raging across the country, killing somebody of our loved ones, people feel gratified to find a place where they don't have to be alone, and they can talk, and they can share their stories, and there really is power and sharing stories, and so people come up, and we hear stories that are the saddest stories in the world about parents have lost their kids. And also a lot of inspiring stories about people who have survived against all odds. Now, you're you're a journalist. You're a writer by trade as are you Nick as well a writer. So you're the Rainer journalists in you, why do you think you didn't pick up on how serious Knicks problem was earlier?.

Nick David Sheff Knicks Mike Alison Stewart writer ten years
Google walkout: Employees protest over sexual harassment scandals

All of It

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Google walkout: Employees protest over sexual harassment scandals

"Communist party warned of what it called profound changes in the external environment, not to the tariffs imposed by the United States, one key omission from the meeting was an announcement about the dates for a plan of key autumn meeting. Analysts suggest the delay of the meeting which is expected to focus on economic policies could suggest lack of consensus among China's leadership over how to handle the cooling economy NPR's. Rob Schmitz reporting. Stocks are trading higher this hour on Wall Street, the Dow was up two hundred twenty points, the NASDAQ up ninety seven. This is NPR news in Washington. This is WNYC in New York. I'm Rebecca era. The city of Newark is facing questions about the quality of its drinking water after state tests found elevated levels of lead mayor raspberry says part of the problem is with privately owned service lines that carry water to people's homes, but star ledger reporter Karen Ye says another factor recently came to light this month, the city acknowledged that. There's also a problem with how they're treating the water. And when you have highly corrosive water that excess debates the problem, right? It's sort of eating away more than it would before the city is handing out water filters to residents and changing the way it treats water today is the first day of open enrollment consumers can sign up for or change their health insurance plans, including coverage under the Affordable Care Act in New York more than four million people get their insurance including Medicaid through the state run exchange political reporter, Dan Goldberg says insurance. Premiums in the state have gone up nine percent since last year. But most customers received subsidies, that's given New York officials confidence that the market will remain stable. It was stable last year. In fact, it had one of its best seasons in twenty eighteen despite some of the turmoil coming out of DC, and they're looking for much the same in two thousand nine hundred New Yorkers can sign up for health insurance at NY state of health dot org, and a Catholic Bishop in the New York archdiocese has stepped down from public ministry after being accused of sexual abuse cardinal. Timothy Dolan says a decades-long allegation lodged against auxiliary Bishop John genetic of Our Lady of refuge in the Bronx was quote credible and sustained genyk has denied the allegations. This is WNYC support for NPR comes from Newman's Own foundation working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's Own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at new. Newman's Own foundation dot org. This is all Alison Stewart, and you have been listening to attract called walk and funny of Christian mcbride's, John six time, Grammy winning jazz

New York NPR Newman Reporter Communist Party China Rob Schmitz United States Alison Stewart Bishop John Rebecca Era Timothy Dolan Newark Washington Karen Ye Wnyc