20 Burst results for "Alice waters"

Desperately Seeking Garifuna

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:53 min | 8 months ago

Desperately Seeking Garifuna

"Roof. How are you? I'm very well. How are you good? I went to the river cafe. I don't know fifteen twenty years ago and it took quite a while to there on the tube from downtown London but it was a marvellous location and a marvelous dinner. But you started really as a a sandwich place. I guess a commissary in your introduction to your new Book Thirty Years River Cafe. The quote is the River Cafe and his clientele are seriously diminishing the tone of area. What do you want to just explain what that meant? When we started the river cafe really it was a site of what used to be An oil refinery in London on the river with votes outside and at my husband who's architect was we were lived in Paris for five years when he was doing the Pompidou Centre. When we came back to London. We wanted to find a place that could be a community so that he could set up his architectural practice again. In place through there was a mix so it was a outside space as I said. We were on the river. They converted these warehouses into rather beautiful studios and offices are picture frames model makers dress designers and always. We always wanted to have a place where people could eat and I was working as a graphic designer. And Ed Always Cook but when the applications came in we thought you know what why are worse than not having a restaurant would be not to have a very good one and I just said I think I'll do it and I'll do with rose gray. Who's an old friend and had also come back from New York? I'm wanting to do something. So the two of US came and looked at the the site and it was tiny. It was enough. Maybe a bar tiny little kitchen and six tables. But the real restriction was that we're only allowed to be open for lunchtime because the neighbors who actually had oil warehouses here up in arms about the idea of a small restaurant so the planners that said we could be open Monday to Friday. We could only be open for lunch and only open to the people who worked and these warehouses. So that's where the sandwich bar. That's where the inexpensive very tiny little place started. But I think Rosen. I always had the ambition to be an Italian restaurant to be a proper restaurant. We just had to do it gradually. Here's a question. Sometimes you just leave something allowed like in your book very often. You don't add a lot of strong. Flavors is something that has a wonderful flavor to begin with you have a Dover Sole Rescue Capers in Marjoram Dover sole is often serve which brown butter and butter something very simple olive oil but capers in March. Very strong flavors is that how do you know as a cook when you? WanNa add strong flavors to something and other times? You don't is that something just whimsical. Or I think it depends. Well first of all depends on your mood. Sometimes I come into the river cafe because you know we changed the menu twice a day and if I have Dover sell on the menu I bite think well what am I going to put with the Dover so I might just put lentils with it today and therefore might like something interesting on the top like capers. I think as a cook the first thing I think about when I write the menu is what what do I feel like eating today. What would I want to eat? And that's one of the joys of working in the river cafe or I think I hope coming here so I think as you know the same thing we say. If you're cooking at home what what do you feel like eating and also not go shopping with a recipe in your head but go to the market. Go to the supermarket go to shop. See what's there and then you know the home and cook you know. A lot of chefs. Do a lot of different things. Jose entrees has twenty three restaurants Jeremiah Tower obviously you know moved around started things enclosed things. You've been doing this thirty years or so. Alice waters has been doing her GIG for forty years. Do you have a feeling about people like yourself who stick with it who start something and just keep getting better at it forces people who move around. Did you think one is better than the other widely? You love for thirty years doing this one thing. It obviously still excites you. By the way you're you're talking about your restaurant that's a good question. I think that it depends for me. It's about ambition and control. You know so I really. I've been asked to other restaurants. I've looked at other sites. We came very close to doing another restaurant. A couple of years ago and Mayfair and I'm always thinking about how to grow how to how to be better and sometimes I think that for me. It's about being better where we are. It's about everyday come in with a set of problems or or thinking about what to cook how to make the restaurant. Beautiful and how to make the waiters more knowledgeable in how to work with the chefs. Who want to learn more about ingredients in how to make our pastry kitchen know. There's so many so many things to do in the restaurant here that would it be possible to do it and have more. Some people really can do it for me. It would be really just so important to know that I if I did another restaurant that it would be as good as this one and this one. Wouldn't you know get less good because I was distracted by another one so I never thought of it as sticking with it because for me I have the best job in the world and I come in and I work with brilliant people and it's exciting

River Cafe Years River Cafe London Dover Sole Rescue Capers Dover Marjoram Dover United States New York Pompidou Centre Alice Waters ED Paris Rosen Mayfair Jeremiah Tower Jose
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:15 min | 8 months ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition so we just heard from some industrial. Who actually started her. Culinary career at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and. Her Mentor was none other than Alice. Waters Alice daughter Fanny Singer. Join me to talk about how shape unease is doing during the crisis and how we can keep local farmers and business by buying straight from the source Finney. I know that you are sheltering place that your mom right now in Berkeley of all. How are you guys doing? How are you holding up? It's it's sort of strange very surreal. Moment I live in San Francisco and I do still have apartment there. But you know it's a one bedroom apartment and my partner and I are together. We both were working at home. And there's no outdoor space than being in Berkeley was not just to be with my mom who I obviously concerned about to. Just because I wanted to fee `sort sort of insane person about disinfecting nail and all the things in a little bit more German centric than my mother so these things were these work concerns of mine but also I mean to be Berkeley in a place that has really rich outdoor environmental NGO to walk through one hundred thirty seven pad this in the hills of the Berkeley into just feel to walk for ten. Miles is like the only thing I think kind of keeping me from total insanity. Alice tell us a little bit about. What's going on with Chez Panisse right now? Obviously you've been closed for five. Maybe six weeks. What's going on with the staff right now. We really paid the step their time off so that when it comes time to reopen that they would be there and available we had the good luck to get a kind of bridge loan from some wonderful friends of the restaurant that are helping us get to the point where money comes from the government to pay people. Some are on unemployment and some are being paid a portion of their salaries. But it's really important to me that people are paid at this time. If I have to ask my friends I have my friends Alice. One of the things I read about which is super cool. is that Obviously you work with a lot of small farmers all over California and a lot of these farmers presumably. I mean they supply restaurants so first of all from your conversations with with farmers that you work with you supply your restaurant and other restaurants. I mean what is their situation like I mean? How long can they go like this without having restaurants to supply? It's very serious. What's going on with our whole organic farm community because they really have a only the farmers markets to bring food to and the number of people that are going to farmers markets is not what it usually is so. We're trying to figure out how to buy that food from the farmers and we have a project in Stockton California The mayor of Stockton is very enthusiastic about getting or Ganic Food in the public school system and serve at this moment in time. He asked if we could help buy food from the farmers said that he can give an stockton and I thought that that would be a perfect way for us to begin building that network that we're going to need for the public schools and were putting little recipes into the box so that people know how to make very simple dishes and may given at least four thousand pounds of food away in Stockton Alice. I I mean you've talked about this for years that when you were a little girl. Your parents had a victory garden at home in New Jersey and that you really are encouraging people to plant their own. Things actually inspired me so much. I've got some ceilings. Here can you see some big lettuce there? You go and I'M GONNA hopefully. That'll be lettuce in a couple of months. I mean I don't have a big backyard. I have a small space and got a planter but for people who don't have a backyard who might live in an apartment I mean what are some ways that people can think about growing their own food that keeps looking at Brown Finley and he started by chanting food out in front of his house? In that little parkway between the sidewalk and the street and it caused a lot of controversy and he actually cited for violating. Some ordinance got any went to court. He wanted his case and he actually has planted that whole strip of land. So sort of thinking about him. I did the same thing I cup. That little plop right in front of my Bad I think you can plant like you have done and planter boxes on a balcony. I hope that the community gardens began to surge research and unite. My mom planted the little section. That's just in front of our house because even though we do have a garden in the back she wanted people to think about this victory garden moment and the potential for even the most throwaway pieces of land. It's now planted with a few different edible things and she's already gotten notes through our mailbox thanking her for taking this kind of actions embolic being encouraging people. And you've just seen this proliferation of gardens now in people's sort of little forgotten front yards and people sowing seeds all around the neighborhood now and way. It's really incredible. I've just never seen anything like it before you know. One of the things that you've talked about is the idea of buying local produce supporting local farmers wherever you are in the country around the world and you know one of the questions that that we're getting from folks on facebook Tuesday from Bell Zelezny also which what are ways that we can help. Small farmers are other ways of their places where we can go buy things from them especially farmers who are used to providing restaurants. I if you are at a loss for who you're farmers are do. The work researching call the pharmacy. Are you having trouble? Are you imperilled? Is there a way that I can help? You facilitate a network of deliveries. Can I help you deliver? But also it might be a question of just helping them figure out logistics or even knowing who they are. Where their farms are I mean? I have friends in. La The lines were so long that they weren't able to get any food so they just started figuring out who the farms were that they could drive out to so they could still got great produce. And I mean it's been a little bit more problem solving and resourceful and also knowing that the farmers are maybe really good at growing vegetables. That don't necessarily know how to work. A whole distribution network. And if that's something that you have extra time for facility with like make the effort because they do need us

Berkeley Alice Chez Panisse Stockton Alice Stockton Fanny Singer Finney San Francisco Ganic Food Partner New Jersey Miles Facebook California Brown Finley Bell Zelezny
"alice waters" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

11:00 min | 9 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Eve. December twenty four th nineteen sixty eight on the first mission to go all the way out to the moon. One of the astronauts saw out of the corner of his eye. This amazing image. They didn't expect it. Sounds like a family on vacation in a station. Wagon off quick. Where's my camera? Give me some Golden Film Journal of near the right setting that come out. This one's called the blue marble and it was from POL seventeen. The last image taken by human being far enough out in space to see the planet hold the most published photograph in all of history. I do so many slide shows and presentations. I just never get nervous anymore. But I'm nervous before this one the very first climate underground conference here on Gore Farm. Al Gore's back and he's got a new slide. Show better take heed last October. The former Vice President Nobel Prize winner and Academy Award Winner for an inconvenient truth and activist restaurant tour. Founder of the Edible Schoolyard Alice. Waterson gathered farmers ranchers scientists shafts researchers and policymakers on his family farm in Carthage Tennessee for a riveting set of conversations about the world of food and regenerative agriculture in solving the climate crisis. They called the two day event the climate underground along with the conversations. Some of Nashville's hottest chefs joined Alice in creating a sustainable organic school. Lunch to highlight. The power of local school supported agriculture in nurturing the health of children and the land. This event happened long before the moment we will find ourselves in right now as the corona virus pandemic sweeps across the planet but it holds seeds and hope for a different approach to our future and the fate of the planet. Meal share in honor of birthday. The kitchen sisters present the climate underground as a child from first year my life all the way through until I was in college. I spent every summer here on this farm at Christmas and every spring vacation. My father told me how to recognize the best and most fertile soil with my hands in it and it was black and moist always believe agriculture in the food system are absolutely key to solving and mitigating the climate crisis. We have converted this farm to a whole variety of genitive practices a combination of plants and livestock with highly diverse cover crops and maximum use of no till the voiding synthetic insecticide. We harvested our first crop. According to these new practices in two thousand sixteen only three years ago. Some very excited that we have not only regenerative farmers but also scientists and entrepreneurs and chefs. We've got some really great. Where else course? Far and Carthage Tennessee. We are cooking to school lunches this for three hundred fifty people who are attending climate underground a about connecting food and farming to climate. I'm Alice waters the owner of shape pennies restaurant and Berkeley California and Co founder of the edible schoolyard project which has grown from one school in Berkeley to a network of seven thousand sent schools around the world. We're here today to acknowledge the land. Not just here in this area Paul over Turtle Island and the Americas. My name is Mary. Crow I'm a member of the eastern Ben is Cherokee. You are here today. Because you have a concern. You have a major concern about this oil about the air about the watcher. I'm really happy to introduce my partner in putting together this event. Alice waters who is providing all of the delicious and nutritious food in addition to her groundbreaking work as a chef and a pioneer in the Movement for organic and local food. Alice's also a committed advocate or the role that food and agriculture can play in protecting our environment. And you get started with the edible school projects really began. Then I had a child. I was a monetary teacher. The IDEAS HAVE MONTESSORI HAVE INFORMED. All of my work she believed in the education of the census ship believed in touching and tasting and smelling. When I started the edible. Schoolyard project is said. Food is subway to really open up the senses because it touches every one of them if we put in a garden and we put in the kitchen classroom. We could wake up. The young people who were have been sent sorely deprived many of them because of hunger and because poverty because of an indoctrination of fast food culture throughout most of human history the daily ritual and practice of collecting gathering preparing eating food together has been a key part of the connection between individuals and nature and in order to reestablish that connection for children you look for other opportunities than you found one in the school system. I mean that's the place where we can reach children when they're young and open idea of this is to have them fall in love with nature. Food is more than just food. Food is really about culture. We have been indoctrinated by fast food culture when we eat that we digest the values that come with the ideas uniformity. The ideas that we should have whatever we want whenever we want. It doesn't matter where it comes from cooking rusher farming stretcher we think advertising confers factor you the centerpiece of this project is a civilized sustainable school lunch. And before you focused on the school system and the edible schoolyard project your career as a chef was really transformative. What got you involved with that? It was all about taste for me. Taste and beauty. I had gone to France when I was eaten and it was a slow food nation. France kids came home for two hours to eat with their and every day people would go to the markets and their neighbor beautiful outdoor markets. And you bought only what was since. He's we go and eat in these family restaurants that are happening again. People see that making restaurant can be aware of lights. Fit Real connection with the people that come in and I love that about the restaurants I visited your and astral and I feel such kinship with that group of people are ready because we have the same values. That's what's important about this and what we need to communicate to the next generation. It's something that we've been doing since the beginning of ballistic gathering together eating only. What's in season? Only what's locally available even fast food culture with sake? It's impossible to feed kids in schools too many. They don't like you can't find the food but guess what we can Chapter one a fable for tomorrow there was once a town in the heart of America. Where all life seem to live in harmony with its surroundings? The town lay in the midst of checkerboard of prosperous far with fields of grain and hillsides have orchards. Where in the spring white clouds and blown drifted above the green fields in autumn. Oh can nate. Birch setup a blaze of color that flamed and flickered across a backdrop of by then Fox's bark hills deer silently. It was on this farm. Mother insisted that my sister and I listened to her. Read Aloud from Rachel Carson's silent spring. My Dad's Generation was really focused on soil conservation. Franklin Roosevelt made that a key part of the new deal. My parents generation understood that in their bones. They live through it. I will never forget. The fields of wheat. So blasted by heat cannot be harvested. I shall never forget. Field out the field of Con- stunted airless stripped of leave for what the sun left the grasshoppers took? I saw Braun. Pasqua would not keep a cow on fifty acres yet. I would not have you think for a single minute that there is prominent disaster. Released drought regions. No cracked no blistering Sun. No burning wind. No grasshoppers are permanent. Met for the indomitable American farmers and stockmen.

Alice Americas France Gore Farm Al Gore Golden Film Journal Nashville Vice President Nobel Carthage Tennessee Founder Waterson Berkeley Rachel Carson Pasqua Franklin Roosevelt Braun
"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"<Music> thank you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> alice waters every <Speech_Music_Male> day. She's working <Speech_Music_Male> to change the way we think <Speech_Music_Male> about food. You <Speech_Music_Male> can find out more about <Speech_Male> her edible schoolyard <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> project <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> edible <SpeakerChange> schoolyard <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot org. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> That's the end of another <Speech_Music_Male> episode of Bullseye <Speech_Music_Male> Bullseye produced at <Speech_Male> maximum fund dot <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> org world headquarters <Speech_Music_Male> overlooking MacArthur. Arthur <Speech_Music_Male> Parkin beautiful <Speech_Music_Male> Los Angeles <Speech_Male> California where we <Speech_Male> had rain <Speech_Music_Male> and hail this <Speech_Music_Male> week. <Speech_Music_Male> You know they say it <Speech_Music_Male> never rains in southern <Speech_Music_Male> California <Speech_Music_Male> but this week <Speech_Music_Male> gave the lie <Speech_Music_Male> to that claim <Speech_Music_Male> Also <Speech_Male> there was a lot of really <Speech_Music_Male> intense thunder <Speech_Music_Male> that freaked out <Speech_Music_Male> the seagulls. <Speech_Male> The show is produced. By <Speech_Male> speaking into microphones. <Speech_Male> Our producer Kevin <Speech_Music_Male> Ferguson. Hey <Speech_Music_Male> Soussan Broszio <Speech_Music_Male> our associate producer. <Speech_Male> We get help from Casey <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> O'Brien here in <Speech_Music_Male> our office. <Speech_Music_Male> Our production fellows are <Speech_Music_Male> Jordan cowling <Speech_Male> and Melissa. Dwayne yes <Speech_Male> are interstitial. Interstitial <Speech_Music_Male> Music is <Speech_Music_Male> by Dan Wally <Speech_Music_Male> also known as <Speech_Male> DJ. W <Speech_Male> If you like the music on <Speech_Music_Male> our show he made a collection <Speech_Music_Male> of it on band <Speech_Music_Male> camp that you can <Speech_Music_Male> pay what you want for <Speech_Music_Male> just search which <Speech_Male> for DJ W <Speech_Music_Male> Bullseye <Speech_Music_Male> van. Kampen and you can <Speech_Music_Male> grab it. There <Speech_Male> are theme. Song is <Speech_Male> by the team. <Speech_Male> THANKS TO THEM AND <Speech_Music_Male> THEIR LABEL MEMPHIS industries <Speech_Music_Male> for letting <Speech_Male> US use it go. <Speech_Male> Team <SpeakerChange> rule <Speech_Male> should buy their albums <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> one last thing. <Speech_Male> There are <Speech_Male> so many <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> interviews in the Bullseye <Speech_Music_Male> and sound of young <Speech_Music_Male> America archives. theives <Speech_Male> alice waters <Speech_Male> and I talked about <Speech_Music_Male> Jonathan Gold for example. <Speech_Music_Male> Jonathan <Speech_Music_Male> was kind enough to come <Speech_Male> over to my house in <Speech_Music_Male> Mount Washington Los Angeles <Speech_Music_Male> when I still recorded <Speech_Music_Male> this show <Speech_Music_Male> at home <Speech_Music_Male> and He <Speech_Male> was he was <Speech_Music_Male> a true genius. <Speech_Music_Male> He's gone now but he <Speech_Music_Male> was a true genius <Speech_Music_Male> and a special dude <Speech_Male> and a wonderful <Speech_Music_Male> interview subject and <Speech_Music_Male> we fought about <Speech_Music_Male> Burritos <Speech_Music_Male> and he told me <Speech_Music_Male> that he hates eggs but <Speech_Music_Male> he's still cooks for his children <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> anyway. You can find <Speech_Music_Male> that at our website. <Speech_Music_Male> Maximum Fund dot work. <Speech_Music_Male> You <Speech_Music_Male> can also find <Speech_Music_Male> lots of past just <Speech_Music_Male> interviews on your <Speech_Male> podcast. APP stood <Speech_Male> up your podcast APP. <Speech_Male> We're also on facebook <Speech_Music_Male> twitter and Youtube. <Speech_Music_Male> We Post our interviews <Speech_Music_Male> there as well search <Speech_Music_Male> for Bullseye with Jesse <Speech_Music_Male> Thorn and I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> think that's about it just remember <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all great. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Radio hosts have a signature. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Sign <SpeakerChange> off <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Bullseye. With Jesse <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thorn is a production <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of maximum <Speech_Music_Female> fund dot Org <Speech_Music_Female> and is distributed <Speech_Music_Female> by. <SpeakerChange> NPR WE <Music>

Jerrelle Guy on Her New Cookbook 'Black Girl Baking'

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Jerrelle Guy on Her New Cookbook 'Black Girl Baking'

"Gerald how are you I'm doing really well thank you you were born in Lantana I guess it was an interesting place I I would say it was lower you right there was Jamaican Cuban Haitian food and culture so the food must have on my father's side you know things that my grandmother made just really really hardy she put ketchup in it which sounds strange now but it is nice sweetness so it was definitely you became a Vegan as a result in you so you really changed your entire dia in all of that so by becoming Vegan that sets you apart from your family and you know starch heavy because a lot of it too you know we're trying to feed a large food that I loved and I wanted to taste but that fit by Diet how I would watch the food network as a little girl and how I would see this huge contrast reality probably for a lot of people but even just the way that we approached and then she would leave like excess food in the ball I'm when she was transferring over were like who eats that like I don't know I didn't I didn't process yeah I was curious about what kind of world is that she could live in and not feel haning food scraps Just talk about that if you would for second no no I just got really inspired because I was going through this period where I was just very overwhelmed with mental state and so I was cleaning it out and I was taking my jars and I was that was really what I did with that project I just took old jars from my fridge and and it was just a fun project to help people think about ways that they can Belinda took over the Internet and the food it was a social media thing yeah that Aqua instead of egg white and aqua is just the Brian that you could get from just whip that up just like you would an egg white and then you just folded into instead of heavy cream oftens which my wife would look charcoal banana bread so it's and I think that it's just me you know I think that it it's all of the things it because I call the book that but I think that that's what makes it real you know like people on authenticity and food and just play with the techniques that you've learned then all of these new ideas just come up like it didn't feel like I was all whole wheat pastry flour mix it with white flour does that that because I feel like I can work it for a while because I have hot hands then I feel like sometimes I'm like you know depending on the temperature while you're there may Gerald thank you so much it was just a pleasure to speak with you I really enjoyed it thank you

Gerald
"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

"So many people are talking about income inequality in the United States, and the difference between the owners of the city owes and workers. You give your workers in the restaurant stock options. Guess? It's fairly revolution. Fairly revolutionary path. I guess again you. You have the pleasure of working with a group of people, not in that pyramid structure of neural restaurant kitchen, chef at the top, and there's sort of the workers at the bottom. When you're working more team that, that seems right to, to have them benefit from the success of the restaurant must've been seductive, though, the idea that you could open all these restaurants across the country, Niccolo.

Niccolo United States
"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

"I bought the napkins full. I can pick flowers in the neighborhoods, but on the table because I've wanted to to. Beautiful and food. Good food was kind of the center of conversation in connection to the community and sexually. When Alice waters returned from Paris. She landed in the middle of the antiwar movement. It was the nineteen sixties in Berkeley, California ground zero of the counterculture, she became politicized and listened carefully to Marius obvio- leader of the free speech movement when he talked about how we are all responsible for one another. She took the message to heart even before you opened the iconic now shape as one of the best known and revered restaurants in America. You were having small dinners, very interesting people in Berkeley tells about that time, right before you opened your. Offensive line. David goin-. Was a good friend of a number of people that were printing. No small newspaper in San Francisco's cold, the San Francisco express times, and so they would have meetings at our house. And I would be there to listening to their conversations about what they wanted to put in the newspaper and then David had this idea. Well, why don't we do a restaurant? Called a Dallas restaurant. And so I would try and find a recipe to be part of that column. Pushed me and to asking everybody on new. What do you like to eat? Do you have a special recipe that I could use for this column and I started making these dishes at home, and then feeding them to the people that gathered to work on the newspaper, and they have to what I cooked and your friends kept coming back, and they wanted more and more. Isn't that point you realized that maybe you had a special gift for cooking? I wasn't sure that I had a gift for cooking. But I knew that I had a gift for. Finding the ingredients finding the dishes, the people like to eat of it still intimidated by the cooking process. So that's why relied on on recipes from other people. I wasn't at all. Ready team bravados? Luckily, someone gave me the book the cookbooks of Elizabeth David. And her recipes were very bare bones. And so I had to interpret what she met. And sometimes I was less successful, sometimes it's more, but she gave me a real aesthetic about food that the simplicity of the, the purity of it. She instill through her beautiful writing, you didn't seem to find recipes is that fair. That's fair to say or measuring things. Exact. So what is it if it's not a quarter Cup of this and ship that what's the driving? Success of a good meal. I think it all has to with ingredients. It's about ripeness. It's about finding the red olive oil and tasting and compare, but finisher to wanting us how much garlic in ways tasting and adjusting all to the end. But I, I cook fairy very simply. You to cook with others? I love to cook with people I do. And I usually have friends come for dinner on Sundays, and I, I buy the ingredients, and then they all come and we talk about what we wanted to do. And it's the way that we could shape unease. We don't have space that we follow. Yes, we do in pastry, certain quantities because you need that. But we are using our oral history of cooking in, in the in the kitchens were being inspired by cookbooks. But we're, we're really fine tuning it together and every day it's a new day. So if Alice waters was left on a desert island. No, nothing else. But you can bring four ingredients like what else all of? A really great low for Pratt. And a salad. Let's talk about. Let's talk about this. Are credited with many things a slow food movement helping women in the field go cheese. American go cheese. Everybody talks about before L waters. It was it was just from France. And the salad really changed the way Americans eat salad. How'd you do that? I sell it inference, and it was kind of revelation to me because it was served as special courts after the main dish, and the idea was that it sort of cleansed your pellet. And so it was never a really big salad, if was a mixture of things now the salad that I'm probably most known for is the mess. Clint salad. And that word means a mix of things, and it was very special mix in the south of France. If we have, you know, garlic sometimes anchovies, sometimes I was kind of a peasant kind of mix of things. The, the farmer Picton. His field always had roquettes or rocket and areas head probably dandy lion greens. Things are a little bitter freezing. Maybe some colored lettuces like oak-leaf red Oakley. I, I took those scenes, and I brought them back here, they let you through customs ever told anybody. And I planted them in my backyard. And when the restaurant really started I had a whole salad garden that covered my whole lawn in the backyard and so right beside you for those listening on this podcast. It looks like a flower arrangement for me. It's the mixture that makes magic. Let's talk about nineteen seventy-one don't have that much money to say the least you're only twenty seven, and you want to open a restaurant. How did you pick the place? That's now on Shattuck avenue that millions of people have gone to. Well, I was looking at a lot of different places in perkasie with my friend, my good friend, Tom lady. So we went to places that were sort of a little too dark too big. And then we saw house on Chadha caffeine, that was a plumbing shop, if just, just two story stucco, but it was commercially sound and I sit. It could be an house could be just like serving my friends at a plumbing shop, a plumbing shop it had pipes front yard. So it looks like a house looked like at the time, there was selling. And you thought, okay this, why not call it Alice's restaurant? Alice's restaurant. That's what's attached to L on the coast. And I knew I didn't want my name in fault. I had gone to see movies with Tom lady renting a repertory theater, and I saw the film's Penuell Marcel Haniel, and I fell in love with these films made in the thirties in France. Yalo. Pretty more personalization. Passe de LA de we did a Michelle line by Nissan on Ohio and one of the characters in films for his name was pennies. It had a certain ring to it..

Alice waters France Elizabeth David Berkeley Clint salad Tom lady San Francisco America Marius obvio David goin California Paris Dallas Penuell Marcel Haniel Nissan perkasie Pratt Chadha caffeine
"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on What It Takes

"If you are my then you remember when salad meant only one thing iceberg lettuce chunks of pale tomato. And maybe if you were lucky some shredded carrots, with rushing dressing, of course, farm-to-table Lok of war, sustainably raised those terms, those ideas didn't exist in the nineteen sixties and seventies. And there was no such thing as a foodie. But then along came Alice waters, I was looking for taste is really looking for taste. And ultimately, I ended up at the doorsteps of the organic local farmers.

Alice
"alice waters" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on 1A

"And on the latest episode of how I built this how Alice waters pioneered the farm-to-table movement and revolutionized American cuisine along the way check it out on how I built this from NPR. Let's go back now to our conversation on Hobie in charge of immigration policy in this country as Kirstin Nielsen resigns from the top job at the department of homeland security responding with Alanya Trine White House reporter from axios and Daniel Griswold of the trade and immigration project at George Mason University Elena, what do we know about cures to Nelson's reputation at DHS, certainly a loyalist for President Trump. There are thousands and thousands and thousands of rank and file workers at D H S who are bureaucrats government workers have a job to do not terribly political not Trump loyalists or Obama loyalists. They just do a job. How did she do with that giant swath of the bureaucracy? While you gotta hand it to her in some ways, she did come in. A time. When I think she was the president had very high expectations of her in really wanted to to crack down on our immigration system. And I think that a lot of people have a lot of respect for her as they did for John Kelly who was of course, the first secretary of homeland security, and then she followed in his footsteps when he became chief of staff, and I think a lot of people the rank and file the career officials did have respect for her. But a lot of her policies or the policies that she implemented while there were very controversial. Again, the separate the child's operation probably being the biggest of them. And I think that's also going to stay with her now that she's exiting. I think a lot of people are saying look, she'll go get some cushy job. Don't feel too bad for her her policies were very controversial. And I think that's going to continue to stay with her for some time that herself that she was worried about her reputation, and maybe stayed on longer than she would have because she knew that life would be hard once she left the Trump administration and the reputation that she hit earned for herself. At HHS. Right. And it is it's interesting to see because I think while she was there. I don't think a lot of these policies she had envisioned implementing, but this is a lot of this came from the top from the president. And of course, these hard line voices. Like, Stephen Miller wanting to really crack down on this system. So it will be very interesting to see what she does next. We'll do I want to talk to you about this giant organization two hundred and forty thousand employees as I mentioned a big bureaucracy with a lot of different of a lot of different responsibilities. We heard from Donald from Arlington just a couple of moments ago. And I and I want to bring him back and have him repeat what he said because it really goes to how you manage not only this huge bureaucracy a bit at a time of of of tumultuous politics, where orders are coming from the top and and bubble up policy decisions are not being implemented the way they normally are. Here's Donald from Arlington. Donald from Arlington Virginia homeland security was poorly. Put tha. -gether after nine eleven and it should be broken up into three parts one to FEMA and the national coordination center for communications which deals with emergencies and flooding then border control, which is deals with people crossing into the United States coming to the United States and customs, which is a tax organization, so there'd be should be three entities that will better operate separately. Dan, Donald seems like he's intimately familiar with h s in what it's responsible for. He says break it up FEMA emergencies border, protection, and immigration and customs and excise essentially the taxing function. What do you think about terrorism and all the other responsible? I don't know the details. But I think he's put his finger on a truth after September eleventh. There was this drive in Washington to do something to centralize. And clearly we need to we needed to reform the.

President Trump Donald Alanya Trine White House Obama department of homeland Alice waters Arlington NPR DHS Kirstin Nielsen George Mason University Elena Hobie Daniel Griswold FEMA Stephen Miller Trump reporter Washington axios
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Dan, pashmina the sport full on his latest culinary obsession, Dan. How are you? I'm doing Well, Chris we're gonna do a little audio experiment right now. Step into my lab if you will. I want you to put your listening ears on. I have two different potato chips in front of me right now. Chip a and chip be. And I want you to tell me based solely on the sound of the crunch, which chip is fresher crisper better. Okay. Okay. I'm ready. It comes chip a. Yeah. Okay. And now ship be. Well, I would say be is clearly crunchier and a better chip fresher to right from a distance. Yes. I would say that's true. Yeah. What if I were to tell you that those two chips were identical. No one was definitely louder man. Well, I was playing tricks with you, Chris, but it was not by getting closer farther from the microphone Efren Jared here on the soundboard brought down the volume for the first ship and put up the vying for the second ship. Okay. But we just replicated a famous experiment and experiment by researcher named Charles Spence in the UK who did this experiment by having people. Eat chips, all the chips read dental. They were Pringles and he had people eat chips in front of a microphone while wearing headphones attached to the microphone, and he adjusted the volume some ships sounded louder than others, and what he found is that these sounds that foods make when we bite into them affect how we perceive that they taste. Oh, I think that's true. Well, of course has some Blumenthal famous. Chef in England, you could actually put ear buds in and listen to the sounds of the sea is you're having a seafood multicourse extravaganza. Right, right. Yeah. He gave you an ipod at your table. You would listen to the sounds of the ocean while eating seafood people. Steve, it'd be fresher. Yeah. It obviously has strong emotional sound has has a lot of affect on your motions and your perception. Yeah. And actually the research shows that association of crunch even extends to the bag. The connection is not as strong with the packaging as it is with the food itself. But there is still a demonstrable connection that when the packages noisy, we perceive the chips themselves to be noisier, and fresher and Chris crispy crunchier. Okay. That that's new. I didn't know that. But it makes sense. Now, you mentioned. Yeah. Anything other than potato chips were the packaging has a sound association. Well, the other thing that I'm fascinated by is not just the sounds that foods make when we eat them with the sounds that are made in the cooking process, and what we can learn from those sounds so the best most obvious example is sizzle right when you put a piece of meat into a hot pan or onto a grill. There should be a sizzle that tells you that the may are reaction is taking place the Browning reaction if it doesn't make that sound you're in trouble. That's true. And I learned recently. There's something you can learn about scallions, you can tell whether or not you're slicing them correctly based on the sound road. Oftentimes, I feel like in the movies TV shows, you see people chopping scallions, and they're doing very quick up and down you hear that that sound of the hard. The knife hitting the cutting board chop chop chop chop, and that's wrong. And that's wrong. Why because when you prepare vegetables like scallions you're supposed to slice through them to get an ice clean slice. If you wack them upside down, you bruise them, and you don't get a clean cut. That's right. And and when you when you press down too hard on them, you're you're releasing the more acidic components of the onion as opposed to clean cut, right, which keeps those cells sealed and allows overtime the sweetness to come through. So I have some audio samples for you here. You're ready. Go ahead. Here's the first clip. This is that chopping. This is the incorrect way to slice scallions. See here that hard shopping that vertical motion. Now, let's listen to the correct way to slice sky. This more horizontal slow smooth. Slicing instead of shopping..

Pringles Chris crispy Charles Spence Dan Efren Jared England Blumenthal researcher Steve UK Browning
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"A bunch on Jons for forty five minutes de glaze wine, it keep doing that four or five times. And then you get a dark rich soup. Same concept, but it's always low and slow, right, sir. Always low and slow because the thing about onions is that the same thing that makes our eyes water. These sulphurous compounds is the same thing that when cooked low and slow give. Great depth the flavor. But if you try to cook, those onions really fast, they'll sort of tastes like watery with crust on the outside you won't develop that wonderful depth the flavor. I don't think salt is the issue. I always season at the beginning. I have a second question about salt. Okay. So I'm also in a debate with my mother who's kosher cook. And we're talking about when to salt meat, and she thinks that we shouldn't sell too much beforehand because of the way that kosher meat is processed and that is in already imbued with so much already. But I think that regardless I think I should add did you guys know about that with because like she thinks coach tickets already been Brind. They have to have okay, Brian. But they've been coated insult. I wouldn't brine a kosher chicken because it would be too salty. You could solve the exterior before just to get credit speech. You know, salty skin. But yeah, I wouldn't know pretty soon. Kosher bird is not to be Brian because it essentially it is already. So we re with your on that one. Cool. Coco she'll be led to hear that. All righty. Our work is done. Well to have a cocktail. It's great. Thanks for calling. This is mostly radio. I'm Christopher Kimball. It's time for this week's Millstreet basic. Most commercial Grenadines today are to thinking Lee sweet they're also fluorescent red made from corn syrup in artificial colors and flavors, but at London's retro modern dandelions bar on the Thames we discovered refreshing update of Grenadine a cocktail mixer traditionally made, a pomegranate juice sugar, Dan, the lion. They simmer. Elderberry, sour cherry pomegranate. Juice into syrup spiked with cumin for a pretty sophisticated sweetener. We created a simpler but.

Brian Jons Christopher Kimball Coco Brind London Lee Dan forty five minutes
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Shop recently with a buddy of mine and me are experimenting with different polices or the doughnuts. Then having a problem with them crystallizing after I've played the donuts and sort of getting riddle and following off. And I was wondering if you had any tips on how to pack. What is in your glaze? Well, it usually starts with a syrup base either like fruit puree with sugar or maple syrup or Honey, and then I'll whisk in confectionery sugar. And I recently started adding Sach such as butter or white chocolate or shortening and also corn syrup product. And that tends to help with FIA the crystallization, but it's still sort of happened on some of them. And I think it may have to do with reheating them or like they dry out in the fridge. I'm just not sure I was gonna say corn syrup that was my answers. Yeah. Nothing left to say. But what percentage of sugar is the corn syrup usually five to ten percent of the powdered sugar. Same with shortening fat. I'm shooting around five to ten percent. It seems to help but after heating and cooling, maybe that's causing the crystallization, or you know, the other things I can think of is like doughnuts being too hot or the glazing to when it goes onto the Donut. What do you do that you take the donuts out glazing right away or you let them cool a little bit? Usually let them cool like up to an hour. So before I get to them. And then glaze, I'm trying to get as close to just warm as possible in the industry when you research before you open, the shop, did they say to glaze the donuts there at a certain temperature is what I've been reading and seen from other industry, folks, I'm savory chef by trade. So this is sort of new to me, the whole confections of things I would think that if they called then you might have. Stable adherence between the glaze and the Donut because if it's cooling there's steam coming off. I don't know. I would try perfectly cool doughnuts. And see if that helps let me just throw out something else. You know, when I glazed donuts, just at home with a simple glaze of powdered sugar milk vanilla usually I've been advised to let them call very slightly and to put the glazed on Routier warm. Maybe try very called. Because you've got a heated, glazed glaze. I do is not heated triumph. Right. When they you know, like four minutes, five minutes out of the oven. Have you found that it depends on the humidity of the day or the temperature outside or is? Absolutely. So can I come to your shop and get a discount on the ones with a messy.

Routier warm FIA ten percent five minutes four minutes milk
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Right now heading into the kitchen to milk street. The chat with aditorial director James Hirsch about this week's recipe pasta. Jayme. How are you? I'm doing great. It's pasta bean day here straight. It is fuzzy Oli or has a lot of people say federal. Look, this recipes done hundreds of times, I've done many times you've done it. But you went to Italy to see if there was something new or something old that we don't know here. Yeah. You know, it is such a simple dish. And I guess that's what tractive me too because they're such simple ingredients. But they have an amazing amount of flavor. And that they bring to the table and it didn't hurt that. I learned it at this. Crazy winery that used to be owned by the mafia apparently the government took it away from the mafia and gave it to every tired stolen, art inspector to run. In the meantime, of course, of course, because it's Sicily. And as it turns out, his personal chef was willing to teach me basic rustic, Sicilian cooking, and this was one of the dishes. She taught me the minute. I walked into her kitchen. I was just blown away by the rich aromas of fennel, and Rosemary and garlic. And it turns out that what she'd done is throw some birdie beings into a pot that had been soaked overnight for some wild fennel that she grabbed from the driveway of the winery a ton of Rosemary. And garlic cooked them away. And when the beans were done tossed in some pasta stirred it all together. And it was a raiders good for such a simple collection of ingredients to have such an amazing flavor. Profile there were layers of richness and creamy, and yet there was no dairy in it. So why is this different than the eighty nine versions all been through your? I think the problem with most versions is that the focus is on the beings here. The beings are kind of like a starchy counterpunch to the rich fennel, the rich, Rosemary and the garlic. I mean, those are really the dominant flavors that you're getting and they're married in this kind of starchy liquid from the beings and from the pasta. So and so the result is really rich and creamy an hour Matic and again for such a simple group of ingredients. It just has an amazing impact on the plate. So I assume when we got back here did you make any alterations to that rescue? We did we made a couple of first of all we simplified it for weeknight ease. We used canned beings, and we were very happy with. Because in part, the can't beings have that starchy water you need to get the creamy sauce that we were looking for the other thing, we did was we found it was a little heavy and we wanted to lighten it up a bit. And even the dish a second time elsewhere in Sicily, and that time the woman making it added some tomatoes, which we like so we borrowed that to kind of bring a little bit of acidity to it. And finally, we felt that a little bit of lemon juice, and lemon zest also helped high everything together and bright, and it also really played well with Rosemary, so pasta. Call fun. Joel I say. Basic recipe, but now authentic and much more. Interesting. Also, not very difficult. Very simple jam. Thank you..

Rosemary Oli James Hirsch Sicily mafia Jayme raiders director Italy Joel milk
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"But I have to say it's it is more than taste. They are also opening up all of their senses. There's milling things they are touching things as part of their math class when they're planting the seeds. It's the whole experience of doing it yourself and empowering yourself. Around food that changes than I think forever. Okay. Now, we're going to change topics briefly. So while you were growing up college after you were thrown out of your fraternity on morals charges, which was drinking. I think which really shocked me, and then then you told the story about living in Berkeley, and someone broke in and tried to rape you, and you actually just propelled yourself out the window to escape and that must have been a this is what are the mid seventies. Yes. Thank seventies. It was. And I didn't know that. I had that in me. And yet when the when that happened I was willing to scream jump out a window. So it said a lot about you. Well, it it kind of empowered me way that I didn't expect that I'm I guess I'm willing to take risk. And that's that was very important to me to know that about myself at an early age. Could you read for me you quote, oh to autumn as one of your favorite poems? I believe it's in your book on some page or other. Maybe just read the last part of it to swell the gourd. I just thought it was wonderful and just tell us about why you put that in the book. I put it in the book because it was such a sensual food oriented pony Nettie wrote and I love the season of mist and mellow fruitfulness. Close bosom friend of the maturing, son. Conspiring with him how to load in bless with fruit. The vines that round the thatch aged run to bend with apples that mosit- cottage trees and fill all fruit with ripeness to the core to swill the gourd and plump the Hazel shells with a sweet Colonel to set budding more and still more later flowers for the B's until they think warm days will never cease for summer has brimmed. Their clammy cells. Wow. Is that is that Keats who who wrote that Keats? Yeah. Let's talk about food your favorite recipe is mint tea. I think actually. T? But so explain that, please. It's my favorite recipe because it only has two ingredients meant and water. Boiling water. And I just love recipe like that. But surprised that's all it is. But if you have the best tomato. A little salt little that's it. Your book really the theme that comes through for me is that your restaurant and your your career and your life going back to your mother. You said I was running a counter culture restaurant was so long, really. And and so. You're always fighting against the culture, her parts of the culture, you currently would describe it's fast food, or as you said, we're leaving our land behind we're forgetting about our children. So you restaurant is really a an expression of your view of the world today. I think you have said it will. Indeed, it is. Right. Hope it is. And I hope that people come feel that when they're there that they. Feel the hospitals the openness of the restaurant the determination that we have around to how we purchaser food. We put the names of the farmers on the menu. We've done that for years and years nears and people come and say are, you know, are moss Massimo does peaches their. Yes, you know. And it's it helps to make the connections for people that that the taste comes from the people who take care of the land. Alice. Thank you so much for your time. Oh, you're so welcome. Thank you. that was else. Waters. Memoir is called coming to my senses. The making a counterculture cook. I I met Alison shape in east back in the nineteen eighty she was sitting at a table shelling peas, and she didn't look like the typical restaurant chef two decades later returned shape as for dinner, and it was really struck by the food the essence of each ingredient was preserved and course, naturally presented by the fact that Alice had persevere she shown up if you will when so many other food celebrities gone onto other restaurants and other careers that got me thinking about the good life. Perhaps. It's simple enough..

Keats Alice Berkeley Nettie rape Massimo Alison two decades
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Coming to my senses waters explains what shapes review that food can be an instrument of social change. Let's go back to the beginning. So you're young you grew up in New Jersey. And you say I get dressed. It was so cold in the house in the winter. I get dressed down in the basement by the furnace where my father was shoveling coal that is almost dickens quality. No. So you actually had a coal furnace. And you'd get dressed right next to the coal furnace on a cold winter morning. Well, I didn't because he had to stoke the furnace to get the heat coming through the radiators. That's that happened every morning, and my sister where sleeping way of students in the attic part of the house. It was cold. My favorite story, though, which I will repeat on radio since he wrote about it was that the Montessori school, and you had you had a child who who bit a lot who was a biter and you decided 'cause when you think with your sister when you fought her you used to bite back and you actually bit him back. And I was I don't know why I guess it's not funny. But the idea of Alice waters and the Montessori school biting back a child who's a biter. Just I don't know it struck me somehow so exactly what happened. It happened. Very impulsively. I wasn't used to being around really young children. And I certainly hadn't been around any that where misbehaving, and I didn't know what to do. And I was about twenty six years old. And I I had learned the Montessori method tonight try to to interest him in, you know, the projects and and he just. Wouldn't stop. And I just heard another child, I just grabbed his arm. I didn't pay him hard. But I was ashamed that I did that and. I thought that I was a whiz being let go from the school because of that incident. But in fact, it was instead because I was wearing rather miss Kay blouse. A see through blouse. And then you went on to other things. So let's talk about your parents. You said it was a wonderful thing. You wrote about your mother before she died. You said speaking to you, you live the life. I wanted to live. So what did that mean? Well, have she was a communist? And she just felt very strongly about how much money people shouldn't may can. Sort of Hanley was. Thinking about. About distributing things. Equally among everyone. And I think she saw me. Taking those ideas. I have also learned them during the free speech movement in Berkeley in the sixties. And she was instead of other parents other parents were afraid of their kids involved in those demonstrations. And my mother was so proud of me. You know that I would stand up and say when something was wrong and immoral and when she died, she. She whispered that to me that I. That I lived a life that she wanted to have what a wonderful thing to say. So your daughter brings tears to. You talk about beauty, which I thought was interesting. You said we have no idea what it means anymore. And then you said something I really caught my attention. He said we've been made to feel the beauty is expensive. You wanna just talk about that? I would love to talk about that. Because we. Have a number of principles of edible education at the edible schoolyard project, and one of them is.

Montessori school New Jersey Berkeley Hanley Kay twenty six years
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"How can we help you well years failing to recreate the dishes that I the India generally, do the lack of the authentic gradients in North America. Thickly? I'm having shoes with Asian recipe, they're smaller lately sweeter. And of course, pinker than North American lands. But they don't discolor like right onions do after long cooking, and there are less sweet than daily while wall. So with onion four wet curries like dopes out or even something in the background like butter chicken, you end up with a great greatly attempt to let a coin if you wanna wallow over something like that. We're just something to every usually just to many. Your evening Andrew larger American yellow on. Let me ask the question yellow onions or sharp when they're raw. But in our testing at milk street, we find they actually turn sweet do you. Find is just the amount of onion or do you? Find the yellow onions or still too overpowering when cooked. What is the biddable, but you just end up with a completely different volume of onion, solid. I know Sarah's going to say so yeah, he knows when I say, well, how about shallan because they are sweeter than a yellow on you. But not cloying Lee. Sweet. I you know, we tried to shell us. It's just not the same flavor is very different. I mean, if you're big complaint is volume I would think just a yellow onion to sous les as the simplest thing. I would think getting the spices, right and using whole spices and toasting them doing all the things you should do. We'll make much difference than whether using yellow or pink onion. Right. I mean, that's really the crux of it. Hopefully neck to gray with that assessment. I would agree with that. You know, the sort of sidebar here is also the total lack and Pavane ability of genuine cashier chili which ends up being introduced many of those careers. We need that dividend that color and everyone tries to. Approximated with coming in. Lent. That's what you out doesn't make sense. You are one serious cook. I wanna come to your house. How? We do our own curing smoking weed you our own renting, I'm building a salami cave. Actually out of a homage. Okay. That's a lie scared visited Slama cage. I have never met someone who built their own. That's pretty cool. I am super press. Yeah. Now, we're inau and we've not helped you all thank you so much. Always said was us less yellow onion. That was our brilliant addition culinary dilemma well. You know what I appreciate that? Thanks. Really good day. That's that should be a my bucket list. Bill salami cave. Right. I mean, just the name..

Andrew Bill salami pinker North America Slama cage India Pavane Sarah Lee milk
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Hi, this is Laura from mobile Kentucky. How are you? I'm well. How about you? I think we're quite perky today. I don't know. What's wrong? Can we know I'm they can't on my own breads more often lately and through in a handful of sunflower seeds to one of my low, and they were roasted insulted and within twenty four hours every one of sunflower seeds had turned a bright green. And so initially I thought it was mold. I thought molded really quickly, and I had a refrigerated the loaf and everything and I did a little bit of digging. And I found a couple of websites that said that might happen. But there wasn't a good reason or any kind of ideas for how to mitigate the greenness that happens. So you all what you thought about that certain foods are sensitive to changes in PH balance and sunflowers are one of them. So when they're put into a batter that has baking powder baking soda, both of which are alkaline that can cause them. Them to turn green with just a little bit of time passing. What did you have in their baking powder or baking soda baking soda? Yeah. Which is more alkaline than baking powder. I would just try to reduce the amount of baking powder in the recipe if you could and add a little bit of lemon juice and that should help. But here's the thing. Even though they're green, which is very hard. It's like green eggs and ham to eat something that credit shouldn't be green. That is green. It won't hurt. You. That's good to know. Easy for you to say. I know I green. But that is really what it is. It's a chemical reaction in that interesting. You know, if if the state of the sunflower seeds before matters like whether there is did or salted or neither very good question. Here's the thing. I would've thought that roasted would have made a difference. But apparently it didn't in your case. No. So you could use sunflower seeds east bread. Yes. Is just when you have a what? Yeah. Because you have baking soda, so it's the alkaline the soda part of it. That makes them turn collar just change the name of the bread to green something. Yeah. I mean, that's what I think. Un-filed? Yeah. Right position. Don't apologize. Never won't Julius. Never never. Explain just presented his that's the way. It was supposed to be some mazing. Green, son. Have these bright green muffins, why not possession? Right. All right, Laura. So it's it's a question of food chemistry. Yes. All right. Thank you, all so much. Thank you. Bye. Bye. Bye. Welcome to milk street. Who's calling? Hi, my name's John Riley. Where are you.

Laura Green Kentucky John Riley twenty four hours milk
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"I'm when she was transferring over like, she would like mix a cake batter, and then put some of the cake batter into a pan. But then there was always something that left in the bowl. And I would just go crazy looking at that thinking what like who eats? Well. Well, I I don't know. I just didn't I didn't process in my mind and made me just feel very there were just two different worlds. You know, like like I is much as I was angry at her like I was curious about what kind of world is that she could live in and not feel like this like somebody's pulling out your stomach like it was just about like such a wrong thing to do. I don't know like you were let leaving someone hungry. You did a really cool thing. Canning food scraps. Just talk about that. If you would for second. I did a fun sponsorship project with Morton salt. And they asked us to talk about what food waste means to us. And so I don't know. I just got really inspired because I was going through this period. Where I was just very overwhelmed with work. I was very overwhelmed with a lot of things, and I noticed that my frigerator was kind of reflecting reflecting my mental state. And so I was cleaning it out, and I was taking my jars, and I was just trying to be super resourceful and a lot of times. I don't even notice it, but being resources makes me feel refreshed like it makes me feel at ease. And so that was really what I did with that project. I just took old jars from my fridge, and I I made I took a lot of wilted greens like things that were about to go bad that would typically throw out and just blended them into salad dressings. I don't know. It's just a fun project to help people think about ways that they can. Blend up things in their fridge and repurpose it. Okay. Uniform ice cream sandwiches? Are we done with Unicor? Now. I mean, where did you come from it sort of took over the internet and the food. It was a social media thing. Yeah. That people I said that it was because people wanted to scape from the reality. And so that recipe it was like, basically, a semi frito. But then I use aqua Fava instead of Ebbe an aqua Fava is just the Brian that you could get from like leggings like a like chickpeas is like a pretty common can that you could could get it from because it's clear, and so then you just whip that up just like you would an egg white. And then you just folded into instead of heavy cream use coconut cream. So your your recipes are it's an interesting mix, you peaches and cream cake bananas Moore's pizza, but then you have complete muffins, which my wife would learn charcoal banana bread. So it's just a mishmash of your vegan past your non vegan. Past. How would you define your baking? Yeah. I mean, I think that it's just me, you know, like, I think that it. It's all of the things that I've been influenced by it's not I guess expected a lot of the things aren't expected because of maybe what your idea of what a black gold cook. Because I call the book that, but I think that that's what makes it real. You know, like people are mishmash of all of these things, you know. And like, I think that the more that we celebrate than just stop thinking necessarily about everything being authentic authenticity food inches play with the techniques that you've learned or the way that you would approach it because that's also a part of your identity the way that you've seen your grandma put together something that comes with you. And so then I feel like if you're just being true to that. Then all of these new ideas, just come up like it didn't feel like I was trying to be creative about it. I was just having fun. You also I noticed in your you have data and apple hand pies. Which look. But you use all whole wheat pastry. Flour mix it with white flour. Does that that work out? Okay. For the pastry, you can work it. And it's it doesn't fall apart on you. I think it does..

Brian Unicor Morton Moore
"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Bootcamp flowers on table. The school children chess. No something intuitively. I know that they're cared about. Before we hear from waters. It's my interview in Terrell guy. Guys, Dubuque cookbook, black baking presents an eclectic mix of recipes. From bananas. Moore's pizza to cookies inspired by her mom's childhood in Guam, too vegan baked goods. Drill. How are you? I'm doing really well. Thank you. You were born in Lantana, Florida. Your father grew up in the south your mother was from Guam. Well, tell us about one time of Florida. What was the community like, well, I guess it was an interesting place. I would say it was lower class living. It was not the best living situation. But I feel like it gave me a lot of contrast to ask for a lot of great things. Well, you right. There was Jamaican Cuban Haitian, food and culture. So the food must have been really great. Yeah. Definitely. There was a lot of a lot of wonderful. I mean, like Jamaican beef patties cabbage and peas and rice and then on my father's side. You know, like things that my grandmother made just really really hearty, delicious southern food. You know, MAC and cheese. She made this delicious spaghetti that had. I think she put catchup in it, which sounds strange now. But it gave it this. Nice sweetness. So it was definitely a wide range of of flavors that I grew up around. And you also write the you when you were fourteen you were overweight, and and you became a vegan as a result in you. So you really changed your entire diet when you were a teenager did. I think a lot of it was me trying to find myself a lot of it was me trying to find my Dimity within all of that. So by becoming vegan that set you apart from your family, your brothers and sisters who were still eating the traditional diet, right? It was it was stark contrast, like our dinners were very meet centered, and you know, starch heavy because a lot of it too. You know, we're trying to feed a large family on on a small budget. So this whole concept of cooking from scratch was born because I had to be creative. I had to think of a new way. To create this food that I loved and I wanted to taste, but that fit by diet. Another thing you write about is negligence in the kitchen that is waste could you explain that? I'm talking about how I would watch the food network as a little girl, and how I would see this huge contrast between a a white woman with money navigating her kitchen space versus what was reality for me. And I know what was reality probably for a lot of people. But even just the way that we approached our resources, you know, you don't have a lot of resources in. So when I would watch I garden in particular make these huge feasts for just her in her husband, and then she would leave like excess food and the goal..

Guam Florida Dubuque cookbook Terrell Lantana Moore
"alice waters" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"Want to learn how to travel space by nasa zone chris hadfield oh and you could use the forum to ask other students that's questions as has anybody made it to fucking space yet the is judd fucking appetito teaching you the rule of three such as higher three actually talented people in pass up there in providence your own honey bye crashing but everybody says not to because i was so hated that somebody was already going to choose it nobody wants you fuck homes no you have to respect someone who earns multiple bridges in alice water cheaper in multiple bridges and now veron goes area yeah bits now bid or what are we thinking i think i'm gonna do preselect because i got angry okay badeah your don't think so anytime starts now sadness bits fuck yourself you're the least important of emotions yet your creeping around like a fucking burbank yeah yeah okay you pick your so important just because you're around and you see your belt by everyone you know what i also feel ragent as more useful rate i buck i write a jokes and i guess when i've said i'm used as i was about to die of their motorcycles you didn't make i agree i was low i was like depressed that you're fucking other horridness that doesn't get blue balls is better than you sadness you're always like suiciding people puck sad too to do our suicide people around story about a screw german nada sake sweater go sewri oh i love that and now we have a very special group which was originally named joel's la friends but with renamed it to be palm springs fair welcome presents it's like oh my god garage the man himself joel him booze booster that bitch who went and replace us with these hotter gays hair severe quarters euless help it back we'll i up to the day is brendan skin.

chris hadfield joel brendan skin judd veron