7 Burst results for "Alison Silverstein"

"alison silverstein" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"alison silverstein" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five. When you add all that up. Larry gas tiger with the transmission group. Wires says it's a lot of money at all that i've actually seen figure that comes up with a grand total for all of these together but as you start to stitch the pieces together. The numbers become pretty eye-popping gas staggers group estimates that just building a transmission system to handle all the new electricity demand could cost up to ninety billion dollars over the next decade and that does not include measures needed to make the grid more resilient against storms like hurricane ida but his new orleans residents have learned. There's a devastating cost when a.

alison silverstein President biden murphy katrina carnegie mellon university hurricane mit new orleans Amin Biden Congress Larry hurricane ida
"alison silverstein" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"alison silverstein" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five. When you add all that up. Larry gas tiger with the transmission group. Wires says it's a lot of money at all that i've actually seen figure that comes up with a grand total for all of these together but as you start to stitch the pieces together. The numbers become pretty eye-popping gas staggers group estimates that just building a transmission system to handle all the new electricity demand could cost up to ninety billion dollars over the next decade and that does not include measures needed to make the grid more resilient against storms like hurricane ida but his new orleans residents have learned. There's a devastating cost when a storm.

alison silverstein President biden murphy katrina carnegie mellon university hurricane mit new orleans Amin Biden Congress Larry hurricane ida
"alison silverstein" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"alison silverstein" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Hurricane ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five.

alison silverstein President biden murphy katrina carnegie mellon university hurricane mit new orleans Amin Biden Congress Larry hurricane ida
Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 9 months ago

Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

"Hurricane ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five.

Hurricane Ida Alison Silverstein President Biden Murphy Katrina Carnegie Mellon University Hurricane MIT New Orleans Amin Congress Biden
"alison silverstein" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"alison silverstein" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Generation continues to come back amid an ongoing request to conserve power that lasts through tonight. We attribute much of where we are today to the help of Texans who supported us during our conservation appeal and helped us Flattened load on the system over the past couple of days. Leslie Sopko with her cut says it remains unlikely that the tight grid conditions will lead to force outages like we saw in February haircut blames the high number of generators being down for repairs and vows to investigate. The reason why so many generators were out of service. Meantime, some energy insiders are suggesting that Texans be paid to conserve energy, as many Texans remain skeptical about calls to conserve. I completely understand that and if I didn't work in the energy business, I would probably be kind of up yours, too, about this. That's Austin based energy consultant Alison Silverstein in an interview with W. F A. Dallas residents could win big prizes this they get vaccinated. Clayton Neville, With just over half of eligible Dallas County residents vaccinated. Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson has a message. We need more people to get vaccinated Q community partners and new incentive program. Dallas Foundation CEO Matthew Randazzo says the goal is to keep Dallas residents healthy and safe and able to get back to our work and our play in a way that feels somewhat normal. Residents vaccinated between June 1st in July, 23rd can be Entered into a drawing for sports or airlines, tickets and gift cards. Injuries are being taken on the mayor's website. Clayton Neville. W B. A P News Divided administration claims the Southern border is closed. Not so, says Texas A G Ken Paxton. They're going to interview on Fox Business Network's mornings with Maria What the vitamin illustrations presenting to us as falls. This is an open border, and it is a massive fall, and I think it's the numbers speak for themselves. Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro My Orcas says on record as saying that the border is in fact closed from the preservation free services. W B A P 24 7 News desk. I'm Kim Lampkin. Your next update is at 6 30 24 7 coverage at w b a p dot com You know, as we enter the summer and, you know, look forward to a productive summer for all our guys. And, you know, training camp, which will be here before we know it. Um, you know a fresh start Good health. Are very important things interesting the way he worded that a good summer for all our guys. I won't be a part of it, but good luck to them. That's former Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle. During their exit interviews 11 days ago, when there was no indication that all heck was about to break loose on this team. Good morning from our Mercedes been to play no sports system. TV land when Carla talk to the media last week after the Mavs season was over after having lost that Tough seven game series of the Clippers. There wasn't anybody thinking that he was done in Dallas, but after 13 years, making the decisions on the court He suddenly resigned. And it comes a day after we find out that the president of basketball operations Donny Nelson was out. How does this decision by Carlisle and yesterday's move with Donny Nelson affect Luca Donges? His future in Dallas? Don't think it affects it at all. He is in line to sign a $200 Million extension once free agency opens. Yeah, we could all be happy. Couldn't we? With 200 Million? Regardless of who the coach is that NBA insider Adrian? Well, Godowsky. Keep Luca happy. Everybody will move on from this. Carlisle is going to find another job. And so will Donny Nelson Jr. Bath mats do need to add a top tier player to compliment dot It's so this team can keep getting better. College football. We've always got time for college Football. Alabama and Clemson are breaking in new quarterbacks this season. But oddsmakers don't expect the Crimson Tide or the Tigers to suffer any significant drop off. They have are topping the college football season wind totals, which were released yesterday by Caesar Sports Book by William Hill each opening at 11.5. Ohio State and Oklahoma are next, followed by Georgia, North Carolina. Coastal Carolina and Cincinnati, Texas under a new coach, Steve Sarkeesian, opened at eight. If that means anything to you, A and M 9 9.5. So there you go. Some college football talk that you check on sports and Steve lamb.

Leslie Sopko Alison Silverstein Steve Sarkeesian Donny Nelson Rick Carlisle Maria Kim Lampkin Steve Luca Donges Crimson Tide Matthew Randazzo February June 1st $200 Million Carla Dallas Foundation Adrian Clemson Mercedes Carlisle
"alison silverstein" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"alison silverstein" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Bill designed to overhaul the system is a good start, but didn't go far enough and gave too much power to regulators who have been accused of already being too laxed. Unlike getting the issues to airlines, offering incentives to travelers who give up seats on overbooked flights. Some energy experts are suggesting that Texans be paid to conserve energy. If you heard her cat say, Please conserve and you turned up your thermostat. You are doing that for free people who get paid to do that Think citizen like me who voluntarily conserves energy. There's another name for it, and it's called the sucker. Boston based energy consultant Alison Silverstein told W F A. T V. She doesn't blame Texans were being angry and skeptical about haircuts. Requests to conserve over four million Americans say they're worried they may be evicted or foreclosed upon soon as the federal eviction moratorium expires at the end of the month. Correspondent Jill NATO about $45 billion in federal emergency rental assistance that was supposed to help keep people in their homes during the pandemic. Hasn't actually reached tenants that need the help. So housing advocates are hoping to convince President Biden to extend the federal eviction moratorium so people can stay in their homes until that help arrives. All this comes as the Census Bureau's household poll survey says nearly 4.2 million people report They're likely or somewhat likely to be evicted or foreclosed upon in the next two months in Washington, Jill NATO Fox News, Dallas based Big Thought and Impact education nonprofit has received a one point million $0.5 million gift from philanthropist Mackensie, Scott and Dan do it. Scott is the former wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Byron Sanders, president and CEO of Big thought, says he's thankful for this unexpected gift. Getting the ability to do programs as we see fit, as we see, we need to respond is tremendous because now we don't feel like we're necessarily beholden to a specific program. We're beholden to the results. He says. This will further expand the work..

Alison Silverstein Amazon Byron Sanders Dan Jill NATO Jeff Bezos Washington Boston Big thought Census Bureau Scott Fox News $0.5 million Dallas about $45 billion Big Thought over four million one point million President Biden Americans
It's Not Just Texas: The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

Environment: NPR

03:06 min | 1 year ago

It's Not Just Texas: The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

"The electricity grid is more than wires. It's also power plants big transmission towers and local utilities. Everything that gets electricity to you. Much of that infrastructure was designed for a different era says energy consultant alison silverstein. We plan this grid for us inherit weather and we are now facing mad max. These pop culture references are silverstein colorful way of saying that what worked in the nineteen fifties sixties and seventies needs to be updated for a future that includes climate change. Everybody has always designed these systems looking in the rear view mirror that made sense grid. Managers identified the worst case scenario from the past and planned for that but climate change is delivering whether that hasn't been experienced before the number of weather disasters with losses over a billion dollars is increasing according to the federal government and the group climate central says that since two thousand there's a sixty seven percent increase in major power outages from weather and climate related events. Each region has its own vulnerabilities. Take the pacific northwest. And it's massive hydropower dams for example. Not only do we need to be worried about the cold weather events like he signed texas and the the hot weather events like in california ben kiala is at the northwest power and conservation council. They recently changed their planning models to look ahead and better prepare for how climate change alters win water flows through the dams. He says warming temperatures make it likely that mountain snow pack will melt earlier in the year. And you have a lot more water running into those reservoirs in the winter when it used to be more of a spring phenomenon and it might be that by summer. You're pretty much. All the snow. Pack melted everything off. And you don't have that much precipitation and you just have way less energy in the summer grid. Experts generally agree. The country needs to build more transmission lines to get electricity from where it's produced to where it's needed. That would make it possible to add more cleaner. Sources of power like wind turbine solar projects in batteries to store energy. Larry gas diker heads wires. A trade group advocating for more high voltage transmission lines. He points out that president biden set a goal of net zero carbon emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five. That may sound like a long time from now but in the world of building transmission It's really not that far off when you think you need a good ten here. Lead time in order to get there and gas tiger says all that new transmission infrastructure big towers. Thick lines comes with a steep price tag. Our study said up to ninety billion dollars of investment by twenty thirty maybe as much as six hundred billion an investment by two thousand fifty gas tiger suspects the texas blackout. While encouraged policymakers to move on this issue. Soon as expensive as this sounds the texas experience shows. There's also a cost of not preparing the grid for more extreme weather in dollars and lives jeffrey. Npr

Alison Silverstein Ben Kiala Northwest Power And Conservati Silverstein Pacific Northwest Diker Federal Government President Biden Texas California Larry Jeffrey NPR