20 Burst results for "Alice Paul"

"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:43 min | 6 months ago

"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Amendment 100 years later coverage presented by the National Constitution Center. Suffrage movement was successful in getting women the right to vote. But it wasn't the end. The second part of the movement, an amendment provided women with equal rights is still a work in progress as we hear from K Y. W's Clovis and Pat Lobe. With the boat One most suffragists packed up their activism and went back to their previous lives, but not the woman who brought the most radical techniques to the fight. New Jersey's Alice Paul was just getting started. Her goal was never merely the vote she wanted for equality for women. Paul's biographer, Mary Walton, says Paul wrote the Equal Rights amendment in 1923 and lobbied for it as long as she lived. Paul died in 1977, believing it had failed because with five years to the deadline, ratification had stalled. But Kim you've found there may be hope. That's right. Pat after its told legal scholars came up with a plan to get three more states to ratify Kristen Niles is with the Alice Paul Institute January 2020. We saw Virginia become the 38 states to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment. And so now that the 38 states have fully ratified we've met that legal requirements. Clinical director of the Institute for Women in Leadership at Drexel University says an E R is definitely needed. But adds Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg wants to scrap this one. Justice Ginsburg has suggested that because of all the history of the current the R a, then the controversies that maybe we need a new amendment, so the future of the maybe it's birth. Again. Kim Glovis K y W News.

Alice Paul Pat Lobe Alice Paul Institute Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsb Kim Glovis Justice Ginsburg National Constitution Center New Jersey Clovis Kristen Niles Institute for Women Virginia Clinical director Mary Walton Drexel University E R
"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:14 min | 6 months ago

"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"The centers are opening September 8th at rec centers, libraries in Philadelphia Housing authority sites. Mayor Kenny says the centers are open on ly two families who register access centers or not drop off centers. Nor are they a replacement for schools. Registration information is being released next week, and Deputy Mayor Cynthia Figueroa says families with caregivers who work outside the home and who can't afford childcare are eligible. We're really trying to target those where they have absolutely no options available. The 31 centers can accommodate 800 students, and Figueroa says. The city isn't sure what the demand will be. School Superintendent William Height told reporters. It'll likely be much more than that, I think is gonna be significant. The launcher than 800 Figueroa says the city aims to open as many as 50 centers by the end of September. Mike Leonardo Kois, heavily NewsRadio, German doctors, who've gotten to examine Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who's suspected of having been poisoned, said he is fit to be flown abroad for medical treatment. But Russian doctors at the hospital in Siberia a Siberia, where navalny lies in a coma, are refusing to authorize that transfer. One of the Russian President Vladimir Putin's fiercest critics is Navalny. He was admitted to intensive care in a coma after a suspected poisoning, possibly from a cup of tea that his supporters believed was engineered by the Kremlin. It's 11 48 Thie 19th Amendment 100 years later coverage presented by the National Constitution Center, one of the biggest forces behind the success of the women's suffrage movement was largely for gotten until recently. W's Pat Lobe has the story of South Jersey activist Alice Paul Alice Paul was a thoroughly modern woman of 1906, traveling on her own to get an advanced degree at the London School of Economics. But Lucy Beard of the Alice Paul Institute says she became part of the cause of women's rights. When she wandered into a talk by legendary British suffragette Emilian pan cursed. Hundreds of people went and they got noisemakers and rotten vegetables to throw anything they could do to disrupt the talks, and Alice pointed to that is Galvanizing moment, and she decided that.

Deputy Mayor Cynthia Figueroa Alice Paul Alice Paul Lucy Beard Mayor Kenny Alice Paul Institute Alexei Navalny Vladimir Putin coma Siberia Philadelphia Mike Leonardo Kois Emilian pan National Constitution Center Superintendent Pat Lobe William Height London School of Economics President
"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:37 min | 6 months ago

"alice paul" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Would abuse Mat Lo tells the story of South Jersey activist Alice Paul Alice Paul was a thoroughly modern woman of 1906, traveling on her own to get an advanced degree at the London School of Economics. But Lucy Beard of the Alice Paul Institute says she became part of the cause of women's rights when she wandered into a talk A legendary British suffragette, Emelin pan cursed. Hundreds of people went and they got noisemakers and rotten vegetables to throw anything they could do to disrupt the talks, and Alice pointed to that as this Calvin izing moment, and she decided that night to dedicate herself to the suffrage movement. In the next tumultuous three years, Alice was arrested three times went on a hunger strike and was force fed. She brought these more aggressive tactics back to the U. S. Organizing the 1st march on Washington and pioneering Violent resistance, which her biographer, Philadelphia writer Mary Walton, Things are as much a part of her legacy as her work on the vote permits were granted that were never granted before she really paved the way for generations of protesters to come. So why was she overlooked for so long? Lucy Beard has a theory. History generally gets written by the moderates and when they sat down to write the final volume of the history of women's suffrage. These radical women were literally written out of history. Her name was revived by women's rights activists using the centennial of her birth in 1985 to draw attention to the ongoing struggle for an equal Rights amendment. They managed to rescue her papers to allowing writers like Walton to share her story. More widely, Pat Lobe white W news radio It's 809. We have got a bad crash.

Alice Paul Alice Paul Lucy Beard Alice Paul Institute Mary Walton Mat Lo London School of Economics Pat Lobe Emelin pan Calvin izing Philadelphia writer Washington
"alice paul" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:45 min | 8 months ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Am so happy that day joining us for you support that I can get back on the pitch and have fun yes excellent although the birth of my second grade child a daughter this past week I'm very happy and everybody's healthy Mazel Tov how beautiful what is her name Alice Paul Margaret absolutely Marjorie Margie yeah I was Marjorie now absolutely beautiful Allen Mazel Tov you have a lot of not because a lot of good things now this is joy a lot of beautiful things in your life thank you for calling in six five one nine eight nine thank you Sir six five one nine eight nine nine two two six Stacey from line a lakes what's making you happy I did finally will be able to get the antibody cast because I want to work with old people because I love that okay you are so sweet what are the antibody test say I won't know until next week well Stacey call back and let us know but you think you had it I do zero and where do you work with elderly people right now I don't I have been a PCA for handicapped people for years now five well not all people are lonely and yeah they are and they need you and you're there for them Stacey will pray that you have antibodies and that you can get back to work thank you Stacy thanks for the call yep mikes in Minneapolis what's making you happy Mike.

Alice Paul Margaret Stacey Minneapolis Mike Marjorie Margie Allen Mazel Stacy
Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Alice Paul: Feminist, Suffragist, Political Strategist

"Are feminists. Today was a suffrage. Est Women's rights activist and political strategist. She brought a more militant fight for the vote to the. Us and steered the Movement for an equal rights amendment. Let's talk about the One and only Alice Paul Alice. Paul was born on January eleventh. Eighteen eighty five in Mount Laurel. New Jersey to William and tasty Paul. Alice was the eldest of four children and was raised in very comfortable surroundings. The Paul Family practiced the quaker faith. Alice leader cited the quaker belief in gender equity as formative in her strong drive towards promoting women's equality. Her mother tasty also had a major impact analysis later work tasty was a suffragette and a member of the National American woman. Suffrage Association herself. Alice attended swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in biology. While there she participated in a variety of extracurricular activities she was a member of student government and she played field hockey tennis and basketball. She was also a celebrated poet classes. Commencement Speaker in one thousand nine hundred seven. Alice traveled to England to work at the would brook settlement while there. She met Christabel Pankhurst. We talked about last week. Christabel introduced Alice to England suffrage movement. It was more militant than what Alice seen in the US. The British women fought under the motto. Deeds not words and took the words to heart. They smashed windows and went on hunger strikes among other tactics. Alice joined the 'cause later saying she broke more than forty eight windows and was imprisoned. Multiple Times Alice returned to the US in nineteen ten and got to work pushing the more radical suffrage agenda. She brought back from across the Atlantic in nineteen thirteen. Alice organized a suffrage parade. Woodrow Wilson had just been elected. Alice plant her march for the day before his inauguration purposefully stealing attention away from the President Xi succeeded in making the suffrage movement front page news but she also made the very problematic decision to ask black women to March at the back of the parade. She failed to appreciate the importance of the diverse movement instead focusing primarily on white women. This is a mistake. She would go onto her. Pete throughout her life in one thousand nine fourteen. Alice founded the National Woman's Party. She was incredibly good at rousing attention for her. 'cause members of the National Woman's Party were the first people to ever pick it in front of the White House during nineteen seventeen. They picketed six days a week after women won the right to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in nineteen twenty. The National Woman's Party had to decide what to focus on next? Alice was lobbied to work on. Expanding VOTING RIGHTS. More broadly instead. She turned her attention to expand women's rights. Outside of the electoral sphere in Nineteen twenty-three Alice wrote the equal rights amendment to the US Constitution to guarantee equal rights. To All American women. She actually went to law school. In order to be qualified to write its language the was introduced in Congress continually until it finally passed in Nineteen seventy-two still the amendment hasn't officially been added to the US Constitution. Because until recently it lacks ratification from the required number of states. Today it's actually the closest it's ever been the ER as tale is a long and wild story that warrants. Its own whole podcast in fact. We've made one. It's called ordinary equality and it's available wherever you listen. Alice passed away on July ninth. Nineteen seventy seven. She was ninety two years old Alice. Paul fought tirelessly for women's legal progress and equity in the US. She's not a perfect hero rather she's a leader who changed the course of our country's history while also having her fair share of flaws

Alice Paul Alice Alice Leader Alice United States National Woman's Party Suffrage Association Christabel Pankhurst Paul Family New Jersey Us Constitution Woodrow Wilson Swarthmore College Mount Laurel England Basketball Atlantic Congress Pete
Meet Alice Ball, Unsung Pioneer In Leprosy Treatment

Science Friday

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Meet Alice Ball, Unsung Pioneer In Leprosy Treatment

"Picture the world of chemical research through about nineteen ten I'm guessing that a young African American woman probably is not a big part of that mental picture right well she should be Alice ball was a chemist to develop the most effective treatment for leprosy in the early nineteen hundreds joining me now to talk about the story of Alice Paul and her legacy is doc my way of Bubba he's director of the ball method a short film about Alice Paul will be making its world premiere next week at the pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles bringing Alice ball out of the shadows of hidden figures full disclosure the film received a grant from for its development from the Sloan foundation that's also a contributor to science Friday that Miley joins us from Skype welcome to science Friday hi are things are going to have the let's start with the capsule summary who who was Alice Paul give us a little bit of thumbnail profile there yeah so ball with the American woman born in eighteen ninety two middle upper class family and she attended the university of Washington and graduated was two masters the two bachelor degree in pharmacy and after that she went to the university of Hawaii which used to be called the college of Hawaii back then and became the first woman to graduate with a master's degree in chemistry and then also end up being an instructor there as well how did she get so focused on helping people with leprosy well started with her teeth on my master's thesis and doctor here at home and who is an assistant surgeon and Kelly hospital where they should take care of patients is that Percy he rendered the service and he saw that the method does she was using on the copper plant on her thesis was could be helping could help them get injectable solution that you're looking for what do the leprosy patients family thing idea they have this plant and it sort of worked a little bit but not very well and she helped to start look for an injectable solution yes they used to apply it as the lotion colors but I wasn't very effective and then they tried giving it or leave but that would also make patients vomit and so document I knew that injectable solution was the key but the problem is that the term group or wasn't so you work wasn't been able to take by the human body so can somebody to help them to accomplish that because in those days if you had leprosy or dead person walking right you were yeah exactly when Alan yeah and so the Alice Paul work with people before they were sent off to this quarantine yes she she started working on it the summer of twenty nineteen fifteen and what happened was patients will get sent to Cali hospital stay there ranging from two weeks to a month and then when they were doing that they're not going to get better they'll get sent to the small island called Molokai where is that Saddam when called Kalaupapa and that settlement actually still has a lot of patience on it today SO you chronicle in the book how she sort of stumbled on the answer to making the injectable solution how how close is that to the truth I mean I know you have literary license and writing a plot for a movie but we were you able to find out what really happened yes right I think one of the current process of for her to find it was leading the that some good acid best thing called for overnight and so that was one of the things that I could show visually in the phone without getting too deep into the chemistry so that's basically what I had I was trying to connect and in fact we have a to give a little peek people it's a little taste of the film we have a that pivotal scene in which he has a flash of insight

"alice paul" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

Ordinary Equality

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Ordinary Equality

"Often the way we talk about. History is problematic because we reduce people to their involvement in a single issue and we stripped people of their complexities. Here's Anna Lehman again. If you're lucky enough to learn about IDA B wells in school you're going to learn about the anti lynching work that she did. You'RE GONNA learn about the incredible pioneering nearing journalism but you're not GONNA learn about IB wells as a suffrage us and that again comes back to how we teach history and how we boil people down to just one thing. So if we're teaching about to be wells as someone who worked against lynching well my goodness. We can't possibly find time in the curriculum to also talk about the work that she you did for suffrage you know the same goes for Harriet. Tubman in the same goes for Journal. Truth if you're lucky enough to learn about those two women school you're GONNA learn a lot about what they did. They're anti abolition anti-slavery work. You're not ever going to hear about the work that they did for women's suffrage but both of those women were out there working towards the right to vote for women. They were incredible powerful people so what we ended up doing. is we take tire movement right and we boil it down to one person. Listen so we take the civil rights movement and we boil it down to Martin Luther King We take those suffrage movement and we boil it down to Alice. Paul or Susan B Anthony. When in fact you had five million suffragettes who marched who fought and who demanded justice inequality and so when we take hake whole movement of people and we boil it down to one person and then we take that one person and we boil them down to be just this We put them on a pedestal. and become this hero right. We do that person a disservice and we do American history to service people much more complicated than that and I think the suffrage movement is the perfect example of that where you had these women who were bold and brave and radical and achieved something that was so crucial for women in America and with out what these suffer just did. I would never be where I am today. I would never be the head of federal agency. I would never be sitting here having this conversation with you at the same time while what they achieved. Steve D- was extraordinary and monumental in American history for American women and for American democracy. They made a lot of mistakes along the way important ones big ones that led to decades of consequences century of consequences and so the nineteen thirteen parade by all measures right achieved what Alice Paul was hoping it would achieve but it came at a cost and it came at a price and unfortunately fortunately that decision that she made in the nineteen thirteen parade. She continued to make throughout her activism over and over and over and Alice. Paul was a genius at getting people to pay attention. Members of the National Woman's Party were the first people people to ever pick it or protests in front of the White House. These started in nineteen seventeen and were there diligently six days a week. It's no rain sleet didn't matter. They would stand in front of the White House with their banners saying Mr President. What will you due for women's suffrage? They would stand there and they would demand to be heard. They basically brought a cauldron they call them watch fires and they would burn copies of president. Woodrow Wilson speeches in front of the White House where he would stand up and he would give these speeches about the importance of democracy and the importance of spreading democracy around the world and it was all part of the sort of world war one rhetoric and they would burn copies of these speeches and they would say you know you claim to care about democracy but fifty one percent of the population here in your country doesn't have have the right to vote. And how can you stand up and say that we need to spread democracy around the world when we don't have true democracy here at home. The woman suffrage movement was violent not glamorous but it was effective women like Alice. Paul were arrested. Jailed brutally beaten assaulted and force fed. Eventually the nineteenth amendment did pass an exactly one hundred years ago. Oh this august Tennessee ratified the amendment becoming the last state necessary to do so having achieved a major goal. Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party already had a big decision to make suffragette Mary. Church Terrell was one of the first African American women to earn a college degree and a charter member of the N. Double Lacey Pe-. She championed an inclusive way forward she supported the era demanded that work on universal. Suffrage was not yet done. It's nineteen twenty the nineteenth amendment ratified. The National Woman's Party. Have to decide what their mission is going to be. Now what is this organization going to be. And they decide site to pivot towards this larger mission of working towards women's equality and so in nineteen twenty one alice Paul drafts the era its first introduced in nineteen twenty three and she starts working towards this idea of equality under the law for all women. At the time time Mary Church terrel came to her and said look. This erasing is great but the nineteenth amendment is not not being implemented fairly and effectively for all women across the United States. Black women are still being marginalized. Black women are still being denied. The right to vote in the JIM MM crow south. There are all sorts of barriers to black women's right to vote and Blackman's right to vote that the nineteenth amendment did not fix and so Mary Church. Daryl came to Alice. Pond said this is this needs to be the new mission. We need your support. We need your help. We need to work towards making sure at the nineteen. Th Amendment is effective in the way that we all hoped it would be effective and Alice response to that. Was I hear you Mary. But my goal is to work towards equality for women and I'm not really interested in getting into race on. That's just not the direction that we're going to head. I'm thinking about women as an umbrella and I'm not going to pivot the mission of this organization to work towards in this specific voting rights specific barriers. That black women are facing now. That's not where this is going to head and you know that reaction is disappointing right and so you can see there. Are these moments over time. We're Alice Paul. Makes sort of the same choice over and over again the wrong choice really over and over again and it's not that simple right because the IRA is so important for women and was so important for women and this this race towards equality and so you can see. She's faced with this choice and it's hard to look back and know right. What what she should have done? But by all measures she absolutely did not value the stories in the lived experiences of black women and she repeated that same mistake Alice. Paul continued to advocate for the era throughout her life until her death in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven she was a steward of the women's movement from the time and before suffrage to a time when we would be fully and completely integrated into the US constitution but her tunnel vision on the era blinded minded her to other vitally important issues. White women often support and uphold white supremacy because it directly benefits us but the equal rights rights amendment was not an is not a white woman's movement. We'll get into this more in future episodes but it's important to note that the resurrection of the Equal Rights Amendment has been led by women of color across the country. That includes Senator Jennifer McClellan from Virginia. Here she is again. I have been very impressed. Impressed and remind people that women of color are leading the way in the legislature. No you got Jennifer Carroll here in Virginia pushing it You have Gilda COBB. Bob Hunter the longest serving African American senator in South Carolina. You Have Karen Carter Peterson Louisiana. And it's and women. Black women have always been in the fight for women's equality. We're just not the ones that get the attention and that was true of the suffragette movement but we were there and and you know I kind of feel the spirit of either be wells where it's like you know not only. Are we going to be in this fight. We're not going to be relegated to the back. We're going to be right up front Ron and hopefully the media will pay attention but we're used to doing the work and not getting dark. Admission we recognize ourselves and we will make sure we're we're lifting each other up. It's more important. The job gets done but I think if we're going to address pay inequity pay inequity inequity impacts women of color more but we can make a big difference on it if we have the era and we have a legal basis to address pay equity the intersection -ality of it being a woman of color or even a transgender woman or a lesbian or queer. In any way I the intersection of it is you are doubly oppressed and once you tackle one. That's going to make progress no matter what and and and so I do think the era is going to help all women.

Alice Paul National Woman's Party White House United States IDA B Anna Lehman Tubman Harriet Senator Jennifer McClellan Martin Luther King Woodrow Wilson America Mary Church Steve D president Karen Carter Peterson Jennifer Carroll
Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

The Electorette Podcast

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Amy Aronson, Author of the New Book "Crystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of disappeared from or is obscure in historical record is because of what really was kind of intersectional mindset an intersectional outlook in her activism. What I mean by that is that Eastman Smith involved herself in multiple movements in many of the major social movements of the twentieth century and believed that they were all all linked together and worked throughout her career to try to link them together all under one kind of vast emancipatory rubric? She she believed saved and she she recognized that there you know there were. There were commonalities. Among various forms of oppression and she she tried tried to kind of straddle multiple movements and bring them together in order to combat. You know all of those common sources of oppression and inequality At once so she spent a lot of time talking about socialism anti imperialism and also you know maternity and maternal ism with feminists earnest's. She spent a lot of time talking about feminism and pacifism with Socialists and with revolutionaries and one of the outcomes outcomes of this was that Eastman always seemed to be kind of straddling so many different movements at once that her voice often it seemed insurgent or challenging from within each individual movement. Many of her colleagues felt that they weren't sure where she stood because she was trying to straddle so many different movements at once because when she talked to save feminists about socialism. It seemed like a challenge from within. Yes in and so. This cut complicated her status and her stature within the the movements that she was affiliated with within the movements that that she she built her life on at the same time as her radicalism and her activism challenged her standing in the more mainstream same political and social environments where she was radical so she was already challenging to more mainstream views but because of that she you know she needed needed stronger a stronger sense of belonging I think clearer sense of standing within the protest movements the leftist movements that she collectively saw as her political home. And so what happened was she. You know kind of fell through the planks of history. She fell to the planks of historical. Memory she we didn't have clear consistent connections with organizations With a single organization right or a single 'cause she didn't have clear and consistent alliances this is or relationships to various mentors. who were recognized the things that that signal stature and make someone intelligible and make someone visible double in historical memory? She kind of challenged complicated at every turn and precisely because she you know tried to connect them All to a larger vision of change that they all shared and so in some ways it was kind of I think a tragic irony that her her inclusive vision seem to divide people and seem to divide people's loyalties but in other ways it's also kind of a fascinating story of how we tell stories as how and why we remember people that I think has a lot to tell us about our current intersectional environment for forming coalitions to pursue the same social change that she and others have been pursuing for a century. You know in counting so is it over simplistic to say that. She was possibly a victim of her own own prolificacy like she was so prolific involved in so many movements that she wasn't known for single thing or was it that and making some hostility because she was seen as kind kind of an insurgent and lots of these movements. I wouldn't say hostility but I would say that you know. She challenged people. She challenged. Organizational hierarchies and in leadership at you know in various organizations and so there were some leaders She had quite a run in with Alice. Paul for example Particularly after the vote was one John when the militant wing of the women's movement the National Women's Party was starting to figure out. Okay what comes next. It was in that period before the rise of the Equal Rights Amendment Amendment nineteen twenty-three that they were you know searching for okay. What's our next approach and Eastman wanted a very intersectional kind of transnational feminist movement and Paul wanted a much more focused targeted women's campaign? Just much like the you know. The suffrage movement that they had just successfully completed pleaded so for some leaders. There was that you know that sense that they were being challenged from a colleague For others it was the fact that you're kind of intersectional perspective active As well as her movement to the left after the Russian revolution seemed to radical and seemed to push the organizations that she was associated with in more radical directions than many of the progressive leaders in those organizations were comfortable. That's unfortunate you know. She reminds me of reading her story. And you know kind of the motion all day of it. And the Ark of her life. She reminds me of not Elizabeth Rankin but there. I can't believe I can't remember a name. The very first woman who ran for president. who was ooh Toria woodhall awesome? She's scared the crap out of people what it's just something about her demeanor. It's hard to tell from a book you know but just something about it. Just kind of reminds me of that similar kind of radical woman radical feminist. Get around that time. And you know crystal was just unafraid. she was so bold and she. She asserted her freedom. She really you know she. She claimed a freedom and claimed a world that even while she was trying to create it so she was an in kind of a kind of a real sense woman ahead of herself or ahead of her time. You know I know. That's kind of a cliche as historians. You know we're we're not really supposed to say that What struck me about her early on? You know what would I I think stuck with me From my graduate school days till almost twenty years later when I finally you know sat down to to try to write the book was the sense of a woman who was just calling ahead of herself and you know and in envisioning and reaching four And you know and actively demanding and trying to live live in a world that was much closer to mine than it was to hers. And you know I found that's just so compelling it's visionary I think she was a gripping person go find her story gripping because of that right she had some really really progressive stances and you know you mentioned a few feminism and she was also I think a socialist. She called herself a socialist right. Yes and she was four reproductive rights. Yes very much. So why was she branded. I WanNa go through the historical arch- of her life a bit later. But why does she branded the most dangerous woman in America. Well I need most of those claims about who came in her. Most radical or revolutionary period after the Russian revolution revolution in nineteen seventeen. She and her brother Maxi sman much better known than she is a radical writer and editor of the Masses magazine. The two of them together published the Liberator magazine which started in Nineteen Eighteen Shortly after the Russian revolution and it was called the Journal of Revolutionary Progress and it became very quickly the kind of center of reporting and information about revolutionary movements worldwide in connection with that period in her politics. Um which I can explain to you a little bit how. She kinda volved into that radicalism from her more progressive earlier activism in connection with that. She took very forthright arthritis very bold. Very outspoken stances in favor of the Bolsheviks and herself traveled to communist Hungary and she was the first the American reporter to do that and reported very enthusiastically at least initially about her hopes that the a similar revolution would come to the United States and would indeed sweep the world would become a global revolutionary movement. And of course this you know this kind of radicalism. She was not alone in it particularly on the left after the Russian revolution many colleagues from a number of different movements also celebrated revolution however You know it still was. That was not a mainstream extreme view. You know even on the left it was not a mainstream view was a radical view and It was very threatening to people especially in the the body of a woman and the voice voice of someone who was so afraid to speak about it. And the voice of someone who had such stature in more mainstream political political movements and more mainstream political

Crystal Eastman Eastman Smith Jim Taylor Skinner Amy. Aaronson Amy Eareckson Journal Of Revolutionary Progr Writer And Editor Aclu Paul Hungary Liberator Magazine Elizabeth Rankin United States Co Founder America President. National Women's Party Reporter Maxi
"alice paul" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"alice paul" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"The president is said if these investigations continue I can't work with you. He didn't bring it up. And so we're going believe we can do both at once. We can come up with some good ideas on infrastructure, and we wanna hear his ideas on funding that's going to be the crucial point in my opinion and the house and the Senate can proceed. In its oversight responsibilities. The two are not mutually exclusive, and we will lead. He didn't make it that way. Trump and democratic leaders have voiced support for infrastructure investments committees in both chambers of congress have started to lay the groundwork for an infrastructure Bill through hearings democratic lawmakers are expecting to have legislation ready in June or July. The Oklahoma supreme court says the state law that restricts women's access to drug induced abortions as unconstitutional the decision overturns at two thousand fourteen Oklahoma state law that banned off label use of a medication used for borden's sometimes called are you for eighty six the ruling upholds in Oklahoma county judges two thousand seventeen ruling that overturned the law approved by the Republican controlled legislature and signed by the former governor congress held its first hearing on the equal rights amendment in thirty years today, the RA would amend the constitution to guarantee equal rights to women. Congress passed it in nineteen seventy two but not enough states ratified it within the legislations deadline. It takes at least thirty eight states to amend. The constitution efforts are underway to amend the original legislation and abolish the deadline. So the ER a could still be ratified it now. Only needs one more state to do. So San Mateo county's congresswoman democrat Jackie speier introduced legislation in the house. This has been a lifetime campaign for many of us a lifetime campaign. It doesn't start in one thousand nine hundred twenty three with Alice Paul actually,.

congress Oklahoma supreme court Oklahoma county San Mateo county president Oklahoma Alice Paul Jackie speier Senate borden thirty years
"alice paul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To. Do right? Her sister is needed to be taken care of her father was an invalid when the marriage took place. So it was a very pragmatic decision. See in terms of in terms of her getting a divorce was that easy to do with that. I mean, I can't imagine. It was I can't give away too much of how the machinations occur. But suffice it to say that she was risking everything that she'd spent twenty years trying to accomplish by making that choice as you researched. This did it become clear to you that she always had this idea of being a political player in mind. She later on in her life becomes part of the suffragette movement. Right. She was that something that was initially part of her her decision to marry this man and worker way up in New York society, or what did she have somewhat of an awakening? No. I think it it happened as she got older. And she started to recognize as conditions changed, especially for the people who were not of upper classes in New York. She saw a need for women to be able to empower themselves. And there was you know, this. Nascent movement for women's suffrage at the time. But there were not very many women of her class involved in it. So this is another way that she sort of breaks through the mold of what she is supposed to be doing by not just giving money, but getting actively involved in that effort, and one of the things that I think also set her apart was she didn't just join the movement when she got frustrated with the slow pace. She started her own organization Alice Paul, and she opened up organizations throughout New York City, and she offered, you know, hygiene products to women and job training to women through these organizations, and she was I think perhaps the only suffrage of of the Aira to deliberately include African American women in the the attempt to get the vote. So she didn't have to do any of that. She could have just sat around in her beautiful hats and eating bon-bons whatever or eating the time. She's very forward thinking she.

New York City Alice Paul Aira New York twenty years
"alice paul" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

Politico's Off Message

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

"The children's book you're more excited talking about that then running for president i'm talking about this because i'm so excited so i'm writing a children's book from nine six year olds two nine year olds and it's on the history of suffrage which is the women's rights movement to get the right to vote and it started in the mid eighteen hundreds and went until we finally passed the nineteenth amendment nineteen twenty when it was ratified and the lives of the women who fought this battle for seventy years are strawberry and the role models that they not only provide for me personally but for every kid in america are real if you look at harriet tubman she was never afraid the lesson she taught me was to have courage and be strong because she not only escaped from slavery but she ran back to her enslavers and literally rescued her family members people she knew in love and she did it for years and years and then served in the civil war as a spider arm scout and then started doing suffrage speeches around the country like this woman was made of steel and anthony anthony elizabeth katie stanton alice paul ida b wells mary church terrell and this is going to be illustrated it's an illustrated by mark hallman who's amazing gifted illustrator she's done yorker covers she's in lots of children's books before she's brilliant and so the pictures of these women beautiful portraits i mean they're going to be posters or some great and we pull out a bit of life advice from each one of them about what they did differently and how they differently and why they were effective i mean susan b anthony she was affective because she never gave up she literally worked for suffrage every gave her life and never stopped like she just wants wants it became her issue it didn't end for fifty years elizabeth katie danton same she dared to be different she was the first one to say we want the right to vote to be nothing we fight for because if we get the right to vote than all these other rights and privileges fall from it whether it's property rights whether it's ability to keep our kids if we get divorced women had they couldn't even keep their money they had literally no property rights so all of them have something to share what's it called bold.

president america harriet tubman mark hallman anthony anthony elizabeth kati susan elizabeth katie danton nine six year seventy years two nine year fifty years
"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Party puts energy into expanding women's rights beyond the vote they say okay the vote is the first step now we need economic equality we need equality and all other legal matters we need a quality in access to education and the professions and in nineteen twentythree these same women who we've watched battle so hard to get the federal amendment approved sue white alice paul and then another legally trained a woman named crystal eastman right the equal rights amendment it is introduced into congress in nineteen twentythree just three years after we get the vote wow and you can count him any years it's been it's been longer than the the battle to get the nineteenth amendment yes yes and they and these are the same women so there's there's a absolutely straight line continuum and of course we see that it's possible to have a federal amendment that does not get ratified yeah and we're and again it came down to i think one state i know i live in florida i believe if florida had ratified it we'd have the goal rights amendment now so so you know that that's kind of a story i'm telling and in the women's our it's amazing there are other parallels between those days and it's we're coming up on the hundred anniversary and you know in in many ways the more things change the more they stay the same it's the book is called the women's our the great fight to win the vote lane weiss is on twitter at e f weiss five your website is elaine weiss dot com where you can find out a whole lot more about the book thank you so much for joining us today really appreciate it we'll thank you it's been a pleasure to be with you for me to take care.

alice paul congress florida weiss three years
"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"They harass you know they would be i mean this and the police they just look the other way wow so you know when you look at how what activists go through i mean we even in our time you know even to a couple of years ago the whole nine you know nine nine nine movement i mean we people go to jail and get literally beaten for you know just standing up for so anyway alice paul pisses them off in you know time goes on and then now they start picketing in front of the white house for the right to vote and they're allowed to and was legal and it was peaceful for eighteen months they stood outside the white house they were called the silent sentinels and they had these signs you know how long but must women wait for liberty because now it's world war one and president wilson joints war and he's going around fighting for liberty and saying that he's fighting for liberty and lowers pulls like a hello how long list of the women weight but the women were seen as unpatriotic they weren't but they were you know seen that way and finally they get arrested they were arrested for peacefully picketing in front of the white house the thrown into jail and i mean physically literally literally thrown into jail this whole story is so horrible it was called the night of terror it was in november older women i mean these are you know i'm sixty one years old you know my age women are out there with signs and being thrown against the wall it's ho the if you read the research it's just the crazy this is littoral stories that came out of that or one of the women who was in there was or was one of the women was friends with the rich woman whose husband was connected and the story got out how terrible two women were being treated they were in a work house said they were not given food and uh i so al's pull goes on a hunger strike which is what she did back in london and for i think it was like two weeks or a week they force feed hurt roy eggs the tubes up her nose down her throw three times a day and word gets out about allah's pull this stuff in the newspaper and the whole thing turns you know turns around people get.

alice paul president london roy al eighteen months sixty one years two weeks
"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Bankers organized women and they went around london's smashing windows so that they would get arrested and they did and then they would go to jail and they did and they went on hunger strikes all of this to get the vote and it worked it works at the pain curse it took a long time but it worked so this is alice polls over there and she's taking like menial jobs and seeing how hard it is for women and getting paid nothing in working in these horrible factories and she comes back to america this is during president wilson's rain and she starts to organize women to vote and she's a lady you know the thing that i love about alice paul is that she was this bull busting hungerstriking 19th the amendment passing you know brilliant ivy leagueeducated sufferer just but she was a lady and you know she was sitting have tea and tried to talk the men into and she would sit with president wilson uh every now and again but he would not allow women to vote and what really pissed him off with that when he became elected she's she he had this big inauguration likely due to today we had these these giant inauguration parades and the president wilson arrives and will in nineteen dollars seventeen he arrived at union station in washington dc he's ready for his big parade there's no one there he's like where where are all the people and they were all on the avenue watching alice paul's suffrage parade she had organized eight thousand women all dressed in white to march down pennsylvania avenue and literally stole his attention and they were fifty thousand people that what happened million half a million people watch this parade this is 1919 the largest parade in in washington history and they always say just imagine what she could do with facebook rain just imagine i mean yeah well that's what how the arab spring happened it was by that kind of thing so she was a brilliant strategist an organizer um but the women really suffered at the parade i mean they were you know they had lit cigars thrown at them they were mob they were they.

london wilson union station alice paul america president washington pennsylvania facebook nineteen dollars
"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Came very good friends with saw the play and heard me talking she goes you know as a sufferer just is in america and and you know there was a moving here of suffragette and now i'm gonna tell you a little bit about alice paul because it all ties together and alice paul who was a real she's the one who wrote the equal rights amendment the she was a very rare privilege she was privileged she grew up in new jersey she was a quaker and the quakers where the very cool group in america they were the first group to ban slavery they were about equality and peace they big educated women they let them preach i mean they were like amazing group uh the quakers and alice paul there's a quaker so it was susan be anthony was also a quaker so it was president nixon brazilian pat whose it's you know pen pennsylvania so it's the history of the quakers is also pretty interesting although i always tell you know my daughter rose is a real girlie girl i don't know how that happened but she is and i was like he would never make it as a quaker because they couldn't wear makeup they couldn't uh dress fancy they didn't drink they didn't list to music i mean they were you know factions of quakers that were you know really severe actually dolly madison was also a quaker when she was first married and then when she when her husband died and she remarried um mad at uh wow forgetting her husband's name addison she stopping a quaker and she started you know dressing like what i say like came crashing it and you know crazy and and and would became like this lovely uh hostess of washington but back to alice paul so alice paul um she ended up getting educated in london she went to england in the early 1900s and was mentored by emily pankhurst who was the most famous suffragette and there was a movie two years ago about her coal suffragette and it was meryl streep who played in line pankhurst well you know it's it's really good movie i would so encourage people to see that movie it really tells you what women went through she had to get violent um not that i'm a proponent of violence but you know they needed attention so emily.

alice paul anthony washington emily pankhurst meryl streep america susan president nixon dolly madison london england two years
"alice paul" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on WREK

"Ever first people every to do act enacted civil disobedience where they protested in front of the white house and then also got arrested even though they were doing peaceful protests basically it was them in jail and doing the forcefeeding that forced the president to sort of say okay we got to give these women the right to vote you know and they did so there are people who think it was els paul there were people things that would carry chapman kari chapman cat you know i believe it was everybody and every inch visual together in the movement that needs the movement happen it's all of us together working enrolling in the same direction to get something done so i don't think they do certainly noone heroin but obviously alice paul is one that i really related to and i would love to think that i would have the courage that she had to face what she did in jail and um you know and what she did but i really really really related to hire and just adored her feeling you were going to say that you know i adore them all you know and then again there's people like these people like me children justin engage who people don't even really know about but she was probably one of the most radical early movers and shakers of the movement who really believe you know not just in the right to vote but in total woman's equality and he points if you know the separation of church and state and you know bigger issues of you know women's equality not just the right to vote who was written out of history that a lot of people don't know about but she's being put back into history more and more and more and she's quite a remarkable woman also um so there's so many different women to relate to into admire and to feel like you know there's a little bit of you in the susan be anthony there's a little bit of you in the mattel jjust engaged there's a little bit of you in you know this person but our how's paul man her dedication hers singleminded exists and her willingness.

white house president heroin alice paul mattel justin
"alice paul" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The food was largely inedible and infested with worms dead flies and mouse droppings usually the only water available was an open bucket that was shared by everyone betting was so filthy that the matrons who had to handle it during inspections and searches did so wearing gloves although these women were still expected to sleep on it the suffrage is were also denied exercise reading and writing materials legal counsel and visitors prison authorities also tried to make the silent sentinels uncomfortable by using racism as a wedge they integrated the dormitory where the suffrage just slept this was obviously during the jim crow era still they arranged the bed so that they alternated with a white suffrage just in one bed and then a black woman who is often serving a sentence for prostitution in the next bed they also assigned some of the suffragette the job of repainting the quote colored restrooms meanwhile many of the suffragette tried to make the argument that they should be treated as political prisoners and not common criminals they tried to advocate for better conditions sometimes for themselves and sometimes for the workhouse population as a whole suffrage is who made a fuss were punished for it uh at least one matrin was fired allegedly for treating the incarcerated suffrage ists kindly of all of this stretched on several of the suffragette stearns who had tactic that had already been in use in the british movement for women's suffrage which was hunger strikes and as had happened in the uk prison officials are turning to force feeding them which was a painful embarrassing and dangerous process although some people were forced bed in the workhouse alice paul was actually transferred to the psychotic word of the district jail and then forced sped there three times a day.

prostitution alice paul legal counsel jim crow stearns uk
"alice paul" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Police did little to intervene other than arresting the picketers themselves in october dc police announced that anyone arrested for protesting outside the white house would be sentenced to six months in prison for obstructing the sidewalk when normally if anyone was obstructing the sidewalk it was the people protesting that are people heckling them not the protesters themselves but they brought those hecklers to the sidewalk is the logic that probably got used at the time yeah nevertheless they persisted with alice paul leading the picket line from the nwpp headquarters to the white house itself the very next day after that announcement was made carrying a banner that said the time has come to conquer or submit for there is but one choice we have made it as promised they were once again arrested convicted and imprisoned as this cycle of arrests in incarcerations wore on law enforcement tried a new approach making a whole process so unpleasant and humiliating that perhaps the women would just give up conditions were poor it every prison and work house in the area but it arca kwan workhouse they were particularly bad silent sentinel started being transferred to the workhouse from the more commonly used district jail at the where cows their personal possessions including toiletries toothbrushes than calms were confiscated and they weren't given any kind of replacements apart from one single bar of soap that was shared by everyone in the dormitory most of the suffragette through actually afraid to use this communal bar of soap due to the risk of spreading disease the women who were typically incarcerated at the work house had very little medical care and some of them had active infections of diseases like tuberculosis and syphilis.

white house alice paul incarcerations law enforcement medical care tuberculosis dc nwpp six months
"alice paul" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Constitutional

"But at the very last moment a young legislator cast the tiebreaking vote after his mom begged him to pass the amendment for women's voting rights and then it was done the amendment finally had support from the required threequarters of the states and it was ratified on august eighteen nineteen twenty the amendment for women's suffrage called the susan be anthony amendment officially became part of the us constitution but that was not the end of alice paul's plan shoot realized that the suffrage amendment itself was not enough it was not fully cool rights and she then uh became convinced that we needed an equal rights amendment she works literally the rest of her life on the nineteen th amendment had only allowed women the right to vote there was still nothing in the constitution that ensured beyond just voting that men and women have equal rights and protection under the law in july of nineteen twenty three on the seventy fifth anniversary of the seneca falls convention alice paul announced her push for an equal rights amendment the original words of it which she drafted stated simply men and women shall have equal rights throughout the united states and every place subject to its jurisdiction congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation that was it simple she named it the maat amendment after the coorganizer of seneca falls luke krisha motte but although was introduced in congress in nineteen 2003 it didn't go anywhere for a long time and some of this had to do with the fact that there were women initially who were reluctant to support it well it wasn't just any old woman brother was that were worried about it it was.

voting rights alice paul united states congress krisha motte anthony seventy fifth threequarters
"alice paul" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"alice paul" Discussed on Constitutional

"Elizabeth katie stanton said step by step we shall undermined the present form of civilization and inaugurate the mightiest revolution the world has ever with this episode of constitutionalist sponsored by wordpresscom did you know that twenty percent of websites roma were press more than any other platform shoes wordpresscom to build a business website without prior experience a beautiful design find accustomed to main name select the plan and you're good to go help people find your business with a wordpresscom website if percent off your website today at wordpresscom slash constitutional that's wordpresscomtim constitutional in the history books they keep saying that woman got equality are you got the vote that's how that usually phrase it got the vote and 1928 get in it we fought for that foot woman sacrifice their lives for that vote ollie's meola is one of the most prominent leaders of the modern day feminist movement she served as president of the national organization for women throughout the 19th '70s and '80s and today she's president of the feminist majority foundation anthony instead both lives a long life but they never saw the vote they were sure would win failure was impossible ssm via he says once both anthony and stanton had died leaving the fight to a new generation indonesia century one of the most important figures who took up the fight in the early 20th century was alice paul alice paul was a young sufferer dissed and in other quicker he grew up in new jersey but then studied abroad in england in her twenty's.

Elizabeth katie stanton wordpresscom ollie president anthony new jersey england indonesia alice paul alice paul twenty percent