34 Burst results for "Alison Aubrey"

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"During the pandemic, several governors David have asked Trump to open reopen the federal Obama care market places for a special enrollment period. This has not happened. Biden's advisors have told me this is something he could do immediately after his inauguration. I mean, just thinking broadly, our country is so divided right now. I mean, there was this this national AP poll of those who voted in the presidential election among voters who said the pandemic is totally or mostly under control. 91% voted for President Trump. How do you bridge this divide? You know, I've been talking to public health experts into Dr Robert Win a physician in Richmond, Virginia. About this. He's been advising communities on just how to get people to follow evidence based recommendations. And basically, this is the deal in order to get people to change their behavior. You need to do three things you need to give them information say the information of the studies to show masks can help save lives Be You know they have to have the wherewithal or the means. You need to be able to buy a mask and remember to wear it and see you gotta motivate people. And this has been the challenge David. There are competing values and competing realities when it comes to mask wearing when people view masks as an infringement of personal freedom, Wind says this has made it harder to manage the pandemic. We are living in two separate worlds, and I think that that is a symptom of the lack of leadership when you have mixed messages coming out of the CDC. How can one fault people with alternative facts? So I think buying offers us an opportunity now for many people to regain trust back in the federal government. And Biden advisers say that starts by putting scientists first and giving people clear consistent guidance. NPR's Alison Aubrey, Alison, thank.

President Trump Biden David Alison Aubrey Obama CDC Dr Robert Win Richmond NPR Virginia Wind
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 2 months ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the news is next. Line from NPR News in Corvo Coleman, pharmaceutical maker Pfizer and its partner Bio intact are reporting strong news on their covert 19 vaccine. They say it is 90% effective in preventing the disease in trials. The Food and Drug Administration says it would require any proposed vaccine to be at least 50%, effective in large clinical trials before the agency will consider authorizing it for emergency use during the pandemic. This is the first of the experimental Covad vaccines to reach the clinical milestone. Investors are responding very strongly to the news on Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrial Average futures are up more than 1500 points. Also this morning, President Electro Biden has named a 12 member task force to work with his transition team to focus on addressing the pandemic. Nearly 10 million people have been diagnosed with the virus in the U. S. NPR's Alison Aubrey says that Biden has numerous goals. Maska mandates nationwide. Biden's plan is to work with governors and mayors to do this. Biden has said he will direct scientists at the CDC to set evidence based guidance to help limit outbreak so that leaders in every state every community are operating under the same standards. He's also calling for significant investments in vaccine distribution, and he's calling for a major ramp up in testing. NPR's Alison Aubrey reporting. As Biden advances his Corona virus task force, NPR's Mara Liasson reports he may run into roadblocks with his other presidential transition plans. Biden meets with his Corona virus taskforce Monday and has a long list of executive orders ready to go. But the administrator of the General Services Administration is refusing to sign a letter formally allowing Biden's transition team to begin its work. Without the letter, the work of the team could be curbed because Biden will not have access to money office space or government officials. The decision is in keeping with President Trump's decision not to concede the election. He has repeatedly refused to agree to a peaceful transfer of power and continues to claim without evidence that he won the election. Mara LIASSON NPR NEWS, Biden is seeking cooperation from Republicans who may retain control of the Senate. NPR's Joel Rose has more. In his victory speech, the president elect said the American people gave both parties a mandate to cooperate. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah says there are some areas where Republicans could work across the aisle with the incoming Democratic administration. Speaking on CNN, Romney noted that Biden himself spent decades in the Senate. Can we find common ground? Yeah, He's been there a long time himself. He knows what it takes to get things done in that chamber. Romney said possible areas of cooperation include covert relief, healthcare and the environment. But he warned that Republicans would oppose progressive policy proposals, including Medicare for all and the Green New deal. Melrose NPR NEWS You're listening.

President Electro Biden NPR News NPR Senator Mitt Romney President Trump Alison Aubrey Food and Drug Administration Covad Corvo Coleman Pfizer Mara Liasson General Services Administratio Senate president partner Joel Rose Melrose Democratic administration
Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

Morning Edition

07:27 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

"One, But however you define it. Corona virus in the U. S is surging. Some parts of the country air passing more restrictions to try to combat the record number of cases this as we have yet another Corona virus outbreak in the White House. NPR's Alison Aubrey is with us now. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Rachel. So when we say the White House we mean in the orbit of Vice President Mike Pence, several aides to the vice president have tested positive for covered 19, including his chief of staff. Nevertheless, the vice president decided to keep traveling to keep campaigning. What's the reaction been to them? You know, the decision to keep his travel schedule intact was made in consultation with the White House medical unit, the spokesperson said. Yesterday and pencils office says this is in accordance with CDC guidance for essential personnel there, basically making the case he has Essential work to do, including on the campaign trail. But public health experts Rachel are really questioning this definition. Here's Josh Sharfstein of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He served in the FDA under President Obama. The vice president should be limiting interactions with others because he could be harboring the virus and he could wind up becoming infectious. And so if there are essential activities that he needs to do in person, he should take extra precautions to do those, but otherwise I think he should be staying at home. Especially given around the country, including places. Pence is scheduled to travel such as Minnesota. The viruses circulating widely, right, So let's talk about that. Alison. What do the numbers tell us about the virus right now? The U. S has been averaging about 68,000 new cases per day. This is about a 30% increase compared to just two weeks ago. In recent days, new cases have reached record levels in several states, Utah, Tennessee, Illinois in Chicago over the weekend. Stronger restrictions took effect of bars and restaurants must close earlier in the evening. This is part of a curfew in the city. Other parts of Illinois have stricter rules, too, including new limits on the number of people allowed together and Rachel. They're certainly a lot of reminders around the nation to stay. Vigil eight, right? Hospitalizations from Cove. It have been on the rice too. I mean, does that mean we're likely to see more fatalities in coming weeks? You know, probably there are still a lot of people dying about 775 people per day in the U. S. On average. That's a lot lower than the highs of last spring. Part of this can be explained by the increase in cases among younger people who are less likely to die. But Rachel there's also been an improvement in treating people in hospitals. Physician Anish Mata is an infectious disease expert at Emory University. He is also a principal investigator for the H M Death Severe trialled at Emory. Last week, the FDA gave this antiviral drug full approval. Red death, severe reduced recovery time to 10 days for 15 days and also importantly, run desecrated treated patients had less use of mechanical valve leaders and other advanced oxygen's airport techniques. Compared to patients who didn't get room disappear. Now it's important to point out Rachel. This is not a home run treatment. It hasn't been shown to significantly prevent deaths among very sick patients, but it does have some benefits and Allison doctors now have other treatments they can offer as well as from desperation. That's right. Doctors have more tools in the toolkit. Now they have You know steroids, such as Dixon Math Zone better information about when to put people on blood thinners. Overall, the death rate appears to have dropped. In fact, a new study that included an analysis of thousands of hospitalized patients found that at the start of the pandemic patients had about a 25% chance of dying. Now they have an 8% chance. So still high, but definitely improvement. Yeah, definitely So younger people, you know, you mentioned more younger people have been diagnosed with the virus. So as we start to think about Thanksgiving Is there any way Tio Tio ensure that college students don't bring the virus home as they leave for break? You know, if you have a college student coming home to you find out if they're being tested, many schools are offering or even requiring an exit test or a departure test. Just before students depart for Thanksgiving break. I spoke to David Paul Thiel, He's a professor at the Yale School of Public Health about this He says. Of course, it's easy to identify symptomatic people. But this isn't good enough. I'm worrying about the student who feels just fine but who happens to have been exposed recently and who could be heading home to visit an elderly relative. And so we don't want to be sending little ticking time bombs home for Thanksgiving. I completely agree that we need to have everybody tested within 72 hours of departure. Now. Not every school can manage this given the cost. But many campuses are offering departure test, including big schools like Ohio State and many small liberal arts schools, too. During such as families that have college age kids either, right? I mean, my own family. We're trying to figure out what we do anything. We're all trying to figure this out, right? Everyone started figured out. So what can you tell us of this boy now, Zim? Well,

Rachel Vice President White House Alison Aubrey Mike Pence FDA Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Emory University NPR President Obama CDC Illinois Chief Of Staff Yale School Of Public Health Josh Sharfstein Anish Mata Minnesota Chicago
Vice President Mike Pence's top aide tests positive for COVID-19

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Vice President Mike Pence's top aide tests positive for COVID-19

"The top aide to Vice President Mike Pence, has tested positive for the virus, but is NPR's Alison Aubrey reports. Pence is continuing to campaign. The vice president's office says. Pence has tested negative and is tested regularly. But the vice president is considered a close contact of mark Short, his chief of staff who has the virus. And per CDC guidance. Close contact should be tested in quarantine, even if their initial test result is negative, given the incubation period is up to 14 days. But a spokesperson said Pence decided to keep his travel schedule in consultation with the White House Medical unit and in accordance with the CDC guidance for essential personnel. Essential workers exposed to the virus should be closely monitored for symptoms and wear a mask when close to others.

Vice President Mike Pence Vice President CDC Alison Aubrey White House Medical Unit NPR Chief Of Staff Mark Short
C.D.C. Suggests Some Child-Care Centers Can Reopen Safely

Reveal

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

C.D.C. Suggests Some Child-Care Centers Can Reopen Safely

"By the CDC finds that hundreds of childcare centers in Rhode Island were able to re open without significant spread of covert 19 during June and July. NPR's Alison Aubrey reports. Rhode Island is that a fairly low rate of Corona virus, But cases were detected in Twentynine daycare facilities, according to the Rhode Island Department of Health, which led to the quarantine of about 850 Children and staff. But in most cases, there was no evidence of spread to the community. CDC director Robert Redfield says This is important evidence. When things were done with vigilance you can in fact Be able to reopen child care and not have significant secondary transmission, he says. The trust of teachers is key. Alison Aubrey NPR NEWS This is

Rhode Island Alison Aubrey Rhode Island Department Of Hea CDC Robert Redfield NPR Director
Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test

All Things Considered

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test

"Delays delays continue continue to to hamper hamper efforts efforts to to quickly quickly identify identify people people infected infected with with the the Corona Corona virus. virus. There's a push for cheaper, faster tests. NPR's Alison Aubrey reports on a new saliva test developed by researchers at Yale University who are awaiting emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. If you've been tested for Corona virus, you may have experienced the sting of a swab being inserted deep into your nasal passages. But there is a less invasive way of testing that involves spitting into a cup or tube. Nathan grew Paws, an assistant professor of epidemiology and microbial diseases at the Yale School of Public Health. Early in the pandemic, he started comparing saliva samples to the swab samples from patients who were hospitalized with the virus. We were finding To our surprise, really more virus in the saliva. Then we were in the swamps and also we could detect it from the same patients more consistently. The challenge has been to develop a test that won't be subject to supply chain snags and Khun deliver results faster and cheaper. So what group on his colleagues have designed is a streamlined diagnostic test that uses heat to break open the virus. We get rid of the most cumbersome step, which is extracting and Play a passive and we replace that with something really simple. You Adam ends. I heated up. She lose the most expensive step in the most time consuming and most skilled group says this cuts down on the labor costs and with people taking their own saliva samples, it could reduce the cost of the health care system to collect the samples. He estimates will cost somewhere between $1.4 dollars plus labor to do a test and with emergency use authorization from the FDA commercial labs could license the Yale test. We're not a

Nathan Yale School Of Public Health Yale University Khun Yale Food And Drug Administration Alison Aubrey Assistant Professor NPR Adam FDA
Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

All of It

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

"Top health officials warning that the Corona virus caseload in this country could rise to 100,000 in a single day. Researchers are racing to find effective ways to doom or contact tracing and testing faster and in the long run cheaper NPR's Alison Aubrey has details about any map. Tula Harvey University team is working on to detect covert 19 outbreaks. You hover over the state and county where you live, you'll see two important things. You'll see a trend line in cases over time, and you'll see a color either green, yellow, orange or red. This is the risk level for your county. Now. This is based on how many new cases there are 100,000 people and the value of tying the alert to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the total population. You're getting kind of an apples to apples comparison, NPR's Ellison Aubrey.

NPR Alison Aubrey Ellison Aubrey Tula Harvey University
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:30 min | 7 months ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"It's a 35 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm No. Well, King. Good morning. The U. S. Is overwhelmed by covert. 19 and hearing about Covad, 19 is getting overwhelming. Listen to Dr Anthony Fauci talking to members of Congress yesterday. We're now having 40 plus 1000 new cases a day. I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 day. If this does not turn around, and so I am very concerned. That is a lot so maybe it's more helpful Toe have information about your specific community. As of today, there's a new tool that shows the threat level in every single county in this country was developed by researchers at Harvard and NPR's Alison Aubrey knows the details. Howson. Good morning, Noel. So up Until this point, it hasn't been easy for me as an individual to figure out the level of virus spread in my community. That's right. I mean, state dashboards display a lot of covert stats. They have number of cases number of deaths, but it's hard to know how to interpret these numbers. What are the trends? Here's Daniel Allen. She's a professor at Harvard. She's working with the Harvard Global Health Institute. A big challenge has been the absence of a unified national way of presenting data and talking about how to think about risk. So Alan, along with a big group of collaborators, top scientists and former public health officials at institutions around the country, they have stepped in. They've developed this new tool that's being released this morning. How does it work? Well, you go to the website global epidemics that order we have a link to it. On our site NPR dot or GE, You hover over the state and county where you live, and you'll see two important things. Noelle, You'll see a trend line in cases over time, and you'll see a color either green, yellow, orange or red. This is the risk level for your county. Now this level is based on how many new cases there are per 100,000 people, and the value of kind of tying the alert level to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the you know, total population. You're getting apples to apples comparisons. Here's Ellie Great, and she's one of the collaborators on the project. She's affiliated with Georgetown University's Center for global Health, science and security, but allows you to compare a rural area and upstate New York compared to New York City. And that's the real value of this effort, when now communicating and all agreeing on the same basic thresholds for the types of actions that need to be taken. So what actions need to be taken depending on what color you see? Sure. Well, if you're in a green area, the signals that your county or state is on track to contain the virus. I should say they're not too many places there. Our engine yellow. That's where many parts of the country are. And for policymakers, it's a cue that they may need to adjust restrictions, depending on the trend line of his going up or down, and there's specific guidance from collaborators on steps to take for us the public. It's also a signal to, you know, maintain vigilance to keep up social distancing and masking Teo, be very cautious. Red is a signal that a stay at home order or some other advisory like that is needed. That's the conclusion of these scientists. And there are counties and states I would presume that are in the red. Yeah. Yes, there are. I should emphasize It's very fluid, constantly changing, But many counties in Arizona and Florida are in the red. So if it were up to these scientists, there would be a shelter in place or a stay at home order. Considered there also 20 counties in Texas a red if you look at the map, much of the country's and orange and yellow as I said, a smattering of green I should point out one way to think about this tool is to guide your own decision making. If you wanted to visit relatives, and you use this tool you see the county they live in. Is that a red alert, you may want to Reconsider your plans and people confined. The tulip NPR dot org's right. That's right. That's right. NPR's Alison Aubrey. Thanks, Allison. Thank you so much. Well, the progressive wing of the Democratic Party did not get one of its candidates nominated for president this year. In some congressional races, they're doing better. Young, progressive and diverse candidates are receiving a lot of votes. Activists say the pandemic and the racial reckoning in this country are shifting the political ground. Here's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis Like most people in American politics, Maurice Mitchell can't believe how much has changed since January. It's hard to believe that the Iowa caucuses.

NPR NPR News professor Harvard Alison Aubrey Steve Inskeep Covad Dr Anthony Fauci Ellie Great Noel Congress Harvard Global Health Institut Democratic Party Howson Toe Iowa Daniel Allen Noelle Allison
Americans will have access to more labs for Coronavirus testing, Pence says

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

Americans will have access to more labs for Coronavirus testing, Pence says

"Vice president Mike pence as more Americans will have access to corona virus testing in the coming days with the rollout of a new private public partnership if yours Alison Aubrey has more the head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases Anthony found she says the US is moving into a new phase of testing in addition to state health labs commercial high speed testing is being rolled out making it possible to do thousands of tasks officials say priority will be given to healthcare providers and older Americans at higher risk so far there are about three thousand documented cases of corona virus in the U. S. though this case count is expected to go up as testing increases those unifies as Americans hunkered down to prevent the spread of this contagious

Vice President Mike Pence Alison Aubrey Anthony United States National Institute Of Allergy
Teens Are Still Vaping Flavors, Thanks To New Disposable Vape Pens

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Teens Are Still Vaping Flavors, Thanks To New Disposable Vape Pens

"The trump administration's partial ban on flavored e cigarettes is in effect but there's still plenty of vaping sticks cartridges on the market in fact there's an array of disposable products that come in many appealing flavors and delivered just as much nicotine. Here's NPR's Alison Aubrey. If you've raised a teenager. You may not be surprised to learn that. Teenagers and young adults seemed to be a step ahead of regulators by the time the FDA announced new enforcement efforts and jewel had pulled most flavored pods from the market. Many teens had already moved on jewel as a product for teens is almost now old school. That's Meredith Berkman co-founder of pave parents against vaping e cigarettes. She says disposable products are the new thing and for now they're exempted from the FDA's enforcement efforts there called disposables because they're designed to be tossed out after one use and among those disposables which are the most popular. There's puff bar there stig. There's Vigo they're all exempt from that guidance. Go to get a reality check. I asked my own teenage son. If he'd heard about these disposables and he said Yeah. Like Puff Bar Matt Meyers of the Campaign for tobacco-free kids showed me how it works here. I'm picking up one of the newer products. It's called a puff bar. This one comes in pink lemonade. It's vape stick and it. Looks like a three inch long thumb drive and when you inhale it. It has a sweet sugary flavor bars and extremely popular product. That's Bonnie halpern filter. A developmental psychologist at Stanford. She says it's hard to know how many teens are using them but she points to a bag. Confiscated vape sticks and pens that a high school principal in northern California collected. Recently I laid out and you can see there. The majority of them are these disposable products they come in lots of flavors lots of colors and it's very attracted to youth and that's what we're seeing them using the most right now. They're easy to conceal. Have about three hundred puffs in them and contain the amount of nicotine found to three packs of cigarettes a lot of Nicotine Christine. Del navo directs the Center for Tobacco Studies at Rutgers University. She says given the survey data showing nearly one in four high school seniors has helped. The data do indicate that there are young high. School students are addicted to these products. She says the e cigarette industry has been very creative despite efforts by regulators to stop young people from vaping to bit of a game of whack a mole when policies are aimed at one particular product another product to kind of pop up to kind of fill the void there and as for all the newer flavors that cover up the harsh taste of nicotine mango ice pomegranate ice. You'll see the word lush used a lot. I'm not sure what lush tastes like Matt Meyers. As parents and others concerned should be aware of how easy it can be to buy vape sticks and e liquids despite the partial ban and age restrictions. Right now you can buy e liquids online often in in websites that are not really protected increasingly in convenience stores and gas stations narrative. Berkman of pave says her group and others offer online resources to help parents. Stay in the loop before you even sit down with your kid. You have to read up on. The latest products. Know what they look like. No what the Lingo is. Because the landscape is changing quickly. Allison Aubrey NPR news.

Nicotine Matt Meyers Meredith Berkman FDA Alison Aubrey Allison Aubrey Npr NPR Vigo Bonnie Halpern California Co-Founder Pave Stanford Del Navo Principal Rutgers University Center For Tobacco Studies
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Flow but since we don't have that back log of history with this particular corona virus I don't think you can say that with certainty and that's why I felt she says you can hope for the best but you've got to plan for the unexpected and the possibility that the outbreak drags on Alison Aubrey NPR news now we have an update on a story we brought you yesterday two decades old bonsai trees were stolen from a museum outside of Seattle the exhibits curator Aaron Packard told us the trees could die within days without the meticulous care they are used to their health will decline damage to full age than to death of the tree if if it becomes extreme late last night the trees were returned security guards found them sitting in the middle of the road leading to the museum there was no note no one has claimed responsibility for the theft one of the trees did have a few broken branches but both are expected to survive we called Packard back today after we got the good news I am beyond released to have them back the trees could live on for another seventy five years if not several hundred years so no rush but if you happen to be near Seattle head to the Pacific bonds I museum both of the trees are already back on public display and they have quite a history to share in twenty sixteen singer songwriter Jackson Browne went to Haiti to donate recording equipment to a local music studio the plan was to help train young producers but the songs they created together took on a life of their own and led to a new album called let the rhythm leave Haiti song summit volume one banning Eyre has this review Jackson brown has been traveling to Hays since the aftermath.

Seattle Aaron Packard theft Jackson Browne Haiti Eyre Hays Alison Aubrey NPR
Parents think teens spend too much time playing video games

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Parents think teens spend too much time playing video games

"A new survey from the university of Michigan finds at about nine out of ten parents eighteens that spend too much time playing video games Alison Aubrey reports of poll finds boys are more likely to spend three or more hours gaming everyday among parents of kids who play video games daily about half say their team plays for three or more hours a day parents reported that gaming can get in the way of many aspect of their teens life including family activities sleep homework and friendships Gary freed is a pediatrician and co director of the poll and a lot of parents have even noticed that it seems like the more times teams spend gaming the more issues I have with mood and with relationships he says parents should take a close look at their teens gaming habits and talk with them about setting limits the poll asked only about gaming not other screen time activities Alison Aubrey NPR

Director Alison Aubrey Npr University Of Michigan Alison Aubrey Gary
Choose The Best Diet For You

Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

17:51 min | 1 year ago

Choose The Best Diet For You

"I'm Alison Aubrey and I cover. Health of them. Uh You know there are a lot of diets out there and we didn't even get to talk about all of them. There's called thirty. Intermittent intermittent fasting meal replacement diets. And for some of you out there. One of these might just be right for you now. This is usually the point point and our episode where we give you some key takeaways and I know we through a lot of information at you but we really just want you to remember these questions when you're trying to choose a diet. What do you like to eat? Who Do you tend to eat with? What sort of fits diet comfortably into your lifestyle? I also hate the idea of making the thing that I love and enjoy. That has happy for me. Which is food making it so regimented words to where it's unhappy? Yeah you know. Why do so many people do that? I don't know now. I'm not about that life. If you like what you hear. Make sure to check out our other life kit guides. NPR Dot org slash life kit there. You'll find guide about how to find money it didn't you had sounds good right and while you're there subscribe to our newsletter so you don't Miss Anything we've got more guides coming out every month on all sorts of topics and here as always is a completely random tip this time from NPR intern. Lena Sons Gabri suffused groucho wooden floor furniture in your house. One good way to cover the scratch is taking a walnut and rubbing it up against the scratch. The oil from the walnut will hide the scratch. If you've got a tip or one is suggested topic for our next guide emails at life kit at NPR DOT org. I'm Alison snobbery. Thanks for listening.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lena Sons Gabri Intern
Blinded by junk food: Teen loses eyesight from bad diet

All Things Considered

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Blinded by junk food: Teen loses eyesight from bad diet

"Can a junk food diet because someone to go blind researchers at the university of Bristol in England say that's what seems to have happened to one teenager they published a case study in the medical journal annals of internal medicine NPR's Alison Aubrey reports several years back a fourteen year old boy went to the doctor complaining that he was tired at the time doctors said he appeared healthy he was not overweight took no medications but his diet was bad really bad according to the report he ate mostly white bread chips and bits of processed meat the fact is that the boy was eating so much junk food that's researcher Allen Taylor of Tufts University he was not involved in the case study but he agreed to review the findings force he says it is very unusual for a team to develop the condition that this team did it's called optic neuropathy optic neuropathy is an inflammation of the optic nerve. these information from your eyes to your brain usually it's a temporary condition but in the reported case study the teenagers vision loss was permanent so Taylor says he'd like to know more actually the diagnosis is quite puzzling to me perhaps there were other issues with this teenager but Taylor says the case is an opportunity to point out to people that poor diet can lead to vision problems consuming a diet rich in such poor quality carbohydrates can in fact compromised vision now this usually does not happen during the teenage years it's much more common later in life Taylor and his collaborators studied about twenty thousand people to see how their diets influence to the risk of age related macular degeneration which tends to occur after age sixty we found that the more you eat the junk food diet the greater your risk for macular degeneration is and the look the more you with a healthy diet the less you have a risk for macular degeneration at a time

England Alison Aubrey Allen Taylor Tufts University Vision Loss University Of Bristol Annals Of Internal Medicine Researcher Fourteen Year
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Warrants more attention the study is published in Jamek pediatrics Alison Aubrey NPR news U. S. stocks are trading lower this hour the Dow Jones industrial average is down one hundred fifty three points or more than half a percent the twenty six thousand seven hundred sixty eight the nasdaq is off eighty two points SNPs down eighteen since the open this is NPR news from KQED news on Jeremy Siegel San Francisco supervisors today are expected to vote on placing a six hundred million dollar affordable housing bond measure on the November ballot KQED is politics and government editor Scot Shafer has more the bond would help fund housing for seniors teachers and other education staffers as well as home loan assistance for first time home buyers the cost of housing is increasingly out of reach for thousands of San Franciscans this bond measure won't solve that problem by any means but if the supervisors approve it as expected voters will then have their say the mayor and the board have been unable to agree on a separate ballot measure to green light more affordable housing projects some supervisors complain it would take away the right of neighbors to appeal projects they don't like says that can slow or even kill for will housing projects I'm Scott Shafer KQED news long time bay area sportscaster Bob Fouts has died France's best known for being the voice of the San Francisco forty Niners in the nineteen forties and fifties he called games for the San Francisco seals baseball team and the San Francisco warriors and St Mary's basketball teams Fouts also spend several decades as a sports anchor for multiple bay area TV and radio stations his son Dan Fouts was a hall of fame quarterback before following his that into the broadcast booth Bob Fouts was ninety seven years old some sports wars the eighties beat the mariners seven to four the.

mariners San Francisco sportscaster Scott Shafer editor Jeremy Siegel San Francisco KQED NPR Alison Aubrey NPR Dan Fouts France Bob Fouts San Franciscans Scot Shafer six hundred million dollar ninety seven years
"alison aubrey" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest as the leading provider of safe, sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests visit them today at American pest dot net. A federal task force of medical experts is out today with a recommendation to reduce HIV infections. The US preventive services task force says doctors should offer a daily preventive pill to healthy patients who are at high risk of. Hiv NPR's Alison Aubrey has details back in two thousand fourteen the centers for disease control and prevention began recommending a pill. It combines two anti retroviral medications and it's a powerful tool to prevent HIV infections by as much as ninety two percent. But today only about one in ten people who are good candidates for the pill. But just called true vodka are taking it John F, laying is a professor of family medicine at Virginia Tech and a member of the task force behind the new recommendation. He says he hopes more providers will talk to their at risk patients about taking the daily medication which is also known as prep prep is highly effective at preventing HIV, if taken. Every day. The treatment gap is most pronounced among black and Latino men and Hyman Scott of UC, San Francisco who directs clinical research at bridge, HIV, and the San Francisco department of public health says one obstacle to the drug is cost. The list price is about twenty one thousand dollars a year. We have patients who go to the pharmacy and are told that they have to pay thirteen hundred sixteen hundred dollars for their month's supply of Travolta, and they may have access through some programs, but it's not immediately apparent to them. Scott says they do work with patients to navigate coverage options, and the new recommendation may sway more providers to expand coverage of the drug task force member, John F, Ling, says the goal is to prevent as many new HIV infections as possible. We've done a good job in medicine at being able to treat HIV in the sense that it's now become essentially a chronic disease for most people, but we still have a problem with HIV infections up to forty thousand. Per year. The recommendation is published in the journal of the American Medical Association. Allison Aubrey, NPR news.

HIV John F San Francisco Hyman Scott Alison Aubrey DMV Allison Aubrey journal of the American Medica NPR US professor of family Virginia Tech Travolta UC Ling thirteen hundred sixteen hundr twenty one thousand dollars ninety two percent
Caffeine, Alison Aubrey And Journal Of The American Heart discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Caffeine, Alison Aubrey And Journal Of The American Heart discussed on Morning Edition

"A new study finds that drinking multiple servings of energy drinks may increase the risk of high blood pressure and irregular heartbeat. NPR's Alison Aubrey reports the drinks contained caffeine, and the combination of other ingredients during the study healthy volunteers drank thirty two ounces of an energy drink during about a one hour period, compared to drinking a placebo, drink the energy drinks led to an increase in blood pressure and EKG's showed changes that can increase the risk of arrhythmia study off their such an Shah, a professor pharmacy at university of the Pacific says it's not clear which ingredients may pose a risk. We do not believe at a caffeine or any other ingredient individually, but we suspect that as the combination is known as the studies published in the journal of the American Heart

Caffeine Alison Aubrey Journal Of The American Heart NPR University Of The Pacific Professor Thirty Two Ounces One Hour
"alison aubrey" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

"Life. If you like what you hear make sure to check out our other life kit guides at NPR dot org slash life kit there, you'll find a guide about how to find money. You. Didn't you had that sounds good? Right. And while you're there subscribe to our newsletter. So you don't miss anything. We've got more guides coming out every month on all sorts of topics and here as always is a completely random tip this time from NPR intern. Lena sons Gabri severe gradu- wouldn't floor furniture in your house. One good way to cover the scratch is taking a walnut and rubbing it up against the scratch. The oil from the walnut will hide the scratch. If you've got a tip or one is suggested topic for our next guide emails at life kit at NPR dot org. I'm Alison Aubrey thanks for listening. Support for NPR and the following message. Come from Lincoln learning, which offers more than thirteen thousand online courses to help you achieve your goals. It's short video tutorials, cover business, tech and creative skills. Employers. Look for at every level all taught by experts and new courses are added every week. Plus linked in learning is personalized recommending courses based on your interests and life kit listeners get a month of learning free. Start your free trial at Lincoln, learning dot com slash NPR. Hey, I'm magnetized party. And I wanna tell you about another podcast, you might enjoy from WB, you are and the New York Times it's called modern love and features actors like Jake, Jillian hall, Greta gerwig and Angela Bassett performing true stories of love loss, and redemption, I started my pediatrics residency on the cardiology unit, which was appropriate. My heart had a giant hole in it. Finally. I asked the question I really wanted answered when will I die modern love. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lincoln intern New York Times Gabri Angela Bassett Greta gerwig Jillian hall Jake
"alison aubrey" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on Eat Your Way To A Healthier Life

"Life. If you like what you hear make sure to check out our other life kit guides at NPR dot org slash life kit there, you'll find a guide about how to find money. You. Didn't you had that sounds good? Right. And while you're there subscribe to our newsletter. So you don't miss anything. We've got more guides coming out every month on all sorts of topics and here as always is a completely random tip this time from NPR intern. Lena sons Gabri severe gradu- wouldn't floor furniture in your house. One good way to cover the scratch is taking a walnut and rubbing it up against the scratch. The oil from the walnut will hide the scratch. If you've got a tip or one is suggested topic for our next guide emails at life kit at NPR dot org. I'm Alison Aubrey thanks for listening. Support for NPR and the following message. Come from Lincoln learning, which offers more than thirteen thousand online courses to help you achieve your goals. It's short video tutorials, cover business, tech and creative skills. Employers. Look for at every level all taught by experts and new courses are added every week. Plus linked in learning is personalized recommending courses based on your interests and life kit listeners get a month of learning free. Start your free trial at Lincoln, learning dot com slash NPR. Hey, I'm magnetized party. And I wanna tell you about another podcast, you might enjoy from WB, you are and the New York Times it's called modern love and features actors like Jake, Jillian hall, Greta gerwig and Angela Bassett performing true stories of love loss, and redemption, I started my pediatrics residency on the cardiology unit, which was appropriate. My heart had a giant hole in it. Finally. I asked the question I really wanted answered when will I die modern love. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

"alison aubrey" Discussed on Exercise: Learn To Love (Or At Least Like) It

Exercise: Learn To Love (Or At Least Like) It

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on Exercise: Learn To Love (Or At Least Like) It

"I'm Alison Aubrey and I cover health and wellness here at NPR. Now, we all know that best intentions can fail. We're busy. We're tired. And one reason that people tell me it's hard to make that exercise habits stick they say, you know, I'm just not athletic. I don't fit in the gym. I was the child who took twenty minutes to walk around the track when we were doing the presidential fitness test. God the bane of every child. Through trying to run the ropes cramping and nobody like nobody is telling me like, no, it's totally normal to cram when he run that was Renita job Lonski. She was a longtime staffer here at NPR. And she and I used to talk in the hallway a lot about this problem that she felt she was up against I always feel better when I exercise, but it's like it's been hard for me to kind of break back into it for some reason just on a very emotional level. So I found a great person for Renita to meet. And I think she could be good for all of us. Hi there. Oh, hello. Nice to meet you. This is Katie milkman. She's a professor at the Wharton school of business. Now, Katy you kind of blend psychology and deacon Nomex to figure out the best ways to nudge, people to better habits is that right? It could not have said it better myself Katie helped me so let's get to it. Katie's got six strategies to help us turn that intention into reality. And tip number one. You have got to give this a month. That's about what it. Takes to build a sticky habit for years. I've heard that it takes what is that? Is that old saying two weeks or three weeks to make a habit is that actually true does the research bear that out and ten seconds to break? It. You got a great question. I always get asked that question. Like, oh, how long does it take? Is it like five days is it fifty days is it twenty five days. The one thing we do know about habits is about a month is enough. So we don't know maybe maybe through what did you find to maybe fifty days would be way better? But we know a month of intense activity, repeating exercise over the course of a month is a is actually enough to kick start habits that long a good long while after that. In fact, I did a a large randomized controlled trial where we pay people to exercise for twenty eight days and saw benefits as much as forty weeks later. The key to habits is repetition. And if you can get that repetition going while you have high motivation, you're much more likely to have a behavior change that lasts. Now, let's talk about a tip that will actually get you moving day in and day out. It's something that Katy calls temptation bundling. And this is tip number to think about a television show that you love watching. But wouldn't always admit to other people. I guess I'm gonna say that loud keeping up with the Kardashians. Of course. And I really really want to watch the crowd. I have not seen any of it. And everyone around me because we work at NPR has talked about I'm with you. I love it. I can't have any the new season starts. Yeah. So you you had me at TV. Right. Well, my research has shown that you could actually combine watching trashy TV or highbrow TV as long as you love it like the crown with exercise, and it may actually help you get to the gym much more often. And we've shown that it can increase the rate at which people exercise, if they combine a real pleasure that they. Forward to with their workouts?.

Katie milkman NPR Alison Aubrey Renita Wharton school of business Katy fifty days twenty eight days twenty five days twenty minutes forty weeks ten seconds three weeks five days two weeks
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Hearing checked your ears NPR's, Alison Aubrey reports. A new study finds people who restore hearing loss with hearing aids actually slow down memory loss of all the things that can cause friction in a marriage. You might not put hearing on the list that is until the person you love begins to lose it. That's what happened to carry. And Lucian Johnson. Screaming? Get to scream real loud understand was bothering you. Yes. It was running my price. Yup. Up everything. And her husband Lucian Johnson felt to know that it was causing trouble. Because at times if you think I'm just a non you. What not just in you, which is eight so. Someone close to you. Then. That's nasty. So a few weeks ago? Lucian Johnson was fitted with hearing aids and audiologist Dina Rollins says as with many of her patients his hearing is now. Better stimulating your ears stimulates the nerves that stimulate your brain. So we're giving your ears back what they're missing and really giving your brain what it needs to make sense of what you're hearing. And here's another benefit than many people don't consider when you restore your hearing a whole lot of living can come back. Social isolation is a huge part of of hearing loss and people will notice their loved ones withdrawing from conversation not going out to family functions. Like they used to. It's not just the loss of social stimulation. The latest evidence shows when people cannot hear well memory loss can set in faster. Peers Dawes is an experimental psychologist at the university of.

Lucian Johnson Alison Aubrey Social isolation Dawes Dina Rollins NPR
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here's one idea you may not have considered get your hearing checked your ears NPR's, Alison Aubrey reports. A new study finds people who restore hearing loss with hearing aids actually slow down memory loss of all the things that can cause friction in a marriage. You might not put hearing on the list that is until the person you love begins to lose it. That's what happened to carry. And Lucian Johnson is of screaming get to screen real loudly and understand was bothering you. Yes. It was running my price and everything and her husband Lucian Johnson felt it to know that was causing trouble. Because you think I'm just ignoring you not just in year, which is eight. So we can't communicate with someone close to you. Then. That's nasty. So a few weeks ago? Lucian Johnson was fitted with hearing aids and audiologist DNA Rollins says as with many of her patients his hearing is now. Better stimulating your ears stimulates the nerves that stimulate your brain. So we're giving your ears back what they're missing and really giving your brain what it needs to make sense of what you're hearing. And here's another benefit then many people don't consider when you restore your hearing a whole lot of living can come back. Social isolation is a huge part of of hearing loss and people will notice their loved ones withdrawing from conversation not going out to family functions. Like they used to. It's not just the loss of social stimulation. The latest evidence shows when people cannot hear well memory loss can set in faster. Peers Dawes is an experimental psychologist at the.

Lucian Johnson Alison Aubrey Social isolation Dawes NPR Rollins
Many supplements contain unapproved, dangerous ingredients: study

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Many supplements contain unapproved, dangerous ingredients: study

"Of dietary supplements finds more than seven hundred supplement products have been found to contain unapproved pharmaceutical ingredients that can be harmful NPR's, Alison, Aubrey reports the most common adulterants in over the counter supplements include drugs for weight loss and synthetic steroids over half of adults in the US report. Using some dietary supplements. In this study, researchers used food and Drug administration. Data to analyze warnings sent to supplement manufacturers. When products were found to contain unapproved ingredients over a ten year period. The authors identified seven hundred seventy six adults. Berated dietary supplements. Peter Cohen of Harvard Medical School says, consumers should be aware when it comes to supplements. The FDA doesn't that the supplements before they appearance store shelves, but the FDA is responsible for removing dangerous supplements. Once they're detected

FDA Harvard Medical School Drug Administration Peter Cohen United States Aubrey Alison NPR Ten Year
How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

Morning Edition

06:46 min | 2 years ago

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm. David green and I'm Noel king good morning the first medication derived from. Marijuana could be in pharmacies as early, as this fall the FDA recently approved it to treat two types. Of epilepsy cake Leslie mcclurg has. The story of one family's quest to get this drug Evelyn Nissenbaum used to watch her, son Sam suffer through one, hundred seizures a day when they, were bad they were once every three minutes Dan was diagnosed with epilepsy when he was four years old when it did ever seizures. Sort of everything went black kind of. For about twenty seconds just long enough to tumble down a. Flight of stairs at, his house in Berkeley plunge into a dinner plate crack head on window I don't, remember a lot of it really doctors tried nearly two dozen different medications to treat Sam nothing worked long term and the side effects for many were. Severe full body rashes fits of rage strange Fficials a Hillis name that my folks sheets came to life. In that holes in my body seven exhausting years passed and. Then Evelyn came across the study using. Cannabis dial. Or CBD to successfully treat seizures in rats CD is an extract from the cannabis. Plant that doesn't make you high and I thought my son needs. Access to that I gotta get this she dug around and found a. British pharmaceutical company that was making highly, concentrated CBD for multiple sclerosis patients the company agreed to let Sam. Try the drag in the UK. Under a doctor's supervision for two weeks after Wedneday his seizures were down to thirty after, two days they were down, to ten after three days he, had one seizure Sam is now seventeen the drugs still works and he doesn't have any side effects for the past six years the. FDA has allowed what's called a compassionate. Use for Sam along the way hundreds of other patients have. Tried the drug in. Clinical trials which eventually led to its recent FDA approval the brand name for the CBD drug is EPA dialects this is. What everyone asked about Dr Joe Sirven isn't Arale just at the mayo. Clinic in Arizona this almost had like instant name. Recognition he says his. Patient's read about EPA dialects studies on social media and then they'd begged to try it it showed. Really, really great results particularly with certain larger seizures the big convulsions now many patients are using CBD from marijuana dispensaries but, these aren't regulated and the dose inconsistency can vary. Widely still serving doesn't necessarily recommend switching I, would never change it. If it's working for. You if it's not thou here's an option EPA dialects isn't right for everyone it only. Reduces seizures in about thirty percent of epilepsy patients and the drug can cause. Side effects like fatigue nausea diarrhea rashes insomnia and it's not on the market just yet I the Drug. Enforcement Administration needs to reclassify CBD it's. Currently, a schedule one drug meaning at the legal, under federal law that's expected to happen by early fall so once that's, done it could potentially. Be in Walgreens or Rite Aid but there are still. Big holes there, are, big gaps in. The price has not been announced. Yet you will need a prescription and you Zimbabwe's insurance companies, may not cover EPA dialects it looks like we, were, for, ten, bottles, here for now San still gets his drugs at, the investigational pharmacy at UC San Francisco Their from please Someday Sam hopes he's the one prescribing EPA dialects wanna be. An, epilepsy doctor I the seventeen year old is going to get. His driver's license he was just cleared to get. Behind the wheel he hasn't had a seizure in more than two years for NPR news unless they mcclurg. In San Francisco so if you've ever been, on a diet but you didn't, lose the weight you had hoped to lose your gut bacteria might be part. Of the, problem NPR's Alison Aubrey reports on how the microbes in our guts may either help or. Hinder weight loss this is kind of an odd thing, to think about but the bacteria that live in our guts can actually do. Us a favor they eat. What we can't Martin Blaser is a professor at NYU. Langone medical, center he says consider what happens when we, eat an apple we digest, most of it but there's a certain part of the apple that. Can't be absorbed we don't have the right enzymes to digest every, bit of it but are bacteria can after the bacteria consume, what we can't, they Produce, byproducts that we can digest and that's another source of calories. For, us somewhere between five and fifteen percent of all our calories. Come from that kind of digestion where the microbes. Are providing energy for us that we we couldn't ordinarily get and times were bad if we were starving. We would really welcome that but these days, when many people want to lose, weight we may not want these extra calories the microbes give us researchers at. The mayo, clinic in Minnesota wanted to know if they could identify certain types of bacteria that might. Influence the success of dieting Purna cash up a gastroenterologist, helped to lead the study it included people who were enrolled in a one. Year lifestyle program they were. Counseled to follow a low calorie diet and agreed to. Be monitored, closely we started with the premise that people, have different microbial make-up's in, the in the gut and that good insurance how well they do. With dieting Richmond and it turns out when cash up and his, team compared the dieters who were successful with those who are. Not They, did find differences we found that people who lost, at least five percent of their body weight had different gut bacteria as compared to those who did not lose five percent of their body big for instance they found an abundance of bacteria, called dial Lister in the guts of people. Who did not lose, much weight and another type. Of bacteria was high in successful dieters cash up says, down the road if they can show. The same, results in a larger group of dieters they'd like to use this information to help people lose weight what do you hope to do is to be able to individualize care for people and we would also. Try to develop new robotics which we can use to change the. Microbial makeup but manipulating the mix of microbes in your gut is easier said than. Done according to NYU's Martin blazer it's complicated he says in part it depends how lucky will be whether the organisms that we think are beneficial we, can cultivate them well it said that they could become next years probiotic that remains on he says if it's possible It's still some years off. Palace and, Aubrey NPR news Support for your health comes from.

SAM CBD EPA NPR FDA Evelyn Nissenbaum Marijuana NYU Cannabis Martin Blaser Leslie Mcclurg San Francisco Aubrey Npr Noel King Berkeley Walgreens UK David Green Arizona Hillis
"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To rocky mountain spotted fever when new study is shedding light on an old technique to repel ticks that many people don't use it is a repellent that you spray on your clothing and not on your skin and here's more from npr's alison aubrey back in the nineteen eighties the us military test at the use of pesticide derived from the flowering chrysanthemum plant to protect soldiers from insect and tick bites it's called permission and now decades later many outdoor enthusiasts use it including danny quinteros i love being outside whether it's hiking backpacking climbing he's got a plan to hike the appalachian trail which cuts through many tick infested areas so he's got a can of premier and he's about to spray it on a t shirt what do you want to do is to stay back six eight inches away from the clothing he applies an even coat then flips it over to spray the back just one single layers fine he says in combination with skin repellent that he sprays on his exposed skin he's found that premiered untreated clothing really works and there's a fair amount of science to back him up nita connolly overseas the tickborne disease prevention lab at western connecticut state university there are several studies now that provide pretty compelling evidence that wearing me thin treated clothing has the potential to reduce tick bites the most recent comes from a study done by researchers at the centers for disease control and prevention they purchased a bunch of pretreated clothing these are garments treat it with premier thrown by.

npr alison aubrey us danny quinteros nita connolly western connecticut state univ six eight inches
"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Spotted fever when our new study is shedding light on an old technique to repel ticks that many people don't use it is a repellent that you spray on your clothing and not on your skin and here's more from npr's alison aubrey back in the nineteen eighties the us military tested the use of a pesticide derived from the flowering chrysanthemum plant to protect soldiers from insect and tick bites it's called premier and now decades later many outdoor enthusiasts use it including danny quinteros i love being outside whether it's hiking backpacking climbing he's got a plan to hike the appalachian trail which cuts through many ticket infested areas so he's got a can of premier and he's about to spray it on a t shirt what do you want to do is to stay six eight inches away from the clothing he applies an even coat then flips it over to spray the back just one single layer is fine he says in combination with skin repellent that he sprays on his exposed skin he's found that premier untreated clothing really works and there's a fair amount of science to back them up nita connolly overseas the tickborne disease prevention lab at western connecticut state university there are several studies now that provide pretty compelling evidence that wearing per meath untreated clothing has the potential to reduce bites the most recent comes from a study done by researchers at the centers for disease control and prevention they purchased a bunch of pretreated clothing these are garments treat it with premier threatened by.

fever npr alison aubrey us danny quinteros western connecticut state univ nita connolly six eight inches
Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

Morning Edition

04:18 min | 2 years ago

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lars Sterling Thirty Weeks Four Inches Three Weeks Six Hours Ten Years One Day
Terence Corcoran: Regulators get drunk on junk science to stop you from drinking

Tolbert and Lund

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Terence Corcoran: Regulators get drunk on junk science to stop you from drinking

"That light drinkers have the lowest risk npr's alison aubrey reports researchers studied about one hundred thousand people who lived in a bunch of us cities including birmingham boulder la in pittsburgh they were in their mid fifties too early seventies when the study began and all completed surveys about their alcohol consumption researchers tracked their health for about nine years and found that the more a person drank the higher the risk of cancer and cancer related death andrew kunsman of queen's university belfast in ireland is the study author and we definitely think it gives the bigger picture about what's going on so how much is too much this study suggests that light drinkers have the lowest combined risk of cancer and premature death even lower than people who never drink though it's not clear why in in this study light drinking was defined as one to five drinks per week that seems to reassure light during this study suggests that cancer risk starts to increase when people drink more than a drink a day but the increase is modest moderate drinkers in.

NPR Pittsburgh Ireland Alison Aubrey Birmingham Andrew Kunsman Nine Years
"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is weekend edition from npr news and lulu garcia varo maple syrup producers are furious and they're letting the food and drug administration know about the issue a controversial regulation over how to label sugar on the bottles of the syrup npr's alison aubrey joins me now to talk about it good morning hey there lulu all right angry maple syrup producers that's right they are upset because the fda under the new food labelling rules which will be rolled out over the next couple of years would require that all of this sugar i've brought in my maple syrup here all of the sugar here be labeled as added sugar and maple syrup producers are up in arms they say this is unfair because in fact all the sugar in maple syrup is naturally occurring it's intrinsic i spoke to one producer in vermont this morning and he says look maple syrup is one hundred percent pure product it's basically concentrated tree sap i mean think of it as tree juice so to have a label it makes their products seem as if it's in the same category with imitation syrups you know the inexpensive ones you see on grocery store shelves that are mostly made from high fructose corn syrup they say is wrong so they say it's completely confusing and not accurate all right so what does the fda saying about this what's their argument these new food labels they're saying look americans consume too much sugar and excessive consumption is linked to be city type two diabetes they say that they're trying to create labels and regulations to support the dietary recommendations to limit sugar to known more than ten percent of your daily calories and they say this is.

npr alison aubrey producer vermont one hundred percent ten percent
"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One thing that will help consumers be aware of how much sugar they're consuming now they have offered a bit of a compromise here they would basically allow for a footnote to say something like on the label here to say something like all sugars naturally occurring now this does not please the maple syrup producers because they're saying look people are going to be confused by it seems contradictory on one hand you're going to have over here the nutrition facts panel saying added sugars and then maybe somewhere else in the label it says naturally occurring people are just gonna be confused so is maple syrup any better for you than imitation maple syrup i mean they're both sort of sweeteners right i would say there is a difference maple syrup which is basically tree sap has a lot of vitamins and minerals in it and there have been a recent spate of studies from the university of rhode island pointing out that there are a bunch of plant compounds in maple syrup some of which could have anti inflammatory effects or other beneficial effects and you won't find those in these imitation syrups that are made from highly refined sugars you wanna limit sugar from all sources but i would say if you're trying to cut back you might as well choose the one that has micronutrients in it and the taste of it is much richer so where does this go now are we going to see these new labels anytime soon well the public comment period on this proposal ended last week now the the fda will review the comments and the new nutrition facts panel labels will be rolling out over the next years that's npr's alison aubrey thank you so much.

fda alison aubrey university of rhode island npr one hand
"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The risk of lyme disease once found mainly in new england lime disease is now being reported in a much wider range of the us npr's alison aubrey reports that cases have more than doubled over the last decade now there's an estimated three hundred thousand sicknesses a year lime disease was once unheard of in western pennsylvania where barbara thorn spent time as a kid so she was completely surprised by what happened to her after july fourth visit there a few years back about eight to nine days after that fourth of july weekend i noticed a roundish red rash on my back just above my waistline and it expanded each day so it made me suspicious and i was also feeling sick with exhaustion and aquinas her primary care doctor diagnosed her with mime disease prescribed her antibiotics and she did get better now thorne is an entomologist by training so she knows she must have been bitten by a black legged tick when these ticks are infected with the bacteria called for aaliyah or door fry they can transmit lyme to people and what she realizes now is that sheep in new lyme hotspot lime disease is on the move it's range continues to expand fairly quickly so we all need be aware the cdc estimates the number of infections each year is ten times higher than the reported cases one reason is that some people who get infected don't know it the nymphs or the young ticks that transmit most of the infections are teeny tiny no bigger than a pinhead or poppy seed and nearly weightless so it's super easy to miss a tick bite and symptoms of lyme overlap with other common illnesses paul fiedler is a physician and chair of the department of pathology at western connecticut health network he says even when people do suspect line there are shortcomings in the waves diagnosed many of the tests for.

pennsylvania barbara thorn red rash cdc paul fiedler npr alison aubrey thorne connecticut nine days
Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again

Morning Edition

01:49 min | 2 years ago

Lyme Disease Is On The Rise Again

"The risk of lyme disease once found mainly in new england lime disease is now being reported in a much wider range of the us npr's alison aubrey reports that cases have more than doubled over the last decade now there's an estimated three hundred thousand sicknesses a year lime disease was once unheard of in western pennsylvania where barbara thorn spent time as a kid so she was completely surprised by what happened to her after july fourth visit there a few years back about eight to nine days after that fourth of july weekend i noticed a roundish red rash on my back just above my waistline and it expanded each day so it made me suspicious and i was also feeling sick with exhaustion and aquinas her primary care doctor diagnosed her with mime disease prescribed her antibiotics and she did get better now thorne is an entomologist by training so she knows she must have been bitten by a black legged tick when these ticks are infected with the bacteria called for aaliyah or door fry they can transmit lyme to people and what she realizes now is that sheep in new lyme hotspot lime disease is on the move it's range continues to expand fairly quickly so we all need be aware the cdc estimates the number of infections each year is ten times higher than the reported cases one reason is that some people who get infected don't know it the nymphs or the young ticks that transmit most of the infections are teeny tiny no bigger than a pinhead or poppy seed and nearly weightless so it's super easy to miss a tick bite and symptoms of lyme overlap with other common illnesses paul fiedler is a physician and chair of the department of pathology at western connecticut health network he says even when people do suspect line there are shortcomings in the waves diagnosed many of the tests for.

Pennsylvania Barbara Thorn Red Rash CDC Paul Fiedler NPR Alison Aubrey Thorne Connecticut Nine Days
"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"alison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With it comes the risk of lyme disease once found mainly in new england lime disease now being reported in a much wider range of the us npr's alison aubrey reports that cases have more than doubled over the last decade now there's an estimated three hundred thousand sicknesses a year lime disease was once unheard of in western pennsylvania where barbara thorn spent time as a kid so she was completely surprised by what happened to her after july fourth visit there a few years back about eight to nine days after that fourth of july weekend i noticed a roundish red rash on my back just above my waistline expanded each day so it made me suspicious and i was also feeling sick with exhaustion and aquinas her primary care doctor diagnosed her with lime disease prescribe antibiotics and she did get better now thorne is an entomologist by training so she knows she must have been bitten by a black legged tick when these ticks are infected with the bacteria called borelli up or door fry they can transmit lyme to people and what she realizes now is that she'd been in a new lyme hotspot lime disease is on the move it's range continues to expand fairly quickly so we all need to be aware the cdc estimates the number of infections each year is is ten times higher than the reported cases one reason is that some people who get infected don't know it the nymphs or the young ticks that transmit most of the infections are teeny tiny no bigger than a pinhead or poppy seed and nearly weightless so it's super easy to miss a tick bite and symptoms of lyme overlap with other common illnesses paul fiedler is a physician and chair of the department of pathology at western connecticut health network he says even when people do suspect lime there are shortcomings in the waves diagnosed many of the tests for lyme disease are negative at the time the patients first visit their doctor he says blood tests to detect lime disease rely on a person's immune response the tests detect lime specific antibodies when someone gets infected with bacteria it takes time sometimes ten.

pennsylvania barbara thorn red rash cdc paul fiedler npr alison aubrey thorne connecticut nine days
Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

Morning Edition

02:06 min | 2 years ago

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

"To relieve pain and anxiety and other disorders npr's alison aubrey reports richard is the retail manager of the homegrown apothecary in portland oregon we're marijuana's legal he says lots of his customers use cbd cbd has gotten a lot of buzz cd which is short for canal dial is marketed as a way to relieve anxiety and part of the appeal is that it doesn't have the same mind altering effects is marijuana since it doesn't contain the psychoactive component in how do i sell it all sorts of ways he walks us over to a shelf full of cbd products there capsules and little bottles of cbd oil that you take like a liquid medicine with the dropper then there's lotions oils so why all the interesting cbd my customers are buying cbd products because of stress relief because of aches pains because their mother laws in town and they just wanna chill out by one industry estimate the cd market has doubled since two thousand sixteen it's a two hundred million dollar industry but with this popularity the hype may have gotten ahead of the science there's a lot of confusion about how it works and what it does exactly turns out there's a lot of new research into cbd esther blessing is a psychiatrist at new york university she now studies the compound there's really good evidence to suggest that cbd could be an effective treatment of anxiety and addiction but we need clinical trials to find out blessing says so far the evidence comes from very small short term studies she points to one from researchers in brazil they do study in people with social anxiety disorder and they gave them cbd before a speech in front of a large audience the researchers compared anxiety levels and people after they took the cbd compared to a placebo and they found that people who took cbd reported significantly less anxiety which is really interesting blessing in a group of collaborators are about to begin a clinical trial funded by the national institutes of health to.

Richard Retail Manager Oregon Cbd Cbd New York University Brazil Alison Aubrey Portland Marijuana Two Hundred Million Dollar