20 Burst results for "Alice Waters"

"alice waters" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:09 min | Last month

"alice waters" Discussed on Good Life Project

"And then when I was in college, I moved to Berkeley where chez panisse restaurant, Alice waters restaurant had been opened in 1971, and I remember which for those who don't know, by the way, is this legendary legendary place as is Alice or so. Yeah, it's an American institution. I mean, she is a visionary who has changed the way this country has access to fresh ingredients and she's changed the way that chefs think and work and sort of made it standard for sort of baseline for people to have seasonal, local, organic ingredients on their menus. And so it was revolutionary at the time. And now a kind of, it's kind of a thing where the great chefs, they start there. And then they go from there. And it's amazing. It's amazing. And she is amazing. And but this was 97. I moved to college in a tubercle in 97. So it was just the beginning of the Internet. I think I got my first email address in 95 or something. And so there was not really celebrity chef culture in the same way. There was not food blogging or food. Food Network was maybe just a couple of years ago. Food Network existed. There was it's not what it was now. You know? But it was not at all what it later became. And I had, again, a very mild interest in watching that kind of foodstuff. And I loved cooking shows as a kid, but not more than I loved other shows. You know? And so my first week, you know, they give you a college orientation. And somebody was like, oh, there's this famous restaurant in town, and to me, I was like, what's a famous restaurant? And I was like, oh, that's where white people's parents take them, you know, when they come visit. But my parents weren't going to take me there. My parents were not going to spend a $100. And dinner, they were going to take me to some Persian restaurant, or Mexican food, or our family friends house to eat. And we just didn't eat in fancy restaurants. I didn't even understand what was the point of a fancy restaurant. And so I sort of went in one year and out the other. And then the next year I fell in love. And my boyfriend was from San Francisco. And we spent so much of our time eating together and learning about food together. Because I've always loved to eat. That's never been a question, you know? And he showed me, you know, his favorite Mexican place his favorite ice cream place, his favorite pizza place, and he had always wanted to eat at chez panisse. And so it became this idea for us to save our money, in a shoe box, and go there once we had saved up like $220. So that took 7 months and we made a reservation and we went there and the restaurant divided into upstairs is more informal cafe where you can order all the cart and downstairs is like a more formal dining room with a fixed menu. So we were like, okay, we're only going once. We're going to go downstairs. So we went downstairs and it really was, I don't even know that I fully understood my body fully understood what I was entering. You know, when I walked in, but it's a temple to the senses. The place is so beautiful, but in the most understated way and it feels very warm and at the time I had no way of knowing all of the hand made Ness of the place, but it's so handmade in the most thoughtful and intentional way. And the art on the walls and the flower arrangements and the displays of fruit and vegetables, and everything about it is so extraordinary, but again, really, really, really subtle and understated. And so I think it probably hit me on some level, but I had no idea. You know, I was the child of immigrants, FedEx were not a priority for my family. You know, getting us in and out of school, getting us fed, getting us, you know, to be respected by our community. Those were the things that mattered. And so I just maybe absorbed it on some cellular level. And I was so inspired by this meal where I felt so taken care of by the staff that I wrote a letter and I asked for a job. I always worked throughout college. And so they hired me pretty much on the spot, I think, in retrospect that they were probably pretty, as a person who's now run a lot of restaurants. I think she was desperate and she needed someone because she was like, can you start tomorrow? And I did. Which is interesting too, 'cause when you wrote that letter, did you even know what job you wanted or you just knew you wanted to be by then by then I understood that some college students were busing tables there? Okay. And so I was like, oh, maybe I can do that. And even in the letter I said, I've never worked in a restaurant. I don't have any food experience, but I can learn anything. And we saved up for this dinner, and it was so extraordinary and magical. Please, like, give me this opportunity. In your mind, is this just a an interesting job at a cool place? And but you're still on path to being like a writer in pursuit you're doing. I was still in school. I was no, I was two indoctrinated as an immigrant kid to ever let go of your education. It was just a job, at least I get to earn some money on this in a cool place. Yeah, totally. And like beautiful food, which to me, I'm like, I just want to eat good stuff all the time. So yeah, I didn't ever occur to me that I wasn't. This is my future. No, not at all. I mean, I had a work study job before that where I basically filed papers in an office. So to me, this was a step up from that, 'cause I got to be in a beautiful social environment. And so with good food, and so I started and almost immediately, you know, my very first job, my very first day, my first task was they walked me through the kitchen, which is just so beautiful and warm and quiet and running at such a sort of slow, perfect hum, or maybe fast, perfect, hum. It's like a ballet, like everybody knows how to move in that kitchen. And the walls are actually a lot of them are lined with copper, so the way that the light reflects the wall on the walls is this beautiful warm light, and the chefs are all wearing these gleaming white chef coats. And there's, again, beautiful produce displays everywhere, and it just, it seemed like a movie set or something. And I walked through the kitchen into the dining room, and they had me vacuum the floor. Even the vacuum was magical, it was like a central vacuum, which I had never seen before, just this like 40 foot hose that you plug in the ground and it starts sucking. And I was like, even the vacuum here is amazing. And I just, by then, I sort of had some concept of what this place meant in the world. And I was like, I just can't believe they're letting me vacuum the floors. It felt really like an honor. And I held on to that feeling the whole time I worked there because I saw a lot of other people grow jaded over time, and you start to take it for granted because it becomes your normal. And I sort of told myself that I would leave before that happened to me. I wouldn't let that happen. The day I didn't feel privileged to walk up that ramp, and come to work at this place, I didn't want to work there anymore. So what was it that was happening internally with you? That lets you stay there. Work really, really, really, really hard. Sometimes the most basic entry level jobs,.

chez panisse restaurant Alice waters restaurant chez panisse Berkeley Alice San Francisco FedEx
"alice waters" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on How I Built This

"Extract a lot from a mushroom. We both, you know, went to the library and found all the mycology books and becoming weeks where YouTube and every possible video on mushrooms and downloading every PDF we could find and Paul stamets like the mushroom guru who wrote the handbook on growing mushrooms. We got all his books. There's a whole documentary on this guy, Paul stammers. Amazing, brilliant. We called emailed him, and he got back to us within two hours of us cold email him. You cold emailed post damage. But for people to know, he's got his whole mushroom tea company, and he's got a ted-talks and mushrooms with the documentaries on him. He's like the mushroom kind of expert. What did you email him? Would you ask him? We were trying to grow mushrooms on coffee grounds. And we were asking about spawn. And I forget if we asked him directly Alex, we respond like the seed basically. Exactly. It's analogous to seed, so you need that to get started. So he donated our first spawn or seed that we needed to grow, which eventually we used for our first test buckets. By the way, you're in Berkeley and you needed to do this on coffee grounds to just like brew a bunch of coffee and use that. One local coffee shop and just said, hey, can we pick up your coffee waste? The first time we thought we were actually we were afraid we didn't know how it was going to work. You remember walking into the first cafe and asking for their coffee ground waste and thinking of this big deal and man, they were so happy to get it off their hands. You want to go to the back and pick up that trash bag, this messy and heavy and leaking, like sure, go ahead and I think we're like, oh, okay, there's definitely a lot of this back here and they don't want anything to do with it. All right, so you get some coffee grounds, Paul stamets, males you, some mushroom spawn, mushroom seeds, through my fraternity. Give it a turn house. And what did you get a bunch of like buckets? Just imagine white paint buckets. We had about ten of them. This is right before spring break. And I think finally both of us are like, all right, we just got to do this thing and got to try growing these things enough reading enough watching videos. And decided to plant them. So we went collected a bunch of coffee grounds, brought them back to his fraternity. Put this tarp down in this fraternity kitchen closet and we mix in the spawn into them, put a little top on them, poke some holes, trying to use all of our best research. You know that we had done and we leave for spring break and we're both gone for roughly ten days. And I will never forget this phone call because Alex gets back to his fraternity. And I get this call and he's just so excited kind of screaming. He's like, Nikhil, you gotta run up here. You gotta check this out. And I'm in this room with him. We look at these ten buckets and literally 9 of them are just contaminated, nothing growing, just looking really nasty. I'm just sitting for ten days with some old coffee ground. One of them had this beautiful crop of pearl oyster mushrooms growing out of them. And remember we're both standing around this bucket and just looking at it and we're Alex is like, you want to try those. I'm like, I'm not trying to be like, you want to try them? It's like, I'm not trying these either. We're both kind of, you know, just looking at this bucket of mushroom sitting in this dark closet. So did anybody wind up actually sampling mushrooms? It was actually funny. That's speaking of never really being chefs or foodies or Gourmet cooks or anything. Neither one of us was trying those mushrooms, but we were like, what's the best restaurant in town? And we both had heard about this restaurant called chez panisse by chef Alice waters who is just an absolute legend and one of the founders is entire natural organic food movement, whether restaurant right there in Berkeley. Yeah, we don't know any of that. We just knew it was this famous restaurant in Berkeley and we ended up literally walking over this paint buckets one paint bucket of mushrooms walked in over and she happened to be in the front of a restaurant. She was talking to somebody and we just walked right up to her and said, hey, Alice, I'm Nick hill, this is Alex. We're trying to go these mushrooms and coffee grounds. We just grew some would you want to try some. And, you know, she got super into it and she's like, that's really cool. And come to the back of me and she actually walked us to the back of the restaurant to the kitchen for her head chef this guy named Cal was and she's like, Kelly, you want to try some of these mushrooms. These boys are grown and he ends up plucking half of the mushrooms out of his bucket. And he chops them up, sautes them up in the back of a restaurant and she tries them each eye and we try and remember chef Alice waters is like, these are delicious. Wow. She was on the show a few years ago and so when you brought the bucket of mushrooms and she said, she kind of gave it her blessing. Did they say, yeah, we want to buy them? Or what was the how did you leave it? No. I mean, we thought that they were gonna taste like coffee waste. So we're like, they're not gonna like them. So it was almost like this, okay, this is further along than we thought we'd be. Where do you go from here? So after that, we were like, oh man, now we got, we got a product here. Let's just take it to whole foods and we took the same day that same bucket to the Berkeley whole food store. This was at the early days where whole foods you could do this all the time. You know, a lot of local growers would go to a whole food store and on the spot, whole foods would buy it from you. So you guys went to the whole foods in Berkeley. I know that whole foods on telegraph avenue. And you'd like walked in and who'd you ask for? First produce guy we saw his name was sesa. And then we just went right up to him and said, we're trying to go mushrooms on coffee grounds. And we just grew these check them out and just kind of told them what we were trying to do. And Alice waters loves them. Now you've got the Alice waters endorsement, even though it may not have been official, but you know, it's also good. And he got fired up about it. And he ended up bringing up he bought his produce manager. I think we had a store marketing lead about three or four people huddled around this little bucket of mushrooms and we were telling him what we're trying to do and got a bunch of interest and support and we got the contact info that day to Randy to comment who is a Norco produce coordinator for whole foods. And we end up getting a call scheduled with him. Alex must have been what a week or two later. And he said, hey, tell me about what you guys are doing. Randy's a character he's like boys. It was like a two minute phone call. Boys, I've seen all these emails and what is this? You guys are farming in it. We said, Randy, we're growing mushrooms on copies. He's like, you hear this pause, and he's like, okay. What were you farming before? Well, Randy, we're in college. Okay. All right, do you guys figure this out? And he's kind of laughing, how to grow mushrooms on coffee, and she's like, I'm gonna blow you up at Whole Foods. It's like, this is the coolest shit I've ever seen in produce. Take coffee with your mushrooms, boys. Figure this out, here's my personal cell phone number, so just call text me if you need anything else, and then he hangs up. That was it. That was it. And no discussion about a purchase order or pricing or anything. It was just like, this sounds cool, but when you figure it out, give me a call back. It was that, and I think at that point, we knew nothing about retail. After that phone call, we were now a couple weeks away from graduation and we were still meeting up all the time talking all the time. 200, what are we doing with this? And we heard about a business plan competition called bears breaking boundaries, big ideas. It was called at berklee. And somehow someone told us about this Alex. I think it was a night before the deadline because I remember it was an all nighter we were up to the end of the night submitting this thing right before the deadline. And.

Paul stamets Alex Paul stammers Berkeley chef Alice waters Nick hill Alice waters Nikhil chez panisse Berkeley whole food store YouTube Randy Alice Cal Kelly Norco Whole Foods berklee
"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"And it's a funny shape sort of triangular with a tall tower. Sticking out of the center it sends a pretty clear message was a kind of a thing a middle finger to the family. That's what the building looks like a tower coming out of a big block. The kavanagh building is a classic spite house edwin wrote about this phenomenon of spite architecture and the piece is in our show notes a thing in a way. We're all interested in the stories behind buildings. You know where. We're all kind of intrigued in the personalities and the histories of particularly curious looking buildings. How did it come to be like that. And the spine house Phenomenon really is a is a building that's built specifically to make a neighbor's life less pleasant. I was very struck. By how many examples in your piece of revenge architecture spite houses there were from massachusetts. Which is where i grew up. Yeah absolutely the more you look into the subject. The more massachusetts crops up and i guess it is to do with that long. History of population does seem to be a particularly. Us phenomenon the spines. There's something in the american nineteenth century in particular because they seem to flourish. I suppose it was a kind of free rural development that time it wasn't as regulated as it is in other cities in old year. People were much freer to build. And they were building fast. They were building to make quick bucks. I guess the conditions were right in newbury massachusetts right off the main road..

kavanagh building edwin massachusetts Us newbury
"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

05:22 min | 9 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"If we don't teach the next generation the values thing me on channel together we will not succeed and addressing clump or hungry. A lot of people have failed in this fight. Big food conglomerates have stronghold over what public schools serve but what is believe. She can do it. She's become very effective lobbyist. So here's what she's doing. She's running her edible schoolyard program to teach students to garden cook and compost. She's working with the whole university of california system to group food into their carbon neutrality goals which she thinks could be a model. She's opening her own institute for edible education at uc davis and. She says she's writing a book. That proves you actually can provide local healthy lunches at school and it's something that nobody believes it because to the doctor nation of fast food and gesture system. We think we can't do it. And i guess i'm saying we can. I wonder when talking with waters. and whom what. It means to be a towering figure in an industry to wax lyrical about your goals to be an idealist whether that has value. So i asked her. I watched an interview somewhere with you. And the interviewer said do you think of yourself as an absolute best. And you said. I don't think of myself as an absolutist i think of myself as an idealist and i'm curious what it means to you. To be an idealist. I can sit means something can always get better. And i'm just constantly trying to push myself to be incredibly open monte. I cannot be open minded about the purity of food. I insist on but the way that it is cold. And the biodiversity up the world and the production of food is so immense. How could anybody stay firmly in one. I can't i. Can't i guess how an idealist that is always open to a greater reflection greater beauty and as for daniel whom he's also not standing in one place. It's unlikely either of them will ever feel done. And how could you. There's so much to do. I have one more quick question. She's just like you were saying that before this pandemic and you got to the top and felt like you had lost purpose and and now you've done the same and the fashion succeeded in the fact that the weightless so long like first of all is that giving you the satisfaction. You may not have felt before. It's it's unbelievable. Yeah it's bigger than the rest. I think that's why police is so important because shift produces much bigger. And so i did stand on that stage. Those my decision and it was been overwhelming and elevate also scary. Now i feel like i have my work cut out. You're saying you're saying that. Oh yeah now. This has been successful but this hasn't succeeded. You know the asked on one money one season. Yes it's it's a blessing that people are reacting. The way they do but we have to go really deep with this and we're just scratching the surface while these chefs struggle with the idea of how to do the most good. I've got another story from. Fte weekend about the opposite doing bad about sometimes interesting and beautiful things come from exeter actively petty and mean a homeowner who puts a big wall in their garden because they hate their neighbor or another scale a millionaire who erects an entire building out of revenge in is there's a skyscraper called the cavenaugh the kavanagh building it was built in the nineteen thirties and imposing structure overlooking the plaza. San martin and. It's an art deco masterpiece. The building has a hidden story. It was the result of a kind of a doomed love. Affair between two young people. One of them was called corina. Kavanagh that's edwin. Heff kit architecture design critic. She fell in love with the sign of a very wealthy family. An old money family. The mother put a stop to the relationship. Because of the class difference really and corina kavanagh kinda kept this burning in her heart and built a skyscraper action when it went up karinna building with celebrated as the tallest in latin america but she really built it in revenge. The family disapproved of her as new money and this new money skyscraper blocked the view that they're mentioned had of their private church. The building is thirty one stories..

institute for edible education uc davis university of california kavanagh building daniel exeter San martin corina kavanagh corina Kavanagh karinna edwin latin america
"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

08:07 min | 9 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"Daniel whom is known as this culinary genius one of the true greats and he's only forty five. He dropped out of school at fourteen to become a competitive cyclist and switzerland and when he got injured he went into food. Okay let's do it. I visited whom a few times at eleven madison park first story. I wrote refugee weekend magazine. The link is in the show notes. When i first met him. I was surprised. He wasn't some intense celebrity chef. Flex some scary guy larger than life. He was tall. Maybe six four but he was softspoken and warm and he had this familiarity to him. It was like he was an old friend. I'd never met before the sort of a soft power. The piece was about chefs grappling. Honestly with what it means to be good and to do good and has changed. Since the pandemic i visited whom because in may he hit the food world with a pretty big announcement. Eleven madison park was going entirely plant based as an environmental choice vegan. It's the first restaurant of its caliber to do so. And so why not put the creativity that we have to make that future more delicious and more magical more exciting. It's exciting to struggles. But whom search for a new direction actually started years ago after winning world's best restaurant before the win. He says that he and his staff had this collective goal be the best they were all aligned. It gave them structure and then all of sudden near number one. And then what where you going now. And now that was chief and now everyone had a different idea right but snacks. I got pulled in so many different directions and it was really really hard for me. Who quite come to an answer by the time the pandemic hit but at that point eleven madison park had a bigger problem than purpose. Anyway they had to survive like so many restaurants they had to lay off staff. They had prohibitive bills. They were talking to bankruptcy. Lawyers and a lot of restaurants in the city stayed afloat for those months by feeding hungry new yorkers. The government gave them a little money to cook meals. Whom used his own nonprofit rethink food to cook meals in his kitchen and deliver them to people in need. I started to feel. Oh my god. That's why i was telling you about the number one empty and now connecting with food in a whole new way in the magic the way i felt the magic for food many many years and i kind of lost it a little bit and i see these people coming up to say. Oh my god this active last meal. I've ever had you know three dollar meal that costs four. I was invited to try. Eleven madison park in august. And the meal was what i can only describe as a four and a half hour long fever dream a meal there now as before is up to twelve courses and cost three hundred and thirty five dollars per person but now it's all plants and it includes a donation of five meals to rethink. Their biggest performance was a beat. Which was con- feed. Dehydrated smoked grilled and then baked in a nest of herbs over three days and then it was cracked open in a clay pot at our table unearthed from the nest and played it it wild that night whom looked really happy. Every time i looked up he was sitting at a different table talking to a different guest. He seemed to be basking in the glow of a risky bet that had paid off. I visited a few weeks later. And whom brought me into the kitchen. He pointed to a prominent row of glass door. Refrigerators they were in front of us. Like display cases. Can i ask you one. Question is Can you tell me what this looks like. When you were serving. You see these Last refrigerator they were actually build to dry. H are duck which was a signature dish. You know people will come in the kitchen and see these stocks and be excited about the process and sort of one night when i went on a run during the pandemic in central park I had sort of decision of these windows hosts pandemic and it became these beads. That we are Baking in this klay pods But sort of like. That's sort of the window into the restaurants very different window. It's very different window but much happier now. You know not. Every restaurant has the luxury of charging three hundred and thirty five dollars for a meal whom has a platform and power most chefs. Don't they have to pick and choose how to do good or even if they can afford to. They can't just go plant based a lot of them are still trying to give their employees health insurance. Whom kept referring to that switch as a responsibility as a chef. I've seeing the food system being broken for a long time. And i've been guilty myself of kind of turning an eye turning you know. What do you find a blend is. We're all we're all guilty of ignoring it. And if the world celebrates me as a pushing the boundaries of culinary i. There's no way i can do it. I did before because that's not pushing anything. The world does not need and other preparation of our duck. It just doesn't. I mean what could be the trickle down impact of what you're doing. What can chefs do who are still trying to make ends meet. I do believe that this is changing completely the company. What we've done has opened up doors for others. I mean look. Alice waters wanted the most important restaurants in my opinion in the history of this country yet. He's speaking here about the legendary founder of the restaurant chez police in berkeley california. She popularized the farm-to-table movement. Alice waters is the original champion of buying your produce locally organically and in season. She's the reason. Farmers markets are cool. Well first of all jumped happy any preconceptions of what you're going to cook for you say go with completely open month. That's waters herself. The matriarch of doing good. When i spoke with her recently virtually. I couldn't help but ask her first to take me to the farmers market. I say i'm looking for some extra look back at asked me actually. I'm so beautiful by me. Here's a woman who did the thing who is trying to deal. She created a profound shift in the food world. And it has trickled down this month. Marks fifty years since water started shape unease and. I wanted to know where someone who's really done it goes next. We have to have food to that. It's a universal and so is education. She wants to change how the whole country eats. And that's a big endeavor and it felt like she was bracing o'clock in her mind. The most efficient use of her power is to get food education into schools as early as possible and feed. Students healthy organic school lunches from kindergarten. I feel an urgence. If we don't teach the next generation the values thing me on channel together we will not succeed.

madison park switzerland Daniel Alice waters chez police berkeley california
"alice waters" Discussed on The Edge with Mark Thompson

The Edge with Mark Thompson

05:36 min | 9 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on The Edge with Mark Thompson

"What does that bird that i hear in the background. The quiet place in the house right now is outside so okay have to live with the birds. This is very. This is where you're you're you're speaking to us from the state. Are you the estate. That food built so to that point. Has your palette change through those years. Mean you're looking back over decades of writing about food where you were different writer than and different tastier than you are now. Well foods evolved and my pal has evolved also. Yes i think wykes simpler food. But but when i started about food we are in an era. Where french food. In particular at european food in general was the food that was taken seriously by food writers. That's obviously changed that you could compare that to to music. In a way which which evolved from mostly being european in the united states to becoming world music. We've evolved to the point where we appreciate more of the foods of the world and we also understand that. The origins of food are not particularly in europe. So that's all changed. My personal palate has changed. Because i think i like simpler food and other people my age that is older people have said that. That's that's a thing that happens. So but i think that you know to to address your audience directly released where you are directly. I'm going to quote alice waters. Who always says and not exactly these words but in word similar to these the best thing you can do cooking wise is take good ingredients and don't screw them up and that's another way of saying that simple food is best if you start with good ingredients and and i think that more and more people are coming to that realization. Alex waters remind everybody from shape niece. You know she's a one of those remarkable chefs and she's also written a lot on food. I know when you go back to those days so long ago when you started in this profession writing about food where you alongside other food writers and critics who had a certain the snobbery about food that you might find around the wind business. I'm trying to. I'm trying to imagine what that world is like. Well thoroughly the generation most of them now dead ahead of me had a more snobbish and eurocentric attitudes about food in terms of food writers and shafts and chefs were revered but again i think i think the to the extent that you associated with oh cuisine or what we thought of then is serious cuisine. You were talking about french food. And that's really really changed. And i think that there's still a certain snobbery associated with more expensive restaurants and with people who don't want to take food seriously but who who take themselves seriously but more and more i think are. I like to think that we're seeing a bigger picture. We're seeing that. It's not that what's important is not have fancy. Food is but again how. It's grown how it affects our bodies how it affects the people who who work on it you call it european. I'm thinking of the richness of that food. European does that sort of shorthand for the butter and the rich sauces that are associated with that kind of food but are rich sauces. Highly trained chefs starched white. Uniforms high prices like that. The last couple of things strike me as all show. And let's go. yeah. I'm going to get into the evolution of where you are now. But how much of the dining experience is that not associated necessarily with the food but with sort of the presentation you know. I think it's interesting because the last year of course restaurants have taken as hard to hit as any industry and we're going to have to see what happens when they start to come back. I'm not sure whether people miss socializing in public or they miss being waited on in a formal way..

alice waters europe united states Alex
"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I'm <Speech_Female> so <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> i'm so hopeful. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> i <Speech_Female> still believe <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> this could <Speech_Music_Female> be a <Speech_Music_Female> as <Speech_Female> i call it a <Speech_Music_Male> delicious <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> revolution. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank <Music> you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> waters from twenty. <Speech_Male> every day. <Speech_Music_Male> She is <Speech_Music_Male> working to change the way <Speech_Music_Male> we think about food. <Speech_Music_Male> You can find <Speech_Music_Male> out more about <Speech_Music_Male> her edible schoolyard <Speech_Male> project at <Speech_Music_Male> edible. Schoolyard <Speech_Music_Male> dot org. <Speech_Music_Male> If you happen to <Speech_Music_Male> be in the berkeley <Speech_Music_Male> area and you want to give <Speech_Music_Male> shape. And he's a try. <Speech_Music_Male> It is still <Speech_Music_Male> a really special <Speech_Music_Male> experience <Speech_Music_Male> fifty <Speech_Music_Male> years <Speech_Music_Male> and if you're in <Speech_Male> los angeles. She <Speech_Music_Male> is opening a brand <Speech_Music_Male> new restaurant inside <Speech_Music_Male> hammer museum <Speech_Music_Male> in westwood <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> report <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this fall. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> That's the end of <Speech_Music_Male> another episode of bullseye. <Speech_Music_Male> Bullseye is <Speech_Music_Male> created out of the <Speech_Music_Male> homes of me and the staff <Speech_Music_Male> of maximum fun <Speech_Music_Male> in and <Speech_Male> around greater <Speech_Male> los angeles <Speech_Male> california. <Speech_Music_Male> Where just the <Speech_Music_Male> other night around nine <Speech_Male> thirty pm. <Speech_Music_Male> My recording <Speech_Music_Male> was interrupted <Speech_Music_Male> by the <Speech_Music_Male> signature tinkle <Speech_Male> of an ice <Speech_Male> cream truck. And i'm not <Speech_Music_Male> gonna lie. I was not mad <Speech_Music_Male> at it. I <Speech_Music_Male> i like to hear an <Speech_Music_Male> ice cream truck anytime <Speech_Music_Male> even at nine thirty <Speech_Music_Male> at night. Our <Speech_Male> show is produced by speaking <Speech_Music_Male> into microphones <Speech_Male> senior producer. <Speech_Male> Kevin ferguson <Speech_Male> producer. Hey seuss <Speech_Male> ambrosio. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Production fellas <Speech_Male> at maximum fun. <Speech_Male> Richard roby and <Speech_Male> valerie moffitt. We <Speech_Music_Male> get help from casey. O'brien <Speech_Music_Male> are <Speech_Male> interstitial. Music <Speech_Male> is by dan. Wally <Speech_Male> also known as dj <Speech_Male> w <Speech_Music_Male> our theme song <Speech_Music_Male> is by the go <Speech_Male> team. Thanks very <Speech_Male> much to them into <Speech_Male> their label memphis industries <Speech_Music_Male> for sharing <Speech_Music_Male> it. You <Speech_Male> can keep up with the show <Speech_Male> on twitter. Facebook <Speech_Male> and youtube <Speech_Music_Male> post all our interviews <Speech_Music_Male> there <Speech_Music_Male> and i think that's about <Speech_Music_Male> it just remember <Speech_Male> all great. Radio hosts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> have a signature. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sign off <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> bullseye. With <Speech_Music_Female> jesse thorn <Speech_Music_Female> is a production of <Speech_Female> maximum fund dot <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> org and is distributed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> by npr. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> This <Speech_Female> message comes from. <Speech_Female> Npr sponsor <Speech_Female> hp. Hp <Speech_Female> has always <Speech_Female> known that good ideas <Speech_Female> come from bringing <Speech_Female> different people together. <Speech_Female> Diverse viewpoints <Speech_Female> help uncover blind <Speech_Female> spots and see possibilities. <Speech_Female> Find <Speech_Female> out how you can join. <Speech_Female> Hp's group <Speech_Female> of diverse thinkers at hp dot com slash jobs.

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:54 min | 10 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Manners get it. Welcome back to bulls eye jesse. Thorn i'm talking with alice waters. She's a lifelong activist. Who's dedicated her. Life to advocating for food sustainability and education. She's also the founder of the legendary restaurant shape unease in berkeley which just turned fifty years old. She and i talked in two thousand nineteen. Let's get back into it. I once had the late. Jonathan gold on the show and the really lovely guy and a real hero of southern california. Food is a writer for folks. Don't know he was who was well known for kind of expanding the palette of restaurant criticism here in southern california and he won every award. There is wonderful writer and and a guy who would you know Putz around in his pickup truck and go to recede at some kind of highly herbal southeast. Asian blood sausage and he'd get exactly what was good about it. And i one of the things i asked him was like. Is there anything that you just don't like eating. Because he ate everything you know. That was his whole deal and he says oh yeah. I don't like eggs. And i was like you. Don't know like eggs down for these. You're down to eat. You know the blood sausages. And you're you're like well knock a few balut back you know. But he's like yeah. I just think eggs are gross and I've like make them for my kids in the morning. And the whole time i think about how grossing i guess he. He hasn't had by a cooked on his spoon. That he's somebody. I admire greatly and he educated all of us. So i guess my question to you alice's you know in your cooking you strive to be seasonal and that means having a relatively expansive palette because you know there's you can't just pick the six things you like and Make those things when those things may or may not pass out of season or might not be good today So is there anything that you're just like That's gross not really not really i. I'm very hesitant about love about seafood about shellfish. And i i guess i know. Too much and see sea urchin scare me. But i think that there's not very much that i wouldn't try. Climate change has been a huge issue in the food world in a thousand different ways. Has it directly. Affected the food that you make and serve at japanese it has We are incredibly conscious of what's going on in the state of california as it's burning and as getting wrong of warm at the wrong time of the year because when that happens fruits ripen a little bit too quickly and i think sometimes they need you know enough time on the vine earn the branch so that they develop their full potential of taste. And we've known noticed it in the stone fruits in the last couple of years. We noticed that we get you know. Even strawberries Sooner that as flavorful but it also turns out that our farmers are the ones that are very diverse in what they're growing and they're they have cover crops and and they're prepared in ways that that certainly the industrial farmers are not prepared. I grew up. Lower middle class sometimes borderline poor and i grew up taking the subway to the farmers market in the civic center in san francisco with my mom to buy food and my experience of farmers market shopping was defined by you know being elbowed out of the way by elderly women And and i think that food was also cheaper than the food at the supermarket by my house. I haven't found a farmer's market like that here in southern california. Where i and thinking about it made me wonder if you ever worry that the push to make food more local and seasonal to bring you know better tasting produce to people has been co opted into being a a luxury product and that it's difficult for that it will be difficult for it to transition from being a luxury product into being a practical part of a broad swath of people's lives. You're right it has been given that wrong impression by the fast food industry. They'd like us not to buy our food at the farmer's market. It's too expensive. Takes too much time so it really depends on our understanding of cooking learning about what you need to spend money on and what you don't but if we have a pantry that is well stocked. I can cook a meal in ten minutes. And if we've gone to the farmers market one type a week and we think about the sequence of meals if we invite our family and friends to cook with us we can make food. That is that is deeply delicious and nutritious. More alice waters. I'm so grateful that you took all this time to be on. Bullseye was It was really fun now..

california Jonathan gold alice waters Putz jesse berkeley alice san francisco southern california
"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:24 min | 10 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Wanna break for streak. I know that. I've never made the pot to and crew again ever but it's that you have to learn by doing. Why did you want to open a restaurant. I wanted to open a restaurant from friends. I wanted to eat like the french. And truly i was incredibly naive. I just thought you know. Somehow i could do this because i had eaten in these restaurants in france. I wanted to small enough. I only wanted one menu a night. Just like some of these little places in paris and i. I was frustrated. That there wasn't a place where i could have those tastes and i instead of Cooking for my friends and kind of going broke doing it. I thought well. I'll make a little restaurant and then my friends come and pay for it and a follow. I mean it's It's a lovely thought to think That in order to avoid going broke cooking. You should open. A restaurant is the top. The top way to go broke cooking. I know it we went. Of course. I think forty thousand dollars in debt for six months. I didn't think about money at all. I still don't think about money. And i think it probably hired way too many people. We had never had any experience except cooking at home. I mean lindsey. Who was the pastry chef. I mean she did the pastries sort of one by one or two by two in the kitchen. Little cottage behind shape pennies to begin. I mean she didn't know how to cook. You know differently and in a way that could have been seen as the wrong way but it turned out to be really the right way because we didn't want to have anything leftover after the evening. We didn't wanna have to use leftovers the next day so we would know how many people came and we would just start a new every day. It must have been intense. It was there was really intense. When when i heard the cord soup went tom and we had to tell people. It was roasted corn soup. When when james spirit came the restaurant you know he said this isn't a real restaurant. This is like going into. Somebody's home. This is not a kind of you know. Production place this. This feels like you're going into somebody's out for dinner. And i thought that was the most wonderful compliment. Because that's exactly what i've wanted people to feel. Did he say it in the way that you took it just devout. I think he did. He wrote a column about it. More bullseye still come after break for maximum. Fun dot org. Npr support for bulls high and the following message. Come from cultural cultural. Wants to know that. An estimated forty. Five million americans may have ibs according to the international foundation for gastrointestinal disorders cultural ibs. Complete support is a medical food for the dietary management of ideas. It's designed to relieve symptoms like abdominal pain bloating. Diarrhea and constipation in a safe well tolerated. Once daily dose save twenty percent with promo code radio on cultural dot com arrowheads in the walls. I'm rob teen louis. I'm and we're the host of through lines. Npr's history podcasts and for our special series this month the best of through life if we carry on as we have been this might wind up with listening now to the through line. Podcast from npr. Both hi i'm jesse thorn. My guest is alice waters. She and i talked in two thousand nineteen. Let's get back into it when i was a kid. My family's chopped at a grocery store. That's still in san francisco called rainbow grocery and natural food store and the reason why is not out of Some particular strong preference for you know natural foods over processed foods or whatever but mostly just because it was the only one within walking distance of our house and we didn't have a car. And i remember a lot of great things about that food but i also remember like you know there's like a kind of fig newton that you get at the natural food store that where the outside is very intensely dense and difficult to chew the fake parts. Alright yes i know about that. Sit if the health food. Yeah exactly and i wondered i. I wonder what your relationship was having opened this restaurant. In the bay area in the early nineteen seventies as the idea of health food with a capital h. in f- was blossoming in. You know the bay area in l. a. particularly. Well you have to remember that. I was a francophile. And so even though i had it dodge justed many Of the the values of the kind of the hippie back to the land movement and certainly diet for a small planet had a big influence on me. I didn't want that. what. I thought was unsophisticated. You know just throwing all the vegetables together making some brown rights and serving them like that. I've wanted to go back into the history of of gastronomy. I wanted to learn from love reuss gastronomic. I poured over that book and and wanted to know what is scofield was thinking and i. I really believed in the art of cooking and presentation over time as you ran the restaurant. Did you get any further from the idea of French food of frank. Ofi leah and figure out what was good about either other other foods of the world or simply american food absolutely. I feel like. I had the good luck to learn from extraordinary people. Like edna lewis and she opened up a whole world of southern food to me. She was talking the same language as i was at but with a whole new vocabulary and it was so Inspiring to me. I think if her one time he to go to his southern food ways conference and she wanted to have milk and cream there that was fresh and she asked if she could bring a cow..

james spirit international foundation for g abdominal pain bloating rob teen louis Npr jesse thorn lindsey paris france alice waters Diarrhea tom npr san francisco bay area Ofi leah dodge scofield
"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:54 min | 10 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"So happy to have you on. Both i welcome to the show. Thank you so. I've read that. You are a picky eater when you a kid. What what are the things that you remember liking to eat mike. That's a good question. I guess i really liked the tomatoes and the corn in the summer in new jersey. Because they will. I didn't know that the taste really was about growing them in our backyard. But i always wanted sliced nato corn on the cob and then my father would cook a steak on the grill and I was very very happy. What do you remember not liking. Pretty much everything i had for dinner. My mother wasn't very sadly wasn't a very good cook and she'd never learnt and then all of a sudden she had family and it was a lot of pressure to know what to do and she relied on on frozen food. And and you know fish sticks and the like but she was determined to have us eat something that was healthy An so we didn't have desserts. We had fruit cup out of a can for dessert at night. And but the amazing thing was back in the fifties it was always good to eat as much butter and baker. Those were healthy things for us and so to cover up the taste of this sort of dry whole wheat bread. I could slather butter and put on a couple pieces of bacon. And i made myself a bacon sandwich which i loved. That's not half bad. I'd eat that. Do you remember eating as a kid. Or maybe let's say as a teenager given that you had picky tastes. I mean like. I like to eat all kinds of things and and i was the same way i was until i was a teenager. Probably i feel bad for my Mother instead mother and father who had to cook for me But do you remember anything when you were really young that you ate that was a special thing and i talked about it in my memoir and i would always want to go to new york city and eat at the automatic in new york because i could choose what i want to have and at that time there were people that were behind these little windows that you could see that were making. You know a grilled cheese sandwich or an excel at sandwich. Sure just cutting into the lemon meringue pie. And i was fascinated by that and and just felt like i. Had you know this special privilege to make that choice with seem more important than really what it actually tasted like. I think having a sense of feeling of control is a really important part of children's eating. I mean i see it in my own head. Malic can save from twenty five years now if the edible schoolyard project in berkeley where we've been dealing with a thousand middle school kids. Six seventh and eighth graders that when they are empowered to cook for themselves. They always want to eat it and i mean anything if they grow it and the cook it they wanna eat it. It's kind of amazing you're seeing the whole process and so it is that that i think is really transformational. Do you remember when it first occurred to you that you would like to learn to cook in a way that you had not had happened at home. I remember exactly. That was after a year of living in france. When i was nineteen i was supposed to going to school but never attended classes. It was always about finding a restaurant reading the menu. No tasting tasting wasters right on the coast of brittany and having them right out of the water and it was a revelation. Do you remember what the first thing you tried to cook was. That was a stretch for you. Came back home and i was luckily given an elizabeth david cookbook and so her recipes were very straightforward. But i think the most challenging thing that i ever tried to cook was a pate on route. This pate that was wrapped in a kind of puff pastry and was seasoned at that time. I mean i'd never seen black truffles and they came into little can't and i chop them all up and put them in that pate but when i- -ccomplish that i felt so so proud i guess that's what i would say an. I choked just the right wine to drink with. Did you make your own pastry. And patrick i did. I can't believe i did that. I really don't believe. I did one time when i was like twenty. I had picked a bunch of apples from the tree and my mom's back yard and decided to make an apple pie out of them because it was just too many and I made the crust for the pie just by like opening you know. I don't remember the joy of cooking or something. You know like december cookbook. They were sitting around and it came out really well and That was now probably fifteen years ago. I have not attempted to make pastry. Since just because i was so proud that i got it right.

nato new jersey mike baker Malic new york city berkeley elizabeth david new york brittany france patrick apple
"alice waters" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

07:59 min | 11 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"When they say that mental health is a journey. They mean it. That's why it's important to prioritize your mental health and wellness every day the long term effects of therapy can give you the tools to deal with challenges as they arise strengthen your relationships and give you a more positive outlook on life. There's no better time to invest in yourself then right now talk space. Is the number one online therapy platform that has thousands of licensed therapists. Trained over forty specialties including anxiety depression relationships and more your therapists can help you set and achieve your goals and tax base is affordable. It's a fraction of the cost of in-person therapy. So instead of waiting for an appointment you can send unlimited messages to your therapist. Twenty four seven and they'll engage with your daily five days a week as a listener of this podcast. You'll get one hundred dollars off your first month with talk space to match with a licensed therapist. Today go talks base dot com. Make sure he's the code seventy s. e. n. t. y. To get one hundred dollars off your first month and show your support for the show that seventy and talks base dot com. We all know how important good sleep is. You need the right mattress. You need the right pillow and you need the right sheets. You make some pretty fantastic sheets. Boll and branch. They're ultra soft. Organic sheets are transparently sourced and their produced in safe fair conditions. I myself have been sleeping on some boll and branch sheets and let me tell you. There's been a heatwave in new york and has been disgustingly hot here and yet at night. I've been pleasantly cool because these sheets stay cool. They feel luxurious. Like staying in a fancy hotel or something and here's the thing they get nicer. They get softer. Every time you wash them they come in a variety of colors in any size. You can imagine twin up to california. King plus got toxin-free processes in fair trade certification to ensure that workers are paid fair living wages to experience the best sheets. You've ever felt choose bollandbranch. You can try them. Worry free for thirty nights with free shipping and returns and my listeners. Get an exclusive fifteen percent off your first set of sheets with promo code. Seventy at bollandbranch dot com. That's bollandbranch b. o. l. l. andbranch dot com promo code seventy s. e. v. e. n. t. y. This episode is brought to you by. Hp instant inc mellon is reading your mind. But hp instant inc knows when your printer is running low and sends you new cartridges. So you never have to think about inc save up to fifty percent you'll pay less than five dollars a month for ink and never run out again. Find out if your printer is eligible and enroll today at hp instant inc dot com conditions apply for details visit hp dot com slash. Instant inc spotify. I wonder if you can think back to the twenty four year old and turkey and what she would think about capital a. capital w. alice waters. I think she would think does she would have never imagined she would never imagined my life except in the way that i wanted to please myself. I never ever was looking for a job. I i never imagined a career. I never wanted to make money. Except i knew that i had to make money but it was never a goal of mine. I never thought about what i was going to do. I just sort of followed my intuition and away. Was it always that way or was there a point after james beard says you've got one of the four best restaurants in america. Is there a moment when you say like okay. The the ground is shifted under me. I have more opportunities now. I need to have a plan. Were you thinking that way or was it always like. I'm just going to do the next thing that that feels right. It never occurred to me to do anything that didn't feel right for either famer version. I guess i of course was affected by the fame being invited someplace or godsend word for the restaurant without any question. I mean it. Please may. And i've thought the restaurant was unique in some way but i thought if if i didn't like doing anymore that we would close it right and every single year. We asked ourselves that question at the board of directors. Do we want to do it for another year or not. Have you ever had doubts. We had a big question. Probably twenty years. But i thought the restaurant a little bit like a child growing up that is all very new and exciting from zero to five. And then there says stable period you know is sort of a seven to ten or twelve thirteen and then it's very tumultuous then you're twenty and go off to college. Is it any midlife crisis hitting fifty midlife crisis. Forty but this is the time that you have a family and extended family had the children and you're really sinking. But it's the big picture that we can communicate. And i've probably been working on a big picture for twenty five years with the edible schoolyard project. Yeah and the more that i've been involved with the slow food movement internationally. I'm pretty clear about what needs to be done right now. I'm glad you brought up the edible schoolyard. Because i do want to talk to you about the the impact that you have had on food and restaurants and i wonder if you could elaborate on that for me for a second. 'cause i want to know what it has meant to receive the kind of validation that you have gotten over your life. When i received the aboard from barack obama i pink that was the most meaningful afford Because it meant that. I had been teaching the values that he fired and that by crazy ideas writing two precedents to make garden on the white house. Lawn was not all in vain. That i was just certain talking.

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"alice waters" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

02:22 min | 11 months ago

"alice waters" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Be done and because somebody helped me. Fate has led me down many parents without me knowing the was doing that. But i don't consciously think of a legacy or what. I'm leaving behind. It's through those people that we've helped. They're the ones that kind of build. Our legacy and my tombstone would probably would be fine for me to see that. It says she lives. She died maybe in between. She had a pretty good time but she didn't have a plan now. Didn't have a plan. That was evelyn greasy and from pineapple street studios. This is seventy over seventy a show about making the most of the time we have left. I'm mccluskey.

"alice waters" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"One hundred forty years ago in the beautiful countryside of provence. The x. winemakers have been able to take advantage of the warm days and cool nights prevents along with the mineral rich soil the famous mistrial winds and an elevation of fourteen hundred feet above sea level to produce their fragrant and well-balanced wine experts say is a gorgeous pale pink color and is fruity and fresh on the nose. And the pallet. Thanks to the grenache. Sarah and san so grapes xs exactly the kind of rosie. I love chris. Bright and beautifully balanced. So it goes perfectly with whatever. You're eating or snacking on maybe some cheese and fruit a salahuddin schwab's even a pizza. I know that's not french. But it's still a great combo. Look for extra zeh at your favourite wind chop again. That's ex- as an x marks. The spot learn more at rose. Eight dot com now my chat with alice waters who joins us from her home in berkeley california alice's latest book is we are what we eat a slow food manifesto and i am always thrilled to talk to this food. World legend. Alice waters welcome back to radio. Cherry bomb this is such a thrill you so much. You look wonderful. It's great to see your face. Even if it's over computer thousands of miles away. alice. I wanna go right into it this year which blows my mind marks the fiftieth anniversary of shape unease. Take us back and tell us about the opening of the restaurant. When i think that canal i just see myself magically tacking in the rug up the stairs as people are waiting at the front tour and i shall like a big improvisation.

Sarah fourteen hundred feet alice waters this year One hundred forty years ago thousands of miles fiftieth anniversary san berkeley california Alice waters dot com Eight french alice chris x.
"alice waters" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Hey bomb squad. You're listening to radio. Cherry bomb the show. That's all about women and food. I'm your host kerry diamond coming to you from newsstands studios and rockefeller center in the heart of new york city. Today's guests are the mother daughter duo alice. Waters and fanny singer. Alice is the forest behind the legendary. California restaurant chez panisse which turns fifty years old this year. And she's the founder of edible schoolyard the organization that advocates for free healthy lunches for schoolchildren. It's a goal that shouldn't be so radical but it is fanny is the author of always home. A wonderful memoir. I enjoyed immensely. And she just curated exclusive collection of limited edition prints for the home kitchen with absolute art. We'll be right back with both women after this word from our sponsor x rosa as some of you might know. I'm a major francophile. And in the summer nothing feels more french to me than sitting around with friends and enjoying a glass of rosa. Some excited to tell you more about today's sponsor x rosa that spelled a. x. xs produced by the maison saint ex winery founded one hundred forty years ago in the beautiful countryside of provence. The x. winemakers have been able to take advantage of the warm days and cool nights prevents along with the mineral.

"alice waters" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"alice waters" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"You today. Mary and I welcome you back to America's number one travel radio show. So good to be with you. That's great to hear your voice. Today certainly is so no, listen, clearly. It's been too long since we last visited in person, so I want to know. How are you? When did the lock Erin Resort reopened after the Corona virus? Shut down and really, how's it going? Here in Ireland off the It was such a shock to think something like this would happen around the world. But it did happen when we closed the doors at the end of March when we re opened them again on the 28th of July this year. To an amazing applause of people customers on obviously welcoming everyone back again, too, for Mama. Yeah, it must be so great for you to be back at work and greeting your guests, which we know how good you are doing that. So I have a question. I'm really curious if the lock down that you experienced in the time that the resort was closed Maybe give you some downtime that you didn't know you needed as a chef, but also sometimes downtimes good for creativity. I'm curious what you did during that time if you worked in a garden if you tried new recipes, and did any of that time off, get you thinking and and more creative or different direction for what you bring to the menu coming back. I think one of the crates where I shouldn't say great things have been off. But haven't Bean off was certainly a shock to any ship's system. First of all, writing because they didn't have to be in at work at half 9 10 o'clock on. They didn't have to work until 10 o'clock at night or 11. Five days a week. So that was a bit of a shock. Second of all have untamed with your partner or your family or your wife for your whatever. So the fact is, I haven't aimed to be with the people that you love was just an amazing experience. Um, haven't time whether the anonymous off I have an animal, a dog, a cat. Chickens and a big garden to look after. And I have to say that I've never been able to Mama cure the garden as much as I have been able to take me weeks and weeks and weeks, obviously un resulting in clearing the garden. You know, before I just came backto work there. I was reaping the rewards off everything that I needed. Help you go back to basics. Really? Yeah, We've heard that from a lot of chefs. They don't want a wonderful thing. I always shape unique in Berkeley in California. What I usedto work them to that Alice Waters would have given me Regarding to the simplicity off, create food. I was able to use that I was able to understand what it's like to plant on DH Norrie be nourished. So let's talk about that, because I have your book in front of me. The Irish pantry and Talk about simplicity. Its I think Sochi and this is such a good point. So with the outbreak of the Corona virus across the world back in March, Robert and I added this segment to the show. It's called Travel the world from your kitchen as kind of a way to bring some joy and happiness through food to our listeners. And we've decided to add this international flair today since food and travelers so intertwined and you're in Ireland. I want to let everyone know who's listening across the U. S. And up into Canada..

Erin Resort Ireland Norrie Alice Waters Mary America Canada partner Robert California Berkeley
Desperately Seeking Garifuna

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

05:53 min | 2 years ago

Desperately Seeking Garifuna

"Roof. How are you? I'm very well. How are you good? I went to the river cafe. I don't know fifteen twenty years ago and it took quite a while to there on the tube from downtown London but it was a marvellous location and a marvelous dinner. But you started really as a a sandwich place. I guess a commissary in your introduction to your new Book Thirty Years River Cafe. The quote is the River Cafe and his clientele are seriously diminishing the tone of area. What do you want to just explain what that meant? When we started the river cafe really it was a site of what used to be An oil refinery in London on the river with votes outside and at my husband who's architect was we were lived in Paris for five years when he was doing the Pompidou Centre. When we came back to London. We wanted to find a place that could be a community so that he could set up his architectural practice again. In place through there was a mix so it was a outside space as I said. We were on the river. They converted these warehouses into rather beautiful studios and offices are picture frames model makers dress designers and always. We always wanted to have a place where people could eat and I was working as a graphic designer. And Ed Always Cook but when the applications came in we thought you know what why are worse than not having a restaurant would be not to have a very good one and I just said I think I'll do it and I'll do with rose gray. Who's an old friend and had also come back from New York? I'm wanting to do something. So the two of US came and looked at the the site and it was tiny. It was enough. Maybe a bar tiny little kitchen and six tables. But the real restriction was that we're only allowed to be open for lunchtime because the neighbors who actually had oil warehouses here up in arms about the idea of a small restaurant so the planners that said we could be open Monday to Friday. We could only be open for lunch and only open to the people who worked and these warehouses. So that's where the sandwich bar. That's where the inexpensive very tiny little place started. But I think Rosen. I always had the ambition to be an Italian restaurant to be a proper restaurant. We just had to do it gradually. Here's a question. Sometimes you just leave something allowed like in your book very often. You don't add a lot of strong. Flavors is something that has a wonderful flavor to begin with you have a Dover Sole Rescue Capers in Marjoram Dover sole is often serve which brown butter and butter something very simple olive oil but capers in March. Very strong flavors is that how do you know as a cook when you? WanNa add strong flavors to something and other times? You don't is that something just whimsical. Or I think it depends. Well first of all depends on your mood. Sometimes I come into the river cafe because you know we changed the menu twice a day and if I have Dover sell on the menu I bite think well what am I going to put with the Dover so I might just put lentils with it today and therefore might like something interesting on the top like capers. I think as a cook the first thing I think about when I write the menu is what what do I feel like eating today. What would I want to eat? And that's one of the joys of working in the river cafe or I think I hope coming here so I think as you know the same thing we say. If you're cooking at home what what do you feel like eating and also not go shopping with a recipe in your head but go to the market. Go to the supermarket go to shop. See what's there and then you know the home and cook you know. A lot of chefs. Do a lot of different things. Jose entrees has twenty three restaurants Jeremiah Tower obviously you know moved around started things enclosed things. You've been doing this thirty years or so. Alice waters has been doing her GIG for forty years. Do you have a feeling about people like yourself who stick with it who start something and just keep getting better at it forces people who move around. Did you think one is better than the other widely? You love for thirty years doing this one thing. It obviously still excites you. By the way you're you're talking about your restaurant that's a good question. I think that it depends for me. It's about ambition and control. You know so I really. I've been asked to other restaurants. I've looked at other sites. We came very close to doing another restaurant. A couple of years ago and Mayfair and I'm always thinking about how to grow how to how to be better and sometimes I think that for me. It's about being better where we are. It's about everyday come in with a set of problems or or thinking about what to cook how to make the restaurant. Beautiful and how to make the waiters more knowledgeable in how to work with the chefs. Who want to learn more about ingredients in how to make our pastry kitchen know. There's so many so many things to do in the restaurant here that would it be possible to do it and have more. Some people really can do it for me. It would be really just so important to know that I if I did another restaurant that it would be as good as this one and this one. Wouldn't you know get less good because I was distracted by another one so I never thought of it as sticking with it because for me I have the best job in the world and I come in and I work with brilliant people and it's exciting

River Cafe Years River Cafe London Dover Sole Rescue Capers Dover Marjoram Dover United States New York Pompidou Centre Alice Waters ED Paris Rosen Mayfair Jeremiah Tower Jose
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:15 min | 2 years ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition so we just heard from some industrial. Who actually started her. Culinary career at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and. Her Mentor was none other than Alice. Waters Alice daughter Fanny Singer. Join me to talk about how shape unease is doing during the crisis and how we can keep local farmers and business by buying straight from the source Finney. I know that you are sheltering place that your mom right now in Berkeley of all. How are you guys doing? How are you holding up? It's it's sort of strange very surreal. Moment I live in San Francisco and I do still have apartment there. But you know it's a one bedroom apartment and my partner and I are together. We both were working at home. And there's no outdoor space than being in Berkeley was not just to be with my mom who I obviously concerned about to. Just because I wanted to fee `sort sort of insane person about disinfecting nail and all the things in a little bit more German centric than my mother so these things were these work concerns of mine but also I mean to be Berkeley in a place that has really rich outdoor environmental NGO to walk through one hundred thirty seven pad this in the hills of the Berkeley into just feel to walk for ten. Miles is like the only thing I think kind of keeping me from total insanity. Alice tell us a little bit about. What's going on with Chez Panisse right now? Obviously you've been closed for five. Maybe six weeks. What's going on with the staff right now. We really paid the step their time off so that when it comes time to reopen that they would be there and available we had the good luck to get a kind of bridge loan from some wonderful friends of the restaurant that are helping us get to the point where money comes from the government to pay people. Some are on unemployment and some are being paid a portion of their salaries. But it's really important to me that people are paid at this time. If I have to ask my friends I have my friends Alice. One of the things I read about which is super cool. is that Obviously you work with a lot of small farmers all over California and a lot of these farmers presumably. I mean they supply restaurants so first of all from your conversations with with farmers that you work with you supply your restaurant and other restaurants. I mean what is their situation like I mean? How long can they go like this without having restaurants to supply? It's very serious. What's going on with our whole organic farm community because they really have a only the farmers markets to bring food to and the number of people that are going to farmers markets is not what it usually is so. We're trying to figure out how to buy that food from the farmers and we have a project in Stockton California The mayor of Stockton is very enthusiastic about getting or Ganic Food in the public school system and serve at this moment in time. He asked if we could help buy food from the farmers said that he can give an stockton and I thought that that would be a perfect way for us to begin building that network that we're going to need for the public schools and were putting little recipes into the box so that people know how to make very simple dishes and may given at least four thousand pounds of food away in Stockton Alice. I I mean you've talked about this for years that when you were a little girl. Your parents had a victory garden at home in New Jersey and that you really are encouraging people to plant their own. Things actually inspired me so much. I've got some ceilings. Here can you see some big lettuce there? You go and I'M GONNA hopefully. That'll be lettuce in a couple of months. I mean I don't have a big backyard. I have a small space and got a planter but for people who don't have a backyard who might live in an apartment I mean what are some ways that people can think about growing their own food that keeps looking at Brown Finley and he started by chanting food out in front of his house? In that little parkway between the sidewalk and the street and it caused a lot of controversy and he actually cited for violating. Some ordinance got any went to court. He wanted his case and he actually has planted that whole strip of land. So sort of thinking about him. I did the same thing I cup. That little plop right in front of my Bad I think you can plant like you have done and planter boxes on a balcony. I hope that the community gardens began to surge research and unite. My mom planted the little section. That's just in front of our house because even though we do have a garden in the back she wanted people to think about this victory garden moment and the potential for even the most throwaway pieces of land. It's now planted with a few different edible things and she's already gotten notes through our mailbox thanking her for taking this kind of actions embolic being encouraging people. And you've just seen this proliferation of gardens now in people's sort of little forgotten front yards and people sowing seeds all around the neighborhood now and way. It's really incredible. I've just never seen anything like it before you know. One of the things that you've talked about is the idea of buying local produce supporting local farmers wherever you are in the country around the world and you know one of the questions that that we're getting from folks on facebook Tuesday from Bell Zelezny also which what are ways that we can help. Small farmers are other ways of their places where we can go buy things from them especially farmers who are used to providing restaurants. I if you are at a loss for who you're farmers are do. The work researching call the pharmacy. Are you having trouble? Are you imperilled? Is there a way that I can help? You facilitate a network of deliveries. Can I help you deliver? But also it might be a question of just helping them figure out logistics or even knowing who they are. Where their farms are I mean? I have friends in. La The lines were so long that they weren't able to get any food so they just started figuring out who the farms were that they could drive out to so they could still got great produce. And I mean it's been a little bit more problem solving and resourceful and also knowing that the farmers are maybe really good at growing vegetables. That don't necessarily know how to work. A whole distribution network. And if that's something that you have extra time for facility with like make the effort because they do need us

Berkeley Alice Chez Panisse Stockton Alice Stockton Fanny Singer Finney San Francisco Ganic Food Partner New Jersey Miles Facebook California Brown Finley Bell Zelezny
"alice waters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A few miles away and the person behind that restaurant Alice waters isn't just notable for cooking but actually she's probably much better known for the impact she's had on American cuisine because Alice waters was really one of the first American chefs to promote the idea that food should be local fresh and seasonal today almost every good restaurant in America pays homage to the farm to table cooking they tell you the name of the farm where the chicken came from and sometimes even the farmer who grew the crops and Alice waters is largely the reason why but when she opened chez Panisse in nineteen seventy one in that old run down Berkeley house she wasn't necessarily trying to start a movement she really just wanted a nice cozy place where she could invite friends to share a meal I was didn't actually grow up intending to be a chef in fact is a kid in New Jersey she ate a pretty typical American diet of that era her mom wasn't exactly the greatest cook and she focused instead on efficiency she wanted something healthy for us but she didn't know how to do that she knew it was you know meat potatoes vegetables salad fruit Cup for dessert but most of it was from a can or frozen she wanted brown bread I didn't like very much I was a very picky eater so you I guess by the time you hit your teens you M. the family moved up that right you to the Midwest and then to California was this for your dad's job yes your boss he was transferred to Chicago and then he was further transferred to Los Angeles she went to see you decided when you graduate high school you went to the university of California in Santa Barbara and this is in the early sixties and what I'm what was your impression of the place well that was party place that right by the water on the beach and I decided to transfer to UC Berkeley in the fall of nineteen sixty four so the fall of nineteen sixty four you end up at UC Berkeley a junior in college or a sophomore.

Alice waters America chez Panisse New Jersey Midwest California Chicago Los Angeles Santa Barbara UC Berkeley Berkeley university of California
"alice waters" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"alice waters" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"UC Davis is collaborating with the world were not with a world renowned shaft and food activists Alice waters to research sustainable crops waters institute for edible education will be at the new Aggie square development in Oak Park it'll serve as a center for research and sustainable crops and environmentally conscious agriculture that takes climate change into consideration the institute will also provide hands on activities to teach students and teachers about the role food plays and health police are reminding drivers at some roads will be closed for the women's March in Sacramento this weekend the fourth annual women's March Sacramento will be held tomorrow it'll start at ten thirty AM go from southside park up night street to the state capitol there will be road closures around southside park starting at eight thirty AM March team this year women rising and Sacramento state graduate is making history as the first full time female assistant coach in the history of Major League Baseball San Francisco Giants are adding Alyssa knack into Gabe Kapler coaching staff that can former softball coach Kathy straight hand remembers the three time all conference first baseman as an exceptional young woman I just knew early on that she was going to probably be a trailblazer and she was going to go out there do something great she was going to make an impact but even in my wildest dreams I never exactly four saw this one coming the giants a national folk focus her talents on helping build a winning culture in the clubhouse traffic and weather together is Brian nobles at the limit on everybody's all the way around Sacramento govern fender Bender westbound I. eighty at Madison but it doesn't appear to be slowing anybody down still have chain controls up in the high country right now on I eighty of the mind I acted the state line fifty its twin bridges to Myers traffic on the tens every ten minutes mornings and afternoons fry nobles leaves.

Myers fender Bender Kathy softball Alyssa Sacramento state Madison Brian nobles UC Davis Gabe Kapler San Francisco Giants Sacramento Oak Park Alice waters
Jerrelle Guy on Her New Cookbook 'Black Girl Baking'

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

Jerrelle Guy on Her New Cookbook 'Black Girl Baking'

"Gerald how are you I'm doing really well thank you you were born in Lantana I guess it was an interesting place I I would say it was lower you right there was Jamaican Cuban Haitian food and culture so the food must have on my father's side you know things that my grandmother made just really really hardy she put ketchup in it which sounds strange now but it is nice sweetness so it was definitely you became a Vegan as a result in you so you really changed your entire dia in all of that so by becoming Vegan that sets you apart from your family and you know starch heavy because a lot of it too you know we're trying to feed a large food that I loved and I wanted to taste but that fit by Diet how I would watch the food network as a little girl and how I would see this huge contrast reality probably for a lot of people but even just the way that we approached and then she would leave like excess food in the ball I'm when she was transferring over were like who eats that like I don't know I didn't I didn't process yeah I was curious about what kind of world is that she could live in and not feel haning food scraps Just talk about that if you would for second no no I just got really inspired because I was going through this period where I was just very overwhelmed with mental state and so I was cleaning it out and I was taking my jars and I was that was really what I did with that project I just took old jars from my fridge and and it was just a fun project to help people think about ways that they can Belinda took over the Internet and the food it was a social media thing yeah that Aqua instead of egg white and aqua is just the Brian that you could get from just whip that up just like you would an egg white and then you just folded into instead of heavy cream oftens which my wife would look charcoal banana bread so it's and I think that it's just me you know I think that it it's all of the things it because I call the book that but I think that that's what makes it real you know like people on authenticity and food and just play with the techniques that you've learned then all of these new ideas just come up like it didn't feel like I was all whole wheat pastry flour mix it with white flour does that that because I feel like I can work it for a while because I have hot hands then I feel like sometimes I'm like you know depending on the temperature while you're there may Gerald thank you so much it was just a pleasure to speak with you I really enjoyed it thank you

Gerald