7 Burst results for "Alice Wolfe Lee"

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from KQED News. I'm Kate Wolf. The San Jose City Council has unanimously approved Google's proposal to turn 80 acres of the city into a mixed use mega campus with shops, offices and housing. It's the largest development deal in the city's history. King Beauties Oddity Bundle A moody reports during the City Council meeting about 200 people called in most of them, urging the City Council to approve Google's proposal. Maria no. Well, Fernandez is with Silicon Valley rising one of the organizations originally opposed to what's called downtown West. I am proud of the work of so many in this community. And strongly support the mayor and council move slow. With this agreement, Google is promising to build up to 4000 housing units, a quarter of them affordable, also 15 acres of parks, plazas and green spaces and 500,000 square feet of space for retail arts, education and other uses. Google expects to start construction in 2023. I'm under the bundle. Moody KQED News Contra Costa County Fire officials have released a report on the causes of a 2019 explosion and fire at a Crockett fuel storage facility Cake. Grady's Alice Wolfe Lee has more The investigation found the likely cause of the blast at New Star Energy was an electrical spark from an improperly grounded piece of equipment inside a huge ethanol tank. The report also found several tanks. That new star appeared to have been built without plans or permits, and that oversight is lacking. Contra Costa County Supervisor John Gioia says that's unacceptable. There's a reason that we require electrical permits on the construction of property for anyone out there that says Let's have industry tell us what to do. Uh, we don't have homeowners Tell us how to ground we inspect the incident shut down Interstate 80 for several hours and cars and estimated $25 million in damages. County officials say they'll need to study the 500 page report before deciding whether new regulations are needed. I'm Alice Will flee KQED News, a California tens rights group filed a class action lawsuit in Alameda County Superior Court yesterday, alleging the property firm Monster Cos her Rast it's rent controlled tenants in Oakland. Monster owns 22 properties there, where tenants alleged the company let rodents fester and repeatedly entered people's homes under false pretenses to push them into leaving. Suit hinges on an update to Attendant protection ordinance that was approved by the Oakland City Council at the start of the pandemic. One tenant, Karima Melody, uses a motorized wheelchair. She says she left it in the garage when monster failed to repair the elevator. She says that building staff then threw it into the garbage, destroying it. Oh, my God. It was horrible. I didn't believe that because we are human. I don't know if there's someone can do this act with a disabled person. Monster did not return. A request for comment on keep Wolf KQED news support this morning comes to us from Earth justice, national legal nonprofit defending the environment and people's health. Earth justice because the Earth needs a good lawyer. What happens, one of police officers accused of misconduct on our watch A new podcast Syriza from KQED and NPR takes listeners into the rooms were officers and witnesses. Air question to find out who the system is really protecting. Listen to on our watch wherever you get your podcasts today, Sonny Sacramento Valley High's eighties to.

Kate Wolf Karima Melody Oakland 22 properties 2023 Monster 15 acres Alice Wolfe Lee NPR Google 80 acres Alice Will 2019 John Gioia 500 page Maria Fernandez Oakland City Council Alameda County Superior Court yesterday
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coast, the morning fog coast in Bayside, only partial clearing near the water today most of the sunshine again from the bay further inland. Eyes. Upper fifties low sixties coast upper sixties to the low seventies Bay low eighties further inland. Good morning. I'm Dave Freeman on KQED Public radio. And the time now is 5 30. Live from KQED News. I'm Kate Wolf. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has approved a pilot project that would make communities Busses and trains free to ride this summer. But as key committees Dan Breaky reports free immunity is not a done deal. Yet the measure would suspend fares immunity from July through September. The pilot aims to restore ridership battered by Cove in 19 service cuts and help low income residents. But the municipal transportation Agency board must also approve the plan. Agency officials have argued that the free Fair program could complicate efforts to rebuild transit service. The pilot could also face a veto from Maryland in Breed, who signaled earlier this year she would oppose so called supplemental spending measures while she's developing the city's next budget. I'm damn Breaky KQED news. Contra Costa County Fire officials have released a report on the causes of the 2019 explosion and fire at a Crockett fuel storage facility Cake. Rudy's Alice Wolfe Lee has more The investigation found the likely cause of the blast at New Star Energy was an electrical spark from an improperly grounded piece of equipment inside a huge ethanol tank. The report also found several tanks. That new star appeared to have been built without plans or permits, and that oversight is lacking. Contra Costa County Supervisor John Joyous says. That's unacceptable. There's a reason that we require electrical permits on the construction of property for anyone out there that says Let's have industry tell us what to do. Uh, we don't have homeowners Tell us how to ground we inspect the incident shut down Interstate 80 for several hours and cars and estimated $25 million in damages. County officials say they'll need to study the 500 page report before deciding whether new regulations are needed. I'm Alice will flee KQED news. The warden of San Quentin State Prison, took the stand yesterday in the fourth day of a court hearing about the covert 19 surge that infected three quarters of the people incarcerated there. Securities Monica Lamb reports. In May of last year, San Quentin State Prison had almost no cases of Cove in 19. But then a busload of prisoners was transferred from Southern California, with at least two passengers already showing symptoms of the virus. During his testimony Tuesday, San Quentin Ward and Ronald Broomfield said he did not enquire whether or when the passengers on that bus had been tested for the coronavirus. He also said the new inmates were not immediately quarantined, but we're allowed to move about and share showers. Winfield said he was focused on keeping San Quentin safe, but he could not have refused the additional prisoners. The hearing is part of a lawsuit by inmates seeking release over unsafe conditions. Monica Lamb, KQED News, Richmond's hacienda and affordable housing complex will begin undergoing renovations after it was shuttered in 2015 to 2 uninhabitable conditions. 100 units come 150 Unit complex is getting a full overhaul and well how seniors aged 62 over here's Doug Shoemaker, president of Mercy housing, one of the partners on the project. We're basically just renovating the building completely from scratch in the building is still standing. It's an old country and feel building but everything inside it is being replaced. 2014 investigation by reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting highlighted deplorable conditions at hacienda, including mice, infestations, bedbugs, mold and major structural issues. Nine former tenants sued the Richmond Housing Authority and received a $658,000 settlement in 2019. I'm Kate Wolf KQED News Support today comes from Earth justice, national legal nonprofit defending the environment and people Self Earth justice because the Earth needs a good lawyer..

Dave Freeman Kate Wolf Dan Breaky Richmond Housing Authority Doug Shoemaker Center for Investigative Repor Southern California $658,000 2014 Tuesday 100 units Winfield September Ronald Broomfield Nine July Alice Wolfe Lee yesterday Alice 150 Unit
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The tools they need by working to ensure their customers are remembered, heard and understood. On the Web. Genesis dot com slash superhuman. Good morning on KQED. The time is 6 30. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Moments ago, Republicans voted to oust Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney from her leadership post. Chaney had been the number three Republican in the House. She was an outspoken critic of former President Donald Trump and voted to impeach Trump following the January six riot at the U. S Capitol building. Inflation in the U. S economy is on the rise. The Labor Department says consumer prices rose 8/10 of 1% last month compared to April of last year. Prices jumped 4.2%. Are above the Federal Reserve's 2% target. Upcoming elections in Iraq will include the UN's largest election monitoring mission on record, NPR's Ruth Sherlock reports. The U. S ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas Greenfield says the monitoring team for Iraq's elections in October will be a bigger and better equipped mission than the U. N has anywhere else in the world. The decision comes after the killing of several activists and journalists. The recent assassination of a prominent activists in the city of Karbala caused protests on an attack on the Iranian consulate there. Many blame these killings on Iranian backed militias. Ambassador Thomas Greenfield says she hopes the presence of election monitors will encourage turn out at a critical moment in Iraq's history. With Sherlock. NPR NEWS Beirut This is NPR news from Washington. Live from KQED News. I'm Brian What in Oakland, Relatives of an unarmed man shot and killed by a Napa County sheriff's sergeant last year have filed a federal lawsuit against the sergeant in the county KQ Edie's Alice Wolfe, Lee reports. Juan Garcia was shot six times by Sheriff Sergeant David Ackman last October after being pulled over for driving without headlights. Footage released by the Sheriff's Department showed the incident lasted 38 seconds. The Napa County district attorney says it may be a year before a decision is made whether to bring charges against Sergeant Ackman. The lawsuit alleges that he used unnecessary deadly force and shot Garcia without warning and that the lack of transparency on the part of the sheriff's department is unconstitutional. Lawyers for the Garcia family say the sheriff's office has not provided police or autopsy reports from the incident and has also withheld video and audio footage. The Napa County Sheriff's Department did not provide us with a statement on the lawsuit. I'm Alice will flee. KQED News. A San Francisco supervisor wants to require all new large buildings in the city to double the amount of water they collect in reuse. Rafael amendments proposal was unveiled yesterday as the state faces drought conditions it would expand the city law that requires the collection treatment and re use of gray water, which comes from showers and bathrooms sinks for non potable uses like toilet flushing and irrigation in large buildings starting next year. The proposal also calls for the city's Public Utilities Commission. Develop a plan for more ways to expand San Francisco's recycled water supply. I'm Brian what KQED news Support for KQED comes to us from a generous gift from Yon Schramm and Maria Manetti shrimp founders of the Manetti Schramm Museum of Art at UC Davis, who believed that all people deserve access to education and culture to enrich a lifetime of exploration and learning. Support for NPR comes from want Lee committed to helping self employed workers and small businesses Get their P P P loans application determines eligibility. Maura W.

Ruth Sherlock Juan Garcia Dave Mattingly Maura W. Maria Manetti Chaney Linda Thomas Greenfield October Oakland Trump Karbala 4.2% Washington January six 38 seconds NPR six times Yon Schramm Republicans David Ackman
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cloudiness, Coast and bay mostly sunny again today. Cooling trend underway tube. Upper fifties to the low nineties inland Today, Bay Area Ah little warmer Sacramento with sunshine in the Valley High's will range today from 91 to 97. Good morning on KQED Public radio. I'm Dave Freeman. And the time now is 5 30 live from KQED News. I'm Brian what Governor Gavin Newsom is proposing to spend $12 billion to confront the state's homelessness. Crisis advocates and local leaders are welcoming the investment. But are urging the governor and Legislature to think long term. KQ BDs Erica Kelly has more Uses plan calls for a massive expansion of home key the project launched during the pandemic to convert hotels, motels and other buildings into housing for people who need it. Home. Key has created nearly 6000 new units of housing. Now Newsome is calling for $7 billion to create thousands more. Half of that would go towards housing where mental health services are provided. Then we gotta drive. This agenda with the urgency is required. I'm not interested. Six year plan 60 year plans changed now get that What happened on the streets and sidewalks is unacceptable. Matt Schwartz is president of the California Housing Partnership and is one of many advocates calling on the state to establish a permanent funding source. The only way to achieve lasting results and lasting progress is to know that the investment is going to be sustainable on something like this skill. It's a sentiment echoed by the state's big city mayors and Democrats in the legislature, who have proposed a $20 billion investment in housing for homeless residents over the next five years. But it's doubtful that Newsom will have an appetite for raising more revenue when the state already has a $76 billion surplus, especially as he faces a recall. Election. America KELLY KQED news. California's new attorney general, has announced the formation of a racial justice bureau and his agency to address racial injustice in the wake of increased attacks on Asian Americans Kick you, Edie's Alice Wolfe Lee reports. In his first press conference, as attorney general Rob Bonta announced the hiring of seven attorneys to head the new department to combat a rise in hate crimes and address racial injustice issues across the state. The bureau will focus on implicit bias in policing and advised law enforcement on best practices in identifying and prosecuting hate crimes. It will also support restorative justice solutions on campuses and provide outreach to organizations on how to identify an address white supremacy and hate crimes. Bonta also plans to convene a meeting of big city mayors next month as part of a statewide strategy to identify and highlight existing solutions and local resource is currently tackling racial injustice. I'm Alice will flee. KQED News. A San Francisco supervisor is proposing a ban on the possession and sale of homemade firearms, also known as ghost guns, often sold online or in gun shows. Ghost guns create a loophole in regulations because they don't have serial numbers, which makes them hard to trace. In recent years. There's been a steep increase in the use and seizure of ghost guns in the Bay Area here, Supervisor Katherine Stephanie who authored the proposal, Every community needs a ghost gun ban because every community is threatened five ghost guns. The ordinance would ban anyone other than a licensed manufacturer from selling, buying or owning key parts of a gun that don't have a serial number. California requires owners of assembled homemade guns to register them with a serial number. Gun control advocates say many who own ghost guns don't follow that law. I'm Brian what KQED news and coming up on morning edition on KQED of federal bankruptcy judge dismissed the National Rifle Association's attempt to declare bankruptcy. The N R. A tried to use bankruptcy laws to evade New York officials attempting to dissolve the group. The story coming up next on KQED. Also later in the hour, the California report Saul Gonzalez from Los Angeles at 5:51 A.m.. Support for NPR on this Wednesday comes to us from data haiku and artificial intelligence platform committed to bringing data driven decision making to every industry every business challenge and every team learned Maura.

Matt Schwartz Saul Gonzalez Dave Freeman $7 billion National Rifle Association $20 billion Erica Kelly Los Angeles $12 billion Sacramento Alice Wolfe Lee California Housing Partnership NPR Democrats $76 billion KQED News Newsome Today Rob Bonta San Francisco
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Time Now it's 6 30. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, employers in the U. S added 266,000 jobs during the month of April, far fewer than economists were forecasting. The nation's jobless rate went up to 6.1%. NPR's Chris Arnold has more on the latest numbers from the Labor Department. This is a much weaker jobs report than expected, most economists predicted a gain of well over a million jobs, so this is just a quarter of that. Also, job gains from prior months were revised a bit lower. There are still about eight million fewer people employed than before the pandemic, and at the same time, businesses say they're having trouble finding people to fill the jobs that they have open. So that's a bit puzzling to economists. Some people are still unable to return to work because their kids aren't back in school or due to covert health risks. Also, more generous unemployment benefits probably have some people waiting to return to work. On the bright side is restaurants and bars reopened they hired on 187,000 more people last month. Chris Arnold. NPR news authorities in Texas say they believe human smuggling was involved when law enforcement discovered more than two dozen people in the back of a tractor trailer near San Antonio. It was stopped along Interstate 10. The driver was taken into custody. Atlanta's mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, says she won't seek a second term in office. This is NPR news from Washington. Live from KQED News. I'm Brian walked in Oakland. The Alameda County Sheriff's Office is asking outside agencies to help in reviewing the autopsy of Mario Gonzales. The Oakland man died after city of Alameda police officers pinned him to the ground while trying to arrest him. Last month. The Bay Area News group reports that the sheriff's office has yet to complete an autopsy on Gonzales. It is ask pathologist from other areas to do a peer review of the autopsy autopsy after it's completed and it's convening a committee to review findings in the case. A new report from the California Cable and Telecommunications Association says access to high speed Internet is improving among rural and underserved Californians. But barriers to connectivity still remain for millions of residents. Quds Alice Wolfe Lee has more. According to the report around 370,000 households will gain access to high speed Internet because of state and federal broadband projects approved over the last year and a half, But Ernesto Falcone of the Electronic Frontier Foundation Says the report is using outdated metrics when it defines high speed and that cable companies air dragging their feet to avoid the high cost of installing 21st century infrastructure. Data and moving information has never been cheaper, but we don't have the infrastructure in place to actually do it in that neck surgeries, fiber optics, I say about a third of California has, I can infrastructure and two thirds does it. Falcone says. If the state invest in fiber optics, many of the challenges to connectivity will be resolved. I'm Alice will flee KQED.

Chris Arnold Ernesto Falcone Dave Mattingly Oakland Mario Gonzales San Antonio 266,000 jobs Brian Texas California Cable and Telecommu Keisha Lance Bottoms Washington Last month NPR 21st century Alice Wolfe Lee Interstate 10 Electronic Frontier April KQED News
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ah look at how the U. S. Is preparing to begin vaccinating Children around the country, then a look at what herd immunity means for the pandemic and whether or not it may be unlikely here in the US, we will probably see outbreaks of the virus for many years to come, plus a look at how lawmakers are pushing for a civilian led climate core to address damage from environmental disasters. And the conversation on creating new languages for fictional television shows and movies. Take away We'll be right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi saying Well, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to soon authorize the use of visors Cove in 19 vaccine and Children as young as 12. NPR's Joe Palooka has more Right now. The emergency use authorization the FDA has granted to Fizer allows its covert 19 vaccine to be used in people older than 16. But the company has presented data to the FDA, suggesting the vaccine is safe to administer to adolescence and is effective in preventing disease in these Children as well. Visor has also begun evaluating the safety and efficacy of the vaccine and younger Children with results from studies of Children as young as two available by September. Studies of infants are not expected until the end of the year. The company is also expecting results by mid summer from a study of its vaccine and people who are pregnant. No Palka. NPR News provided the FDA gives the all clear President Biden says his administration will be ready. We're ready to move immediately. Immediately moved to make about 20,000 pharmacy sites across the country ready to vaccinate those adolescents as soon as the FDA grants its okay. The White House is setting a target date of July 4th for 70% of all U. S. Adults to get at least one shot of a covert 19 vaccine in a bid to further increase access to vaccines. The White House has notified governors. It's tweaking the allocation system. States will still receive doses every week based on population. But those states will also have the choice of using all their doses or donating some to a federal pool that other states in need can access. A man who was shot outside CIA headquarters yesterday evening during a standoff with the FBI has died. MPR's Ryan Lucas reports a deadly encounters now under federal review. The individual was stopped at the main gate at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. On Monday. The FBI responded and engaged in lengthy negotiations with the man. The FBI says At least one agent opened fire in the evening after the man emerged from his vehicle with a weapon. Man, who has not been publicly identified, was taken to a hospital in the bureau now says he has died from his injuries. At least one FBI agent was involved in the shooting. The bureau says it is collecting evidence in examining the circumstances as part of an official review. Which is standard procedure after an agent involved shooting Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington Mexico's facing one of its deadliest mass transit disasters, with the help of a crane, a recovery team in Mexico City work today to lower at least one train car to the ground. Four bodies were inside. Last night. The train was passing over and elevated section of the subway system when the support beams collapsed. Authorities have raised the death toll to 24. They say dozens of people were injured as well. Mexico City Metro is among the world's busiest rail systems. The Dow's end of the day up 20 points of 1 34,033. This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm Alice Wolfe Lee San Francisco is entering California's least restrictive coronavirus tear Today KQED is Holly J. Make Deed reports. Loosened restrictions allow businesses like indoor bars that don't serve food and endure saunas to open up beginning Thursday, Mayor London Breed said in the statement that this means there will no longer be any businesses that are required to keep their doors shut in San Francisco. After sporting events can have up to 3000 people and gyms and bowling alleys can let more people in the city is averaging just 26 New Cove in 19 cases a day and nearly three quarters of people who are eligible and San Francisco have received at least one dose of the cove in 19 vaccine. I'm Politan indeed. KQED news. The San Francisco Health Commission plans this afternoon to hear a proposal that would reduce the number of sheriff's deputies at San Francisco General Hospital. KQED is M. J. Johnson reports. The proposal would reduce the number of deputy positions at SF General. But about half five deputy positions at Laguna Honda Hospital would also be eliminated. Instead of deputies, A team of trained mental health care workers will respond to incidents and on Lee call law enforcement. One more help is needed. This comes after Department of Public Health report found that nearly half of the use of force incidents reported by deputy the last year involved black patients. The DPH hopes reducing the deputies will just racial equity issues. And used the escalation instead of use of force. If it's approved by the Health Commission, the Board of Supervisors will vote on the proposal in June. I'm M J..

Monday FBI Ryan Lucas Joe Palooka September Food and Drug Administration July 4th Alice Wolfe Lee US Laxmi FDA Mexico City Thursday 20 points 24 Today yesterday evening San Francisco Health Commissio Last night June
"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"alice wolfe lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The past has his own terrible inevitability, but it is never too late to change the future. That's according to historian Heather Cox Richardson, who observes that the political, racial and economic divisions in the country evoked the crises faced by the nation. On the brink of the Civil war. And now as we prepare for a transition of power to President elect Joe Biden and the nation's first female vice president, Kamila Harris, What can history tell us about the tumultuous moment we're living in? Richardson, a professor of American history at Boston College and the author of how The South Won the Civil War in the Popular newsletter. Letters from an American joins us that discussed the past and the future of the American experiment. That's next after this Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying Joe Biden's Journey from Delaware to Washington, D C today will be unlike any other time since he entered politics decades ago. Today he returns to the nation's capital on the eve of his inauguration as the 46, president of the United States in Newcastle, Delaware, Biden will speak at the National Guard Reserve Center name for his late son, Bo, who is a military veteran and also politician. Hours later, the Lincoln Memorial reflecting pool he and Vice President elect Kamila Harris will attend a remembrance for the nearly 400,000 people in this country who have died from covert 19. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The pandemic will be priority number one on day one of Biden's presidency. First order of business is Biden's $1.9, Trillion coronavirus Relief Bill, and Democrats see this as a big an early test for this 50 50 Senate over whether they're going to be able to get any buy in from Republicans to move legislation over the next two years or if it's just gonna be hard party line votes full time, NPR's Susan Davis. The Senate's began holding confirmation hearings for Biden's nominees. Include his selections for the departments of Treasury, Defense, Homeland Security and the director of National intelligence. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee is considering the nominee for Secretary of state Tony Blinken. Former deputy secretary of state, Blinken goes way back with Biden. He was a staffer on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee when Biden was chairman, and he says he wants to help the new administration restore America's place in the world because America at its best Still has a greater ability than any other country on Earth to bring others together to meet the challenges of our time, and that's where the men and women of the State Department Foreign Service officers civil service That's where they come in. Lincoln is a French speaker who went to high school in Paris. His father was an ambassador to Hungary and his stepfather was a Holocaust survivor who was rescued by an African American G I Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington President elect Biden is nominating a health expert to the Department of Health and Human Services, You could become the first openly transgender federal official To be confirmed by the Senate more from NPR's Bill Chappell. The bite in transition team has announced the nomination of Dr Rachel Levin to be assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services. Levin is currently the secretary of Health and Pennsylvania, where she's become a high profile figure leading the state's fight against Cove in 19. In a statement about his choice, Biden said Levin will bring leadership and expertise to get people through this pandemic, no matter their zip code, race, religion, sexual orientation, gender, identity or disability. Levine has previously been confirmed by Pennsylvania's Republican controlled state Senate, including a unanimous vote in 2015 when she became the state's position. General Bill Chappell NPR news The Dow is up 134 points. This is NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what Strong winds have downed trees caused power outages affected Bart Service and helped fan the flames of several wildfires in the Bay Area this morning. The National Weather Service says the gusty ist winds have been reported in the Mayacamas Mountains in Sanoma County, the Diablo range and the Santa Cruz mountains. The strong gust took place amid wildfires in Mill Penis, Livermore and east of Guys revealed Santa Rosa. Fire officials say they responded to multiple reports. Of wind damage, including trees falling onto power lines and a cottage, a roof blown off a carport and a fence blown into a tree. New data show that Bay Area cities have seen some of the steepest declines in rent over the past year due to economic fall out from the cove in 19 pandemic. KQ BDs Alice Wolfe, Lee reports. Real estate firms and rental listing websites report that San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose and Silicon Valley cities have seen some of the nation's largest drops in rent since last year. There are two reasons why analysts believe demand is down. One is that local tourism and service industry workers have lost their jobs due to stay at home restrictions. Another is the large number of people working from home and relocating farther from Bay Area employers. Prints in the Sacramento area have risen more than 6% in the last four months. San Francisco remains the most expensive rental market in the U. S showing just how much higher the prices were than the rest of the country. I'm Alice will flee KQED NEWS SPORTS The Warriors came back and beat the Lakers won 15 to 1 13. The Sharks lost in ST Louis.

Joe Biden NPR Senate Senate Foreign Relations Commi Heather Cox Richardson vice president Kamila Harris President Bill Chappell Delaware Michele Kelemen Susan Davis San Francisco Tony Blinken Washington Pennsylvania Department of Health and Human Lincoln Memorial