6 Burst results for "Alicia Johnston"

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Corona virus is a public health crisis of course but it's also devastated the economy it's been especially destructive businesses that depend on people gathering together in person tourism restaurants and the arts. Kyw's arts and culture reporter. Marcy silman has been monitoring the health of the regional arts and culture community. She spoke with kim. Malcolm about what. We might see moving forward so marcy for the past couple of months. You've been doing some deep dive reporting on how the pandemic has impacted our cultural communities. How would you describe what you found across the board. Kim organizations are treading water. If they haven't already drowned you might remember last march. When governor inslee issued his social gathering restrictions. everyone had to shut down operations museums and some art galleries have started to welcome back visitors. But they're at twenty five percent of normal capacity which just does not sound sustainable. And marcy you and i've talked about how performing arts groups and musicians have been streaming content and how it just doesn't cover the costs for many of them. So what are arts leaders telling you about this pivot to digital when it doesn't pay the bills. Peter bowl who is the artistic director at pacific. Northwest ballet told me that he pivoted digital because he wanted to give some work to the dancers musicians backstage artisans and other staff who would otherwise be unemployed. According to a new study from the seattle advocacy group arts fund. Thousands of area of workers are still jobless and even though as we said. Some venues have reopened. This survey found only about nine percent of local artisans and been rehired many back part time or reduce salaries but kim beyond providing jobs. I think that this pandemic has really forced performing arts groups to reckon with the digital age in a way that they hadn't done before the pandemic kit. And what do you mean by that. Well for at least a decade arts groups have been trying to figure out how they compete with free or low cost online content that arts fund study that i mentioned found that every responding group plan to permanently integrate digital content into their arts program offerings the ceo of arts fund. Michael greer told me that's partly because audiences are really leery about heading into enclosed spaces with lots of people that component that new revenue component is going to be essential to kind of filling the void of individuals. Trepidation do moving back into the theaters or just a general reorganization of how society interacts with itself. Not even just in the arts bottom line marcie will most arts groups survived this pandemic. It's really hard to say for certain. But to quote the head of seattle's office of arts and culture randy angstrom. The sector is on the knife's edge getting people to value in compensate artists and creatives for their time was already a challenge. Then the pandemic it and it was devastating. And i think that that devastation was disproportionately felt by by park organizations and artists because they've been underinvested and undercapitalized for so long and i'll just note here by poc refers to artists who are black indigenous and people of color. What is happening with these communities. Well this summer one worries alicia. Johnston told me that they only have the funds to make it through the calendar year. I did check back with her earlier this week. And she says that right now. They've got about half the budget for twenty twenty. One heart of that came from contributions sparked by black lives matter but she told me those have tapered off and even though she describes herself as one worry self designated worrier about money. She's pretty hopeful that they'll raise the two hundred thousand dollars. They need to keep this community cultural center going. Marcy i know can county. And many private funds have funneled relief. Money to the arts sector. What are arts leader saying about what they need to survive. Many hope congress will enact another significant stimulus measure randy. Angst room would like to see a twenty first century version of the works progress administration. That was the depression era program that funded arts projects across the country. Local artists have already stepped up. And they've been making murals. And creating digital arts lessons plan for the public schools angstrom and many other folks think it's time to fairly compensate them for that work. And how optimistic is he that that might happen. I'm gonna let him answer that. I am hopeful because the creative community of the city gives me that help. I am hopeful because of the incredible resilience. I've seen and we need to meet that resilience with dollars and faith in their work but angstrom says the city cannot finance this on its own. They really need a major influx of federal dollars. At this point. Who knows when that's going to happen. We'll mercy speaking of resilience. I have to acknowledge. Even though i don't want to that this is most likely our last on air conversation about the arts as you retire from k. u. o. w. after a remarkable thirty five years. Marcy i just wanted to say thank you we're gonna miss you and all the attention and the advocacy for the arts. That you've paid <hes>. Here in this part of the world. I'm just grateful for all the work and thankfully that still lives online. It does indeed. It's been migrate pleasure working with you as the all things considered host. And i'll miss you. And i won't be gone from the world of seattle's arts and culture still always keeping my eagle eye on it.

Can Seattle arts groups survive the pandemic?

KUOW Newsroom

05:52 min | 7 months ago

Can Seattle arts groups survive the pandemic?

"Corona virus is a public health crisis of course but it's also devastated the economy it's been especially destructive businesses that depend on people gathering together in person tourism restaurants and the arts. Kyw's arts and culture reporter. Marcy silman has been monitoring the health of the regional arts and culture community. She spoke with kim. Malcolm about what. We might see moving forward so marcy for the past couple of months. You've been doing some deep dive reporting on how the pandemic has impacted our cultural communities. How would you describe what you found across the board. Kim organizations are treading water. If they haven't already drowned you might remember last march. When governor inslee issued his social gathering restrictions. everyone had to shut down operations museums and some art galleries have started to welcome back visitors. But they're at twenty five percent of normal capacity which just does not sound sustainable. And marcy you and i've talked about how performing arts groups and musicians have been streaming content and how it just doesn't cover the costs for many of them. So what are arts leaders telling you about this pivot to digital when it doesn't pay the bills. Peter bowl who is the artistic director at pacific. Northwest ballet told me that he pivoted digital because he wanted to give some work to the dancers musicians backstage artisans and other staff who would otherwise be unemployed. According to a new study from the seattle advocacy group arts fund. Thousands of area of workers are still jobless and even though as we said. Some venues have reopened. This survey found only about nine percent of local artisans and been rehired many back part time or reduce salaries but kim beyond providing jobs. I think that this pandemic has really forced performing arts groups to reckon with the digital age in a way that they hadn't done before the pandemic kit. And what do you mean by that. Well for at least a decade arts groups have been trying to figure out how they compete with free or low cost online content that arts fund study that i mentioned found that every responding group plan to permanently integrate digital content into their arts program offerings the ceo of arts fund. Michael greer told me that's partly because audiences are really leery about heading into enclosed spaces with lots of people that component that new revenue component is going to be essential to kind of filling the void of individuals. Trepidation do moving back into the theaters or just a general reorganization of how society interacts with itself. Not even just in the arts bottom line marcie will most arts groups survived this pandemic. It's really hard to say for certain. But to quote the head of seattle's office of arts and culture randy angstrom. The sector is on the knife's edge getting people to value in compensate artists and creatives for their time was already a challenge. Then the pandemic it and it was devastating. And i think that that devastation was disproportionately felt by by park organizations and artists because they've been underinvested and undercapitalized for so long and i'll just note here by poc refers to artists who are black indigenous and people of color. What is happening with these communities. Well this summer one worries alicia. Johnston told me that they only have the funds to make it through the calendar year. I did check back with her earlier this week. And she says that right now. They've got about half the budget for twenty twenty. One heart of that came from contributions sparked by black lives matter but she told me those have tapered off and even though she describes herself as one worry self designated worrier about money. She's pretty hopeful that they'll raise the two hundred thousand dollars. They need to keep this community cultural center going. Marcy i know can county. And many private funds have funneled relief. Money to the arts sector. What are arts leader saying about what they need to survive. Many hope congress will enact another significant stimulus measure randy. Angst room would like to see a twenty first century version of the works progress administration. That was the depression era program that funded arts projects across the country. Local artists have already stepped up. And they've been making murals. And creating digital arts lessons plan for the public schools angstrom and many other folks think it's time to fairly compensate them for that work. And how optimistic is he that that might happen. I'm gonna let him answer that. I am hopeful because the creative community of the city gives me that help. I am hopeful because of the incredible resilience. I've seen and we need to meet that resilience with dollars and faith in their work but angstrom says the city cannot finance this on its own. They really need a major influx of federal dollars. At this point. Who knows when that's going to happen. We'll mercy speaking of resilience. I have to acknowledge. Even though i don't want to that this is most likely our last on air conversation about the arts as you retire from k. u. o. w. after a remarkable thirty five years. Marcy i just wanted to say thank you we're gonna miss you and all the attention and the advocacy for the arts. That you've paid Here in this part of the world. I'm just grateful for all the work and thankfully that still lives online. It does indeed. It's been migrate pleasure working with you as the all things considered host. And i'll miss you. And i won't be gone from the world of seattle's arts and culture still always keeping my eagle eye on it.

KYW Marcy Silman Regional Arts And Culture Comm Marcy Governor Inslee Peter Bowl Northwest Ballet KIM Michael Greer Randy Angstrom Arts Fund Seattle Malcolm Marcie Pacific
"alicia johnston" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is komo. W i'm page browning. Corona virus is a public health crisis of course but it's also devastated the economy it's been especially destructive businesses that depend on people gathering together in person tourism restaurants and the arts. Kyw's arts and culture reporter. Marcy silman has been monitoring the health of the regional arts and culture community. She spoke with kim. Malcolm about what. We might see moving forward so marcy for the past couple of months. You've been doing some deep dive reporting on how the pandemic has impacted our cultural communities. How would you describe what you found across the board. Kim organizations are treading water. If they haven't already drowned you might remember last march. When governor inslee issued his social gathering restrictions. everyone had to shut down operations museums and some art galleries have started to welcome back visitors. But they're at twenty five percent of normal capacity which just does not sound sustainable. And marcy you and i've talked about how performing arts groups and musicians have been streaming content and how it just doesn't cover the costs for many of them. So what are arts leaders telling you about this pivot to digital when it doesn't pay the bills. Peter bowl who is the artistic director at pacific. Northwest ballet told me that he pivoted digital because he wanted to give some work to the dancers musicians backstage artisans and other staff who would otherwise be unemployed. According to a new study from the seattle advocacy group arts fund. Thousands of area of workers are still jobless and even though as we said. Some venues have reopened. This survey found only about nine percent of local artisans and been rehired many back part time or reduce salaries but kim beyond providing jobs. I think that this pandemic has really forced performing arts groups to reckon with the digital age in a way that they hadn't done before the pandemic kit. And what do you mean by that. Well for at least a decade arts groups have been trying to figure out how they compete with free or low cost online content that arts fund study that i mentioned found that every responding group plan to permanently integrate digital content into their arts program offerings the ceo of arts fund. Michael greer told me that's partly because audiences are really leery about heading into enclosed spaces with lots of people that component that new revenue component is going to be essential to kind of filling the void of individuals. Trepidation do moving back into the theaters or just a general reorganization of how society interacts with itself. Not even just in the arts bottom line marcie will most arts groups survived this pandemic. It's really hard to say for certain. But to quote the head of seattle's office of arts and culture randy angstrom. The sector is on the knife's edge getting people to value in compensate artists and creatives for their time was already a challenge. Then the pandemic it and it was devastating. And i think that that devastation was disproportionately felt by by park organizations and artists because they've been underinvested and undercapitalized for so long and i'll just note here by poc refers to artists who are black indigenous and people of color. What is happening with these communities. Well this summer one worries alicia. Johnston told me that they only have the funds to make it through the calendar year. I did check back with her earlier this week. And she says that right now. They've got about half the budget for twenty twenty. One heart of that came from contributions sparked by black lives matter but she told me those have tapered off and even though she describes herself as one worry self designated worrier about money. She's pretty hopeful that they'll raise the two hundred thousand dollars. They need to keep this community cultural center going. Marcy i know can county. And many private funds have funneled relief. Money to the arts sector. What are arts leader saying about what they need to survive. Many hope congress will enact another significant stimulus measure randy. Angst room would like to see a twenty first century version of the works progress administration. That was the depression era program that funded arts projects across the country. Local artists have already stepped up. And they've been making murals. And creating digital arts lessons plan for the public schools angstrom and many other folks think it's time to fairly compensate them for that work. And how optimistic is he that that might happen. I'm gonna let him answer that. I am hopeful because the creative community of the city gives me that help. I am hopeful because of the incredible resilience. I've seen and we need to meet that resilience with dollars and faith in their work but angstrom says the city cannot finance this on its own. They really need a major influx of federal dollars. At this point. Who knows when that's going to happen. We'll mercy speaking of resilience. I have to acknowledge. Even though i don't want to that this is most likely our last on air conversation about the arts as you retire from k. u. o. w. after a remarkable thirty five years. Marcy i just wanted to say thank you we're gonna miss you and all the attention and the advocacy for the arts. That you've paid Here in this part of the world. I'm just grateful for all the work and thankfully that still lives online. It does indeed. It's been migrate pleasure working with you as the all things considered host. And i'll miss you. And i won't be gone from the world of seattle's arts and culture still always keeping my.

seattle Marcy silman kim Malcolm Kyw reporter governor inslee twenty twenty Michael greer ceo Peter bowl congress Johnston k. u. o. w. director pacific
"alicia johnston" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KOMO

"Coming up here just momentarily six thirty one right now this is the komal morning news and it's forty two degrees in seattle right now we're expecting plenty of sunshine today i gregg hersholt i'm manda is off this morning these are some of our top stories from the komo twenty four seven news center we're hearing from lake stevens nurse who was at that concert in las vegas when the gunfire rang out and she says she prepared herself for what it would feel like to be shot komos carleen johnson is here to share some more of her thoughts us she is thirty five year old chelsea lay some mary just five months ago she was with a group of girlfriend's down at the country music festival having the best time and tell the gunfire rained down just says it took several seconds to realize what was happening and they knew they need to do ron he didn't move you're going to get we started running and i look over on my active cpr and and the gun she described running for their lives then with the shots would start up again they would crowd slow and get behind anything they could find ended up inside the chop a cana hotel hiding behind the bar crushed by panic people all huddled together she said she thought she was going to die right there this dress a people and how you can think the suitor comey honestly fifty shares it was much higher leith them is a registered nurse at the everett clinic a friend that was with her amy also a nurse stayed behind it helped people triage putting an ivs and closing wounds and found out the next day that she was doing all that with a broken wrist because she too had been trampled carleen johnson come on news also hearing a more from a north bend couple of especially a woman who was shot during that concert she hopes to be home from the hospital soon alicia johnston were just thirty yards away from center stage when the gunfire erupted nick says when they realised alicia had been shot he picked her up ran at jumped offence to escape the gunfire it was terrifying shop.

seattle lake stevens las vegas carleen johnson chelsea comey everett clinic nick ron alicia johnston forty two degrees thirty five year thirty yards five months
"alicia johnston" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Ban bumps stock a rifle attachments they make it possible for weapons fire hundreds of rounds per minute lee said a las vegas killer had twelve dumped stocks when he opened fire killing fifty eight people and injuring more than five hundred as those bullets were raining down sunday night a former snohomish county firefighter as his old instincts kick danny jumped into action taking over an unlocked ambulance so he could start saving people scott peterson says there were so many with her with horrific wounds and they just kept coming into the ambulance for help he sprained that those he treated survived their wounds the guy who was shot in the back i know sakhawy looks i when i closed ladder for i think about in i'll never forget that but eits hair let's hope the look and see if they are on that list because i i just and he told the dory montzen show today that he and an off duty officer probably treated more than fifteen victims let me travel member melinda brockie was shot in the cheek she's recovering from surgery now and other local women alicia johnston was shot in the back and is recovering at a vegas hospital the thirty one year old carry parsons originally from bainbridge island died in the attack they went on the attack on a muslim lift driver and they wanted investigated as a hate crime the council on american islamic relations has sent a letter to the fbi saying the driver was attacked because of his fate last month abdelwahhab costs was beaten by the customer will dry even on i 5 near everett causing him to crash into another car the snow miss county prosecutor's office says the suspect has not yet been charged after a series of bold necklace steps on the east side w police are advising people with expensive necklaces to consider not flaunting their fashion detectives are investigating a series of six incidences in september in which men wearing expensivelooking necklaces were targeted by a couple of guys who literally snatched the jewelry right off their necks a check on your forecast now sunny skies as you're heading home or at least clear skies overnight lows in the 30s and 40s sorta other cool morning backup to run seventy was son i'm cairo seven pinpoint meteorologist nick hour sixty six degrees now in seattle i'm kim shepherd on demand with a cairo radio cairo radio news 973 fm news we see a brought to you by chevrolet of puyallup and everett live from a carter subaru studio.

kim shepherd subaru miss county everett alicia johnston scott peterson danny snohomish county las vegas puyallup chevrolet lee seattle nick hour cairo prosecutor fbi bainbridge island parsons vegas hospital melinda brockie officer sixty six degrees thirty one year
"alicia johnston" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"alicia johnston" Discussed on KOMO

"Festival with his girlfriend another victim rachel parker who graduated from cheaney high school and spokane she worked for california police department and there are also the survivors melinda brockie of the loving nation is recovering from surgery tonight she was shot in the cheek jason hamid of boise needed surgery to remove a bullet in his knee his father says a 'nother grazed hammond's head and so many people that we're trying to help like my son and his wife to see the the type of injuries that's embedded in your mind goats we also know steve dean as to how much county and alicia johnston of north bend were also injured in the attack tonight we are hearing new incredible stories of survival as coming steve mccarron explains a local couple hid under bleachers to escape the gunfire and were some of the last to get out of that then you jeff betterment wife araj back home exhausted after a night of chaos zero sleep after what they witnessed norman bruce from family members never felt so good this moment of the bellingham airport coming just hours after jeff brennaman and his wife found themselves in the middle of the worst mass shooting in modern us history just when he thought things were over start again so we just absolutely were paralysed under the bleachers bullets flew right past them thought about their kids back home just call the say goodbye to be hard to try to help others to safety and saw some people die brought in front of a beautiful have have fun young good looking men women jeff and his wife worse over the last people out still wearing their bracelets from the concert all they want now is yes jeff is thankful he and his wife survived this heart goes out to the families of the dozens of victims who won't make it back home bacteria gain steve tonight police still have many questions about the shooter and is arsenal investigative say steven paddock had two gun stocks in his hotel room that can replicate fully automatic fire there are investigating whether the guns used had those modifications a gun shop owner in utah says he was shocked when he saw the news and recognize the shooter immediately he's been in my store he's frequented here a couple of.

norman bruce steven paddock steve bellingham steve mccarron alicia johnston melinda brockie utah jeff jeff brennaman rachel parker north bend steve dean hammond boise jason hamid california police department spokane cheaney high school