35 Burst results for "Alina"

Tech Giants Join Corporate Reckoning Over Political Spending

Morning Edition

01:54 min | 6 d ago

Tech Giants Join Corporate Reckoning Over Political Spending

"Is looking at money in politics in a new light. Ah growing list of companies is pausing some political spending after last week's violent attack on the U. S. Capitol. Among them are tech giants Facebook, Microsoft and Google and big banks, Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan. Full disclosure. Those five companies are among NPR's recent sponsors. NPR's Alina Cellucci reports. One after another. Corporations piled on one trade group called for the removal of President Trump and not just hanging group, the National Association of Manufacturers, a longtime supporter of Trump. Many of the tech and banking giants halted all their political giving, at least for a few months. Marriott, Comcast, Airbnb and others stopped donations to specific Republican lawmakers. Those who fought the certification of the election at this moment right that this crisis moment they sensitive, really important signal. MEREDITH McGee. He's the executive director of issue one and nonprofit that works to reduce the influence of money in politics. You just can't really over emphasize the role that donor Play in the current political calculation, and it's unusual to see so many companies on their own without a campaign to pressure them publicly address how they contribute to the current political state. But there are caveats. This is often the moment when many companies reevaluate their political spending right after an election. Plus, there are many ways companies make political donations. All the corporate statements now are about their official political action committees, but there are also super PACs. And tax exempt groups that don't have to disclose donors and a lot of corporate spending flows from individuals like executives. The biggest question is money in politics groups ask. Will this flurry of corporate reckoning be an epiphany or a fat Alina Cell yuk NPR news?

U. S. Capitol Big Banks Alina Cellucci President Trump NPR Meredith Mcgee National Association Of Manufa Jp Morgan Goldman Sachs Airbnb Donald Trump Comcast Marriott Microsoft Facebook Google
After Shopping And Shipping Crush Come Record Returns

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 2 weeks ago

After Shopping And Shipping Crush Come Record Returns

"Beginning of the year is the traditional time for fresh starts. New resolutions and returning gifts. You didn't want its peak season for online returns in this story. NPR's Alina Cell Yoke introduces us to a word that's new to me. Returns. My getting The end of the year. You think it would be the time when stores and retail companies could finally exhale from the crush of holiday shopping? But for many, it's just the beginning. This is the calm before the storm. From our perspective. Marcus Jenna's chief operating officer at B stock, which helps stores resell the returns, and January is when the big wave of those returns comes crashing in. Right after the big wave of shopping, Shin says, returns in the first place give people confidence to buy stuff. Online sight unseen returns really are highly correlated to sales. But then the more stuff we buy, the more of it is likely to get sent back and this holiday season so record setting sales, causing the 2020 ship McGee, Aiden, overwhelming postal and delivery services. So what comes next is a record setting volume of returns, which Twitter mavens of retail have been trying to call returns. My gettin doesn't really roll off the tongue, right? We're all just trying to figure out a nice way to talk about this stuff. Whatever you call it. The phenomenon is real. This year surveys air, finding the majority of shoppers planning to return at least some of their holiday gift. Nerve are which handles shipping and returns for hundreds of brands, predicts twice as many returns this year compared to last here CEO Amid Sharma and I would estimate just in the shipping cost for retailers. To get those items back. It's going to be over billion dollars over a billion dollars. Sharma says. A few trends feed into the surge of returns, and the first is pretty straightforward during the pandemic. More shoppers are buying online instead of in stores and things we buy without seeing or touching. Get returned Much more frequently in general, is 4 to 5 Times higher returns in online channel was his instruction, especially in the apparel and footwear, clothes and shoes. He says 30 to 40% of them might get returned. And there's one thing in particular that online shoppers have been doing a lot, especially during the pandemic by the same item, either in different size or in different color or style, with an intention off, keeping one and returning the other items. This is expensive for retailers who call it wardrobe being or bracketing. My favorite analogy came from Kerry's ate at warehouse robotics company Locus who says it's modern day Goldilocks. I called the three Bears concept. They're ordering a size up in a size down, but they find the one that's just right and the other two items, then our return. This has been going on for us long as online stores allowed free or relatively cheap returns. But This year in a pandemic with fewer opportunities to check things out in person. Even more shoppers discovered this option. Also, more people have been trying new stores, which means shopping at places that never visited before unsure of sizing and quality. And finally, Sharma from Navarre says they're sorry. Found one more reason. Pandemic weight changes almost 40% off. Customers have mentioned that their sizes have changed during covert time. And hence there buying multiple items making sure they fit very 2020 excuse for shopping like Goldilocks. Alina, Sell you NPR news.

Marcus Jenna B Stock Sharma NPR Shin Aiden Mcgee Twitter Kerry Navarre Alina Npr News
Cant Deport a Movement

In The Thick

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Cant Deport a Movement

"What's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Race and culture from a poc perspective money. Sam and i'm lorella joining us as a special guest. All the way from brooklyn is a daas. She's an immigrant rights lawyer professor at new york university school of law and co director of the. Oh so important. Nyu immigrant rights clinic alina. Welcome to in the thick. Thank you so much for having me. You are the author of the recent book. No justice in the shadows. Which is what we've been saying. You know people in the shadows is not a good thing for democracy and your book you write that. Roughly three hundred thousand people are formerly deported from the us every year with a million more turn back. Just you know. Within the border area you talk about how the immigration criminalization and deportation systems are intertwined desire to maintain the racial status quo in other words the white supremacy and white majority of this country. You talk about how the use of the terms like criminal alien one of our favorites. Yeah falsely separates immigrant communities into categories of good versus bad right. And we've also had this presidential election where one candidate didn't denounce white supremacists and in this mist of a nationwide protest for black lives and a pandemic that has disproportionately affected black and communities following the election right. it was declared that joe biden had one right. Donald trump who previously had said. He wouldn't commit to a peaceful. Transfer refuse to concede and his allies started referring to vote as what a surprise quote legal or illegal and they especially tried to discredit the vote counting in cities with large black populations detroit philadelphia atlanta. This idea of like even votes now becoming good and bad legal and illegal criminal or non-criminal. It just permeates throughout our entire electoral politics so alina. Can you talk about how the immigration system has been set up to protect a particular type of immigrant absolutely and this is one of the things i focus on in. The book is really a historical perspective. Because we're told that our country is a welcoming country in that people who face deportation must be facing this. Because they've broken the law. They violated the laws where the laws are actually written and the foundation of the laws are designed to treat immigrants a- suspects to exclude them and to exploit them and we know this from the very origins of this country right there first naturalisation law that congress row because the constitution required them to come up with a universal naturalization law was limited to free white persons that's the foundation of our rules about membership in belonging and we police migration in this country initially focused on black people an indigenous people right so for the first century when voluntary immigration was mostly why congress was focused on fugitive slave laws that allowed black people to be removed from free state's to slaveholding states and the indian removal act that allowed indigenous people to be removed from their ancestral lands to make room for property white man and those are the tools that congress picked up on when it decided to focus on immigrants because they had chinese immigrants arriving in large numbers but eventually that led to the national origins quotas where we explicitly used racism to decide who could get a visa a spot in this country and mexicans in particular were actually exempted in order for southern businesses to use them for cheap labor so instead of excluding them that's why in the nineteen twenties southern segregation has proposed criminalizing unlawful border crossings. So that when people's labor was no longer needed they could be easily police imprison than deported. And that's the legacy of our immigration laws and while we may have gotten rid of the national origins quotas in nineteen sixty five. We replaced it with a system that essentially perhaps immigration including mexican immigration for the first time to twenty thousand nieces when hundreds of thousands of people have been going back and forth and the laws created this kind of undocumented population at created this false sense of illegality and as a backlash to legal immigration suddenly coming from asia africa. The caribbean you saw this rise of law and order policies nineteen seventies eighties war on crime. The war on drugs suddenly treating immigrants as criminals. And that's really what's laid the foundations for the modern immigration system today where police have been taken over as essentially immigration agents to create a pipeline for deportation and that replicates all of the racism that we see in policing generally and combined so that immigrant communities kind of double ranked in their communities.

Lorella New York University School Of Alina NYU Congress Brooklyn Joe Biden Donald Trump SAM Detroit Philadelphia Atlanta United States Caribbean Asia Africa
Amazon Warehouse Workers In Alabama Plan Vote On 1st U.S. Union

All Things Considered

00:47 sec | Last month

Amazon Warehouse Workers In Alabama Plan Vote On 1st U.S. Union

"Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama are getting closer to voting on whether to form the first union at the company here in the U. S. Get more on that from NPR's Alina cell yuk. The National Labor Relations Board has already said the unionization vote should happen at Amazon's warehouse invested more Alabama. Hundreds of workers there had signed cards looking to be represented by the retail, wholesale and department store union. Amazon and response has argued they do not represent the majority of its employees views and touted its pay and benefits. Note. Amazon is among NPR's recent financial supporters. Unions are prominent at Amazon in Europe. But in the US, this could be the first union at one of the country's largest employers. Company, the union and the NLRB be now need to sort out procedural and other disputes before a vote can

Amazon Alabama Wholesale And Department Store NPR Nlrb Alina U. Europe United States
Computer Crime Law Scrutinized at Supreme Court

Techmeme Ride Home

03:28 min | Last month

Computer Crime Law Scrutinized at Supreme Court

"Finally today there was an interesting tech related case that was argued before the. Us supreme court yesterday it involves a nineteen eighty-six computer crime law that has been used ever since to prosecute hackers and internet activist than the like people have been arguing strenuously that the law is outdated and indeed as justice gorsuch said in yesterday's court hearing the us government's interpretation of the law risks quote making a federal criminal of us all and quote. And yes if you're wondering this is indeed the so called. Aaron swartz law quoting politico. The supreme court on monday indicated serious reservations about the ambiguity and scope of the nation's only major cybercrime law hinting. It may narrow the law's applicability to avoid criminalising acts such as checking social media at work during arguments in a case involving a georgia police officer convicted of violating the nineteen eighty-six computer fraud and abuse act by accessing a license plate database. The justices pushed a justice department. Lawyer to explain how a ruling in the government's favour wouldn't open the door to prosecutions of innocuous behavior those could include browsing instagram on computer or performing public-spirited security research to test a system for vulnerabilities as the first see. Faa challenge to reach the high court. The van buren case generated amicus briefs from a wide range of technology privacy and cyber security experts. Most of them on van buren side a group of cybersecurity. Experts described the faa a sword hanging over the head of researchers who probe computers for weaknesses with the goal of helping their owners fix the flaws. The most controversial ever see faa case never reached a verdict. In two thousand eleven federal prosecutors indicted the prominent internet freedom activists aaron sorts on hacking charges for downloading millions of journal articles using a subscription provided by mit swertz. Then twenty four face thirty five years in prison. He by suicide in january twenty thirteen while awaiting trial. The justices sounded alarm. Monday about the broader reading of the cfe. A justice neal gorsuch suggested that the van buren case was the latest example of the government. Trying to broaden the scope of criminal laws incontestable ways several justices expressed uncertainty about the definitions of key terms in the law such as authorization and they spent a significant amount of time asking both lawyers about the meaning of the word so in one part of the statute quote. What is this statute talking about. When it speaks of information in the computer justice samuel alito asked finding in at one point. All information that somebody obtains on the web is in the computer in a sense. I have a feeling. That's not what congress was thinking about when adopted this law. I don't really understand the potential scope of the statute without having an idea about exactly what all those terms mean li added. The justices also sought more clarity about the consequences. That fisher argued would result from abroad. Reading of the faa alina. Ask fisher to explain how the would criminalize one of his example scenarios. Wait on dating website. Fisher responded that by receiving interested messages from potential romantic partners based on falsified. Wait the user would be obtaining information from a computer in violation of the websites terms of service and also thus these cf a similarly fisher told justice elena kagan checking instagram at work constituted obtaining words and pictures from ones instagram feed and if a company prohibited social media browsing on computers obtaining that information would also violate the cf a bike contravening the employers policy and quote

FAA Gorsuch Van Buren Supreme Court Aaron Swartz Justice Neal Gorsuch Us Government Justice Department Government Georgia MIT Aaron Samuel Alito Fisher Alina LI Congress Instagram
Retailers Change Up Black Friday Deals To Keep Shoppers Safe

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | Last month

Retailers Change Up Black Friday Deals To Keep Shoppers Safe

"Many businesses did not make it to this black friday. Maybe you've seen them shuttered in your neighborhood but those that have endured until now may be in position for a big holiday shopping season though. It definitely not safe to push your way into a crowded store just about anything can be delivered to your door if it's a gift. Hopefully that is done discreetly. Npr retail correspondent alina. Seljuk is covering the story for us. Good morning good morning. What do retailers expect big picture across the board. I'll surveys are suggesting. The majority of americans plan to shop in store or online this week or next and forecasts suggest. Were actually in for a record setting holiday shopping season just address. I always get this question about black. Friday is a dead and every year. I come here and if you like declared dead and then get a bunch of annoyed messages from people who love not just want to say. It's just no longer at that obsession with this one single day of the year. You may have heard these ads weeks ago this year walmart. Turn black friday into deals for days. Starting saturday november seven this year targeted black friday deals all november. Actually sales began as far back as tober in some cases so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping. And don't intend to stop okay so we should really think of it as black friday's or black friday sales holiday. This is mainly happening online. For safety reasons. I assume by far the vast majority do say they plan to shop online on their phone screens. Because the big thing that happened this year we got a lot of people becoming online converts for the first i and especially thinking things like grocery health and beauty products stuff that we used to have to see i will. Here's vivek pandya tracks online shopping at dobie digital insights about thirty one percent of consumers reporting that they rarely shopped online or had never shopped online before and covert pandemic was essentially a forcing function. And when you think about physical stores every year the international council of shopping centers does a shopper survey and this year even this group is reporting a big drop in the number of people who say they plan to physically go shopping but in that survey almost two thirds of respondents said they did plan to go shop at a physical store. It's a lot of people and stores are adjusting. You know they're requiring masks. They're counting customers again to limit crowds and they're drawing attention to the cleaning measures which like unglamorous thing stores usually like distract from. We'll now you've got you know sanitizers front and center however people shop. What are they shopping for. Classic stuff close. Get guard stores. Electron ix smart. Tv's home speakers that sort of thing for years. We watched this shift toward experiences rather than things this year. We're back to things you know until we can start jumping back into massages classes or whatnot and especially talking things for the home where we're spending all this time now. More holiday decorations to check out houses books and crafts to occupy time. My favorite hot for the cova time is apparently air. Fryers are big for all that comfort food. So many families are still struggling financially. We hear about that every day. They still seem to say they want to feel special. The wants to celebrate the national retail federation predicts on average. Shoppers are going to spend almost a thousand dollars gifts food decorations and other holiday things which is only a little bit less than last year when the economy looked extremely different leading. It's always a pleasure talking with you. thanks thank you.

Tober Vivek Pandya Dobie Digital Alina International Council NPR Walmart National Retail Federation
Senator Susan Collins wins reelection in Maine

Morning Edition

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Senator Susan Collins wins reelection in Maine

"President. Trump has received the majority of Election Day votes in Pennsylvania, but Joe Biden has dominated the Mayland votes. Alina Cell Yuk NPR NEWS PHILADELPHIA Republicans are maintaining their majority in the Senate mains. Susan Collins is among the latest GOP incumbents to win reelection. Collins won 1/5 term by defeating Democratic challengers Sara Gideon At present, Democrats have added at least two Senate seats ones in Colorado and Arizona, and Republicans have gained one in Alabama.

Mayland Alina Cell Donald Trump Joe Biden Susan Collins Pennsylvania Sara Gideon Senate Philadelphia GOP Collins Colorado Arizona Alabama
2020 Pennsylvania Election Results: Biden leads in Philadelphia mail-in votes

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

2020 Pennsylvania Election Results: Biden leads in Philadelphia mail-in votes

"They were not able to begin processing those ballots until election day. NPR's Alina Cell yuk reports that state elections officials have rejected the Trump campaign suffered toe halt the vote count there. The Trump campaign's legal focus here is particularly on ballots arriving after Election Day. State Supreme Court has allowed them to be counted as long as there are postmarked by election Day. But the Trump campaign wants to prevent late arriving ballots from being counted. State officials have rejected the idea of stopping the vote count. Here's Democratic governor Tom Wolfe. Let me be clear in Pennsylvania, every vote is going to count. I'm going to fight like hell to protect the vote of every Pennsylvania President Trump has received the majority of Election Day votes in Pennsylvania, but Joe Biden has dominated the mail in votes. Alina Cellucci NPR NEWS PHILADELPHIA Republicans still control the U. S. Senate, with a few races still undecided. Democrats

Alina Cell NPR State Supreme Court Pennsylvania President Trump Tom Wolfe Alina Cellucci Joe Biden U. S. Senate Philadelphia
Top 10 Haunted Crime Scenes

Extraterrestrial

06:14 min | 3 months ago

Top 10 Haunted Crime Scenes

"Starting off our list of haunted crime scenes is the Eden Brown estate on the Caribbean island of Nevis. There're couple versions of this story and they all take place before a wedding. Of course, they do essentially the groom and the best man they get into a fight they pull out their vessels and they kill each other. Oh but they're not the ghosts of the Brown. Estate that would be the bride who still roams the estate and a long white gown waiting for her wedding day. Of course, she is the. Are. They're always brides dressed in their wedding clothes just waiting for their wedding day at these places and it's always really sad because i. they're also always like crying or like they look very like shock they've always been jilted. Yeah. It's not fair. No I. Don't like while in eighteen, twenty, two, this bride Julia. Huggins was set to marry Walter Maynard, his best dude John Huggins was going to be the best man but all was not well of course, there wasn't everyone died. Wheeler Alina a fight was a bruin. So there's like multiple stories about what actually happened and since the story was largely spread by tourism, they all vary a little bit. I feel like the best things in the worst things are always spread by doors. One hundred percent we can account for a lot with tourism well, like I said, there's a few theories. The first is that the grew was having an affair and the best man found out that was his sister. So he was like I'm upset and then the groom was like you are Eliah I think that was it that was it, but there's also some mortgage bonds. Okay. The next one is that the best man like I said was the bride's brother and the groom discovered that they were hooking up with each other on the low, and obviously he went a little bananas about that Allah incest a lot incest. So S- big ill. Another theory we've got another one says that the bride's father now, that's the dad this time was tried for mistreating his sleeves and this was in the eighteen hundred. So you know that was real bad. That was a sharp left turn sharp left. The groom having an affair. Yeah. That's like the classic in the best man is being a good dude and killed them died hero. It's a pretty good wrong com movie actually I picked up I like that one while historians think the real story dates back to a historical rivalry between the maynard and the huggins families the plantation itself dates back to the Century and it was at that time a beautiful property decorated with international furnishings from Africa and China. But today it's in ruins. Really. Sad. But sad torres claim to hear whales of a crying bride enslaves. ooh, and Julia is sometimes spotted in her wedding gown only during the full moon I don't hate that this is in ruin. Now what's meant to be will be yeah don't go there. It's terrible place. Nine. At number nine this week is leap castle and love this one according to ancient legends. Leap Castle is built on an ancient Druid holy site. ooh while we don't know if the druids used the land for human sacrifice, we do know that once the castle was built it did witness hundreds of murders I feel like that's just like what castles do. Yeah. Any good castle worth. Its name seen offend learning the hundreds of murders. You can't be a castle. You know it's a qualification. The best part of this place is that it's named after a little earl leap off a nearby cliff by an ancient Irish abandoned chieftain. ooh. Yeah. He jumped as a sign of bravery to win clan leadership from his brother later, it was taken over by the bloody carols. I want to be friends with them because you definitely don't want to be their enemy. Yeah. You don't want to be an enemy of the bloody. Oh Carols No. Well, they were known for throwing Red Wedding s dinner parties and just straight up killing their guests like the saddest episode of Game Fern. So to picture that was all is affecting me R.I.P Robb stark. Talk. About number be over it. Well, this was way back in the fifteen hundreds. So the it is pretty game of thrones Ian. Yeah. So the carols, this is one of my favorite things they built an uber yet a what an yet. and. What would happen was victims would fall through a trap door into this. googly. It in the remains of one hundred fifty people were found during a nineteen twenties renovation. So I think we have three major ghosts that we want to chat about really quick. Hit me up. One of the ghosts is called the Red Lady. It's an carol hostage, the murdered her baby. Oh, I don't WanNa be a part of them anymore. This is when I got off the OH. Carol, Bandwagon. You're. Not. In. She's looking for her baby though was murdered. Oh, I know and then we have thaddeus. So Carol who is a priest killed buys brother in a power grab anybody named Thaddeus as okay in my book thought he is a great name does the last one that I found was called the murdered lady was she murdered? No. We. Think she was I wouldn't Wanna be called the murdered lady later in life she shows up and she's naked has all yeah. Has a red cloth over her face and she just screams twice at you and then leaves that would change you as a person I think like to which say I leave I leave the Milky Way Galaxy. If that happened to me I would walk like five hundred miles and then I'd walk five hundred more which I would be so far. That's terrifying to me. No. Thanks. So we don't love that will in the sixteen hundreds after all that crazy. Oh, Carol business it changed hands and it went to Jonathan Darby who fell in love with an old carol daughter. So now it was just all about love right romance. Well, he still haunts the castle right now people as looking for his loss golds, but I think that's pretty priority of him. The other reports of things happening are doorbells ring with no one their tools move around without being touched There's like sounds of furniture moving people screaming, and then a carpenter that was working on the property once just left and he was like I'm never coming back to work because he walked five hundred miles and then five hundred more leap castle everybody.

John Huggins Carol Leap Castle Julia Eden Brown Estate Caribbean Thaddeus Wheeler Alina Walter Maynard Africa Robb Stark Torres Jonathan Darby China Bandwagon
Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

SuperMamas

07:53 min | 3 months ago

Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

"Hi I'm probably next high embraced. The I'd were sisters, Fred Solders, wives, and business. And we're just falling three. We know. To be a better version of herself every day. All right and we're also. Welcomes. Sisterhood. Hi Emma what's up everybody? How are you? Do everybody I'm great. How are you? Yourself. Do I wanNA, introduce myself. Yes I do. Hi everybody. My name is Lena. I, am Bruce's sister. And I am a mom of three girls nine, six and three year old right now, and we're just trying to survive. who at you on the other side of the Mike. I am also your sister Duh. I am but he Lopez mother of two of a three month old and a fighter old little boy and my little girl who was just born three months ago. Just trying to be me being you know the best near can be embracing be. Husband. I had to have a high note shuttle the has. To the husband's Yeah I mean, we're just assist in women trying to be better rational results every day. If you're new to the show. Welcome to the Super Sisterhood, and if you are og longtime listener Sept- ladies, we love you. Also. Don't forget to follow us on our Social Media Instagram and twitter at underscore. So but Romance Facebook, Super Roma's podcasts, and on the Web Superman dot com, you can check out or previous episodes newsletter subscription newsletter all the articles that we have just check it out to romance dot COM If you WANNA, send us a note you can do it by sending us an email at hello at superman dot com or you can call us at four to four, three, two, six, three, seven, seven. End At the end of the show, we have our favorite favorite segment, the pick or tip of the week. So stay tuned for that. And my favorite segment mind theory subject to subject segment not subject my second subject to subject to name to. who do we have on the show this week? Today on the show this week we have two great very smart in a in a high achievers I would say On the today we have Chris over to is a president of the company called. Okay play. It's an APP that I started using that will come very much in handy these days of virtual learning. So again, we have Chris Hogan, who was President a dad on for your boy and Dr Colleen, Russo Johnson. PhD, and she is a chief scientists and Mama up two toddlers for for the okay company in the okay play APP, which is a little bit about Chris who is again the CO founder and President He is just a serial entrepreneur I mean like his bio I can go on and on and on. Angel investor he's invested in companies like beyond me and block renovation. When he is a member of terrorists next establishment list and graduated from Ucla with the history by just like a serial entrepreneur and Dr Combing Russo she is again hundred scientists in she is a de mental psychologist with expertise in children's media and technology who serves as an adjunct professor at Ryerson University in codger rector of Ryerson's children medialab She is a senior scholar for silly center for scholars and storytellers and the CO author bestselling Children's Book Dino Dana Dana Field Guide again she is like the. Best person to talk about what's happening right now with virtual learning and what did we talk about Alina? Love. This episode I love the APP. I think it will. It's first of all they launched this. This APP during the during a pandemic, which is in of itself. Amazing we talk about emotional learning. We talk also about how to choose right even a good app for your kids and what makes this APP different which is again, the emotion social emotional learning and. How these actually involves the parent lonely the children and how it translates from the APP in the device to outdoor play to more than play and I, love how they came up with the name any. To play with the kids. So we talk about that. We talk about perspective of screen time. What's good what's not good you know what what to do right now with the kids and how this APP has helped our families as well in many other families. So I'm excited for for this episode end for the APP. Awesome. So but before we get into that base, yeah, what's up with you? What's going on what's up with me? You know. With me like every day seems to be the same thing. I'm just trying to gain for routine with were in. You know just having a Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday schedule Northern, I actually took up a new wouldn't say my. was is that a hobby is. Added something we were routine which I really like he's in writing letters to his friends. Then he would aches and we're going to the post office like every other day I try not to do it every day, but he wants to go every day. here's a couple of letters and heap envelope and puts his postage stamp, and then just you know we go to the office in everything. That's pretty cool. That's kind of like the new thing we're doing here I bought him some stationary. We should be coming next week, which I'm so excited Abou-, he has going to have his own stationary. And the customized initials yes. It has his name I got I couldn't decide I couldn't decide on witch on which science. So I got him to design. I'm very site for people to receive a customer stationary and the baby. She's she's just living her best cuter every day Chubbier every day or she's those beautiful three months old like chummy legs and Chevy she eats them. As she started to mile a lot more and talk a lot more and. She's being like the Pistons such a great baby you know I can't really complain about her. She's awesome. Obviously still not sleep through the night actually migrated her bedroom I don't know if I share that already. Oh. Yes. She's been living. She's living in her bedroom for the past two weeks already. Like I actually moved into her bedroom before to turn three months. And she's been doing well, she's only waking up once usually runs for now. I, mean I'm just hoping that like continues

Chris Hogan Fred Solders Emma Super Sisterhood President Trump Facebook Twitter Lopez Ryerson University Bruce Mike Dino Dana Dana Dr Combing Russo Pistons Alina Abou Ryerson PHD
Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

Short Wave

12:37 min | 3 months ago

Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

"So, you just got back from the Gulf coast where you were covering Hurricane Laura. How was your trip? The, hurricane damage was really bad. You know a lot of people down there have lost their homes, which is hard to see. Yeah and just to remind everybody Laura was the one that hit the Texas Louisiana border in August. This storm is clearly roaring. You're reaching that critical moment here. This now joins an elite group. It's in the top ten, a small elite group of the most dangerous hurricanes to ever make landfall into the US residents along the Gulf coast are bracing for potential devastation, Hurricane Lara and that area is so flat. It is so full of petrochemical facilities to their these refineries, a lot of new natural gas infrastructure, their chemical plants that manufacture all sorts of things like plastics and solvents actually even the raw materials for p. p. e., a lot of them are manufactured. Rubber gloves and surgical masks. So so what happened when the hurricane of hit all of that a lot of them shut down and when petrochemical facilities shutdown they usually release a lot of pollution right stuff that can't safely sit in pipes. So it has to be released or burn and preliminary estimates just in Texas showed that more than four million extra pounds of pollution were released. That was actually before the storm even made landfall. But the reason I wanted to talk to you is because one chemical plant caught fire because of the storm that is a look at I ten, which has now been shut down as these plumes of smoke emerged about an hour ago. The governor now is confirming this as a chemical fire has made an emergency crews responded to the inferno at via lab in Lake Charles which manufacturers pull supplies. Okay. So we've we've talked about this on the show before it didn't chemical plant in Texas catch fire after another hurricane Hurricane Harvey. Ago Yes and we talked about it on this very podcast because that fire in Texas started this totally new kind of legal battle, a climate change criminal lawsuit, and I have to say so far there is no indication that this most recent fire will lead to similar litigation but with this really active hurricane season that we're having in the super hot water in the Gulf of Mexico hoping spawn these strong. Storms head right for America's petrochemical centers I thought it might be a good moment to revisit that story and the questions that raises. So this episode, we're going to hear that story. It's a story that asks this question can companies and the people who work for them be held responsible, even sent to prison for failing to adequately prepare for climate change, you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Becky, take us back to the beginning of this story. So it's a story that happened in twenty seventeen at a chemical plant near Houston Texas, and it's when this major hurricane struck. We are coming on the air for breaking news. This is Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Harvey barreling into the Texas coastline as a category four storm with one hundred and thirty mile an hour winds. It's yeah, I remember. Hervey was kind of unique because it made landfall and then it just kind of stopped and sat on top of Texas, just dumping and Dumping Rain. Some places got as much as sixty inches of rain. There was a lot of flooding obviously, our primary layer of protection was our power supply. When the storm hit we lost our primary power. You're hearing a guy who is a division president at one of those petrochemical companies that was overwhelmed by the flooding. His name is Richard. Rendered the company he helped run it's called Arkham. We brought in emergency generators to provide backup power. So what he's describing his in the aftermath of the storm, those generators were compromised. There's this intense effort to keep the power on at the Arkansas plant outside Houston. The plant is near a major highway. It's in a relatively residential area. So why were they fighting so hard to keep the power on basically because the plant was full of chemicals that have to be refrigerated Otherwise they catch fire. We do have that breaking news that we've been bringing you throughout the five o'clock hour this brand new explosion and a fire burning. As we speak the Arkham plant in Crosby, you can see that plume of black smoke billowing into the air. In fact, you can see it for miles and miles away. So they make organic peroxides which are. Volatile Chemicals, they're used to manufacture plastics and other stuff and organic rock sides are pretty hazardous because they can catch fire if they get warm right and they don't even need a spark, right. So organic peroxides contain both fuel and oxygen and when they become unstable, they heat up on their own and catch fire. Yeah. I can really hear that PhD coming through. So the Arima plant, it had a lot of refrigerated warehouses and buildings to keep these chemicals cold, and they also have a bunch of refrigerated trailers outside those warehouses. Okay. So talk me through it. What happened that resulted in the accident so harvey was stalled over the Houston area, just dumping rain for days and the refrigerated warehouses, the buildings they were flooding as the warehouses flooded. The employees were using forklifts to move containers of these chemicals from one refrigerated warehouse to another to try to keep them dry and cool, and the water just kept getting higher and higher and the electrical generators for the buildings started. Flood that's not good and then the forklift flooded. Okay. So would you do when you're forklift floods? So according to the US chemical, Safety Board investigation employees at the plant started carrying individual jugs of these highly flammable liquids in the dark my chest high water while it was still raining to get it to the refrigerated trailers we talked about because only the trailer still had power. Yeah. I read this report and it was terrifying like I can't imagine being one of those people still there as they're in like deep water trying to move these chemicals at one point, one of the trailer started to turn over. On their side. It was really like super scary. Yeah and you might be able to guess what happens next the trailers flooded they weren't refrigerated anymore the chemicals got warmer and warmer until they caught fire. So did people get hurt when the fire started in the plant? Well, the plant had been evacuated. So the employees were okay that we know of but there were some first responders who say they were injured while they were patrolling the area that had been evacuated specifically that there is and respiratory tracts were urinated by air contamination and there were some people who live nearby who also say they were injured. By the smoke and the ash from the fires. So we knew the chemicals themselves can be toxic was the smoke from them toxic as well. That's a good question. So when the chemicals burned, they actually just turned into carbon dioxide and water, but I talked to multiple organic chemists and they explained that the problem is actually the containers that were being burned a chemist at Bryn Mawr. College Name Michelle Francis explained it this way everything from the labels on things to whatever plastic or metal that the containers are made out of all that stuff is GonNa absorb other chemicals that didn't burn entirely. So the ashes nasty. The ashes nasty so that ash is made up of container junk and chemicals that didn't totally burn. That's the stuff that potentially could have harmed the first responders and the people close by and it's not something you ideally want in the air or water right so much. So that in two thousand, eighteen, the district attorney's Office for Harris County Texas announced criminal charges against the plant manager who was actually one of the people carrying those chemicals through the water. And Armas North American CEO, and later they also filed charges against a third person and executive at the company which was really surprising to a lot of people because in general, the criminal courts aren't used to punish companies in their employees for polluting the air and water especially when it happens during big storms and I went down to Houston interviewed the district attorney about it. Her name is Kim Og-. The. Charges are environmental. They are reckless emission of an air contaminant and endangerment of persons. Reckless emissions of an air contaminant feels like a bunch of words that be polluting lawyers like. Big Words. So why did she say she was filing these charges you mentioned that there were a lot of petrochemical plants around Houston that flooded and leak stuff during Hurricane Harvey is there something about these fires that was worse? Yeah I asked her that and one argument she made is that the fires happened because people at Arkham ignored the risk of flooding like they should have known that their plant could flood like that and prepared better. For example, the plant is in a flood plain and even though Harvey dumped more rain than any US storm on record the argument the county is making. Is that there were signs that flood risk was increasing before harvey because of Climate Change we've had new normal in Houston. We've had three five hundred year floods in just a short period of time, and it's true that flooding is getting more frequent and severe in. Houston as it is in many parts of the country and something climate models have been predicting for a long time that extreme rain will get more likely as earth hotter including rain from hurricanes. So in this case, the county is basically arguing that the company had a responsibility to recognize that flood risk was increasing and do. More to keep their chemicals from catching fire. So obviously, the company doesn't agree or they wouldn't be in the middle of a trial right now what is the company say? So after the indictments for announced, I interviewed two of the layers representing Komo and its employees. One of them is pretty well known in Houston been working for a really long time. His name is Rusty Harden Arkham did everything they were supposed to do here hardened says the company followed all the regulations it's required to follow. He seemed pretty galled that employees were facing criminal charges trying to find scapegoats and calling individuals felons. Are you kidding me this is outrageous. It's morally legally ethically wrong and the point he made is that if the current regulations for chemical companies in flood prone areas aren't enough. Then the regulations should be changed by legislatures not by courts and especially he argues by criminal courts sometimes bad things happen that there's no crime. There's no responsibility is not anyone's fault we need to look forward to. The future and make sure that we are prepared for these kinds of things if this is going to be the new norm in many think it is. Okay. So becky, like what is at stake in this trial if the county wins and the company loses will that change how we think about climate change in the law it could actually yeah, I talked to this Guy David Omen he's. A law professor at the University of Michigan, and one thing he said that I think is really interesting is that environmental laws and regulations are generally based on this underlying assumption that the future will look like the past today. Already, we expect companies to be prepared to handle what I might call ordinary rainfall. What climate change is going to do among other things is change our definition of what is ordinary rainfall. Another way to understand it in a legal context is that you can be held accountable and punished. If you don't prepare for something, you should have seen coming. It's the idea of foreseeability so. Like if you know that climate change is happening, does that mean it's foreseeable and you should prepare for it yet that's the big question exactly and how foreseeable extreme weather is hinges in part on how businesses inform themselves about the climate science that's available to them, right? Yeah. Like I talked to an environmental lawyer at the Conservation Law Foundation Alina Mehalle that foreseeability isn't just a question of did you personally know that this could happen but it's really what kind of maps were available to you. What kind of experts did you hire to inform yourself about this decision? What kind of modeling

Houston Hurricane Harvey Texas Arkham United States Harvey Hurricane Laura Hurricane Lara Becky Gulf Coast Volatile Chemicals Texas Louisiana Laura America Conservation Law Foundation
Belichick reaches milestone as Patriots top Raiders 36-20

Vegas Nation - Raiders Football

04:59 min | 4 months ago

Belichick reaches milestone as Patriots top Raiders 36-20

"Everyone is time for the bonus episode postgame recap for Vegas Nation podcast. I'm your host Heidi Fang and I'm joined with our readers writers, Ed Greenie, Adam. Hill we're going to break down what happened here in the Raiders Lost Thirty six to twenty against the New England Patriots here Gillette Stadium in Foxborough at an ir up in the press box Adam back in Vegas a from my vantage point it was. A lot of mistakes made by the raiders, which is something you can't do against the bill belichick coach team. So we're GONNA get all into that here but I I want to remind everybody that we are brought to you by Salmon Ash, indeed visa and also favor. So make sure to subscribe wherever you're listening and what was your first take on what you saw out in the field today with the raiders. You're right. They did everything you can't do and win on the road or anywhere turn the ball over three times. Once rent on. Didn't protect car when they were driving. Me fumbled the Fumble Alina Game Matter Games already overby fumbled the end zone. In the second half, they just wore down defensively I actually done the first thirty minutes be interested at him. I think thought the first thirty minutes they played. As good. A defense as they haven't a while let's be honest. Thirteen points here cam help them a lot. He wasn't any third, but they were down on the second Apple Sikhism Derek. Carr in the offense couldn't stand field. He gave up two hundred and fifty yards total rushing late Sony Michelle when expert in its players per talking, you know these of League so they were down and they just couldn't match. Match up. So a bad game they printed everything you can do and what on the road so Adam how much in fact that these running bags like just through the defense offered their game because I don't think they were looking to contain the likes of three different running backs in this one I think they prepared to contain Cam Newton? What was your thoughts on the running game? I think I was definitely a part of it and I think there was definitely adjustments made. By the Patriots coaching staff because as as ED put out for the first half of the, Patriots were able to run the ball somewhat. But I thought a it wasn't. There wasn't those explosive plays. There wasn't those big plays downfield and it was a kind of picking up some yards here. They're moving the ball effectively but not really gashing the raiders defense and then. They figured out something in the run game after halftime and I'll be interested to find out the later in the week. Interested to get the the all twenty two film comes out like Tuesday. Look a little what happened but I think just at first glance without really looking into what they were doing on the line maybe differently. They definitely started to go to some more cutback plays where they I thought really were able to take advantage of some over pursuit of the writer side in particular from Jonathan Abram, who you know, we know what he can do. In terms just flying around offensively and having people would kind of sending a message for that defense but at the same time. You can use that aggression against him and I think the Patriots kind of figure that out a little bit and it really hit him with a big plays on a place where he got into the gap, he was near the bulk area but just couldn't make up Adams exactly right and and they're going to have to here's the thing about a player John Neighbor might think they love is aggressiveness in his hitting all that he's got a swagger Jim and I. Hate to say this, but sometimes, you just have to you have to balance that it's hard to tell a guy like that. Don't play this way but Adams wait we should for resod against Christian McCaffrey, over pursues too much when you take the battling new pursue Sunny Michelle Christian McCaffrey, they're gonNA come back will go so Yeah. They just didn't play the run wellness second atoms right they adjusted and you have to give Michelle credit like I said when you go For, an average of thirteen yards of Kerry and I don't know if he's ever average per carry more than seven in a games and you also have saved in job I am. But they did they didn't play offensively were out of rhythm Waller. We'll talk about that I know atoms writing thoughts. Darren WELLM was non factor when you get a lot of good at the bill Belgium at he talked about. How good daring waller as well. Guess what he must have died because they ran every defense coverage double team run in stem and stopped him. So atom I know you you wrote about this mean, what did you hear the game to her? How they? You know bottle up there wall I thought it was a group effort I. think that's what of expected to hear from the Patriots Bill. Belichick obviously didn't go into detail about what he did. I think it was just a lot of deception what they were doing offensively disguising it and Bella check pointed out. Hey, it wasn't somebody covering him necessarily a lot of zone. We played a lot of you know bracket coverage a lot of. Men under there was a lot of different things. Defensively. On Waller but I think it was more just about the looks of they're giving up the line and never letting the raiders. No. Before the play what kind of coverage is GonNa be on Waller? Want Credit Anybody I. Think mccourty would be the one that you would like added. Say. Devin mccourty that Dinnie. Tremendous job on him but it was a little bit of everybody kind of in the mixer.

Raiders Patriots Bill Belichick Waller Adam Michelle Christian Mccaffrey New England Patriots Gillette Stadium Heidi Fang Foxborough Devin Mccourty Ed Greenie Cam Newton Hill Vegas Adams Carr Sony Apple Writer
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

Morning Edition

04:05 min | 4 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for 82 years, American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they could be paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people. But today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs that they call exploitative and discriminatory. NPR's Alina, sell your reports. Jerry Dagostino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do, like, go out to eat. Sometimes daughter more days go to events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode Island, doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes. Packaging ice packs, assembling boxes for jewelry. If I remember correctly, my first my first paycheck was only 12 box. I just question myself a cz. You know, I really don't want to keep doing that worked for my whole life. Dagostino now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than $12 total. But he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage, thanks to that carve out in the labor law. Centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities in a separate cluster there, pay is estimated to average $3.34 an hour. To calculate individual pay. The center's regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to an experienced non disabled worker half as fast half the pay Now the U. S Commission on Civil Rights says this programme and the law should be phased out. In short. The program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work. Catherine Lehman chairs the commission, she says. Instead of expanding opportunities, the program's limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with regular wages. I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated now over a decade's a federal assumption that people with disabilities Are less capable full employment than people without disabilities. A lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs, including how many people they employ. Estimates range from 100,000 to 4 times that Most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the program's a run by nonprofits. They get state and federal money to support these jobs. Many of them have government contracts. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who want the programs to remain an option, a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother, Linda Howe, from Wisconsin, testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November. We're parents with their son's best interest at heart. Any suggestion that we would allow him to be taken advantage of our discriminated against is an insult. Families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to let the program's B Some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they'd go, Lehman says that is why her agency is recommending a careful, gradual phaseout. Disability rights advocates have wanted such a phase out for years. They point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated thumb A new Lewis. We're now fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the Blind, testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing, And because of that misguided compassion, these individuals been significant part of their lives. Wasting away in that works out making money for our center but wasting away. And I I'm just sitting here really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative. Four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum. Several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed.

Jerry Dagostino Civil Rights Commission U. S Commission On Civil Right Catherine Lehman NPR Linda Howe Alina Rhode Island National Federation Of The Bli Lewis Wisconsin
U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:07 min | 4 months ago

U.S. Agency Urges End To Below-Minimum Wage For Workers With Disabilities

"So for eighty two years American labor law has had a carve out for some workers with disabilities they paid less than minimum wage. This was meant to encourage employment of more people today a top federal civil rights watchdog says the exemption should end because it's been trapping workers in job programs they call exploitative and discriminatory NPR's Lena Seljuk reports. Jerry. Douglas Dino had a job but couldn't afford a few things he wanted to do like go out to eat sometimes. Vase Goto events. He was working alongside other people with disabilities at a center in Rhode. Island. Doing what he calls bench work road tasks like fitting rings into heating tubes packaging ice packs assembling boxes for jewellery. If I remember correctly by I by first paycheck was only twelve bucks I just cautioned myself as you know. I really don't WanNa keep doing what my whole life Doug AC- now works at a supermarket where his paycheck is a lot more than twelve dollars total but he spent years in that center which made him below minimum wage. Thanks to that carve out in the labor law centers like that are often called sheltered workshops because they keep people with disabilities a separate cluster their pay is estimated to average three dollars and thirty four cents an hour to calculate individual pay. The centers regularly time their workers comparing how fast they do tasks to inexperienced non-disabled worker half as fast half the pay. Now, the US Commission on Civil Rights says this program and the law should be phased out in short the program doesn't work and it is designed in a way that it can't work Kathryn Lehman chairs the commission she says instead of expanding opportunities, the programs limit them don't really prepare people for work in the community jobs with rights wages I was. I was ashamed of the ways that we have operated. Now over a decades, a federal assumption that people with disabilities are less capable. Full employment than people without disabilities, a lot of data are missing about sub minimum wage programs including how many people they employ estimates range from one hundred, thousand to four times that most have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Commonly, the programs run by nonprofits, they get state and federal money to support these jobs many of them have government. And their most vocal supporters are some of the workers families who won the programs to remain an option a safe environment for relatives with disabilities. One mother Linda how from Wisconsin testified before the Civil Rights Commission in November we are parents with our son's best interest at heart. And you suggestion that we would allow him to be taken. Advantage of are discriminated against is an insult families like hers helped workshops flood the commission with a record number of comments asking to lead the programs be some described workers with quote severe disabilities worried about where they go Lehman says, that is why her agency is recommending a careful gradual phase out disability rights advocates have wanted such A. Phase. Out For years the point to success stories of people thriving outside of the systems that underestimated them, and you'll Lewis fights against sheltered workshops at the National Federation of the blind testified about his past work running one thinking he was doing the right thing and because misguided compassion these individuals spend significant part of their lives wasting away in that workshop making money for our center but wasting away. And I am sitting here. Really feeling sad about what I perpetuated because there is a better alternative four states have abolished sheltered workshops to support more jobs in the community. Seven states have moved to end wages below the minimum several federal bills trying to do so on a national level have so far failed. Alina. So you NPR, news Washington.

Civil Rights Commission Douglas Dino Kathryn Lehman NPR Doug Ac Lena Seljuk Jerry Rhode Linda Washington Wisconsin Lewis National Federation Of The
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:15 min | 4 months ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"We don't know how to deal an actor that does all these things at once as you said, that isn't functioning in the sort of our rational way if you will in which we tend to think about foreign policy actions and covert operations. and. What if Donald Trump were of a mind to respond appropriately to this? What would an appropriate American response look like I mean this is after all the attempted murder it's not like the scruple poisoning, right? It's not on the territory of an ally. Alexina Valmy is not somebody except in the sense that the United States has an interest in democratic reforms in general, he's not somebody. I mean, this really is the internal politics of Russian Federation you know should this be something that the US government responds to in a serious way on what would a serious response to it look like? Well. The quick answer is yes but I think it's not just about in the Bali. Pattern here that we've been talking about and it's not just a pattern of poisoning is a pattern of state-sponsored murder of opposition leaders, and at this point the numbers are you know I've lost count of how many journalists have died? How many opposition leaders have been killed? Or. Poisoned in this case and barely survived. It is a pattern of Rufus behavior that is very clearly being directed by the Kremlin and perhaps by Mr Putin himself and I will say that we've done nothing so far. It hasn't just been the trump administration although this administration hasn't put out a statement as a recording time an official statement condemning this from the white. House. The State Department has made a statement by the White House is not I think as an obvious first step just say something about it and call the Russians. Out on this but I think going further than that one thing that people have been talking about for very long time because his pattern has been there for a long time is that we can take pretty specific steps to undermine specific individuals that are in the criminal lead that we know are probably involved in this decision making process, and we do that with targeted sanctions that would perhaps a freeze their assets not allow them to have access to certain bank accounts property rights as Cetera. Almost every individual within the Kremlin elite has off shore bank accounts owns assets and property real estate in. The world. But in some very specific places like London, like the United. States. And likely elsewhere that we don't know about and so we have a lot that we can do to really make it pretty painful for these people and send a very clear message. But we haven't I think Germany here be interesting to see given merckel has said about, Nevada she made a very strong statement and this was unacceptable behavior. which we really haven't heard from before but. We haven't seen Germany pull out of this very lucrative for the Russian side Norstrom two pipeline has incredibly controversial that the United States this administration and the Obama Administration disapproved of, but we haven't seen the German government do anything about it. and. I. Think that comes from putting. The relationship with Russia. The price of gas perhaps on which Germany is dependent on Russian gas above you know morals and above ethics just certain extent. But was certainly there's a lot that we should do in that we can do. But for years we've let this behavior just go basically unpunished. You know one of the things that the president's defenders have said is that while trump you know makes nice verbally to Putin. In fact, the actions of the trump administration have been substantially tougher than its predecessors. Do you expect that US reaction will get tougher if Joe Biden is elected and inaugurated or is the stasis that we've seen on this on the sort of toleration that Putin has been shown a kind of more bipartisan feature of American policy than we sometimes acknowledged. I think it's very much the latter. I think that's really unfortunate meaning that we've seen. SO-CALLED RESETS with Russia from multiple administrations in the United States the Obama Administration called that reset. But obviously, the Bush administration raptured on eleven. Wanted to work with Russia overlooked a lot of bad behavior and it's it's a pattern that we've seen across both parties in the United States where there is this sort of acknowledgment or perhaps common understanding that. We have to work with Russia there around and we have to work with this particular regime I'm meeting Mr, Putin's Russia because they're not going anywhere and as the argument goes on top of that, you know the real problem and I've seen this emerge more and more in the policy debate, you know the real problem is not Russia because look they're a big player economically speaking the real problem is China and so we. Really. Need to do is bring the Russians into the fold to help us build a common front against China and I think this thinking is is deeply deeply mistake him because we've tried it at least three times a cross about twenty years and it's only produced bad outcomes obviously the worst or which has been the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the continued occupation of Crimea. So I'm not sure why we keep doing the same thing. When it obviously doesn't work. So my concern is that the election won't change that much although I certainly hope it will I think Joe Biden in the past when he was vp was actually quite good and very sober minded on what the Kremlin is in his work on Ukraine I. Think he did some very good things policy perspective when it came to Ukraine by the same time, the Obama Administration carried out the reset which then resulted. With the Russian saying no thanks to your reset we're. Going to. Invade Ukraine. So I. Think I've seen this kind of thinking emerge and it's a hotly debated issue. I am skeptical though. because. Of the pattern we've seen for the last twenty years in the United. States. Alina Polyakova. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. The law fair podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution and today it's produced in cooperation with the Centre for European Policy Analysis, our audio engineer. This episode is.

United States Mr Putin Russia Obama Administration Ukraine Donald Trump Germany Joe Biden Russian Federation Alexina Valmy murder Brookings Institution State Department Alina Polyakova Bali White House
Night Of The Living Dumb

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

04:25 min | 4 months ago

Night Of The Living Dumb

"I. When we last left out horrified heroes, they were in Egoyan New Japan in the year sixteen fifty, they were currently surrounded by Dr Steve's latest maniacal Mac and nation an acrimonious army of Ninja zombies while Dr. Steven Frigid Morbid Amusement nearby the blood-curdling Brigade Zombie staggers closer and closer to Dr Floyd Dr Grant and chips. What are we GONNA do Dr Floyd? And we have to make a pen according to my calculations. Thanks time every. minute. They are pretty slow moving not like those Sammy's in that one movie though zombies degrade I will not get into the slow versus fast moving Zombie debate here. Well, we have five minutes Oh we don't I want to get back and go trick or treating quick back to the ship. Let's jump ahead four minutes and thirty seconds, and we'll get this over with. NOBODY CHIPS BECK ownership in seconds. Our heroes are back aboard their time and space ship and they wanted again make a jump to Eagle Alina, Japan just four minutes and thirty seconds later. Once they reappear, they run down the ship's ran back to the same exact spots they were in moments which are now within arm's reach of the Ninjas on. See we saved ourselves sometimes. Making. John. Probably would have been a good idea. I TAC doctor. Mr. I'm not Dr Floyd this is just my halloween costume he's Dr Flowing. Heat. I just wanted them precise Ninjas on. What are we going to do? The only thing we can do in this situation Dr Grant? House our heroes stoically screen self-defense the lead Ninja, Zombie, Prius back to deliver a crippling coffee trump to Dhaka floor. When his hand makes contact with Dr Floyd shoulder there's a creaking sound and zombies on right off onto the drought. Not Degrade chips I know what to do now to defeat them what's that stench do? Trust me standstill our heroes Stan perfectly Steve. As they do zombies own back to begin their. As they attack however owns on their coats break east on's invades flying everywhere and you moments our views are still standing studio in a pile of dust and old Ninja rooms standing nearby shopped at what they witnessed is Dr Steven Bridget. My beautiful. Army of Ninja zombies go guess you up Lloyd what of these days I will succeed. Whatever US J. DR Steve? Come along? Let's get out of here. Should we go after them let them run. We need to get home and do some trick or treating or Hughes. Soon back in Dr Floyd's laboratory all set to go out and do the trick or treating last night's check candy bags. Looks like we're all set where's your costume Dr Flowing e-trade here help me put it on. Okay. Hang on our. Watch. My ears your arms through down. There we go. Okay. What do you think? I'm figure. Where did you get a sock? That big Dr Floyd? You know the basketball player Nate Thurman Healed me a favor. So you're wearing one of big nate's socks. Would Wash did I? That is disgusting. Come on let's just go no seriously I washed it heroes lockup the lab and head out into Saddle River city to go trick or treating where with their adventures take Dr Floyd in his cool next what evil plans could Dr Steve The cooking up in the dark of night and just what candies Dr Floyd hooping to his trick or treat bag this

Dr Floyd Dr Grant Dr Flowing Dr Floyd Dr Steve Dr Steven Bridget J. Dr Steve Dr Steve The Egoyan New Japan Army Nate Thurman Dr. Steven Frigid Basketball Eagle Alina Dhaka Saddle River Stan John Hughes
What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

Geeks Under the Influence

02:32 min | 4 months ago

What's new for TV, Movies And Video Games This Week

"Hello everyone and welcome. It is the Gui recap. It's a recap of all the things that are going to have the week of September seventeen, twenty, twenty before it happens. My name is Bruce and let's get started with the Gui pick of the week. I'M GONNA go with Superman Man of tomorrow comes out on DVD and Blu Ray this week This is yet another year one slash origin story of the man of steel like we really need. One of those does anybody not know how Superman got his powers and who he is and Blah Blah Blah seriously. Are Right for TV pages on Monday ABC has the bachelor's greatest seasons ever finale NBC has the Premiere of American Ninja Warrior and Nat go has the premiere of life below zero for Tuesday ABC has a finale of what would you do? For Wednesday CBS as forty eight hours suspicion that's a premier. For Thursday ABC has the finale of Holy Moly and NBC has the NFL Twenty Twenty season begins with the Houston Texas taking on the Kansas City chiefs. Thankfully, some amount of normalcy is coming back. We've got football. Art for Friday, paramount network has built tour MMA live Saturday. CBS as the premiere of forty eight hours and. Has. The premiere of birds of prey and Sunday CW has the finale of fridge wars. For movies coming out this week you have the broken heart gallery This is the film about a young woman living in New York. City, who after being dumped decides to start a gallery where people can leave trinkets from pass relationships or for the items of love has left behind Oh whatever for DVD's like I said, you've got Superman man of tomorrow and first cow. For On Line Services Net flicks you have so much love to give get organized with home edit season one la- Alina shadow of narcos season one, the social dilemma. Julie and the phantoms season one, duchess season one and family business season to Hulu you have the premiere of woke season one for video games you have kingdoms of Millar re reckoning for the PS four, xbox one and P C.

ABC Kansas City Chiefs CBS NBC Bruce Paramount Network Hulu New York Julie NFL Houston Texas Football
A Confusing Back-To-School Season May Lead To Blockbuster Spending

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 5 months ago

A Confusing Back-To-School Season May Lead To Blockbuster Spending

"Back to school shopping is different this year what's the point of a new backpack when the walk to school is shuffled from the kitchen table to a desk in the bedroom? Though retailers are in a tailspin from the pandemic shutdowns. This year's uncertainty could bring them some good news. NPR's Alina Seljuk reports normally Lydia Rodriguez would have spent hundreds of dollars to get her daughter ready for the first day of class that's on her school uniform alone, and this year she's wearing top for zoom meetings. So she's just wearing last year's at barely fit but I don't feel like investing in other three hundred dollars on. Uniforms until she actually physically starts her daughter like many other students around the country started sixth grade without actually leaving their home in Tampa. So Rodriguez her spending felt really minimum but it's not like she could skip it altogether I did buy school supplies. You know like the notebooks and the folders, the pens and pencils binders, and all that, and here's a curious thing. The retail world is actually hoping for strong back to school spending the. Retail Trade Group, even predict record highs potentially topping a hundred billion dollars for school and college. That's because parents like Rodriguez might end up having to stock up for multiple scenarios. In case students learn person virtually were a bit of both which also means they're buying more big ticket items or seeing more families purchasing Electronics Katherine Cullen Senior Director The national retail. Federation. They've been tracking big changes to what's in demand backpacks in new shoes not. So much instead enter comfy home clothes and cleaning supplies and especially pricey electronics. This year's big sellers, laptops, tablets speakers, but they're also buying things that you might not expect maxium desks, lamps, headphones. So a lot of new items that were traditionally on the school shopping list, and so retail marketers had to get creative to keep people shopping in a year of mass layoffs and furloughs Amazon Walmart old navy embraced the oddity and disarray pandemic schooling. You've got your back school year whatever that. macy's did a montage of kids at home learning to build a robot or tend to garden even ace hardware got in on the pitch now that students have to bring masks and disinfectants to school why not stuck up for back to school at a home improvement store the biggest priority for this year was setting up their whole workspace Geisha. Washington did much of her spending back in the spring as both she and her daughter adjusted to working from their home in Chicago Washington set up her high school junior with A. Mounted Computer Monitor and a good sound system later installing new task lighting which morphed into her wanting task lighting plus t light patio hanging from the ceiling random led lighting. So she's also taken this opportunity to you know redecorate both Washington Androgynous Gez. Would have to buy more supplies if or when their children actually return to the classroom by one estimate families like there's still have about sixty percent of their back to school shopping left to do the question is when or how much of it will actually happen

Lydia Rodriguez Washington Retail Trade Group Alina Seljuk Katherine Cullen Tampa NPR Walmart Senior Director
Midsummer Shopping In Recovery Mode: July Retail Sales Rise 1.2%

The Takeaway

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Midsummer Shopping In Recovery Mode: July Retail Sales Rise 1.2%

"Midsummer Shopping is in recovery mode. The Commerce Department says retail sales rose 1.2% in July. NPR's Alina Selya HQ reports. It's the second month in a row. That sale stayed above pre pandemic levels. Retailers that much hope for a big midsummer shopping spurt and July proved to be somewhat lackluster. The people did cautiously go out to shop. Indeed, they bought Elektronik CE. Just entertained at home and appliances for Homer models. The shop for clothes again got into cars for trips, stopping at gas stations and finally slowed their run on exercise an outdoor equipment like kayaks and dumbbells. Big question is what happens next. Some states and cities air still seeing record spikes and Corona virus cases re imposing restrictions on public gatherings. Tens of millions remain jobless and the boosted unemployment checks that got many people outspending have now

Commerce Department Alina Selya NPR
"alina" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"alina" Discussed on KCRW

"To reunite with their families. But it took a while for fiddling had to take it all in. The other day. I was talking to her. And I said, Why did you not go with us right away? Because I didn't even know you. And why would fate do in a trust merely who she had just met two months ago. Over the family that she had worked for for nearly 70 years. Fed. Alina was born in later in the Philippines, an island near the center of the country. Then she moved to the capital to live with her niece, and not long afterwards, she was hired by a middle class family to be there, live in housekeeper in Manila. The Cox family. Sometime in the seventies or eighties, Adelina says. It was 1974 reports say, 1980 Benedicta Cox, who the family called Benjy for short Got fed Elina to the US to take care of her sister. Adelina would have been in her late thirties or early forties. Now you know a No. Go on dung Dina When she brought me to the US, she told me Do not worry. They are nice people. They will treat you like family community. That was a lie, but that the greater in the ballads Did you know anyone else in the U. S. When you came, mom? I did not know anyone in the U. S on when they brought me. They told me I would be taking care of just one person. Then just sister. Trust.

Adelina Cox family Alina US Benedicta Cox Manila Philippines Elina
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:46 min | 10 months ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Kate Clinic and Alina Polyakova on pandemics platform governance and geopolitics. So this week where Jane something a little different turning around and putting a lien key hosting in the guest chair are thinking was basically. There's so much going on right now with coded nineteen how that's shaking up the information space platform governance even geopolitics. That it would be really great to just kind of sit down and get everyone's thoughts so Lena I wanted to start off with you. You were something really interesting on twitter the other day basically saying that were in what you call the vulnerable moment that we're we're in a space where everyone's concerned about public health but we should also be prepared for a pummeling of political warfare attacks. Cyber-attacks data leaks disinformation campaigns. So tell me more about what you mean by that. What makes us vulnerable right now? Thanks Quinta I mean. We've always been vulnerable. I would say to what someone the Defense National Security Sector call the below threshold space right. These sort of grey zone operations that we hear on the arbiters of truth often referred to as information campaigns. There's a whole slew of these kinds of operations that you know state actors especially but not just state actors like launch during moments of chaos in crisis in force. We are ANA president a crisis moment right now at a global scale and this of course presents the perfect fertile a soil for countries across Asia in China to try to undermine cohesion and integrity of the Democratic space. And that's basically exactly what we've been seeing on when it comes to at least the information operations phase but also we've seen some reporting including from the United States government on cyber attacks against our government health agencies as well which when I posted that tweet it was in response to news That there had been a cyber breach of health data on the cyber attack. So that's what I meant by that and I think we're seeing some really new tactics Being deployed on serve me by the Chinese Enemy New in terms of actually are Banou or the Chinese When it comes to info ops now is while so so k. From your perspective as someone who studies platform governance? What's your perspective on? That is now a particularly vulnerable time for the online information space and how our platforms responding. Yeah I agree with Leeann. This has been this is always the puffer always motorable. If anything I think that to a certain extent maybe there's something to be said for the fact that people are recognizing the platforms or recognizing how important they are in this moment and the the space that they feel for people to stay connected that there is more emphasis than ever on kind of making sure that they're going to get this right one of the things that. I think we are going to see is definitely concerted misinformation campaign specifically as we head into elect the election season. And we been witness and I had Alex. Stamos and neat personally both Stanford Neat is at Stanford Law School and Alex runs the Stanford Internet Observatory and does a ton of great research on missing disinformation. He's been on the show before with me and Evelyn and I loved that he was dark but I loved it. He put it this way. Alex said something to the effect of the. Us elections are The World Cup of missing disinformation so basically this idea that there is going to be a of all of the the the elections all of the things to mess with the. Us elections are definitely Highest on the list so that being said right now we're having a really weird moment for content moderation by that I mean that the platforms have mostly had to send home their armies of human content moderators because they can't work at call centers. They typically work into review information And so they've sent home Most of the people except for like kind of a skeleton crew that looks at specific Three specific areas of self harm on terrorism and Cova nineteen related a content flagged and everything else is basically big being automated with review or not being reviewed at all. And it's just it's a very. It's a very crazy time in terms of whether or not they're going to you know this is a giant Beta test for them to test. How great their automated systems are and if people really notice a difference and so I think that the concern around people who are concerned about free speech and missing disinformation as that. This experiment possibly goes well for the platforms and there is no huge difference in quality or people's unhappiness with with what's going on and they end up never returning to kind of meaningful human review that we've been kind of people who are involved in this stuff have been clamoring for for years. So let's dig into the specific kinds of disinformation and responses. That we've been seeing Alina you've been holding these great events at your think tank. Cpa about Russia's role in all this and how Russia has responded and the role that Disinformation plays in that response. So can you just tell us a little bit about that? Sure but if I could I do want to pick up on something that K- just said about how the platforms have been responding and I think if there is a silver lining in the current crisis. Is that all of the efforts that the platforms were putting in gearing up ahead of the US Twenty twenty elections are to ensure that we don't have another twenty sixteen nightmare scenario when it comes to the information space And some of the research that keep reference that Alex is doing Stanford on the others like Gaba. Nemo who we haven't podcast is doing now graphics and has been this real growth of researchers looking to expose CIB as it's now called Coordinated Authentic behavior impersonation accounts all of that kind of stuff. And that's become I think quite valuable relationship between the platforms and these research groups that function to alert each other when they are picking up these kinds of activities online. So I think we're seeing in to a large extent in this crisis the work that the platforms of Putin and the research has has advanced so far over the last forty years or so. That's been a really positive thing to see And I also think in terms of how platforms are seemingly cooperating and coordinating with governments. That I think that also has moved onto a new phase now that has been much more cooperative than we initially saw in twenty sixteen. I think it's always useful to compare where we are today than when we were During the two thousand sixteen nightmare scenario. I think we're in a much better place but I think the bigger issue that I am seeing now is ghost. Your Russia question is that as the companies have gone better on the CIP fron They still don't really know how to deal with overt disinformation and propaganda. And how to really understand the difference between the two so you for example. When you have an official Chinese source on official Russian source or unknown say Russian state-sponsored media entity Putting out not false information but conspiracy theories for example about the origin of the virus. Bad are just out there that domestic citizens at home are also sharing retweeting going on facebook to look for these kinds of conspiracy theories. They really haven't figured out how to deal with these. You know over versus Covert operations in wishing much more of that. Now I think because the Russian machine has certainly always done that and I think what's been new In the cogan moment is that we've seen the Chinese move much more aggressive way into the similar space kind of launching this barrage of either conspiracy theories or misleading information from known Chinese outlet. That often buttressed by Chinese officials. And it's it's difficult space that the platforms find themselves in high. What do you do with that? Do you label them. Do you not give access to. Let's say Chinese officials to their platforms at all because these platforms are blocked in China. But I think these are all Kinda policy questions that coming up now. I'm in a way that we haven't seen before. I think a lot of that has to do with the fact that the Chinese have gotten much more into the game now of Using the Russian playbook to to obfuscate the truth and confuse reality cages. You WanNa follow up on that. It's not related to where Only ended up going but she said there's one thing that just kind of reminded me generally and she said about the nightmare scenario. It's not the nightmare area. We saw are coming out of two thousand sixteen which was something that as I think Quinta. We talked earlier today. That like how are you and I was like well you know. I exhausted at nine thirty and went to bed and then woke up at two. Am and like stared at my ceiling having like horrible visions of the future and I was like God. Twenty twenty is the worst year. I can't wait for twenty twenty to be over and then I'm like I have said that for four years and I don't even think it's just related I don't even think that it's just related to the presidency. It just penn like I am kind of like wondering like which at one level can we go? What will be? I don't want to even ask. I shouldn't ask but like what the next level is going to be at which things just go completely haywire. It just it's been it's been a hall that's on the next level of hell. Where are we really just working through the rings right now? I feel income. Yeah I mean we're we're finding out. How many ways things can go wrong? Right as we're going to set you know maybe the silver lining is we we get this kind of road test of platforms and of the relationships between governments and platforms before the election. And right I mean the silver lining here as like personally pointed out on her show yesterday. Replacing he's completely rate is like well. Holy cow at least this is happening. We have all we need is more time at all. We need is more time. At least this is happening in the primaries and not happening in not happening general. At least we have time to Beta test. All of the different ways for this to go wrong and to figure out like all of the and to debate all of the issues and come to conclusions. I do think that that's actually a silver lining. This would be worse for democracy. Gets pretty battery now. But it would be way worse at this was happening in August or September For sure Olina. You mentioned that China is kind of using Russia's playbook in a sense they're they're taking similar tactics in the kinds of information they're putting out there like just walk us through what specifically Both China and Russia have been doing and then K. Altern to you and ask sort of how the platforms have been responding to that. Yeah well I think it's in some ways Too early to tell. One of the lessons learned Yet because we're still in the middle of this but I think certainly the Russian seven been doing anything particularly new. I mean they've had this Playbook for a while and they just keep hammering at it and that involves a combination of their externally facing state sponsored media the operates multiple languages like artiste with Nick in various spin offs of that the tries to target younger generations..

Russia Alex China Us Alina Polyakova twitter Twenty twenty Lena Jane Banou Kate Clinic Asia Stanford Law School facebook Defense National Security Sect Leeann US Twenty Stanford Internet Observatory Cova
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

10:22 min | 10 months ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"We're not gonNA talk to you on this do Xyz and they didn't actually work. During the Obama Years We saw greater and greater moves towards quote unquote illiberal democracy in these countries. And I think this administration came in with idea okay. Well that didn't work okay. I'm not saying was that rational necessarily but that didn't work so kilmeade continued to engage. Because if we don't you know the fear is that these countries will drift further and further away and we can only have influence if we engage all right. So with that as premise. What is the democracy playbook for International Actors So we hear also looked at a distinct set of international actors the United States being one of them and I think Alina makes a very good point that the United States is not just a unified actor that is represented by the president and an administration. This also involves the US. Congress which I think in recent years has been more vocal on looking at democratic backsliding in central Europe and in Turkey holding hearings on these types of issues is an important way to draw attention to them meet other. Us actors such is a US foundations. Ngos have been good at calling out illiberal tactics. When they're seeing calling out you know infringements on the rule of law and independent judiciaries and so at least on the US front. We put forward a range of strategies and tactics at look not just at rhetoric from the administration but also on the congressional and private-sector. Ngo Foundation level for helping to bolster the actions of the domestic actors on the ground as Alina mentioned a lot of the countries that we focus on are also Members of the European Union. We also focus on how the European Union can pursue and strengthen institutional channels for pushing back undemocratic A retrenchment within their own ranks This is a tricky issue. Because when European Union was expanding in the nineteen ninety s and the early two thousands. There were tools that the European Union had at their disposal to help straight in free institutions within states that wanted to become members of the European Union steps that ascension states had to take on strengthening the rule of law strengthening accountable institutions ensuring. That there is a viable political opposition and then once a member of the European Union this type of leverage kind of disappeared and so we looked at other types of tools that the EU could pursue and just mentioned one for now but the EU has structural funds and disposal that countries such as Poland and Hungary are recipients of and not just pulling agree but other member states and we think you should be adopting some sort of rule of law conditionality that insurers how these states are able to receive structural funds again not just for newer states in central and eastern Europe. But also for long tenured member states and Western Europe. There should be a sort of rule of law index whereby states that score higher on the index greater access to funds and that is something that the U I don't think uses enough at its disposal right now. So that is the second actor. European Union institutional channels the third actor which is not necessarily on the front lines of pushing back democratic retrenchment. But it's important unless is NATO in NATO is first and foremost military organization but it is also an organization that has within its founding charter a commitment to strengthening institutions across its member states and within NATO most importantly Poland Hungary and Turkey. First and foremost we've seen a backsliding of democratic institutions that is actually hurting the alliance's core mission of cohesion and trust and interoperability. To address shared security challenges. And so this is a platform where we outline a few ideas on how NATO can actually try to make it and help its member. States uphold the institutions. That are a part of its charter. And a part of being part of this military organization. I think to put it simply. You need carrots and sticks right. You can't just have all sticks all carrots and what that means in reality. Is that disagree? Quick more current example countries like Poland especially are incredibly key allies for the United States when it comes to determining Russia for example And Poland has been. I think a an incredibly vocal partner when it comes to shifting the conversation within the EU which As we've seen in some recent moves especially from France Some countries there are sort of wobbly on the Russia. Question and Poland does not And so as a security partner their key for the United States as well if one of our missions as ministration has put around US national security strategy is to out compete Russia in this Arab geopolitical competition. And so we have to remember that there are a lot of commonalities and shared goals. That we still have with these countries. Another example of that is an hallway. Obviously the United States is really keen to get a European allies to not allow hallway into the into the Five G. infrastructure. We have the UK now publicly saying that they will work with hallway. Poland on the other hand Has recently said that they will have very strict restrictions and Romania has done the same and still has Estonia so I think there again is just a much more complex said relationships that we have with these places and so we need to continue to engage in these core areas of national security. But it doesn't mean that we. We shouldn't absolutely should continue to point out when we see problems in rule of law and corruption and other issues related to democratic decline. So we need to wrap up. We've gotten pretty nitty gritty in a bunch of areas. But I want to zoom out at the end of the day. Alina is the democracy playbook out playing the illiberal tool kit or you know how deep is is the crisis of European democracy right. Now let me answer that sorta through the back door a little bit. I think the big question to my mind that I don't think we ever really got to the bottom of both of these. Reports is whether we're really in a crisis of democracy of whether we're in a crisis liberalism and we often put these things together and we kinda just say liberal. Democracy is the style of governance that allows the most freedom for citizens individuals. But I think what we're seeing in reality the source splintering of these two concepts where you can have democratically elected leaders. Who are not necessarily going to promote gordon quote liberal values with a small l and that applies to economic policy applies to cultural policy and applies to political tactics. As well and I think to my mind we have to understand what we're trying to fight here in. Our decision was to really focus and democratic institutions. Yeah those checks and Balances Judicial Independence Free Media Free Fair election system. Opposition political movements and parties are in place. Because those are things that we can actually kinda see and measure but I think the big question to me is you know what is the e U as the traffic alliance if those liberal ideas are starting to fray away from consensus and certainly. I think it is true that we do not have consensus on whether this isn't a lines base to liberal democratic ideas. I think we still have consensus that some lines based in democratic values but I think that is still the big question to my mind. Tori final thoughts. When the democracy playbook confronts the illiberal toolkit who prevails we talked about a lot of worrying and negative trends on the podcast today but I would like to end on an optimistic note because I do think despite the backsliding that we're seeing in Europe and the even the troubling trends that we're seeing in the United States there is hope to be had because something that I think we miss. These conversations is that democracy is not some sort of end state to be achieved. I think this is what we missed. In the heyday of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union democracy looked like an end state and something that we would kind of March inevitably towards in this LINEAR LINE. And it's not true democratic momentum across centuries waxes and wanes and it's a process. It's a process that has to be constantly reinvigorated and revitalized. And I think you know. Pro Democracy actors. Small Democracy actors had taken their eye off the ball Institutions feel out of touch from people who elect officials to serve them. Trust is declining. But these are solvable problems and I think that kind of torture that spirit of nineteen eighty nine just needs to be passed down to the next generation to be picked up Younger people today are participating in political systems in different ways they're looking for new platforms and new ideas and we're at a transition but it's certainly not preordained to be a negative slide toward liberalism or authoritarianism but we need to. We need to put our back onto ball. The report is the democracy playbook preventing and reversing democratic backsliding. It is by norm. Eisen Andrew CA neely Susan Kirk and our guests today Tori Taussig Andolina Polyakova. Thank you both so much for joining us. Thank you thank you that the l'affaire podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution.

United States European Union Poland Alina Europe NATO Obama Turkey Hungary Congress Brookings Institution Russia Soviet Union Western Europe UK president Tori Taussig Andolina Polyakov Ngo Foundation Berlin Wall
"alina" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"alina" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"I mean this should be of high priority to certain european countries to the united states as well it took the united states longtime to publish <hes> our strategy and it's mostly still in the military space on not in the space of ethics and norms and rules goals but you know we are falling behind in that so unless democracies are able to get a grip meaning that we need to come to the table income up with a common set of norms and practices around the specific issue around took us around <hes> technological exports especially the end imports in the u._s. Now <hes> very aggressively trying to push back against the use of technology for example the many european already pretty adopt this technology and so this is gonna come at a great cost for them to roll that back but i think we have been asleep at the wheel for a very long long time and now going to much much harder to roll back the incursions something to throw a train regimes made into our democracies through a look like legitimate ah technology sales but we have to keep in mind that technology sales from authoritarian dictatorial regimes always come with strings attached so in that vein you know if we're trying to think about weaknesses in the authoritarian strategy i was intrigued by your example of telegram program and how the russian authorities were not able to successfully manage that <hes> and i'm wondering if there are any lessons from that either about approaches to the private sector her ways that companies can play a role that might be applicable outside russia's borders but do you think that you could briefly describe what happened with telegram and then if you think there's anything to be learn from that. This is a really fascinating example. I'm glad i'm glad you brought it up. So for listeners there may not be aware telegram one of these <hes> private messaging apps. That's a highly encrypted so similar to signal or <hes> or what's up <hes> and it was <hes> designed and made by a russian entrepreneur <hes> and normal government. I'm a democratic government that values entrepreneurship. This should be lauded as a great achievement. You know that you have a successful tech company. This used by lots of people around the world of course in the russian context. This is seen as a threat to the regime because it allows people to communicate and set up a channels or groups groups <hes> just to shan formation. That's not official or control information and when the russian intelligence services the f. b. <hes> <hes> tried to enforce a russian law that actually forces all companies that have operations within russia to allow access to there and corrupted channel so they had to basically provide the encryption keys so bad the russian f._s._b. Services will be able to monitor and track communications telegram graham obviously don't want to do that. It will lose all legitimacy people calling nine use it anymore so for them. This was an existential question and they fought it tooth and nail l. meaning that they refused to do this and they found various work arounds to try to route their data in various other ways with the russian government did was was a complete embarrassment. They responded by trying to shut down millions of i._p. Addresses and that were not related telegram below relate to other cloud services like an amazon amazon <hes> other <hes> large <hes> <unk> data holding companies and the end of actually screwing over there on banking <unk> sector for example some people's on banking broke down people can get an amazon. They couldn't do that online shopping. <hes> you know it was a huge effects across crossed the economy and it was a huge embarrassment to the government. I think that clearly signals is that in countries like russia that have not kept up with imposing these repressive rules and practices as the internet was developing as these new technologies. We're developing now now. They're also not well prepared to bring an all to put all back in the box right and so this fight would telegram. I think was really instructive because i think it exposed imposed some of the uncoordinated <hes> kind of ad hoc bajd incompetence of the regime eamon again. This is why i started the conversation. If you look at what's happening russia domestically you've quickly see that the government is not ten feet tall because they're naming capable of dealing with a relatively small company buddy would that tells us is then countries that are quite controlled authoritarian question. There is still space for entrepreneurial companies especially for oh. The tax sector to use its own lovers is only leverage against the government against these repressive norms as a way to expose will. They're capable not incapable of doing <hes>. I think other companies <hes> a lot of western companies have been complicit in this and they've signed up to these repressive rules. Dave conformed to the russian. Government's demands the installed these so-called black boxes allow the f._b._i. To monitor activities from their servers they sign up for the same with china china's a huge market so we need to be much from aware of our own western tech companies are complicit in facilitating beating the growing digital authoritarian regime in russia and china and i think implicit in your responses that <hes> we have largely largely perceived this degree of integration between authoritarian regimes and democracies as working well according to our revamped view now in the democracies is working against as the democracies but to some extent if there were some realize ation at this and if companies decided to think collectively about how to work against this there is a degree of leverage to be had from that integration absolutely <hes> you know the entire world is increasingly more connected tune in digital space and it's not governments that control that space for the most part it is private companies and as a result <hes> because individuals want the new phones. They win the new apps. They want google facebook and whatever else there's a lot that these companies can shouldn't be doing. I think that is in line with democratic values and principles and for too long <hes> we've let these big firms off the hook because i think think we in the united states have been too afraid <hes> to mandate to legislate regulatory practices to force these companies to come to terms with the fact back that they're not just <hes> being used for good. They are being used for evil as well. I mean we have to be very clear about the morals and principles of democratic societies because these are the muslim principles are deeply under threat and the private sector has a huge role to play in this and have a great deal leverage. I would argue more than many governments and they need to start stepping up. I think you've touched on an issue that so centrally in which is on the one hand in the norm setting realm the governments in beijing and moscow riyadh and elsewhere. They're very purposeful this full about what they'd like to see of all in the online space in terms of <hes> the way it's thought of in terms of his ideas such as internet sovereignty whereas the democracies for a host of reasons some of them quite understandable. They don't have the same unitary <hes> approach to these things haven't quite figured out how to defend their interests when it comes to things as basic as norms of a freedom of expression and i think what we've seen over the last couple of decades cades is a a slow erosion of that because the <hes> less free countries have been more <hes> mindful and purposeful and what they're trying to achieve and so if you were to identify <hes> one or two things that would be most useful to set the wheels in motion in doc in the democracies in a more practical way to start a more meaningful defense of these sorts of standards and values what comes to mind well. You know one thing that <hes> i discussing another paper <hes> with a colleague ambassador daniel freed call democratic defense against this information. Just bring a plug out there. <hes> is this notion that first and foremost democracies and we can start with europe in the united states but of course it should be expanded to low bowl. We'll <hes> democratic countries. <hes> need to come to the table and come up with again starting with a set of norms and principles and it shouldn't just be governments involved in this because this is not a problem. It's going to be solved just by policy loan. <hes> it may sound cliche but this is a whole of society question shen and what that means is that you have to bring the social media and tech companies to the table. You have to have civil society at the table exactly because <hes> will you mentioned chris that democracies don't work top down way thus cod authoritarians democracies work best from bottom of the optimize were slower but the often also means that we're in the long-term more resilient and so we need to start thinking about it in this whole of society <hes> kind of mentality and one thing that we propose in the paper i mention is at least in the information space we can start there because most people have an everyday experienced with that through their social media the we should think about setting up a counter disinformation coalition that could look a lot like isis coalition for example because the threat is is that syria's <hes> it may seem less urgent than the threat of isis of course but in the long term it can have much more dire consequences and the very core in our democratic societies before we wrap up our conversation. I'd like to conclude with our final segment called what we're reading where we discuss what's at the top lavar respective reading lists and mike recommend to our listeners lena. What's on your list well.

russia united states russian government shan formation amazon europe graham official eamon china china google mike Dave chris beijing
"alina" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

16:23 min | 1 year ago

"alina" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"I'm your host christopher walker vice president for studies and analysis of the endowment recording studio in washington d._c. And i'm your co host shot the colossal senior director talknet international forum for democratic studies over the past few years policymakers in public audiences have begun devoting more attention to the ways in which powerful anti liberal relaxers are exploiting technology driven changes to today's information landscape in this episode will explore how authoritarian governments are devoting immense resources sources to improving their capacity in this arena as a means both to consolidate power at home and project influence far beyond their borders. Although authoritarian teheran regimes the world over are adopting such approaches to stand out as leaders the russian and chinese authorities alike have used new communications technologies to deepen their ability to manipulate the public discussion using these technologies both have emerged important incubators for the development of modern forms of censorship for for its part. The chinese party state is on the leading edge of this effort to deepen control moving with great speed and no meaningful checks on its ambitions to implement a comprehensive apparatus for policing political discourse in the democracies at least until now there's largely been a failure of imagination to recognize the growing global implications of the rapidly advancing digital prowess of the authoritarians many analysts have covered these trends from the perspectives of national security and economic it competition that relatively few of considered the implications for human rights and political freedom for this reason. We're delighted to welcome to the show one such expert who has been very thoughtful in this regard alina polyakova the david rudenstine fellow for foreign policy at the brookings institution here to discuss digital authoritarianism emelina. I'd like to start alluding looting to an article you wrote last november <hes> on russia and its ambitions in the technologies fear and a in particular you noted that <hes> there may maybe some real obstacles to russia developing its its abilities in the tech sphere among other reasons as a result of the public corruption poor rule of law and an oppressive <hes> regulatory environment <hes>. How should we see this. Will they be limited in pursuing their objectives to to curb dissent or will they simply invest in what they think is most important and therefore make real advances. Well thank you for that question. Chris and thank you <hes> shanty for <hes> <hes> hosting me on this fantastic podcast today so speaking directly to your question craps about russian future capabilities in new and emerging technologies space as i think we'll become quite obvious is russia looks like it's ten feet tall but it's not and what i mean by that is in the russian economy. Emme is about the size of spain's country. That size is a huge disparity. It's not really projected to grow economically. Foreign direct investment is is not likely to increase because of some of the factors you mentioned the difficulty of doing business the public corruption etc in terms of a._i. Startups russia really lags behind the rest of the world and if we nearest darlie lucon valley most of us find russian-speakers there and there's a reason for that because people that have great it skills and many many russians do have very good technical skills can find work elsewhere so thanks for those reasons we can expect that russia will continue to fall behind especially countries like china and when that comes to the government's own desire to emulate what the chinese have been doing certainly in terms of social surveillance and digital authoritarianism at home. They are already deeply deeply limited. They been doing certain things and ad hoc basis the chinese they have not been able to be strategic so as a result what they're able to do is not so much filter information meanings of the chinese do <hes> they're able to censor information before the populations even able to see it in the russian case. They're not capable of doing this because they lacked the ability you to process that much data but they are increasingly doing is monitoring and surveilling <hes> what citizens are talking about online whether text into each other over the phone phone and they're doing this through a variety of intimidation means including a quite a intimidating repressive legal structure. That's been slowly forming under the president putin and i i think in that respect it seems that <hes> while china is operating. Maybe at a unique level in this space and perhaps it isn't <hes> quite the right frame of reference for for russia's ambitions when one looks <hes> from the point of view say ten years ago of some of the things that <hes> russia has done despite the fact it's been under sanctions and it's had a weak economy and it has all the features that you described. It's actually proven to be quite quite active internationally and so should we underestimate <hes> given the fact that this the authorities in russia which really have no meaningful checks on their decision making <hes> that they won't be purposeful investing the limited resources they have in areas. I think are most important. I mean that that's exactly exactly the key point <hes> you know just because they have certain constraints and limitations many of those financial resources when we think about the the kremlin strategic intent abroad odd again. This is where russia differs from china russia's strategic contend the government strategic intent is to try to undermine <hes> any countries that sees as potential competitor's and of course from the kremlin's perspective that is the democratic west first and foremost and so we've seen russia again unlike china use of these new technologies these new tools to try to undermine western democracies and why are they doing. This again makes perfect sense from their perspective. If you're a country that has limited resources but you see you're so-so slipping and falling behind. You'll do what you can that is most low cost and high impact to try to stay day ahead or at least catch up or at least push everybody else down just a little bit so if we look into the future what i expect and what my research has been suggesting is is there were going to see the kremlin investing more and more limited resources specifically into these asymmetric threats meaning <hes> using a._i. Driven adamant technologies as a form of foreign influence operations. You know just a pickup on this. So much of the current conversation has been around china. Ed's artificial intelligence capabilities that you've written that artificial intelligence has the potential to hyperpower russia's use of disinformation referring to the intentional spread at a false and misleading information for the purpose of influencing politics and you also say that democracies are ill equipped to respond to this. Can you elaborate what you mean on both points so at this point. I think many people are aware of the term deep fakes <hes> but this storm is relatively new and i do wanna talk. A little row with that is because that's really what i'm talking about when i'm talking a._i. Powered disinformation so of course a is a neutral tool. You could says the dual use tool ominous multi-layer layer reserved for shaw intelligence rex referring to whole suite of various technologies that we'll have both positive negative consequences for society's basically every single sector her <hes> but i think it's really important to understand how this new technology in the suite of new tools will also be used for me by militias actors <hes> to try to pursue <hes> the kind disruptive foreign policy john the russians have been pursuing for some time so specifically <hes> when when it comes to russia's usa v i n deep fakes defects are manipulated audio and video content but they're not like photoshop auto shop right at people often say well. You know we've had in manipulation of images for a long time. We've had people doctrine pictures of photoshop doctoring videos and various other ways but right now. Those kinds of manipulations are very easy to detect software that can do that. We have some artificial intelligence tools that can do that very quickly. Fix a whole new level of audio video and image manipulation there are they are generated which means it's not manipulated you did. You're not taking an existing image. Doctoring actually producing a brand new image brand new audio brand new video based on a ton of data on these new artificial official intelligence algorithms can process very very quickly and currently we don't have the technical response meaning were not able to detect act the this kind of video audio manipulation. If you think about what's on my mean for disinformation. I think the implications are quite like profound. You know we can see a video of a world leader making offensive remarks for example <hes> and that could spread viral on twitter on social media all the other platforms and we can debunk him because they know you know <hes> president trump didn't say chelsom urkel density that but the damage is usually done because it's like playing a game of whack them all and i think this is the new challenge there were going to face increasingly over the next two to three years and one thing that you've you've written about which i think is quite fascinating is you've highlighted. The fact that the kremlin has focused its efforts already over the past many years on a tactic of moscow fca and <hes> that this is something that predated the machine learning era. Could you talk doc little bit about this concept and why you think that this will be dramatically enhanced by machine learning so thank you for bringing some rushing into the conversation and none of those great <hes> so the term you used muscular fca <hes> loosely translated into english basically refers to tactics tactics of military deceit so this was something that was often you love to news in the soviet era <hes> so for example you try to sort of ruse your enemy to to make them think that your forces are at one place in fact in another place it can take the form of things like actually making fake blow up tanks airplanes <unk> airplanes missiles so that from satellite images adversaries might see that you have a tank in one location with us actually a false the you know misleading purposely misleading <hes> way of trying to deceive so these are all tools all taxes around for a very long time to try to destabilizer enemies position mislead them various ways but the new digital tools there were discussing actually in the twenty first century version of that on what i mean by that is when you see just some the russian disinformation campaigns we've seen already you saw russian trolls masquerading as americans as europeans operating many accounts <hes> setting up these networks on twitter amplify false content to miss exactly to mislead scene and deceive people and when we see in russia's in fact it is the russian ministry of defence has taken the lead on artificial intelligence capabilities season development <hes> so squarely <hes> the russian government seized as much as part of its military arsenal and i think that's important to understand that from the russian perspective <hes> you know things like disinformation new forms of information warfare a. i. powered information warfare is part and parcel of his bar military a strategy that goes very much in line with long tradition of trying to deceive your enemy mislead enemy misguide your enemy in various ways. You've you've you've raised how these approaches and methodologies have been developed at the domestic level one of the wrinkles that were confronting in an era of globalization -sation and where our political speech and political discourse is now <hes> integrated so seamlessly especially through the open platforms that have emerged <hes> from the west coast of the united states and in other settings <hes> and this is where this activity that you just described as happening so could you talk a little little bit about how these domestically developed capabilities through trial and error experimentation by by incubating them have now been diffused beyond russia's borders. It seems just about everywhere now well. That's right again you know from the russian precise also a business component component here. I i do wanna make that clear. So now we see a lot of companies. That look like p._r. Firms allow them happen to be rushing but you can go online. Look this up. I don't really want to advertise them <hes> <music> but you can actually buy a hundred thousand twitter accounts. <hes> twenty verified facebook accounts. You can buy a g mail accounts to step maratha vacation included <hes> they'll even the age of the accounts allow these companies will try to take over old accounts have been abandoned and then caserta zombie fly them if you will and turn them towards a different purpose and they'll tell you this account is one year old is account as five years quite sophisticated <hes> but the the point is that it's very cheap so we see now is that from the russian trial and error of trying to influence manipulate democracy especially running elections but not just just around elections. We see others learning from this. I you know we see countries like iran. Perhaps north korea certainly china. I think at some point point will enter this space as well any aspiring authoritarian can basically buy a package now of you know however many bots on twitter <unk> have many trolls and accounts and pages on facebook and launched their own influence information campaign aimed at the domestic audience or the foreign audience audience so we see this package of information manipulation tools now diffusing across the world and and do you want to call it when other things we were talking about going to the export of digital authoritarianism from from countries across asia one thing that we're talking about earlier this this notion that the russians are falling behind the you have certain limitations constraints and the resources that's all true but if we look at the world you know there's no other country looks looks like china right a very fast growing wealthy incredibly technically capable authoritarian regime but there are many countries countries that look a little bit russian some sense resource poor <hes> not very centralized run more like a kleptocracy than you know hard hard to tell the charity dictatorship and what that signals the technologies the russia's develop for its own specific purposes at home. He's monitoring technologies actually much compatible with the rest of the aspiring authoritarians who face similar constraints as the russians do so i think for that reason as a big market for the russians to export these surveillance tools because they are cheaper because they who have higher impact and frankly because most countries aren't china you mentioned earlier that <hes> we don't have the technological response to some of these emerging technologies including <hes> deep fakes in the artificial intelligence context but it also it seems like we don't have the the norms and the accountability to deal with so even if we were to develop the technical response how would we you get to the point say in the democracies to know how to use these what the boundaries are because it seems to me at least maybe you can speak to the selena right now the the discussion around a._i. And how it's applied is either coming from the military side or from the commercial side which is really driving the development of a._i. But there's very little talk at least relatively speaking in terms of the norms that should shape the use of of these new terminologies that that's right..

russia china kremlin twitter christopher walker brookings institution teheran president chinese party united states senior director washington china russia vice president facebook spain russian ministry of defence
"alina" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"alina" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"From students grandparents with some well targeted wining. And dining parents at these schools, typically preschool or kindergarten through grade twelve have long been hit up with request to donate. But grandparents until more recently have been eight less tapped resource. It's a story by Wall Street Journal, contributing reporter Alina dick Alina, what's up here. Private schools are really looking towards the grandparents to help with donation, and they're doing it in very interesting ways. And really engaging the grandparents to participate more in the school activities. One thing I couldn't get past with you open the story with the shocking number of tuition of like twenty eight thousand dollars a year for kindergarten some school, right? Kindergarten starts and some schools at twenty thousand dollars but typically somewhere in the twenties. Wow. All right. So how do you get grandparents involved and get them interested in willing? Well, some some of these schools are hosting events for grandparent's, and it allows them to meet their own network, and really, you know, feel like they're part of their school and being honored rather than events where parents are inviting grandparents. Okay. So I think the one school you've referenced one of the schools you reference was in Maryland. And like the head of the school flew to Florida to host a dinner or something. Yeah. There's a there's a school in Maryland there. They realized that a lot of parents are actually ending up retired at Boker a ton though. The head of the school flies there every year or nearly every year to make the ask of donations and host a dinner. Wow. We're speaking with Wall Street Journal contributor Alina, dick. Her piece is called grandma. My school wants your money and is talking about how private schools are hitting up grandparents for donations. So how much is the school trying to get per year? For example, when tuitions like twenty eight thousand dollars, it strikes me that the the kids who go there probably fairly well off what what are they using the money for the schools are using the money for different projects day, typically private schools have to fill a twenty percent gap between tuition and their need. So grandparents are still a very very small part of that. So they're gifts this year. The average was six hundred. And fifty one dollars. So it's it's still fairly small, but it makes a to school, then they're, you know, they're China and hate them to give more and that number is going up. I think you said, right? That numbers going up slightly so three years ago. It was about five hundred sixty five dollars in total donations four last year through about nine hundred schools. The figure was forty two point five million. So those numbers add up across the different schools. I think you referenced that this particular generation of grandparents they're not in great financial shape yet. They're finding the money or the time somehow. Yeah. They're they're not a great financial shape. But there's still plenty of apple grandparents who do give and some of the schools say that they even pay tuition that time. So it really varies, but definitely finding the money to participate and to give parents could their grandchildren. We Selena Wall Street Journal, contributing reporter Alina district the twenty eight thousand dollars a year kindergarten, by the way is the Charles E Smith Jewish day school in Rockville, Maryland, twenty eight grand for kindergarten thirty minutes after the hour.

China Wall Street Journal Alina dick Alina Maryland Charles E Smith Jewish day sch reporter Alina district Rockville Boker apple Florida twenty eight thousand dollars five hundred sixty five dollar twenty thousand dollars fifty one dollars twenty percent three years
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And so the question has been okay while in all these months since April till now the Kremlin going to do. And so we easy to say, well, the Kremlin's looking for another foreign policy venture like Crimea that will boost Putin's ratings again there. But the reality is there is no second Crimea. There is no territory that the Russians have the capacity the capability. And the incentive to take in the same way to Crimea. And so I think what's happened in the sea of was almost inevitable because some issues we've been discussing here, the the narrow passageway the the rising potential for accidents and conflict there, but certainly the it's it's hard to see how this escalation this maritimus collation going to really serve Putin domestically. And give them a bump. I think that's still an open question. And I say that because we're going to have to wait and see how the Russian media spins this, but it's going to much more difficult to spin this into, you know, Putin being the great protector of the Russian people Putin putting wash back on the global stage because it is much more complex. It's not so clear cut. Like, we got more land Harare. It's a much more complicated and less exciting foreign policy adventure. So I think that. That remains a question, whether the approval ratings really has something to do with this or this just a something the Russians have been planning for some time and situation the ground kind of force their hand, you know, the other piece to consider here. I think is that at the end of the day. You know, you said Ben about Russia beat ten foot tall. You know, it is. It is true. They will continue to assert their dominance and their control over the countries that are on Russia's proofread. The Russia continues to see as rightfully belonging to its fear of influence, and we're not going to see an end to that anytime soon. There's all speculation about Belarus, for example, a more esscalation 's in places like Moldova in the Caucasus central Asia. But I don't see the Russians having an incentive to really push the envelope. Best to get involvement from the United States, certainly not. They would not be a real competitor to you. US NATO military might nobody wants a war. And I see the recent engagement in the Sierras as relatively constrained military operation and to the service of an assertion over these waterways and landmasses much in the same way as China has been doing so the domestic situation. Russia's driving some of this. But went tribute too much to it quite yet. I think we still have to wait and see how the Kremlin decide to play this. We are going to leave it there. Alina scott. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you. Thank you. The law. Fair podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to Alina and Scott for coming together on short notice to do this near emergency podcast, you need to do your part. I know if you've already done this. I'm really sorry to keep bugging you about it. But if we're one of the approximately forty five thousand people listens. The law fair podcast and has not given us a rating on itunes, Stitcher, or whatever other podcasts distribution you use. You are part of the problem, and you need to become part of the solution. So tweet about it sheriff's on Facebook. Tell your friends about the law fair podcast. We don't do advertising. We only do you. Our audio editor this week was Matt con the law fair podcast is produced by gen Paci. Halal our music is as ever performed by the one the only the back in China, so feel Yan and as always thanks for listening.

Russia Putin Crimea Kremlin Alina scott United States Harare China Facebook Brookings Institution Belarus Sierras gen Paci Asia Moldova audio editor Caucasus Yan Matt con
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"There was a time where there is kind of no controversy no dispute over the rules that govern here, and that was in before nineteen ninety one at that time the evolve essentially landlocked within the. Soviet Union and the Soviet Union at the time said this is our internal see a body of water that entirely subject to our sovereignty and international agreements for great Salt Lake, right? Perhaps exactly or you know, a variety of of other lake Champlain. I think is entirely landlocked United States. I could be wrong on that. But, but I think I believe it is an example like that where there's no dispute there's no international traffic that can go through because it's really a see that is doesn't lead anywhere, but to that country to the Soviet Union that case within its territory after nineteen ninety one when Ukraine broke away there became this open question saying, what is the scene out at that point Ukraine had about half, the circle may be a little more than half of the circle including Crimea, including this northern stretch where Mary polls when these other cities that Alina was describing fit in. And Russia had the eastern half. And they both met at the car straight Russians in control of the eastern half, the Ukrainians control the western half, which is part of Crimea. There's a lot of the speed for about the ten years or more after that saying what is the regime governing this? They had developed a kind of set of understandings over what they would do to handle maritime traffic, but the delineation of the exact rights was a subject of dispute a number of times Ukrainian parliament, considered kind of declaring. Hey, these are this is our territorial see this stretch of territory on the western half is subject to our sovereignty which would go in about a certain distance into the sea will not miles. I believe and that this is our area that we're able to control and consider our sovereign territory. We're not gonna have this kind of shared arrangement in two thousand three. However, they ultimately agreed to enter into agreement that Lena Mench where they say. And describe that the his off as being a shared historical internal sea of Ukraine and Russia. And essentially with a dozen practices. It kind of says, hey, this is our issue general rules governing the law of the convention on the law of the sea being the most prominent one your default rules, don't really apply here. We're gonna come up with our own separate arrangements and this agreement of follow on agreements establish a bunch of sort of procedures about how maritime traffic was gonna be manage information sharing inspection rights things like that the Russians and Ukrainian authorities. We're going to share amongst each other that arrangement more or less proceeded up until two thousand fourteen with the seizure and eventual claimed annexation of Crimea by Russia. Russia now considers Crimea to be part of Russia, although it is pretty much the only state of us at that way, or one of very few that kind of changes, the dynamics here because all of a sudden the curse straight at from the Russian perspective wasn't something that shared with the Crimeans, it's entirely under Russian control on both sides. One thing that that leads them to do. Start building the bridge. Lena mention which connects these territories, obviously, something you wouldn't do if one half of the territory was still considered Ukrainian, and it gives them control defacto controls, no legal control of the maritime traffic. So what the Russians say up until this point is that they essentially say, hey, these are still we're still treating the c as subject to this kind of condominium arrangement to these subset of rules that we worked out the Ukrainians. They let you crane ships go through at various points to these ports, but they do it subject to their terms and their conditions. They say we're going to inspect the ships were only allow certain number of ships through and then most importantly, Lena, mention they build this bridge that dramatically narrows the amount of maritime traffic that can go through the gives them a doorway that they can patrol in block very easily so easily in fact that to block the entry into the office only requires them to park a single tanker across the gap under the bridge that boats can get through, and that's shuts off the his of the Ukrainians have respond. Did this on a number of different ways?.

Ukraine Crimea Soviet Union Lena Mench lake Champlain Salt Lake United States Alina Mary ten years
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"So Alina lack of through what happened they are. And to what extent this is. Now, a sort of Ukrainian Democratic's rat sort of quite apart from from anything else that might be going on. So it was interesting. Of course, is that nothing. In this part of the role is devoid of politics. And in some ways, we could see this escalation in the sea of ZOA as sort of standard military maneuver, you know, if you think about an aggressive force that is trying to control the land territory they fail coming in from one side. And so they're trying the pass through the c- to achieve the same potential ends. So it looks like a a pretty traditional strategic military move. The is still I think relatively constrained in restraint in its ultimate objective. I do wanna mention that. Because you know of the commentary about this escalation has been asking the question is this the beginning of an international conflict is this up potential a path to world's towards, you know, World War three. I don't think the probability of that is very high. In fact, I think it's quite low. What I think this looks much more like a kind of standard washing creep where they. Tried to gain further for the control of territories. They see within their own sphere of influence, but they're not interested in art incentivizes start a conflict, but they know perfectly. Well, if they did the Crean's would be completely outflanked out gone. They cannot defend themselves against Russian military might in the sea or land. But what's been happening, Ukraine? Of course, domestically is that Ukraine is an election season the presidential elections are coming up in March. The current president petro Persian co is polling in the single digits has been very very unpopular, and even before this escalation is a lot of speculation that he would try to postpone the elections thinking that was somehow benefit him. Politically will buy him more time, you can make up all kinds of reasons why he'd be interested in doing that. And so we have this interesting move by the president of Ukraine when this esscalation happens over the weekend. When the Russian ship Ramsey tugboat to propose imposing martial law now in all the conflict that we've seen full than Ukraine, relax, four years. Active fighting thousands of Ukrainians killed thousands of them killed the government has never imposed martial law. So this seemed like a very extreme move on his part that was likely politically motivated he took this proposal to the cranium parliament which contested and outcome. We got was not a sixty day Marshall out of the president had proposed but a thirty day martial law term, the only affects the cranium provinces that are close to line of conflict. So it's not for all of Ukraine. It's released of the eastern regions where there is fighting going on Ukraine's east Ukraine southeast where the sea of altercation has been happening. So it is a limb. Wanted martial law, and it is only thirty days, and the president has been forced to guarantee that the president presidential elections will go as scheduled but still this was by all accounts, an extreme move in in the bigger context..

Ukraine president Crean Alina petro Persian co Marshall thirty days four years thirty day sixty day
"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And this is the law fair podcast, November twenty seventh two thousand eighteen I know you thought naval warfare was dead. But this week Russia and Ukraine went at it any straight. You've probably never heard of the curse strait which separates. It's the Black Sea from the sea of Zoff. It's the latest salvo in Russia's secret not-so-secret war against Ukraine over Crimea over the two provinces in eastern, Ukraine. And it's the latest thing that has the world talking about Ladimir, Putin's lawlessness in his backyard with me in the jungle studio to talk about it. All our my Brookings colleagues Alina pull yakuza of the foreign policy program and Scott Anderson of law fair and the governance studies program we talked about what happened this week. We talked about the international law implications, we talked about the domestic politics in both Ukraine and Russia the name Donald Trump never came up. It's the law fair podcast episode three hundred sixty eight we've done a lot of episodes people Alina. And Scott talk, Ukraine and Russia Elena. Let's start for those who haven't been, you know, religiously following each incremental development in the new Crimean war. What happened over the last few days between Ukraine and Russia, and well, let's start there. What happened? So if you haven't been following the the recent developments, basically what happened over the weekend was that? There was an attack by a Russian vessel a Russian navy ship on a Ukrainian tugboat, the Russian ship, basically, rammed the Ukrainian tugboat in the sea of so for listeners that don't know where the see of is it's a relatively small body of water that is bordered by Ukraine on the west Russia on the east and to the south you have what is called the Kerch strait, and the Kurds straight is this passage. Dj that connects the sea of Zoff to the much larger Black Sea, and it's also a contested area because it also connects Crimea, which occupies to mainland Russia via bridge that the Russians built in may of this year and so- tensions have been escalating in this water. Jim for quite some time. It's a small area, and it's an important area for commercial and merchant ships to pass to Ukrainian ports, and since about may we've seen esscalation a Russian military activity. More vessels more ships in the area. Also Ukrainian activity trying to keep an eye on what the Washington doing. And then, you know, finally over the weekend, it all came to a head and quickly escalated to the point where you know, based on recent reports, we know that the Russians have not taken three Ukrainian ships into custody. They're also holding some conflicting reports somewhere between twenty three and twenty six. Ukrainian, sailors, some of those were injured in the in the fires that the Russian ships allegedly fired the Ukrainian side, and so this is basically where we are today. The Ukrainian government has responded to this by instituting, a temporary martial law for about thirty days on some regions of Ukraine, which of course, is also a problematic decision to say to say the least. Okay. So let's unpack because there's a huge amount in that very brief an admirable account. Why would Russia want to interfere with a Ukrainian tugboat going through the Kirch straight into the sea of Zoff? Well, with the Russian side claims is that they basically have sovereignty over the curb. Straight and the see of us all that is not true necessarily of because in two thousand three. There was an agreement reached between Ukraine and Russia, obviously, very different political and historical moment, but that agreement still in place and in gives you crane and Russia dual control of the Sierras, oh and also dual control of the cared straight. Now things changed quite dramatically in two thousand fourteen which is when Russia invaded Crimea and militarily continues to occupy and since two thousand fourteen is actually built up Crimea to be much more of a military base for Russia. And now what we see the Russians doing. It's not that different from what I think the Chinese have been doing the South China Sea where they express sovereignty over this body of water because they claim sovereignty over certain landmass and what they're doing. Now, they blocked this very critical passageway the Kerch strait, which is already costing that Ukrainian economy, potentially millions. Because lowing down shipments into major ports in Ukraine, and what there will likely do though we don't really know yet in..

Ukraine Black Sea Kerch strait Russia Elena Crimea Zoff Ukrainian government South China Sea west Russia Russian navy Scott Anderson Alina Donald Trump Putin Jim Ladimir Washington
"alina" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on No Jumper

"If you put like three or four fingers on there. And then it just comes out. Shit out of your house with your hand. On camera Brown. Exactly. That's right. That's why girls go so out of their way to give. You could take a modem to take them on him like in the morning, and then you're poor Colin you need to go to the doctor. Right now, I'm taking some time off to kill my body. Your healing your butthole Jonah, you're taking a butthole sabbatical. Pussy break a pussy break. She's injured. She's injured. What happened you tore it? Yeah. I have a tear star. Important for like half a year. What about you? A year next month. How many times how many like scenes have you shot? Maybe like six she I thought than me. I do extremely refs. Is that what you're too we? Both are. Hi, seeing submissive like. People do anything. Oh, my stop what dinner because we were like, we're submissive for oh shoot. Dominance. Yeah. So with me if we ended up hooking up, you'd stop on my boss, high heels or something. Dominant with guys I'm more submissive, but can be dominant with guys, but I. Dominant person in general with girls for sure with pens on the guy. I wanted to. Yeah. Let's do it. Use your life all about dominated talking shit. So you're going to know about the terms of your relationship with your boyfriend with you, and none of the plug fucking Shelvin of monster Hennessy bottling vaginas together. Yes, he was he's into that very open. So is he like a cook type or what? I mean, like he's never like I mean, he's never watched me. I've texted another guy, but we've had plenty of three some and he's watched me with plenty of girls. Gross against he's watched me have sex claiming the list today. It's a very long list a list forgetting we fucked so I have to but I keep for I'm. So that's really good though, because I'm my whole life have had a list of mice partners. And I really feel like I've stopped keeping updated over like the last year. So I feel like it's like way. Way. Ten. Listen. And then some point I just like stopped fucked like a few guys within like a short period of time. When I couldn't remember or it was in, and I was really trying to keep the right order. And I couldn't remember I kept trying to remember. And I didn't end kept fucking other people. In the meantime, and then I just lost track. I was just always trashed when I was. I was looking slow. That's so real. I'm so and she remembers everyone. That's so RAD though, just because I feel like the time period of my life where I could potentially have completely blackout drunk. I wouldn't really remember is kind of over. I trust me. Drink because I wish I around. Great hearing that. Yes. Why told you that even if it takes four hours, I wouldn't like have you lay there for you to relax? I would do guided. I do I'll do guided meditation with you until you're like, mentally ready. Come on this gross the Hennessy, really. I don't like Hennessy either. It's disgusting girls. It's enough. Kilo Mexican, okay? You're as long as you're a PSE. A person of color. We can't be having no white people around here as whole is all these face tattoos. And listen to all these meek mill songs Spotify trying to get my car, you know? Nobody even likes to believe that a Mexican though name is Alina Lopez my stage name, but. Why do you like say Lopez you're not even Mexican I'm like Georgia oppose skin second off? Lopez is a real fucking family name. No, you don't think of that. She can't do it green is when they do even shoreline. Mafia says a lot and it gets shit for it. Because he looks like he's kind of. I have no she's long. About this topic that? You look like you say..

Hennessy Jonah Alina Lopez Kilo Mexican Colin Spotify Georgia four hours mill
"alina" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Alina what do these things look? Like they look like egg-shaped pod, basically and you can float inside of. It there's about a foot of water inside and when you get in you flow because of the Epsom salt in it How much do they cost they cost about thirty thousand, dollars on the high end. But you can also buy one? For about fifteen now this is, something that has kind of taken the. Country by storm because there are centers where you can do this right is that where the the idea came from Yes there? There centers where people come in much like a tanning, salon used to be where they can flow to. And, you know their floats are by the hour but some people are choosing to install them in their home spa areas did? You talk to any homeowners who've done this I spoke with homeowners who've? Done, this and they're usually installing it as part of a spa area so they'll have and then also this flotation, pod or or even a bigger pool as part, of that area okay Alina talk a little bit about why somebody would. Do this what are the benefits of these things Some of the benefits of these have been noted that very help release stress they're good for inside either did for sleep there's been a few. Studies that have come out and. People just really enjoy the experience of kind of you know being able to tune out not use their phone then you know almost kind of a. Meditative state how much care is needed to take care of one of, these water pods, from from. What I heard from the manufacturers there's not too much care involved. Once you have the setup so? You can reuse the same water for. One or two years because there is a filtration system and. There's an outlet so most of the time they just kind of plug into the wall and you, know they're setup, we're speaking with a Lena disa- contributor to the Wall Street Journal what does it actually look. Like. You're laying in a foot of water are you closed in. There is they're light as their music It's how's it work so. Most of the time you're laying. In a foot of water there is you can have kind of star lighting if you want you can also have music that kind of fades away. After a few minutes and the lid is closed because that helps keep, the temperature steady, and it. Helps kind of block out any noise or any any other senses. So most of the is close?.

Alina Wall Street Journal Lena disa two years
"alina" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With sensory deprivation tanks and is? Here now Alina what do these things, look like they look like egg shaped. Pod basically and you can slow inside of it there's about a foot of water inside and when you get in you, flow because of the Epsom salt in it How much do they cost they cost about thirty, thousand dollars on the high. End but you can also buy? One for about fifteen now this is, something that has kind of taken the. Country by storm because there are centers where you can do this right is that where the the idea came from Yes? They're there centers where people come in much like a, tanning salon used to be where they can flow. To, and their floats are by the hour but some people are choosing to install them in their home spy areas did you? Talk to any homeowners who have done this I spoke with homeowners who've done? This and they're usually installing it as part, of a, spy area so they'll have and. Then also this flotation pod or or even. A bigger pool as part of that area okay Alina talk a little bit about why somebody would do, this what, are the benefits of these things some of the, benefits of these, have been you know noted that they help release stress they're good for inside either good for sleep there's been a few studies that have come out and. People just really enjoy the experience of kind of you know being able to do now not use their? Phone, then you know almost kind of a meditative state how much care is needed to take care of one of, these water pods from from what I, heard from the manufacturers there's not too much care involves once you have. The up so you can reuse the same water for One or two years because there is a filtration system and there's an outlet so most of the, time they just, kind of plug into the wall and you know they're setup we're speaking with Lena disa- contributor. To. The Wall Street Journal what does it actually look like you're. Laying in a foot of water are? You closed in there or is there light, is their, music it's how's it work so. Most of the time you're laying in a. Foot of water there is you can have kind of star lighting if you want you can also have, music that, kind of fades away after a few minutes and, the lid is, closed because that helps keep the temperature steady and it helps kind of block out any noise or any any other senses so most of the time is. Close Wall Street Journal contributor Alina disc it's thirty minutes after the.

Alina The Wall Street Journal Lena disa thousand dollars thirty minutes two years
"alina" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on KTRH

"Deprivation tanks and is here now Alina what do these things look like they, look like egg shaped pod basically and you can float inside of it there's. About a foot of water inside and when you get in you flow because of the Epsom salt in it How much do they cost they cost about thirty, thousand dollars on the high. End but you can also buy? One for about fifteen now this is, something that has kind of taken the. Country by storm because there are centers where you can do this right is that where the the idea came from Yes they're they're centers where people come in much like, a tanning salon used to be where they can. Flow, to and their floats are by the hour but some people are choosing to install them in their home spa areas did? You talk to any homeowners who've done this I spoke. With homeowners who've done this and they're? Usually installing it as part of a spa area so they'll have a sauna. And then also this, flotation pod or or. Even a bigger pool as part of that area okay Alina talk a little bit about why somebody would, do this, what are the benefits of, these things some of, the benefits of, these have been noted that they help release stress they're good for anxiety ther- good for sleep there's been a few studies that have come out and people. Just really enjoy the experience of kind of you know being able to tune out not use their phone then? You, know, almost kind of a meditative state how much care is needed to take care of one of these water, pods from from what I heard from, the manufacturers there's not too much care involves once you have the sped. Up so you can reuse the same water for One or. Two years because there is a filtration system and there's an outlet so most of the time they, just kind of plug into, the wall and you know they're setup we're speaking with a Lena disa- contributor to the Wall. Street. Journal what does it actually look like you're laying in a. Foot of water are you closed in? There or is there light as their music it's how's it work so most. Of the time you're, laying in a foot. Of water there is you can have kind of star lighting if you want you can also have music, that kind, of fades away after a, few minutes and the, lid is closed, because that helps keep the temperature steady and it helps kind of you know block out any noise or any any other senses so most of the lid..

Alina Lena disa thousand dollars Two years
"alina" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Alina what do these things look? Like they look like egg-shaped pod, basically and you can Sloat inside of. It there's about a foot of water inside and when you get in you flow because of the Epsom salt in, it How much do they cost they cost about thirty thousand, dollars on the high end. By you can also buy one? For about fifteen now this is, something that has kind of taken the. Country by storm because there are centers where you can do this right is that where the the idea came from Yes they're they're centers where people come in much like. A, tanning salon used to be where they can flow to and you know their floats are by the hour but some people? Are choosing to install them in their homes Did you talk to any homeowners who've done this I spoke with homeowners who've done this and they're, usually installing it as part of a spy area so they'll have and then also this flotation pod or or. Even. A bigger pool as part of that area okay Alina talk. A little bit about why somebody would? Do this what are the benefits of these things Some of the benefits of these have been noted that they help release stress they're good for anxiety either good for sleep there's been a few. Studies that have come out and people just really enjoy the experience of kind of you know being able to tune out not use their phone then you know almost kind of a meditative. State how much care is needed to take care of one of. These water pods, from from. What I heard from the manufacturers there is not too much. Paren- Volvo once you have the? Setup so you can reuse the same. Water for one or two years because there is a filtration system? And there's an outlet so most of the time betas kind of plug into the wall and you, know they're setup, we're speaking with Lena disc contributor to the Wall Street Journal what does it actually look like. You're. Laying in a foot of water are you closed in there. Or is there light as their music It's how's it work so most of the. Time you're laying in a foot of water there is you can have kind of star lighting if you want you can also have music that kind of fades away after a few minutes. And the lid is closed because that helps keep the temperature steady, and it helps, kind of. Block out any noise or any any other senses so most. Of the time the lid is?.

Sloat Alina Wall Street Journal Volvo Lena two years
"alina" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"alina" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wnyc this is fresh air i'm terry gross it's not safe for my guest to return to iran so she spent the past nine years in exile first in london and now in brooklyn musc alina jarred was two years old in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine when the islamic revolution overthrew the shah and took away the rights of women her opposition to the regime started when she was young she was imprisoned when she was eighteen after becoming a journalist she covered the iranian parliament but as a result of her reporting on corrupt officials she was expelled from the parliament building and banned from returning the first reporter to have that distinction she covered human rights abuses in iran until she was forced to leave the country in exile she became an activist against the law requiring that all females starting at age seven cover their heads and necks with job she started to opposition campaigns on facebook in the i called my stealthy freedom she asked women to take photos of themselves in secret not wearing hijab and post those photos last year alina giants campaign white wednesdays asked women to wear something white on wednesdays as symbols of protest against the compulsory hejab and post those photos now alina jar has a new memoir called the wind in my hair my fight for freedom in modern iran musc alina jarred welcome to fresh air why did you make the hit job your issue oh my god the first question it's like my childhood you know when when i was seven year old starting school i had to wear he job that's one of the law makes it compulsory yeah i mean it's about the law and my personal is three it's about my family as well my father i had to work compulsory job inside the house as what and if you see my picture have too much hair it was not easy to cover them up so maybe that was the reason from the beginning when i was a child because i didn't have any clue about freedom of choice freedom of expression or nothing i just wanted to feel the wind in my hair to be as free as my brother and you.

london reporter iran facebook alina jar alina jarred parliament nine years seven year two years