17 Burst results for "Alison Bechtel"

"alison bechdel" Discussed on Sway

Sway

06:24 min | 5 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on Sway

"These people are out there who believe trump is still president. You know that's really frightening and i. I don't know how how we supposed to cope with that. Yeah they never give up. That's the issue in our last interview. The actor on fun home musical made you a household name besides getting a macarthur genius. grant Have you gotten more used to success and fame at the time you said you'd worked particularly comfortable with it. I'm still struggling with that. I think you know. I formed my identity as a young person completely on the outside like as a cartoonist. As a lesbian i was just as the marginal figure you know banging on the door asking to be let in to the culture and and then i did. I did get in to a certain extent. And you know it's funny you just find yourself becoming complicit with things you know having a hollywood agent having a big publishing company having all these corporations connected some out to what you're doing. It's just interesting to watch that happen and to try and fight against letting it really change what i'm doing. I don't know if i'm really successfully doing that. You know meaning. How can you be resistance. If you don't resist. yes yes There's a pressure the more famous. What were or whatever. The word is that you get to win people over and to connect with people and to tell accessible stories. And i'm trying to do that. But i know i don't know if i wanna make sure you don't go over the line and do something. That's not genuine. You have to be very careful you do or else you get the power and the news it for the things you want to have happen. Yeah i don't mind doing that. I don't mind i don't mind doing that either. The power okay. All right So what impact you think. The pandemic and lockdowns relationship to outdoors as a society. It seems like going for a walk. Was the most popular activity last year. Do you think everyone is catching up to you. Because this was something that wasn't happening as much as we rushed through our world. I hope that we can hang on to some of the upsides of this pandemic you know people just slowing their lives down. Mainly that was an amazing experience for me. I mean i know obviously not everyone have that luxury right. I mean people spending more time outside just learning to stop running around doing pointless errands you know. What the hell is everyone doing in their cars all the time. Just stay home and go out and look at a tree. It will really do so much for you. Is that your new exercise looking at a tree. Yeah yeah last night tree looking. I went outside after dinner. When in the old days i would have been like drinking beer and watching netflix. I went outside and frogs were trilling and the birds singing their serenade. It was this crazy symphony. The i would never even have heard. It was amazing. It was like this blessing just fed my whole spirit. I would have done that. But we have cicadas here in maryland eastern on so. I couldn't resist. Sorry anything's literally the polar opposite to you. So when you think about that when you are at one with nature do you feel like you have more to write about as a memoir honest. You know somebody's i feel like less. I feel like it. Just my mind just goes quiet and silent ville like moving toward just kind of blank page. I feel like that would be think it's called the dharma. You're going into the correct if i get there. Yeah the dermot of the blank page. I'm just gonna break. My next book is going to be all empty. And then say don't you see it. What will really need to like become more a transcendent when you think about comic strips and graphic novels. What are you excited about another any artists that you follow her inspired by. I love the job. The cartoon websites like a progressive comic site with lots of really great work on it. Some of it's just funny. Some of it's like deep dive nonfiction like journalistic comics. They're great. i think that stuff is really wonderful. You know at explaining complicated things going on the world. I live near a place called the center for cartoon studies. Which is wonderful. Mfa program and they're always saying projects they just Came up with a comic book project about healthcare. It's called go fund me won't fix health care and how there's all kinds of great ways that comics are explaining the world to people give any artists for you look at and you go. Wow that's amazing. I've been reading a lot of gabrielle bell lately. Who's kind of a diary cartoonist. Where she just writes a lot of stuff about her everyday life. I love her work. I love kate. Beaton funny history comics. Harka vagrant is the name of her strip. You've ever gonna do an nfc by it. Well if you would buy i will. I will do one but which you imagine doing one i can't. I've still struggling to get my mind around this idea. I don't really get it. It's just art sold through the internet. Essentially what do you have just a little certificate that it's genuine. Yeah why is the mona lisa worth anything. Yeah i hate are is the production of new york. Times opinion is produced by name rosza. Blakeney schick matt and daphne chen edited by name. Arosa and paula shuman with original music. By isaac jones mixing by eric gomez in fact checking by kate sinclair special. Thanks to shannon buster. Kristen lynn and lille higa. If you're in a podcast app already. You know how to get your podcasts. So follow this one. If you're listening on the times website and want to get each episode of swayed delivered to you with a complete set of jane fonda workout videos download any podcast app then search for sway and follow this show. We release every monday and thursday. Thanks for listening..

eric gomez Kristen lynn paula shuman isaac jones kate sinclair lille higa trump last year daphne chen Arosa shannon buster gabrielle bell rosza thursday matt last night kate monday netflix each episode
"alison bechdel" Discussed on Sway

Sway

08:21 min | 5 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on Sway

"I'm jane costa hosted. The argument a podcast. From your opinion. I've spent years as a reporter talking to people from across the political spectrum. I've heard a lot of arguments to in person and online are baseless and mean but clinton made me think differently or helped me understand other people's points of view and that's what the argument is about each week on the show you'll hear people who disagree with each other respectful simple debate that gets behind the big ministers and beyond party lights like how to reform policing in america whether we should cancel student debt. Raise the minimum wage or kill the filibuster. You might not agree with everything you hear. And that's the point. You might even walk away with some new opinions of your own. You can listen to new episodes of the argument. Everyone's day wherever you're listening to this. Podcast let's talk about some of your earlier work you published a comic strip dykes to watch out for which i love for twenty five years. Now you're in the early stages of a tv adaptation of it. I'm thrilled about this. What's like to revive those characters. it's really interesting. You know at first my plan with this show was to update it to bring the characters up into the present moment but it was having a really hard time getting my mind around that Because i feel like they were so much creatures of their era. You know as tight knit community because the whole world was against them in a way. That's not happening in the same way. So now i've gone back to doing it as a period piece and setting it in like a early nineties which is really exciting to me to go back and revisit that period It's funny to go back to that pre-digital moment before we had everything constantly recording itself as we did it and just think of that political moment to you know It was in the middle of aids. There was just a very different attitude. So much casual homophobia thrown around and the culture and this. Lgbtq movement was really starting to take off and cohered was exciting. Yeah pre gay marriage. What had marriage even on the horizon right. It's kind of interesting because when you go back to that you know you think even before that the reagan administration said trees caused pollution. I don't know if you remember that and you go to that and you sort of think. Fast forwarding to the trump administration. It all seems like quaint. Like those are easy villains to deal with one set of villains becomes quite when the next one comes along like reagan seem quaint when bush came along and bush to like a paragon of a statesman compared to trump. So who knows what's going to happen next. Yeah you start like nice paintings. I like you come back. What do you think of him as a cartoonist. Maybe he should call them cartoons. Yeah maybe so so. Are you writing new stories for these characters for dykes to watch out for. They're going to stay in that period for people to remember you're not bringing them into the present. No it'll remain in the period up and also centering around a different character. And when i was writing it mo is the main character. Because i sort of felt like she was my avatar over the period over the twenty five years that i wrote that comic strip. I kind of morphed from mo- into Sydney the evil women's studies professor. And so now. She's going to be the central character. Why is that. Because i just have a more of a feeling for her. I feel like i can access her character and her family story Is just exciting to me in a way that moths story isn't true. Whatever reason but you aren't going to update going to do new characters no at all to create a strip. So it's like you're not gonna do like the l word and suddenly were in the two thousands. No no no no no this to be going back to the original characters one or the other things that never changes Issues around women in the bechtel tests came out one of your dykes to watch out for strips by the way basically character jokes if she only sees a movie if it satisfies three rules it has two women talking each other about something other than a man. The test was elevated along with the metoo movement after harvey weinstein. it's been kind of shorthand for representation. There's even a website that rates movies against these rules. Are you surprised. It's still in so relevant. It's funny. I mean i i wrote that in nineteen eighty five like that was the kind of stuff me and my lesbian feminist friends would joke about because there were no movies then but i. I think it has changed. I think there. There's a lot more movies that. Pass that test now. And the fact that it is become the mainstream phenomenon that people talk about is a huge sign of progress. I feel like you know. The mainstream has caught up to her lesbians where back in the eighties right. But who knows where. It's all going to go. What are you imagine. The bechtel tests would be now. I'm not sure I mean it's still. It's still a viable question. I know there's many variations on like due to african american characters. Talk to each other about something. Besides a white person like This lots of versions of it You know it's just all about subjectivity. And whose stories are told just always worth analyzing so one of the things that it seems like though is your work has gotten actually less political over the decades of you know there's little things on the edges of your cartoons but they were very squarely political It comes up here and in your new book. Mostly as markers of time you know stress from the two thousand sixteen election spurred you to run more for example. What's it like now. Well you know. Honestly that was i think. Part of my struggle with this book was as especially during the trump years like just feeling so impotent. Like why am i running a memoir about fitness when the world is in flames. It just felt crazy. I don't know how any artist functioned during those years But eventually kinda got my shit together. Thanks to the running. You know that like helped me from sinking into a total of despair. But no my work has gone from the very political commentary world of sweatshop out for into these much more interior internal Stories about family and the self Which feel like in a way still have some of the some political residents because to me. It's like it's it's very much about self-determination. It's about the way our parents can occupy us and take us over now. We have to resist that and how difficult it is to do to overthrow them and I feel like maybe. I'm coming back out into the world a bit more through this latest book. Do you feel pressure to address politics now. Our responsibility i do sort of excited about getting back. To dykes for that reason even though it will be looking back in time. I feel like it's still going to be commentary on the president and how we got here mainly i. I want to be an entertainer. I think of myself as an entertainer. i like to think i'm entertaining. The troops like the people fighting the good fight. So i wanna give them stuff that feeds them and so i think it will be good to get back into a little bit of a political sphere so now just speaking of which the eighties. It feels like that again. There's a slew of anti. Lgbtq bills now being proposed in state. Legislators i think Number in the hundred some are anti translates but there. It seems to be back Was marriage bills. They announced bathroom bills. Or these Student athlete bills What are your thoughts on this way because it feels like a bad feeling that i had way back in the eighties and nineties. It is a bad feeling. You know i. I spent a lot of my youth thinking. Society is really just moving forward but i really feel much less sure about that. Yeah all these. Anti trans bills are horrifying. And they're clearly just hoping people aren't gonna stand up for trans people and i. It's so far. It seems like people are standing up so not encouraging. But what do you imagine. This is going towards. What are you scared of. I'm just worried about everything care which worrying about living in fascist authoritarian state. You know I don't know where all this is going. I mean we've had like a temporary stay but you know there's.

jane costa twenty five years harvey weinstein america trump one set two thousands eighties two women three rules each week african american early nineties reagan administration Sydney one two thousand sixteen election each clinton eighties and
"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:39 min | 6 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Know my next book. I have that it's going to be about what's going to be about money but also think about time I i'm i'm running out of topics you know. Exercise was like something. I felt very passionate about so. I knew that there was a book there for me but now i'm like what else do i care about. I have always kept very close accounts of my financial life. So i'm thinking. I just had the sense that i can do something with that. I don't know what yet. But i love the way that you know. A ledger is just a a a list of stories. like everything you buy is a transaction. Something that happened in your life and not do something with that somehow and use my decades worth of financial records. Have you literally. Have you kept a ledger of everything you've spent. Since i was in my thirties. I mean and they have random little like physical ledger. Books that i kept like one. I started when i was a kid and i put my allowance in my babysitting money eventually. How much money is spent on pot. you know. i have some of those old ledgers. Which i'll make use up to us amazing alison. So what about the exercise of. What are you into these days. I've been running. Running has really saved me over the over recent years i started doing it slowly in twenty fourteen. Two thousand fifteen and started being able to go for long runs by election. Day twenty sixteen. Which really really helped me. So much i running salvation from it really really calms me down so it kinda got me through the trump administration without losing my mind. Yeah well heck. He does the same for me. That's what we should do like like gary. Snyder jack kerouac should. Oh my god that will be so much better than been the dharma bums. Are you still doing.

gary thirties Snyder jack kerouac Two thousand fifteen twenty fourteen alison Day twenty sixteen decades trump
"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Freeing about that actually like i. I feel like i've articulated. That was worth doing. But i had to go through that whole process like out there running it. Through here very inarticulate. I need to have a whiteboard and draw some pictures. I i think. I'll speak for all of those people out there listening who. We can't see that. You're being quite articulate. Indeed so another question from a here this book and those those of you out there who have read got one of the delights of it is the alison really does. Walk us through. You know this this extra this sport and that yoga and you know we we get so many different activities hiking and biking and just all olives at But so the court as question which i think is is really a very interesting one. How does your book speak to people with disability. That's excellent question. You know i feel like When i was when i was younger in my twenties hanging out in my lesbian feminist community it was actually like kind of a head to be secret about my exercise life. Exercise was not something that you flaunted and you know it was very much. I i felt like it partly. It was like flaunting. you're able bodied. Hardly it was flaunting your fitness and maybe this implicit assumption that you were exercising in order to lose weight. You know that was exercise. Was just kind of anti-feminist enterprise so it was something i i honestly didn't talk about much when i was younger Was doing karate. Feminist context of that was okay but other stuff like running or weightlifting. It just kept that under my hat. You know but now. But i couldn't help feeling as i wrote this book like yeah. I really am flaunting my able bodied nece in this. In this way that might seem really annoying For a while. I had a strand of the book where i was making that explicit. Talking about it i. It just didn't fit in the end and i just decided i'm just going to talk about loving how i love to do these things and hope people don't take it amiss so.

one yoga twenties karate alison
"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

04:35 min | 6 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"I feel like in my story over the course of my whole life. It kind of loops around. It's not like a clear through line at these. This spiral of coming around and around to the same issues over time will say a little. Thank you for that and let me just assure you that my the book. I'm writing right now. Is that kind of loop. I mean i think one of the the the hike provided me with a sort of narrative. Arc fits neatly into memoir. But as you said the complicated thing about writing a memoir and certainly i. I saw this in in in this book. This new book is you're writing about your whole life and try to tell a particular story of yet you got all this material and how do you find your way through it. And yeah one of the most moving and powerful aspects of of the spoke for me. That just absolutely blew me away. Was the the ways vulnerably. And how honestly you write about creativity and your own anxieties and struggles with doing your work. Which i want to say. I relate to and you know alison i. It was all. I could do not be just like okay. I'm gonna drive to vermont and we're gonna take a road trip together and talk about. The work is so it'd be awesome. I think obviously you know you've been given a genius grant. We both have bestselling books and in from the outside people. Think oh okay well. They just do their work and they just lottie dod they know how to do it. And that's not the truth at all. So can you talk to us. I about how difficult it has been for you over the years to create to find that flow as you say to me. You know to not procrastinate. All that stuff that you write about in the books. We share some of that with us here. I i don't wanna seem to self-indulgent have to go like into the coal mines every day..

vermont both alison one
"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

05:29 min | 6 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"My book ended up sort of mimicking. Some of these writers work that i was writing about like wordsworth prelude endlessly revised story of his own development. Dorothy wordsworth journal. Like i never could have written this book without my and listen obsessive journal keeping over the course of my whole life. Carol expert the dharma actually kind of his own weird version of the diamond sutra. And i feel like in some ways. I'm i'm copying both kerouac and trying to give my own version of the diamond sutra in this book so I feel like i was just doing a lot of copying of these people who was writing about including you. Sheryl i thought about doing this talk with you. I realized oh my god you use all these pollens from audrey richest dream of a common language in wild and i i wasn't ripping you off. I promise but but one of her poems from dream of a kind of language is also like a through line in my book but Alison that when i came to that page. I was just like because so. If wild i write about i carried andrea. Enriches the dream of common language with me on the entire hike all the other books. I burn them along the way as i read them. Yeah i couldn't do. This was like my sacred texts right. And i read the first night of out there. The trailer palm power. I've just it's a very meaningful boats to me. And so i loved. I actually love that. It's used the word copying but you know when you think about emerson of these writers you just named you know. I don't think of it that way. That i really love the way that your work references explicitly so many other works but i think in all of our writing right. We're always even referencing implicitly. You aren't may be conscious when you were writing about audrey rich but we were there together. There was a certain thing that we both tapped into a different version of the thing and yet also the same thing and so that that kind of Legacy lives lives in a lot of us in different ways. Yeah yeah can. I tell a funny story about how i did. Come to us that poem in my book. please do I was doing a drawing exercise to kind of free up. My drawing and to be more spontaneous. I was practicing rush drawings and i i got a big scroll of rice paper in every day i would do little addition to this drawing so it was like actually one long continuous drawing.

Sheryl Alison Carol both first night emerson andrea one Dorothy wordsworth audrey wordsworth
"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

03:17 min | 6 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Let's go back. I want to the. Oh you sort of walked us through many of the things that i really am curious about. And and i do wanna go back to those earliest beginnings. I think that as you said this this book you you tell it in chronological order. You were conveniently born in nineteen sixty. So you get to do these very Attack decade by decade you end Twenty twenty right. Yes you know that first decade I was really struck by what you longed for as a girl were so many things that you weren't allowed to long for the close the outdoor clothes that you discovered in the l.l. Bean counter the muscles that you immediately read. You weren't supposed to grow even things like you know that sports weren't available to girls and in that time and place. And i think we forget that that we that no really recent history and i'm just curious if you can talk to us about the way the ways that sexism and misogyny and the erasure of girls not being able to be strong how that impacted you one thing i wanted to share with you is i have a daughter who's fifteen and she's been a feminist since she was a kid at a you know since she was born and when she was maybe six or seven. I explained to her. She was asking about the olympics and men's sports women's sports. And i said well you know. Men are faster and stronger so they run separately and she became furious with me and that isn't true. That is not true. That is not true. And what struck me is. I thought well what if what if we have on up with the narrative that girls and women were physically weaker than boys mad. Yeah you know. It was so rating as a small child. It's hard to convey to young people today. What it was like being a girl in the nineteen sixties. It was like you know it was like mad. Men times a thousand it was just like wall-to-wall misogyny twenty four hours. A day girls were dumb. Girls were week. Girls were stupid It's it's amazing. Any of us ever grew to maturity at all and it was especially. The idea of weakness was really bothersome to me as a little girl. I knew i wasn't week. I knew i would strong. I was a strong is my brothers. I was always beating them up You know as soon as i could i. I started learning how to strengthen my body. I found calisthenics book of my mother's and it was amazing to me that you could actually do exercises and increase your endurance for a certain motion and i could feel myself getting stronger. Which is incredible. I started running as a teenager to and i love that feeling of endurance. So i was just kind of figuring this out of my own. You know man. I had gym class. That gym class didn't really do very much for me. I didn't really like gym class. Even though i like the.

six twenty four hours seven fifteen Twenty twenty today first decade nineteen sixties one thing nineteen sixty
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

03:49 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"What <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> am i gonna talk about <Speech_Female> the next ten minutes <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> this sort of natural <Speech_Female> deka texas <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> kid letting go their <Speech_Male> stuffed <SpeakerChange> animal <Speech_Male> just finished <Speech_Male> so interesting to sort <Speech_Male> of just sort of run out <Speech_Male> of material because <Speech_Male> again it <Speech_Male> sounds like when it comes to <Speech_Male> making books about your like <Speech_Male> you very much <SpeakerChange> have not <Speech_Female> run out of material. <Speech_Female> I worry about that. <Silence> I mean <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> the period of time. <Speech_Female> I i started <Speech_Female> work with this <Speech_Female> analyst. Who had <Speech_Female> been seen for nineteen years <Speech_Female> was so rich <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> just revelations <Speech_Female> like every week <Speech_Female> some new <Speech_Female> insight into myself <Speech_Female> on some new tangent <Speech_Female> of <SpeakerChange> it <Speech_Female> would take me on <Speech_Female> a lot of that <Speech_Female> but i read about that <Silence> in my mother. <Speech_Female> That <SpeakerChange> was <Speech_Female> just really exciting <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> my mental <Speech_Female> life in <Speech_Female> i. I don't <Speech_Female> have that <Speech_Female> stuff going on anywhere <Speech_Female> you'll serve like <Speech_Male> miss it but <Speech_Female> maybe the tocchet <Speech_Female> be. <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> also feel like maybe one <Speech_Female> day of outgrow <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> need <Speech_Female> document <Speech_Female> Leads <Speech_Female> obsessively <Silence> what. I'll do that off <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> get <Speech_Male> some kind of a job. This <Speech_Male> sort of loops. Back around <Speech_Male> to that conversation <Speech_Male> about knowing <Speech_Male> when you're finished with something <Speech_Male> in new england <Speech_Male> To send it out into <Speech_Male> the world. Obviously <Speech_Male> the process of <Speech_Male> making comics has <Speech_Male> largely been <Speech_Male> solo for <Speech_Male> you writing drawing <Speech_Male> them. I know <Speech_Male> this time <Speech_Male> you worked with <Speech_Male> holly. Who did the <Speech_Male> coloring and that. That's <Speech_Male> a little bit different but <Speech_Male> the math completely <Speech_Male> changes when you're talking <Speech_Male> about somebody adapting <Speech_Male> your work <Speech_Male> whether it's a musical <Speech_Male> in this <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Film <Speech_Male> in the works. <Speech_Male> Is that <Speech_Male> a difficult process <Speech_Male> to just <Speech_Male> let somebody else pick. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Pick up the ball <Speech_Female> with it <Speech_Female> now. <Speech_Female> I mean <Speech_Female> i don't. I might feel <Speech_Female> differently about this <Speech_Female> film. That's in the <Speech_Female> works if it were <Speech_Male> an adaptation <Speech_Male> of the book <Speech_Male> but in fact <Speech_Male> it's an adaptation <Speech_Male> of the musical so <Speech_Female> feel is kind of <Speech_Music_Female> remove from <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> That's fine <Speech_Male> you feel more distanced <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> there is a <Speech_Male> intermediary. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Yeah <Silence> yeah. I mean. <Speech_Female> It's <Silence> already <Speech_Female> not my <Speech_Male> work at someone's <Speech_Male> work about mark. <Speech_Male> What was <Speech_Male> that process. <Speech_Male> Like for <Speech_Male> the musical. Then <Silence> yeah. had a nice <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> connection <Speech_Female> with. Lisa crown the <Silence> playwright. <Speech_Female> Even <Speech_Male> though i wasn't <SpeakerChange> <Silence> involved in any <Speech_Female> of the her <Speech_Female> thinking <Silence> decision <SpeakerChange> making <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i felt like <Speech_Female> she was <Speech_Female> kind of consulting <Speech_Female> me and listening <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Female> throughout her process. <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> somehow just felt <Speech_Female> good. Like i was <Speech_Female> being included <Speech_Female> in some way. <Speech_Female> I <SpeakerChange> didn't feel like. <Speech_Female> I just turned this stuff <Speech_Male> over and they were making <Speech_Male> of it with a wood. <Silence> I felt like i <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> might feelings. <Speech_Female> Were being <Silence> consulted <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> along. <Speech_Female> Choose <Speech_Female> very respectful <Speech_Female> in that way <Speech_Female> so it didn't <Silence> really mind <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> control. I don't know how to explain <Speech_Female> it. I probably <Speech_Female> would. I did feel <Speech_Female> differently about a <Speech_Female> movie. <Speech_Male> Which is an art form. <Speech_Female> It i felt <Speech_Female> of was more <Speech_Female> similar. Something <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> knew <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> us. It just felt <Speech_Male> like another kind of it's <Speech_Male> almost. It's <Speech_Male> almost so alien <Speech_Male> to. Yeah <Speech_Male> the work that you do <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in. That sense. <Speech_Male> Have imagine <Speech_Male> that even <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> in spite of that. <Speech_Male> It's got to be released <Speech_Male> real to see <Speech_Male> your child's <Speech_Male> played out <Speech_Male> on on a on a <Speech_Male> broadway stage <Silence> or <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> of that remove <Speech_Male> was it <Speech_Male> less <SpeakerChange> of a surreal <Speech_Male> experience where <Speech_Female> you know it was absolutely <Speech_Female> surreal. <Speech_Female> I can never come up with <Speech_Male> a better word to describe <Speech_Male> it in that. <Speech_Male> That is what <Speech_Male> it was. It was <Speech_Male> wonderful <Music> <Music>

Lisa nineteen years new england texas ten minutes
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

02:36 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"With myself coming stemming from my relationship with my parents and now this this new book is about. I mean all those books were about self identity in pretty explicit ways this is about like getting beyond the cells getting beyond my particular identity so a feel like extensively some kind of progression the way it did manifest itself in this book though. It's very obvious the rule your parents play when it comes to your clothing choices. I mean that that to me is the moment where it's really obvious where they're like getting on you for dressing like a boy as they probably would have said at that point and that's the one place where it's served really clear where their presence really looms large. Is this question of gender. That was a big thing as a little kid. But as i think about it now many other larger ways that they impinged on a certainly with my dad like he just had so he just had a whole agenda for me. What i was studying. Where i was gonna go to grad school like so the boys closings just like just a small thing. I've been talking about this book nonstop for two months. And i can't remember what it's about. I was listening to another interview. Where you essentially told the interviewer that you had graduated from therapy. First of all you know. She was surprised that that even can happen. And i'm surprised to hear that to you know as a child of a psychotherapist own interesting. What does that mean to graduate from. Therapy and i guess sort of. What role has that process of going to. An analyst played in your creation of these books i might have used the term graduate. Oh i think i use graduate. I might might enjoys. The technical term is even worst. it's terminate i terminated. But i have to say it was after nineteen years with this particular therapist and before her there've been a number of others so i have been therapy pretty much thirty years of my adult life. Which sounds crazy but it just became a part of my life. It was something really needed something. That helped me repair that that self problem. I was just trying so awkwardly to talk about an i. I really needed it. It was important part of my life. Important always look forward to my sessions. In what i found in recent years was that i was not not happening anymore. It was actually kind of looking at the clock. Not thinking omega ten minutes left but like oh my god..

thirty years two months ten minutes First one place after nineteen omega years
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

04:46 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Easy to some suffering around. It knows kind of just creating that drama for myself. When really what i needed to do was commit to finishing the book and it was like accepting the fact that i'm going to die by not ending the ahead. This illusion that i i wasn't gonna end either in somehow really a feel any a little bit of progress in their tour accepting my the reality of my own death. May i know. I'm going to die but we we'll have to like assimilate that somehow in stages as we go through life on that just helped me to finally in the book digging in and say this is it. I'm writing this book. Here's where it ends. I guess not to put too fine a point on it. But in a way ending the book was acceptance of mortality. Yes i think that's true. I mean to be fair. With every thing i've ever written down to the shortest little comic strip endings are always hard. I think in part because of their finality. In the way that they foreclose all other kinds of possibilities. That's always painful to say. Well i'm not gonna use that idea It's just go like this. You just have to constantly face that kind of grief as you're creating you never finish anything. I assume that in the work that you do with memoir especially again given the fact that these are three books. Do revisit certain points in your life that what you choose not to include in each one is almost as important as what you choose to include. It's funny because when i finished a book always thought some leftover stuff and so far. It goes into the next book. That's the pattern Material that i. I felt a strong feeling about but couldn't fit. It's carried over like almost like a like this little numbers you right in your adding numbers together majors but yeah there's stuff i didn't get to in this book that i probably will some hell shelvin to the next..

three books each one
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

05:37 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Defend across such a really particular an awful feeling but it was really good lost. My mojo actually kept sitting in his last name literally austin powers. Yeah that was real and i. I didn't quite. I didn't think to myself well. I need to draw get my mojo back like a can't drive lost. My mojo is a chicken in the kind of thing but eventually i just had to start drying and i think that really helped much upside of that and and you do detail. This at the end of the book is it. Sounds like ito over the past year while the world was going to hell you were able to. If not process said at least kind of navigate through it because you had drawing it sounds like drawing and working with your wife were a source of consistency at least throughout. Yeah you're right brian. What a crazy year. That was but i felt like really chill. I felt like i just had this. Deep equanimity spite of all the craziness in the news in spite of this raging pandemic. Which normally i probably would have found a lot more anxious about but yeah. I was working with my partner. Holly spoke. I was thinking she was doing color just in a roof working. These long days drawing. I felt happy. Feel anxious when i say that something you feel guilty almost yes yeah i did feel guilty and also i'm always worried about saying feel happy because it might stop you don't want to jinx. Yeah lot of that was due to just being in that heightened focus out the of the dry really soothing. Very absorbing activity not just someone was telling me recently at flow state happens when you're making constant little micro decisions in inactivity. Which is exactly what you're doing when you're drawing and your brain is just absorbed with that in a way that allows you to sort of float three above it this wonderful way. It's interesting to hear you discuss spontaneity in the context of of making comics. Because you know certainly there are. There are art forms that lent themselves spontaneity. You know we're talking about making music before like jazz. Obviously it's a very montana's art or care wak as you said was at least trying to push through into that. Benjamin green and his long scrolls a paper Very methodical right. I mean isn't isn't there a certain aspect of making a comic especially a very long term comic that is almost antithetical swan eighty. Yes yes absolutely. I mean i don't like looking at work. That has not been labored over. That's not very very dark with ink. Just hasn't had a love care put into etc maybe john poor selena whose work so just humor in pristine and simple but must be heavily..

Holly selena Benjamin green john poor brian swan eighty past year three
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

04:06 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Everyday self. My everyday monkey mind as the buddhist college was researching listening reading books about things also trying to have an experience of of those things myself part of the research process will it wasn't just the source material but it was actually researching a new method or a new way of creating. Yeah that was my my hope. Is that it somehow repair myself or jumpstart myself into this next phase of life. Did you need jumpstarting. I did there were years in my fifties. I didn't draw at all. i feel very sheepish. Admitting this as a cartoonist. I should have active in regular drawing practice in. I hopefully do now. I think i will try not to let it happen again. Trying to let things get to that state of affairs. You know drawing this kind of like being a musician or surgeon like there is a lot of manual dexterity involved. In if you stop doing it you you lose that so took me quite a while to get ramped up to do this book. And it's interesting to to see how my drawings changing as they get older as just looking back at some of the drawings for my mother which published in two thousand twelve. And i feel like there's so much more detail Sharper and have finer details in them. And i think it's precisely because i could see better. I wasn't wearing cosa glasses to draw so losing a certain amount of visual acuity. What's your sense of what happened over the past decade. That led you to stop for a while. Well it was the things. I was saying like just being very busy. Dealing with stuff that came up in life like my mother dying in just having a lot of demands on my time but also more. Psychologically i think i love drawing more than anything is my favorite part. Certainly doing graphic book like the rating. That's fun too. The you'll magic of it threw me is when it's all coming together in a really in the thick of the drawing. I think that there's some way that i will. I don't like doing drawings. So that when you don't draw you know that next time you sit down to draw. It's going to be bad so unless likely to do it. And then it gets into this bad you know negative loop and you don't do it and you get in you know you'll be worse next time so that was going on. That's a lot of things in the past when he dealt with grief major life changes. How much is drawing. Been an outlet or a source of catharsis for what you're dealing with in the immediate term. Never actually thought about drawing itself. Thursday said certainly think of the writing that way. Well guess drawing to. I mean certainly these memoirs about my parents. When i was having to draw carrots repeatedly there was something you know. I was just constantly like confronting them and who they were talking drawing their faces in having this intimate contact with them was kind of like getting them out of my system. But i haven't thought about the process of joins kind of versus the mall over that one. I know that we're similar from the standpoint of both being workaholics. And you know and part of that. I think is you invariably end up tying your identity to what you do to your career which you know for better for worse and and i don't think that necessarily having your identity to being an artists in your case or or being primarily a writer. Mike is necessarily a bad thing. But when you put that on hiatus and when drawing for an extended period is part of your life does it have a profound change on your identity. I certainly went into kind of a slump. I wouldn't say a depression..

Thursday Mike both buddhist two thousand twelve fifties Sharper past decade
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

05:42 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Learn a lot more about him like he had this tragic family. Losses is agitated. Older brother died. When jack was four. Older brothers like six or seven. Any little older allegis really scarred. The family hannitized his mother and him. I think it's part of why jack was so enmeshed with his mother. You know you just didn't want to separate from her and she didn't want to separate from and they were just like this crazy dysfunctional unit together. I mean he was still living with her in his forties. So that's one thing. Also look recently and i actually was finishing a book so it was too late to incorporate this i read something. I think it was in new yorker article about someone who speculating that part of chair. Wax antisocial behavior was really due to brain injury traumatic brain injuries that he might have sustained from football injuries. In his youth he played a lot of football in high school and college and also at an auto accident that he had that he just never got treated for so all. These symptoms aggressiveness. In heavy. drinking those are all compatible with. Ti is so that does that change. Anything i don't know. Do you feel though that you know being matched in biographies of people that you wouldn't necessarily find sympathetic has made you more empathetic to really kind of get to the bottom of their stories. I hadn't thought of that but yeah. I mean certainly. Yeah i go actually. I resisted reading biography of karaoke feeling with him. Do i really want to spend my time reading about. This guy is fuck ups but that was the side effect of it was coming out some more understanding and compassion for partouche specially in this Just given especially if you both right andros Amount of time. It takes her just about everybody to make a book and since you drop some heavy mortality me before it's my my my returned the favor but i found that cartoonist. At a certain point in their career start quantifying the amount of time they have left based on the number of books they can produce is that something has factored into your work just sort of knowing that you know that these take eight years. Yeah got a certain number left now. That is absolutely in the forefront of my mind very conscious of that end her apps more so than you know someone who is just a writer. Because there's not that same kind of physical work that goes into its. It's physically hard work. What's it's a kind of labor. It's not like going down in the coalmines but you're using your body for long periods of time my eyesight you know a while ago and to start wearing reading glasses to draw that's always changing to get closer and closer to the page in bending over more and more so. Yeah i maybe have one more book.

eight years new yorker seven six four jack one thing forties both one more book
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

04:00 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"In the amount of time it takes to from beginning to end its. I think this book took about eight years. And how much of your tendency to sort of go and research every aspect of things really ends up dragging your heels. That's definitely a part of it. I love reasons that i tell myself why. This book took so long hartley makeup really busy for a while. My mother died the musical a stone. My book fun home opened on broadway was very distracting at a lot of things that is distracting a based on your book. Ridiculous like wonderful. It did take me away from my work. Let's just traveling lot Never able to really settle mind down it also as work on this book in saw saw. That was taking the shape of chapters people in decades. I couldn't really if i finished the final six chapter of the book before. I turn sixty which was last fall. It wouldn't be unbalanced. We've never really lived out that full. Turn my life so in a way. I just needed to lift through my fifties before it finished this book. It took a long time in a lot of the time was indeed stat going down rabbit holes in just allowing myself to read what i wanted research what i wanted in such a wonderful heart of working on a book and let myself do that. I did it with funding home. I did it with my next my mother in all these projects it has. It's only been through that free-ranging almost kind of play in my research. That i've found the thing that helps me gives the book a shape and they all sort of come late in my process with with it was finally setting. Read all the books that my father had loved as a way to get some insight into those books than serve j. Back into what. I was reading a shape in the book. About mother embarked Multi year study informal. Studying psychoanalysis freud in delving into the work of donald linocuts. I didn't know anything about that stuff. So i had to learn vocabulary concepts and it was fun but took a long time. And so this book. It was reading all these biographies of these. Various raiders of black emerson margaret's fuller and taylor coleridge and dorothy wordsworth and it was so funny. I really into biographies now. I just love getting a sense of the arca persons. Foale life and learning what Meaning shape i think in a way. That's because i'm trying to write my own. Biography kerouac especially interesting example. I think you've discussed this before that really. I was a fifteen year old boy once he read every care wack book in junior high school which they don't think is a unique experience. But it sounds like for you. Dharma bums really. The kind of the one of his book said that really connected. Iraq is dodd at very good example of somebody who aids gracefully and over the years. I've watched a lot of this sort of late. Period william buckley conversations. He's just a just a total piece of garbage. Do you feel like you got a better insight into what happened there i do. I feel. I mean honestly i i haven't read a lot of his other work besides the dermal bones. I just feel impatient and as yeah a feminist i am More efficient than you. You would have been at age fifteen in just the way he treats the female characters in his stories but i did start..

taylor coleridge william buckley donald linocuts sixty six chapter fifties dorothy wordsworth last fall about eight years age fifteen fifteen year old Iraq fuller one kerouac black emerson
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Clunkers like from the fifties and sixties rusty bikes. They take him up. The slopes of mount tam or you know the hills around marin and co snap down eleven gradually started adding stuff to this old bikes knobby tires and gears than making later frames for them until they really have this whole other animal of the mountain bike. Mitch now Granted always exists. How large part in your interest in all of these activities does the gear play. Are you a collector. Just generally is that is that scratching data where you pursue new activity and you feel like you need to kind of go out and get everything related to a super collector and an over the top gearhead. I do love this stuff. But i could spend a lot more money on it than i actually do and i just don't i mean i love it but i am sort of a you know minimal. I don't wanna have excess stuff..

lot more money eleven marin sixties Mitch fifties
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

05:08 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"Well let's just try to be more conscious. jer. I guess what i'm getting at is. I didn't even know what i was talking about. A about aging and mortality. Until now i feel like it's which perspective now aged sixty nine i did during the time was working on the book. I feel like i still have more to say about aging mortality. That didn't even begin to touch this because we we can't see it. That's the thing about aging it's only revealed you slowly as you walk into the horizon of your own life. Can you see death living up more and more clearly child you have. You might understand abstractly that you're gonna die but you really don't have any idea about it. I think turn forty. That's that will start to get. You know you can see something on the horizon up there something with your name carbon. Oh god that really hit in terms of the understanding that you have. Now that you didn't win. He started the book that wasn't able to make it into the book. How was your perception changed. Will all of a sudden. I have a lot of friends who are seriously ill. New sickness and death happening of course all along back. I feel like that's really increase lately. It makes me feel a little girlish in foolish about mortality. When i'm not facing it in that kind of vivid way as as my friends who are dealing with cancer are so i feel like i've gotten a little more compassionate about talking about death biggest that mainly you think that before you were willing to talk about death in spite of not having the same context that you have about now yes it makes sense. But it's a little counterintuitive in that neo. Now you feel like you have more perspective. But because of that you're more reticent to talk about it i don't think i'm reticent i think i i just wanna talk about it in a different way like not quite so live and fatuous one of the things that jumped out at me and i think one of the things that really got to the heart of the matter in terms of aging in the book relates to your lifelong taxation with fitness. Is you go to the doctor. You have an issue with your shoulder. I mean that's something that i've dealt with that too and it is that sort of thing of old joke of out just at some point like your soldiers. Just not gonna get better. Yeah yeah when. I hit fifty. I got frozen shoulder.

fifty forty one sixty nine aged
"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

RiYL

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"alison bechdel" Discussed on RiYL

"I know is a memoir that writing chronologically debt is so boring. Because you know what's coming but wipe tonight partly it was aging. I was interested in just showing the process of my life over.

tonight