17 Burst results for "Alison Klayman"

"alison klayman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi there happy to be here. So tell me what's known about Convalescent plasma. What is it? Sure, I mean, Basically, it's taking the plasma from people who've recovered from Cove 8 19 and transfusing it into the bodies of patients just diagnosed to give them these beneficial antibodies. You know, it's not a new idea. It's been used for over 100 years earlier this spring and effort to try convalescent Plasma and Cove it patients I was really kick started at the Mayo Clinic, and many hospitals have been using it, including Mount Sinai in New York and Houston Methodist in in Houston. What's the evidence that it is helpful? Well, this is the sticking point. I mean, Currently there are study results, pointing to some benefits. Today we heard the president say it's proven to reduce mortality. But you know most the experts I talked to say it's still early days. They say we need more clinical data. We need data from a randomized controlled trial, which is the gold standard for this type of research to really figure this out. I think that thinking among the administration officials and what we just heard from the FDA commissioner seems to be well convalescent plasma is shown to be safe. It's looking to be then officials, so let's keep using it and find out more. I spark I spoke to Mark boom. He's the CEO of Houston Methodist. He's a physician, he says. With more data, randomized controlled trial, It will become clear just how effective the plasma is compared to say, You know, placebo. I understand completely respect the need to get randomized controlled trial data. We need to know these answers. But the same time we have 100, plus year therapy that's been used that we know is very, very safe and that has some pretty strong signal of efficacy. You know, I should point out no. None of the experts that I've I've spoken to think that this is a you know, a magic bullet. I mean, doctors now have multiple therapies that could be helpful. Rend death, severe antiviral steroids, other drugs being tested now, so to the extent that convalescent plasma becomes part of the mix, it really could be thought of as sort of one more thing, one more option of a part of a cocktail of therapies. I want to go back to something you said earlier. You see, it's been around about 100 years could just tell us a little bit more about that. The history of UCS asthma? Yeah, it was used, you know, instead of pre vaccine era, one scientist currently studying at Arturo Custody ball at Johns Hopkins, he says, it goes back 120 years. That's when doctors first realised that antibodies borrowed from the recovered patients may help save lives. He tells this story about a doctor at a boys boarding school in Pennsylvania Back in 1935, who treated the boy with measles, then took his plasma gave it to other Children and was able to stave off cases so That's sort of the history. Convalescent plasma was also used during the 2009 H one n one pandemic and during the 2012 murders epidemic, So it's based on that experience. The doctors began using it this year. All right, Allison we have about 30 seconds left, So I just want to ask. How unusual is it that the FDA would do something like this? You know, Granting emergency use authorization is unusual, but not so much during the pandemic. We've seen a bunch of these kinds of authorizations of the last couple of months. Bottom line. The approval is likely coming much faster than it would be the case if we were not in the midst of this pandemic. That is NPR's Ellison. Aubrey. Alison. Thank you. Thank you very much. I'm going to talk now about a former member of President Trump's inner circle who now finds himself under indictment. We're talking about Steve Bannon, a former top strategist in President Trump's 2016 campaign, and in the White House. On Thursday, federal prosecutors in New York charged Bannon with fraud, alleging that he and three others funneled money to themselves that they were supposedly raising through Crowdsourcing. To build a portion of Trump's southern border wall. Bannon denies the charges. You wanted to hear more about this formerly prominent figure in Trump's orbit and the latest of his close associates to face criminal charges. So we called Alison Klayman, she directed the 2019 documentary The Brink. Which followed Bannon after he was fired from the White House in 2017 and work to influence the 2018 mid terms in the U. S. And Link far right Populist in Europe. Alison Klayman, Thanks so much for being with us, so nice to be here. Thanks, Michelle. For start back where the film starts. Would you just remind us why Bannon was fired from the White House when his hardline views on immigration were so central to Trump's campaign to begin with? Yeah. Bannon left the White House essentially in the fallout after the Charlottesville far right demonstrations and the death of Heather hire. His exit was Swift in the wake of Charlottesville. And at the time Trump Still, you know, considered him in his good graces. It was only later around the time that Michael Wolff's book came out. And quotes that Bannon said that were disparaging to Trump and his family were published that Trump gave him the moniker Sloppy Steve and this more public rift was on everyone's radar. What was your reaction when you heard that he had been indicted for fraud. When I heard he had been indicted for fraud, there's some element of it being a little surprising, right? He's a former Goldman Sachs investment banker. Who you know, continues to surround himself with friends from that time, including the former president of Goldman Sachs. John Thornton seems like a guy who would know how to be on the right side of avoiding criminal activity. Criminal charges in terms of handling money. But it's sort of not surprising because the time that I spent with Bannon over, you know, 13 months after he left the White House, I saw the kind of people he surrounded himself and.

Steve Bannon President Trump White House Trump president Alison Klayman fraud Houston Methodist FDA Goldman Sachs New York Mount Sinai Pennsylvania Mayo Clinic Houston Mark boom NPR Michael Wolff UCS Michelle
"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"How would you pick who's going to weigh in on this? I felt like it had to be you know, an. Unmediated experience between the audience and the subject except the media. The media was me like through all of the choices I made, but I wasn't going to how do you pick who's going to frame things? And then, you know, we thought maybe kind of like at the very very beginning kind of like with Weiner as a model, you know, there was like that one key sit down interview that it seemed like it was done at the end, you know. And so we sort of like if you look at the earliest budget, there was like a budget for like having something like that. And then it was like we were talking all the time. And I was like a, and I also saw how there was no value in encountering Bannon interview context. Like I felt like he does not sit down in good faith. He thrives in the in the combat of it, all, you know, there's I just felt like there was that wasn't a place where there was anything revealing. And as the year went on. He did, you know every long format interview under the sun, you know, Charlie rose and freed Zaccaria hit me. He just he was he just did so many things to where I was like, well, that's not people can find that. Elsewhere. And you know, when you're spending time with someone in their real life things will happen when you interview them in a setting in which you've seen them be interviewed in no matter, how brilliant or not you are, you know? It seems like a rigged game. I want to open it up to the audience. If there are questions, I have like a million more I could ask, but I see a hand here, and then a enthusiastic, and they're so the question is about access and whether at times, you were denied or more often you had open access and also about releases. I think most people could here. So can you can grade me on my summaries later. So a really good question because you know, it's about the access to Bannon. But then to me, the movie would only be interesting if he's talking to other people, and that is a daily negotiation. A lot of times. He was my greatest champion in telling people. Oh, you should be v. I was always. I was never misleading about who. I was. Although I think a lot of people when they encountered me were probably like do you work for him. And that I mean like a lot of journalists that he works with. So they were always like, you know, fuck this. And when it comes to people who are on, you know, who are far right heads of state, or basically if anyone ever asked me, my line was always I'm an independent filmmaker. I don't work for him. When he would introduce me would say, she's a documentary filmmaker, you know, she's doing a movie about populism and nationalism. And the whole thing, you know, he never said, she's making movie at me because I think he thought that would sound like, you know, like he was to full of himself. And it was kinda true. They my intention was to make a movie that's about things that are bigger. So. What was great is that he would often encourage people to be in the movie, except people that he didn't want me to film, like a one example is Michael Wolff was around a lot and those after fire and fury..

Bannon Weiner Zaccaria Michael Wolff Charlie rose
"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"In a timely manner. Because there was some urgency, but never to compromise the quality of the film if that makes I mean, obviously, you can always say that. But that was true. I feel like if I was like this movie's garbage we put it out. There wouldn't have been an issue. But. I also think we worked really smart and part of that is because of how much responsibility we all felt and for me how much intention like I came to the edit not even that I was like better prepared than in the past. But like everything was just super thought out because I think I every day. I was like. You know, you're making this movie. Why why are you making this movie? Like, are you doing what you're what you set out to do? People are gonna come at you from all sides. You know, I think I would go to bed at night just imagining like now I did like today was a press day. And it's like, I probably was imagining the kinds of things I'd have to talk about at a on days. Like this like every night because it really felt like a scary. Like like if you do this wrong. You know? I mean for me, it's like if you do this wrong like the the right loves you. And the left hates you or the left hates you. And the right hates you or. I mean, there's like so many combinations of. You know and reasons that people won't give them a shot is really what it is. You know, just because of who the subject is. But I believe that what I was doing had value. But I had to prove it to myself every day, and it meant that. I was like there has to be a reason why every choices made it can't just be look how cool this access is like I got to film Bannon that was the number one thing this movie is not about being in Namur of the access like I have something to say that is completely about what I observed not like I came in with a with a world view. But I didn't come in with an idea of what the story is. And then I, you know, made up things to to show that story, you know, the story revealed itself of most not great foams. I mean like, and I felt like also it should work out that way, I was pretty confident that as long as I had the access as long as I was able to film real things. And he was you know, as long as I had enough material. There was the story there that would. Yeah. That would do what I had to do. I didn't have to do any like anything misleading or any tricks and and back to one of your earlier questions like the verite approach. I mean at the this is the first time I've ever done a film where there's no talking head like interviews or other interviews to contextualized with way, it was verite. I did follow him. But I had a lot of other voices to talk about, you know, his backstory in the art world and China all that kind of stuff this. I mean, I was like who what a minefield..

Bannon China Namur
"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Who I was filming in what I was filming because it was like something to focus on I directed. A segment of this film called eleven eight sixteen that was like a bunch of different directors all following one person during the two thousand sixteen election, and I was filming Davies who's a reporter in in Philadelphia. And so I like experienced the election of Donald Trump kind of through the the screen of my camera. And and that's this mediated experience, you know, as it is when you're you know, if anybody has that kind of experience, and and it's in a way, it's like, you know, I fell apart when I came home perp because that's personally, you know, I don't know if I was surprised, but I was upset, and and you know, but the experience you're kind of because you're just thinking about the light and the framing and the sound and because running it all, and I do think that was kind of helpful and meditative. Some ways while I frankly, would describe, you know, filming with Bannon day in day out because he also is kind of on a loop, and I could finish his sentences on his sorta stump speech, and the what he'd say to reporters. But because of where I personally come from with my politics. I felt like it was like having poisoned poured into my ear all the time. But I was also like engaged in other ways, which was like I was trying to decide where to put the camera, and you know, what to film and thinking about how would this fitness storyline. And you kind of just treat every day. Like, it's definitely going to be in the film, and you're always trying to figure out how is this going to be in the film, even though there's hundreds of hours, and it's a ninety minute kind of film. But. When I guess in terms of other parts of the question. It's it's not just fly on the wall. I think in the film, you hear my voice more as it goes on that is both like Representative of a relationship that evolved. I didn't say as much to him in the beginning. I was kind of getting my bearings. I didn't you know. I didn't know him. Very well, he wasn't used to having me around. It. Also, I filmed for a long time before we had their release officially signed. So I also felt like I didn't really want to say a lot before I knew that we had the release signed. But you know, also the point of the movie was not. Can I get a point on Bannon? Or can I like, you know, not even a Gotcha. But it's not about my like, the offscreen voice interaction with him anything that could be done by someone with him in front of my lens was better than me having to to say it from offscreen, but we had hours and hours long conversations by the end, I did have a lot of options of times where I thought I could show the kinds of things that I show. I think when I do when you do hear my voice, but. You know, I kind of I think it's very calibrated. How how you talk specifically about the choice. I mean, I think I know why you chose to put the scene the the interaction about the pronunciation of the Chinese names. But can you? I don't know. I mean, like, what could you what were you experiencing in that moment? And then did you know, and then also the decision to use that? And what what again because like, and I don't mean to. Insult the fly on the wall description because it could be biologically, very smart. Fly. Say and creative. But. But so also filmmaking involves making lots of decisions not just when you're in the field, which is to put yourself in the right position at the right time. And it's also about the decisions that you make in the edit which in this case was very fast at it. And so the decision to include that until me a little bit about that process. Yeah. So what's funny is?.

Davies Bannon reporter Donald Trump Philadelphia Representative ninety minute
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"And I think he was was a little distracting. He only saw it once. And he was you know, he wasn't particularly vocal during the screening. Wasn't very clear. I don't know if it was intentional. If you didn't seem to hate it in to love it. And but then you know, we were in close touch very often. There are a lot of things I need to tell him about ask him about tell him. And then once the reviews came out during Sundance and an interview that I did he he cut me off and stop talking to me. So I I, you know, I extrapolate from that what he thinks about the movie right now. But he hasn't told me or spoken to me. So what was Steve Bannon's motive to appear in the movie audience member put that question to Alison, I don't know that I know any better than the evidence that I tried to put in this film, because I don't know that he, you know, he's always performing he's calibrating the answers. I think that there's a mixture of. Opportunism and seeking his own status fame and financial gain. I think that that is evidenced by the way, he uses the media, which I don't think is just about getting some sort of message out. I think it's also it's important for him. You know, why would he let this film? You know, be made. Why would he let multiple films be made about him? You know, he sees himself as a he believes in the great man version of history. And he is one of those great men and his activities are all funded by billionaires, you know, the people he spends time with as he talks about being for the little guy are billionaires, you know, he's a millionaire funded by billionaire. So I, you know, I also look at his policies. I personally don't believe that they map out. A path to a better life for the average person or for the people that are hurting in various ways, economically, you know, in terms. I think there's much more direct ways to help people like healthcare and minimum wage regulating corporations. These are not things he believes in. So when you also see who he spends time with and how he spends his time. I think it's really clear who's carrying water for. I think it's also really clear that the super rich are not threatened by him even though he acts like he's coming up against them. So so to me, I'm inferring what his alternate goals are from that. I also think there is some ideology that he holds an I think that's evidenced by when he gets, you know, in the room with these foreign leaders, and they talk about they worry about birth rates of Islamic people coming to Europe, and he talks about the Judeo Christian west. And which is so to me, there are some things that are in there that matter, but you know, I think it somehow it's a mixture of all of that. And I just really tried to put in what I think are the clues in the film. I want to thank director, Alison Klayman and producer Marie trace gear..

Alison Klayman Sundance Steve Bannon Europe Marie trace director producer
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I think you can invite the audience to to think about things just based on what choices are made in what you include in the film, and where you put it. But yeah. In any case, I just I did feel like I wanted to it would be I would fare better. If I watched him for a long time. I also wanted to that released to get signed. He knew what my, you know, he knew that my ordination, I think the way marine tries introduce me it was like this Alson. She's Jewish granddaughter of holocaust survivors, like it was very clear that my politics were left, and he would always call me his like commie lefty Brown University, filmmaker or Brown, filming or whatever. But you know, I I think as time went on. Yeah. Like, the little bits you hear those. They're like. Hours of conversations that we had especially by the end. But it wasn't so much for me to like again for me necessarily to get my licks. It was sort of like where I felt like I didn't have anyone else saying something because I was always preferred if someone else would do the work in front of the camera like the Paul Lewis seen obviously is great. And you know, it's better that it comes from two characters in front of the camera. But also, I feel like. For me. It was really about trying to see if I get something new out of him. So a lot of what I would say to like just trying to see. Okay. If I say this. If I challenged him this way because you're gonna give me something new like, it was just, you know, we would have hours on a plane or we'd have thirty minutes in between interviews, and you know, I've just try to see what what I would get that felt new or different the thing about the cultural like, you know, who does identity politics. I'd say that to me was more like I mean, honestly that moment, and you know, the the globalist sort of line in the car. I mean, those were maybe a little bit cathartic where I was just like it bugs me that this needs to be said right now. But yeah, you know, some of it was just trying to see if I would learn anything new about him or get a different performance out of him, depending how I approached him. How did your feelings about him change question for both of you? If they even changed throughout the process. I would say for me. I, you know, I I used to joke when I when I knew him many years ago because of his interests and his some of his hobbies, and I would say I would say come on like like, I know you're a closet liberal because many of his interest many of the things he talks about or not things we associate necessarily with people on the right? Little in the far. Right. And he would always say like, shh, don't tell anyone, and it was actually kind of believable. Right. I mean, I I would say I would not say that now. I I think that. People ask the question, which is maybe you're planning to Ardy asked him jumping the gun. But people always ask us, you know, really a racist is really intimate equity think he's just an opportunist. And that was I would say for me personally making this film. Those were those were big questions looming over me, they were painful questions. It's not it's not pleasant to think of someone that you knew well and actually liked in some ways being, you know, being those things, and I think the conclusion I reached is that it doesn't matter what you know, what he believes in his heart. I don't know. I just look at the actions, and I look at you know, the people who works with and the g that he promotes and what he's, you know, everyday working to to fuel and the policies and at cetera into me those that's the answer. And I think that that is the conclusion I came to and I really think that you know, so that was, but when I look at the film when I saw the very first assembly one. The things I felt good about is. I felt like that's the person..

Paul Lewis Brown University Brown Ardy thirty minutes
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"And he said, yes. So then I was sort of introduced to the room and everyone said it was okay. And then I filmed from start to finish I took their group photo. And then I asked them all to sign the release incredible. Another day at the office. I mean, what's so incredible about the film is the amount of nuance. There is and he is such a layered, man. I mean, he's very self aware of where he's going to look bad. I mean, there's so many scenery saying, oh, you're going to slay me in this film. You're going to look bad yet. He doesn't tell you to cut anything out. And he doesn't have any creative control over the film. And I was wondering retry like how is your relationship with him after filming started? It's one thing to get somebody to agree to film. But then as Allison's there, and this whole film is taking this new turn. And they're in Europe. And there's other national leaders where there any other communications between you inhale where he might have expecting them all the time pretty much because. There were always I mean, Alison our communicating all the time. And there would be times when let's say Alison was having trouble getting in someplace where he was just he wasn't. They're not letting her or just know what the people around him were letting her in or were, you know, where we would discuss kind of his coming schedule, and what he was going to be because it was changing every day. So I had to I was in touch with them constantly. You know, I it was I was very transparent. I still I was still saying scathing things about what he was doing which was probably very unprofessional of me as a producer. But I was I couldn't help it. But no, I mean, you know, it's complicated complicated. I can I can only explain it as if like when I knew him he was a Republican. And he was what I consider it at the time like like a fairly moderate Republican. I didn't see any of these any of the particularly more extreme views in him at the time needed an express them openly. And so I had to go through my own journey cheesy word, but of kind of getting to know the new in some ways, the new old, Steve which was, you know, painful, honestly, in some ways and interesting and the best the best filling I have is watching the film as Alison I spoke a lot about. Certainly moral issues and ethical issues..

Alison I Allison Europe Alison Steve producer
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Get set up where there any limits imposed anything. No there were no limits. And that was something I said up front in the first emails, I said, you know, the whoever the director is that person will have creative control. I want director to follow you for a period of time. And there can be no limits. And there weren't I mean, it took us we were actually filming. I am saying this to a bunch of filmmakers, but we were filming before we actually had our release fully executed that took quite a while. But not because there were negotiations. We're really none. And I think we actually, but but he just held out for a while. I think you know, and eventually I knew he would I knew he would sign it. But I think the people around him weren't thrilled about the film. But no there weren't and he was I mean Alec those stipulations were really from our side. Of course, you know, that we were saying you can't have any control, and that we were also asking for basically exclusive access in certainly in this capacity of film. Ming? But I think that you know, the one thing that he could control even though it is like it wasn't on paper that we couldn't do XYZ. But you know, as you see in the film, and I we made the effort to put it in the film. So you see that I understand full access isn't like full access. It's you know, it's kind of the same as any documentary film. I mean, it what he allows me to film. I have to like. Were my way in figure out where he's going what he's doing ask to be able to film, the other people in the scenes have to also agree to be filmed. And there were some meetings where I feel like, you know, he he asked me to film, which I looked with a big side. I like why does he what is it that he wants out of this? But you know, I can film things and not put it in the movie. So I could film things even if I wasn't interested there were some meetings where part of it happens. And then he says his way of telling me to leave was to get everything you need to get everything you need. He would always say it like that. And then usually was conversations about money and finances, the the real the real stuff, and then there were times like those the lunch and dinner with the far right leaders of Europe where I'm very proud of those. Because that was you know, I was in that room from start to finish. You know, it wasn't like here's the preamble because Allison's here, and then, you know, ask her to leave. It was. All a range and the access to get better over time as it, you know, typically does in these kinds of projects, and those leaders refine with you being there as well to the very last moment. I was I was ready to go in. And I went to put the microphone on on Bannon in his room because everyone was assembled except for Representative Paul gosar sitting congressmen of Arizona who if you guys remember he's the one he won his reelection in the midterms. He's the one who famously all five of his siblings campaign for his opponent. So he he wasn't there yet. But I went up to put the microphone on banning because I think it was like a little less awkward if you know, we didn't have to stop and put the microphone on. And he said, look, I can't do it. You know, listen, I was ready to have you do it. But there's going be a sitting congressman in this meeting. Like, you know, he's really he's got to say, yes. Or like, you know, this can't happen. And I was like really pissed because like that was my daily thing was trying to film interesting things, but I waited outside the room, and as he was walking in one of Bannon's team asked gosar, if he would agree to have we have a documentarian again as always made clear, you know, not that I didn't work for them. But you know, she's been filming she's interested in the populist movement. And can she film, and he said sure and basically emerged out of nowhere like falling in formation behind them and walked in and Bannon was like did he say, yes..

Bannon Paul gosar director Allison Alec congressman Ming Europe Arizona Representative
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Influence, and that this was these were not things that you are seeing at all in the media, and to to sort of underestimate that was also to kind of at the same time underestimate him. So I felt that he was being both, you know over. Given too much power and also sort of being underestimated in certain ways, and then I just I didn't know what to do with this knowledge that I had and also this this relationship and my frustration. And then one day I just woke up, and I work in documentary, produced documentaries. And I said to myself, you know, I could make documentary about him. And I asked him I reached out and I asked him, and he was still in the White House. And he he wrote back and said no way you'll destroy me. Because he knew how it felt for months, and and then I just kept asking asked a few more times. And I would just say look, you know, how I feel about what you're doing. So I'm not gonna pretend that the film will be a some sort of hagiography. But I promise that it'll be intelligent. You know, it'll be a good film. All bring a really good filmmaker and the fourth time, I think he wrote back to my surprise. And just said, I'll do it and he was still in the White House. And then I just thought like oh shit. Now, we gotta do this. But and then I pretty much immediately. Asked Allison if she wanted to direct the film and Allison what was your reaction when retreads calls you and asks you if you want a direct to film about Bannon. So I kind of just said, yes, which I then spent, you know, thirteen plus months sort of be like, what did I say? Yes. But meaning like, let's interrogate that. Let's have a good reason why. But I did say I, you know, I would like to like my my sort of one stipulation, which is a big one was like I need to meet him. And see what he's like he hadn't really done any television like long format interviews a lot of the stuff that's out there. Now at that point. I guess if I listened to Breitbart radio, I realized I could have known what he little bit sounded like, but I really didn't know what he was like in person. I just had that image that retreads just described. I felt like the opportunity would be something where I would immediately. Understood this has to be verite. This is about an opportunity to go inside to be exposed to a whole world and a whole world view. But also to see how he operates what he's interested in doing next to me, the fact that it was going to be able to see things. Unfold in real time. We didn't know where it was going to go. Again, it started when she called me he was still in the White House. But then even when it became that. He was leaving. It was really even bigger question. You know, what is he going to do next? And I felt like it was an entree into a bigger world. But I needed to know that he was a good character. So to speak like, a could I did I wanna spend the time, you know, watching him and keeping him in focus in my little monitor. And could he carry a film, and we went in September twenty seventeen. And that was the first time I met him not not filming just an introduction and he like walked into the room. And I really swear like the first ten seconds. I was like oh, man. Okay. Yes. He is a good character. He's going to say some shit. Like, this is I think this is going to be good because I really didn't expect from the get-go, you know, what I encountered, and we're there any stipulation setup because I can imagine he's in the White House. He's extremely controversial. He's very well known. You've made a film about IWay. How did that whole? Thing..

White House Bannon Allison Breitbart ten seconds one day
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I'm Tom power the documentary programmer for the Toronto international film festival and artistic director of doc NYC. On this episode director, Alison Klayman and producer retrace gear gifts discussed their new documentary. The brink in the film Alison follows Steve Bannon through the ear of Twenty-eight teen after he was fired from Trump's White House and fired. From Breitbart news and lost the support of his billionaire backers the Mercer's but Bannon didn't slow down. He went looking for new financial backers and took his nationalist ideas abroad. We watch him meet with right wing leaders from the United Kingdom, France Italy. And elsewhere to start a new group he calls the movement, we helped knit together this populist nationalist movement throughout the world because guys Egypt come into the Modi's guys in India. Do you know in we get or Mon in even and we're somehow some sort of convening authority producer Marie Therese one. Worked with Bannon in an earlier chapter of their careers fifteen years ago. Bannon was the CEO of American vantage media that bought the art house distribution company wellspring, we're Marie Therese worked. She experienced his brusque management style that we witness in the film have to change your nappy powder. Your bottom. Yes. Marie Therese secured the access to Bannon and picked Allison is the director Allison's previous documentary. I way way never sorry about the dissident Chinese artist took a similar observational approach for covering Bannon. Allison took advice from Washington DC journalist. He told me that, you know, everyone in DC likes to think that their life is house of cards, but it's really veep. So I did have this in my head. And then when I was in this world, and especially seeing this team and organization I was like, wow, this is going to be funny too. And I think to capture the behind the scenes because it is not just the bumbling. But also, the feelings of self importance the naked desire for power and status all that. Bannon his disarming Bonomi, he seems to enjoy debating liberal journalists in the film, we sometimes hear Ellison asked pointed questions from behind the camera. She also captures him clashing with others guardian reporter, Paul Lewis accuses Bannon of using antisemitic dog whistles with references to globalism, and George Soros. You can't possibly those dog. Was you can't possibly there's a dog whistles? I think..

Steve Bannon Marie Therese Allison Alison Klayman director producer Tom power White House NYC Toronto Breitbart DC Trump George Soros Mercer programmer United Kingdom Modi India American vantage media
"alison klayman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Considered from NPR news, I'm korva Coleman. Steve Bannon has become a household name. He was for a time. President Trump's chief strategist and the executive chairman of Breitbart news, Saturday Night Live portrayed ban. And as the grim reaper when he was in the White House, and for some this one dimensional characterizations stuck, but the newly released film, the brink provides unfettered access to Bannon's meetings colleagues and opinions creating a more complete picture of who he is director Alison Klayman shadowed Steve Bannon from the time you left the White House in two thousand seventeen until right after the midterm elections. And she joins us now from the NPR bureau in New York. Alison Clinton, welcome. Thank you so much korva. So Steve Bannon speaks in the film of quote doing the Lord's work. What is that work? According to Steve Bannon in some ways that ends up. Being kind of a tricky question because the world view in general tends to be a little bit incoherent. But what he is really focused on this year that I've been following him is he's really someone. Who's articulating a vision for a an international unified, far, right nationalist movement. It's an idea that is gaining some traction because of the successes that far right anti-immigrant parties have had across Europe and also in in other countries around the world, and so he's trying to take the clout that he has as a former member of the Trump administration White House chief strategist and to push forward and make himself a figure of importance you're film captured Steve Bannon's ability to negotiate you captured his energy, you captured his charm. Let's let's listen to a scene from your film people really thinking about making race politics. The centerpiece of the democratic primaries, if they do that woman is just people are because people it's economic nationals. They care about jobs. I'm saying is like you're making the Florida does the identity that you're on your show. And then being attacked and saying that Asia, the average happy about them. In your point. You're telling him that he's blaming liberals for engaging in identity politics when he's engaging in identity politics. I'm so happy that you played that clip because that to me really was one of the things that genuinely bothered me the most during the time, I spent I I didn't know this about him. And what he was doing before. I started I really didn't know a lot about him. But the way he would go around and speak to Republican groups, whether they were small grassroots groups are fancy fundraising dinners in all different parts of the country. What he was doing first and foremost was playing identity politics, and creating this in group identity the shared identity, you know, where remember quote, Billy Bush weekends. Remember, our great victory in two thousand sixteen and really trying to create these moments of shared victory, and he would accuse the left and liberals of playing identity politics as far as I could tell. Oh, that was really the bread and butter of of what he was doing. There's one really startling scene. When you when you seem to be taken aback, and you say what what did I just see was that you talking about working with the National Front in France. Yeah. I mean, I watched this meeting in the summer of two thousand eighteen when he's sitting down with two leaders of the party, and they're kind of talking about messaging talking about what voters are thinking about Macron right now. And because he doesn't really have a depth of expertise or knowledge in any of these European context. So, you know, this is like factfinding for him to talk to them about their electoral situation. But then where it becomes something where he is providing something to them is they start to discuss financials you want to go through the financials. Do you have those documents? That to me are two million. Euro is what you're paying expenses for for the month of July and August. Anything for this right now? Or that's of course, the part where they invite me to leave the room now consulting for the national rally party. Or what have what did I just watch every populist party or nationalist party that looks viable, right? I'm trying to help. This is what I've done for forty years. This is no different than in the one thousand nine hundred Goldman Sachs sitting down with entrepreneurs in tech companies or media companies or in the nineties when I have my own firm. It's it's literally just a different conference room. Right. It's the same thing to me. That was a really key thing to understanding who Bannon is. And what he's providing in a lot of context. I really think advice about financials is something that he's providing an really did feel like he was there as a consultant the people who he is really working with and the areas in which he's working. He's he's a millionaire funded by billionaires. You know, there's a lot of billionaires in the film when he's getting together with these parties, it's not talking about. How can we bring value added manufacturing jobs to the people it's about how can we fund these movements and frankly talking about how immigration is the issue on which they're going to win? Steve Bannon is often seen smiling and engaging lightheartedly with you. We also see him throughout the film, backtrack on statements or redirect conversations to focus away from perhaps the question, you're asking him or something. He just doesn't want to answer is he that good of a manipulator. I do think. That's a big reason why I took the approach that I did for this film. First of all, there's no talking heads or sit down interviews with other people. But there isn't really anything like that with him. Although there's a lot of you know, kind of side conversations that we have but fundamentally it felt like encountering him in an interview setting. There really wasn't much that was going to be revealed by that because he approaches every interview like it's combat and purchase it not in good faith. So his tactics are sharp. But also, they're kind of not ethical because he will change the topic. He will distort facts he will lie. And so for me, what is to be gained. I did spend a lot of time having these conversations with him. But you know, the film is much more about seeing him in action and kind of letting him reveal himself through his words rather than being like, you know, it's certainly not about can I? You know, Spar with him and get a point in Steve Bannon is sixty four at the time. This film was made was it difficult. Having a great difference in age between you two to complete this film. You know, my first film, I was following the Chinese artist and activist. I way way who can't do the math now. But also, we have a couple of decades in between us, I do think that way has a kind of very young spirit, but still, you know, in a lot of ways that was not a bad preparation. Even though there too. Practically opposite people. It was a good preparation. I also think with Bannon that dynamic might have even been helpful when it comes to maybe him underestimating me a little bit. That was really my that was really my hope my daily mantra was let him be underestimating me and let me never underestimate him. From the first time I met him. I that was very very clear to me. That you know, he he is a forest. He is smart. He is savvy. And so if I'm coming in here and my goal is to have him expose himself that I need to not ever underestimate him. And I shot it all myself. So it's just kind of me with a camera and a fanny pack in Amman, you know, in the corner, I do think that he was able to let his guard down. And if not sometimes he said, he forgot the camera was there as people might say, I still always don't understand how that could happen because I'm always very camera aware, but at the very least to feel a little bit of safety. I think I was around so much that you can't at some point. You can't conceive of what is being recorded the amount of what's being recorded, and what it's eventually going to become that was Alison claiming director of the brink, which is now playing in select theaters Alison, thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you. It was a pleasure..

Steve Bannon chief strategist NPR Alison Clinton White House director Saturday Night Live President Trump korva Coleman Alison Klayman Florida Billy Bush National Front Alison Goldman Sachs Breitbart New York France Macron Asia
"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news, I'm korva Coleman. Steve Bannon has become a household name. He was for a time. President Trump's chief strategist and the executive chairman of Breitbart news, Saturday Night Live portrayed ban. And as the grim reaper when he was in the White House, and for some this one dimensional characterizations stuck, but the newly released film, the brink provides unfettered access to Bannon's meetings colleagues and opinions creating a more complete picture of who he is director Alison Klayman shadowed Steve Bannon from the time you left the White House in two thousand seventeen until right after the midterm elections. And she joins us now from the NPR bureau in New York. Alison, Klayman, welcome. Thank you so much korva. So Steve Bannon speaks in the film of quote doing the Lord's work. What is that work? According to Steve Bannon. In some ways that ends up being kind of a tricky question because the world view in general tends to be a little bit incoherent. But what he is really focused on this year that I've been following him is he's really someone. Who's articulating a vision for a an international unified far-right nationalist movement. It's an idea that is gaining some traction because of the successes that far right anti-immigrant parties have had across Europe and also in other countries around the world. And so he's trying to take the clout that he has as a former member of the Trump administration White House chief strategist and to push forward and make himself a figure of importance you're film captured Steve Bannon's ability to negotiate you captured his energy, you captured his charm. Let's let's listen to a scene from your film people really thinking. About making race a daily politics, the centerpiece of the democratic primaries, if they do that woman is people are because people it's economic nationals. They care about jobs. You're making the Florida balls the identity. Is your show and then being attacked and saying that Asia? Talking about them. In your point. You're telling him that he's blaming liberals for engaging in identity politics when he's engaging in identity politics. I'm so happy that you played that clip because that to me really was one of the things that genuinely bothered me the most during the time, I spent I I I didn't know this about him. And what he was doing before. I started. I really didn't know a lot about him. But the way he would go around and speak to Republican groups, whether they were small grassroots groups or fancy fundraising dinners in all different parts of the country. What he was doing first and foremost was playing identity politics, and creating this in group identity the shared identity, you know, where remember quote, Billy Bush weekends. You know, remember our great victory in two thousand sixteen and really trying to create these moments of shared victory, and he would accuse the left and liberals of playing identity politics as far as I could tell that. That was really the bread and butter of of what he was doing. There's one really startling scene. When you when you seem to be taken aback, and you say what what did I just see was that you talking about working with the National Front in France. Yeah. I mean, I watched this meeting in the summer of two thousand eighteen when he's sitting down with two leaders of the party, and they're kind of talking about messaging talking about what voters are thinking about Macron right now. And because he doesn't really have a depth of expertise or knowledge in any of these European context. So, you know, this is like fact-finding for him to talk to them about their electoral situation. But then where it becomes something where he is providing something to them is they start to discuss financials. You wanna go to the financials? You have those documents. That to me or to made euro is what you're paying expenses for for the month of July and August. Anything else you need for this right now. Or that's of course, the part where they invite me to leave the room. Now, I'm consulting for the national rally party. Or what what did I just lash every populist party or nationalist party that looks viable, right? I'm trying to help. This is what I've done for forty years. This is no different than in the one thousand nine hundred Goldman Sachs sitting down with entrepeneurship in tech companies or media companies or in the nineties when I have my own firm. It's it's literally just a different conference room. Right. It's the same thing to me. That was a really key thing to understanding who Bannon is. And what he's providing in a lot of context. I really think advice about financials is something that he's providing and I really did feel like he was there as a consultant the people who he is really working with and the areas in which he's working. He's he's a millionaire funded by billionaires. You know, there's a lot of billionaires in the film when he's getting together with these parties, it's not talking about. How can we bring value added manufacturing jobs to the people it's about how can we fund these movements and frankly talking about how immigration is the issue on which they're going to win? Steve Bannon is often seen smiling and engaging light-heartedly with you. We also see him throughout the film, backtrack on statements or redirect conversations to focus away from perhaps the question, you're asking him or something. He just doesn't want to answer is he that good of a manipulator. I do think. That's a big reason why I took the approach that I did for this film. First of all, there's no talking heads or sit down interviews with other people. But there isn't really anything like that with him. Although there's a lot of you know, kind of side conversations that we have but fundamentally it felt like encountering him in an interview setting. There really wasn't much that was going to be revealed by that because he approaches every interview like it's combat, and he approaches it not in good faith. So his tactics are sharp. But also, they're kind of not ethical because he will change the topic. He will distort facts he will lie. And so for me, what is to be gained. I did spend a lot of time having these conversations with him. But you know, the film is much more about seeing him in action and kind of letting him reveal himself through his words rather than being like, you know, it's certainly not about Kenai. You know, Spar with him and get a point in Steve Bannon is sixty four at the time. This film was made was it difficult. Having a great difference in age between you two to complete this film. You know, my first film, I was following the Chinese artist and activist. I way way who can't do the math now. But who's also we have a couple of decades in between us. I do think that way way has a very young spirit. But still, you know in a lot of ways that was not a bad preparation. Even though there too. Practically opposite people. It was a good preparation. I also think with Bannon that dynamic might have even been helpful when it comes to maybe him underestimating me a little bit. That was really my that was really my hope my daily mantra was let him be underestimating me and let me never underestimate him. From the first time I met him. I that was very very clear to me. That you know, he he is a forest. He is smart. He is savvy. And so if I'm coming in here and my goal is to have him expose himself that I need to not ever underestimate him. And I shot it all myself. So it's just kind of me with a camera and a fanny pack in a monopole, you know, in the corner, I do think that he was able to let his guard down. And if not sometimes he said, he forgot the camera was there as people might say, I still always don't understand how that could happen 'cause I'm always very camera aware, but at the very least to feel a little bit of safety. I think I was around so much that you can't at some point. You can't conceive of what is being record the amount of what's being recorded. And what it's eventually going to become that was Alison Klayman director of the brink. Which is now playing in select theaters Alison, thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you. It was a pleasure. Here's the good news. There is a lot of high quality TV right now with strong plots and a list actors the bad news..

Steve Bannon Alison Klayman chief strategist NPR director White House Saturday Night Live President Trump korva Coleman Billy Bush New York Florida National Front Goldman Sachs Breitbart France Europe Macron Asia
"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Local senators Cory Booker and Kirsten gillibrand or running for the democratic presidential nomination will have an early look at their early campaign strategies. That's right coming up next year on WNYC. You're listening to weekend edition, and it is time for our documentary of the week from Tom powers and Raphael, and they housing the. Cofounders of the dock NYC festival and the pure nonfiction film series and podcast here is Raphael with this week's pick. As the chief ideologist of Donald Trump's twenty sixteen presidential campaign. Steve Bannon is one of the most divisive figures in American politics after he was ousted from Trump's White House. He took his nationalist agenda abroad. We watch him at work in the film the brink. We helped knit together this populist nationalist movement throughout the world because guys in Egypt to me the Modi's guys in India. You know, and we get Oman in even thinking, we're somehow some sort of convening authority filmmaker Alison Klayman has a knack for getting close to subjects and watching action unfold she observes Bannon working with neo-fascists in Europe to create an international political operation. He calls them movement. And she captures his volatile management style. Do you want me to come in white have to change your nappy in powder? Your bottom. Yes. Some liberal pundits attack ban on camera while he is warmly received by other influential figures, former Goldman Sachs president John Thornton tells Bannon. He's more important than Trump. That's all good. However, you're the leader something that's much more powerful runs twenty twenty four twenty twenty four. So. So I'd like to see what other increasingly seen as the as the intellectual horsepower. Leading the move. The film is a disturbing first draft of a history..

Steve Bannon Donald Trump Raphael WNYC Cory Booker Tom powers Kirsten gillibrand NYC Goldman Sachs Alison Klayman White House Oman Europe India Egypt president John Thornton
"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Funding, that's NPR's Joel Shapiro. Thanks very much. Joe? Thanks glad to be here. It's time now for our documentary of the week from Tom powers and Rafael a house and co founders of the dock NYC festival and the pure nonfiction film series and podcast. Here's rafaela with this week's pick. As the chief ideologist of Donald Trump's twenty sixteen presidential campaign. Steve Bannon is one of the most divisive figures in American politics after he was ousted from Trump's White House. He took his nationalist agenda abroad. We watch him at work in the film the brink. We helped knit together this populist nationalist movement throughout the world. Because guys come to me the Modi's guys in India new day. You know, and we get or Mon in even thinking, we're somehow some sort of convening authority filmmaker Alison Klayman has a knack for getting close to subjects and watching action unfold she observes Bannon working with neo-fascists in Europe to create an international political operation. He calls the movement. And she captures his volatile management style. Do you want me to come in? We have to change your nappy in powder your bottom. Yes. Some liberal pundits attack. Bannon on camera while he is warmly received by other influential figures, former Goldman Sachs president John Thornton tells Bannon. He's more important than Trump. That's all good. You're the leader something that's much more powerful. Whether he runs twenty twenty or twenty twenty four so. So I would assume. Increasingly seen as the as the intellectual horsepower. Leading the movie. The film is a disturbing first draft of a history. That's still unfolding. The brink opens this weekend in theaters for more information, visit WNYC dot org slash docs. Jose this week on Latino USA this story of the Latinos who helped shape rock music from garage rock pioneers to the basis for a little band called Metallica the hidden history of Latinos in rock and roll..

Steve Bannon Donald Trump Joel Shapiro Alison Klayman NPR Tom powers Joe NYC Goldman Sachs White House Europe India Jose Rafael president John Thornton
"alison klayman" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"I would also encourage people to think about the fact that there is four and influence on US, politics and all kinds of ways that was already legal before citizens United. There's tons of money that flows into tanks in Washington. There's tons of money that flows into lobbying organizations in Washington in ways that are perfectly legal but involve for an influence on US politics. I hope that other reporters will look at this and realize that this was just out there in the open for anybody to find like this information is probably there for other corporations. We just don't know it yet. And this is actually something that anybody can do like anybody can go look through the campaign finance filings there on the SEC website there at the center for responsive politics, if you are interested in this issue, even if you're not a journalist, go comb through this and send it to reporters. I guarantee you that they'll be interested to hear about anything you find. That was my colleague at the intercept John Schwartz. You can check out that series at the intercept dot com. It was called foreign influence John spoke to our system. Producer elise. Swain. I'm not a globalist a menagerie list, and they say oh. I'm proud of this country. And I call that nationalism. I call it being a nationalist word, it sort of became fashion. It's called a nationalist. And I say really we're not supposed to use that word. You know what I am? I'm a nationalist. Using. Whether or not Donald Trump understands demeaning or historical significance of the words that he uses like, nationalist or globalist. That's debatable for Trump the positive response. He receives from his base when voting this language supersedes any need to fully comprehend any definitions, and while Trump is fully capable of constructing his own dog whistles about African Americans about women about immigrants about Muslims. This specific kind of weaponization of words, like nationalist or globalist did not appear a priori in his really big big boy brain Donald Trump's very, very large brain. It's most likely that Trump co opted these phrases from his former advisor Steve Bannon who's entire existence as a filmmaker is that of a revisionist historian, assembling words and signifier 's. Manipulating them toward his own ideological ends. If you're curious about Bannon's grotesque nonsensical documentaries that word in bold air quotes. I encourage you to watch the field of vision. Film American carnage that explores Bannon's filmography believes the world. Thickly Judeo Christian west is in a crisis. While the camera has recently been turned toward Bannon in the form of a new cinema verite style documentary from the director Alison Klayman that is called the brink. And it follows Steve Bannon for an entire year as he pedals his idea of an organized transnational so-called populist movement to various right wing leaders throughout Europe and the United States every populist party or nationalist party that looks viable, right? I'm trying to help. This is done for forty years. This is no different than in the nineteen eighties. When I was Goldman Sachs sitting down with entrepreneurs in tech companies or media companies or in the nineties when I have my own firm. It's it's it's literally just a different conference, right. It's the same thing. But again Bannon actually understands the potency of language at many points in. The film. It seems like Bannon's movement is little more than a rebranding tour for white supremacy under the guise of fighting for economic equality to discuss this intimate look into the life of Steve Bannon. I'm joined now by the director of the film the brink. Alison Klayman Alison welcomed intercepted. Thank you so much. What was your impression of Steve Bannon before you got involved with this crazy ride? I mean, my impression really was probably the most simplistic based on a media diet in America. You know, he's Darth Vader. He's kind of physically disgusting. His ideas are disgusting. You know, when I first met him September twenty seventeen a few weeks before being up starting filming. I didn't know who is going to walk in the door..

Steve Bannon Donald Trump Alison Klayman Alison Trump Washington US SEC Alison Klayman John Schwartz director Goldman Sachs Swain Producer elise America United States Europe advisor
"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Americans are asking for a lot. They're just asking to get by. And they're just asking for politicians to be brave enough to help them. Get by all the attention that cost. You Cortez has gained in recent months. This film captures her at that special time when she was still unknown. We gain insight into how much family means to her and how she stays motivated by the memory of her late father. From a Costco, Cortez is a progressive hero. Let's move to our next film. Profiling her political opposite, right wing ideologue. Steve Bannon, the film is called the brink director. Alison Klayman got access to Bannon not long after he was fired from Trump's White House. Here's Bannon the White House. There's literally no glamour to the job does glamour to the job at all. I hated every second was, you know, you go to a church or temple or mosque or something like that. You can get the vibe of all the prayers in the mantras and just the energy the positive energy that that these places have. And then you go into like jersey strip club at one o'clock on a Saturday afternoon. And you got the vibe of like there's a lot of best stuff. Right. Just devise of sacred and the profane, right? The White House is telling you the west wing is gonna bad karma to it just had a bad field. They would say because you were doing evil stuff actually thought it was doing the Lord's work. And subsequently lost his job if the right wing website Breitbart and lost his key financial backers the Mercer's, but as we see in the brink. He didn't slow down director Klayman who's best known for her film. I way way never sorry follows Bannon as he jets around Europe spreading his ideology of anti immigrant nationalism to right wing politicians in the UK France in Italy. This is the second documentary about Bannon in the past six months. The first was American Dharma by Earle Morris that played at the Venice Toronto and New York Film festivals. Morris's film takes different approach of a one on one conversation that traces Bannon's history claiming takes an observational approach unfolding in the present. They are complementary projects each shedding light in a different way Morris's film. Mm has yet to reach wider distribution claims film. The brink will be released in theaters this spring from magnolia..

Steve Bannon White House director Earle Morris Alison Klayman Cortez Costco Breitbart magnolia Trump Europe Venice UK Mercer New York France Italy Toronto six months
"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"alison klayman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Yeah and i think that they could tell it was doing something but again this identity question of how much is me how much is the drug and how much is it really helping it seems like the study that's talked about in the film and which study was that this is dr martha farah study you pen it was done in the two thousands and what's amazing is that one of the effects of adderall which is an phetamine mixed amphetamine is that it makes you feel like you are doing better but the idea that these are smart pills or that their cognitive enhancers is a little bit misguided come away with this film with kind of mixed feelings on the one hand a lot of people don't like to think that they need something that they need a drug to ace attest or finish a work project on the other it isn't clear what long term harm these pills due to most people you know unless you have a serious medical condition they're rarely deadly unlike things like opioids what harm do you see here i think the harm that is maybe most urgent that applies to the most people is what the film focuses on which is a little bit more of the identity questions of what is lost if we are all in an adderall world what does it mean to feel like you need it to succeed from my reporting that seems like the most widespread applicable sort of risk and and question that needed to be discussed more in the open director alison klayman her new documentary take your pills his out tomorrow on netflix thank you.

adderall amphetamine alison klayman netflix dr martha farah director one hand