29 Burst results for "Algal Bloom"

Time Series at the Beach

Data Skeptic

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Time Series at the Beach

"Shane ross. And i'm a professor of aerospace and ocean engineering at virginia tech. Welcome to the show. It's going to be her. Broadly speaking can you tell me a little bit. About what your areas of interest are. What do you study well. I have a lab that studies of variety of aspects of dynamics and this has dynamics broadly defined so anything that changes over time. Some of our bias has been looking at environmental systems and things moving through the air and the water particularly biological agents. But also i do some first principles modeling of engineering applications related to aerospace. So i know a lot of my audience comes from a machine learning perspective or a data science point of view and perhaps bring this bias. The table where you think. Just give us the data and then we'll go find a model and that can work buying in some contexts. But i know in a lot of the things you study. It's sort of the other way around right. Can you describe the process of modeling from your perspective often. The problems that i've looked at have two things transporting through an environmental fluid. So the atmosphere or some aquatic medium like the ocean or a lake so we take the point of view of typical fluid based transport so how does material move. And if there's anything on top of that like some biological or chemical process happening that just gets added on top of the fluid mechanics. Well the paper. I invited you on to do. A deep dive about is titled beach level. Twenty four hour forecasts of florida. Red tide induced respiratory irritation. So a couple of things to unpack. Maybe we could start with. What exactly is the red tide. Red tide is a name given to the phenomenon that seems to happen. A lot in florida but also throughout the gulf coast and many coast throughout the world it's an algal bloom and it's called are harmful algal bloom because of how it affects people but it it just means that algae have grown to a level that sometimes it's actually visible as red water but the florida red tide. It's not something new. It was first seen first recorded by native americans. Hundreds of years ago something that comes periodically and when it's a high enough levels it can cause respiratory irritation effects but also leads to death of fish. It has a big economic impact along the coast.

Shane Ross Virginia Tech Florida Gulf Coast
"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

"Continues after this news traffic whether sports Columbus is news radio 16. And W TVN. Welcome back to our Ohio Weekly anti Higgins Earlier this summer, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration pegged the severity of the algal bloom on Lake Erie at a 4.5 on a scale of 10 1 of the smaller forecast in recent years. Final data to calculate the official bloom sighs won't be released until later this year. But one researcher says the original guests will be close. Chris Winslow is director of the Ohio State University's Ohio See Grant College program, Dr Winslow Thanks for being on the show this week. Absolutely pleasure. So earlier this summer, the algal bloom forecast from Noah for Lake area came in at 4.5. How close do you think will be to that number Given what we've seen so far. Yeah. I mean, it wouldn't surprise me. If that's an accurate forecast A CZ that tool has been for the last handful years. They don't actually know it won't actually take all the data across the year and really address whether they hit the forecast spot on or not. But based on the bi weekly reports, I get of where the bloom is at and where it's moving. Um, it has been a relatively small bloom on and so that's that's good here. We in a year where You know, some of our travel restrictions have been in play. It's nice to be able to go to a lake in social distance and enjoy that resource. So it has been a light blowing you How would you summarize the bloom activity So far? Yes, the most. I would say most of the communities that are being impacted by the bloom this year is right around Mommy Day between you know Toledo and Mommy Bay State Park. Then because of the wind directions that we've seen this year. A lot of it has been held up against the Miss Michigan shoreline. And so I would say it has really pretty much been relegated to right around. You know, the Mummy River that day and a little bit west of that up along the machine shoreline and a little bit south east of that, but again, mild relative to some of our previous years. Mentioned how the forecast has been pretty on point for most of the years. It's hard to believe because the past few years the weather patterns have been pretty sporadic. We had a wet spring in 19, you know, mostly dry for the northwest part of the state this year in the spring. Does that help or hurt your research efforts? What? What the variability and whether Does that makes it difficult for the academics in the agencies to communicate. You know, the successes we've had been trying to address her flogged blooms is that the size of the bloom is really driven by how wet that spring is so basically the first of March a day in July. And so if you have a dry year, people that engage with the lake, you know, feel like, hey, the problems Khan and nothing's here and then, in those wet years, you get a big bloom and advice says, You know what the heck have we been doing? Where's our progress? So the wedding spring years I'm sort of the wet and dry years. Definitely impact that size of the bloom, but you need to look at the bloom over a decade or more to really figure out. Are we making progress from, you know, addressing wastewater treatment plant and septic tanks, you know, run off from from the landscape will suburban urban areas and then also, you know the runoff from our agricultural lands, and so The variability. What it does is it just makes people that live along the lake and recreate on the lake, you know, not know what to expect every year. Um, but from the scientists perspective, it's It's absolutely what we expect to see. Want to talk to you about the waste water and sewage control structures in a bit, But you mentioned agriculture's Let's start there. You know, we have mentioned the ever changing weather and its impacts on the intensity. The algal Bloom. How does research show how much progress is being made by best management practices being used on farms in the watershed? You know, there's always has to be a control, right? But the weather certainly isn't that. So how do you gauge if we're making progress on the agriculture front or not? Yes, I would say we've made a lot of progress on the agricultural affront from one specific perspective. And that is the best management practices. So the recommendations we make tea growers about you know when to use cover crops When not you want to put trial or tile drain control structures in place, you know? Ah, how big should above her stripped me where should be placed in Corporation of fertilizer? We're seeing a lot of great data come back from from experiments run on those very applications. And so every day that goes by our academics and other agencies, air learning when one BMP works, and when it doesn't which landscapes or better shooted for that versus others, So I think the greatest progress we're seeing is being able to Inform farmers. When you want to be engaged in placing being peace, and a lot of our farmers are many of them. Just want to know which which practice is best for them. That's the biggest progress that I feel like we're making a cz you've seen in your onions has probably seen you know the models that come out on. You know, we just need this 40% reduction in and phosphorous entering, you know, Lake Erie from the Mommy River. Come to get to that point. We need to have just huge adoption rates across the watershed and and we're not quite at those numbers yet. And so it's hard for a year to year basis to say. Where are we? In terms of that? 40% reduction are we 20% are we 30% Have we not moved it all. It's hard to do that assessment right now. So when people ask me, are we doing the right things? From a research perspective. It's hard to tell at the full watershed scale, but I can tell you we're learning a lot about what to tell farmers to do a cz they as they work their farms. Dr. Chris Winslow is director of the Ohio State University's Ohio See Grant College program. Our guest this week on our Ohio Weekly. There are some new initiatives being done in the name of water quality, including Governor DeWine's H to Ohio program. How does Dr Winslow see that programme fitting into Ohio's water quality efforts? I'll ask him coming up. Putting together in a state plan is a great idea, and the success of that plan hinges on how well those plans were communicated before they need to be implemented. Kelly Break Field. Mohr is an attorney with right and Maura and Kelly, making sure everyone's on the same page is key. When it comes to a succession plan. Yes, we do have a family here, and one of those questions is as we sit around table do I share this playing with our Children? There could be multiple answers to that, But I have found that if the parents have shared the plan with the Children It makes for a lot easier Administration of emotionally and physically easier administration but a really tough conversation to have because some of those expectations are high, right. I say it's easy for me to say all this right, But for Mom and dad to really sit down with the family and share that plan, there's a hard decisions to make for Mom and dad have the equitable versus equal issue that's hard to sit down and say We're not treating you all right? Well, here's our plan, and we will say among that, you know if we need to be at that table and had that conversation, look at us, maybe as the there and and help ease some of those fears and answer those questions for those Children that may be uneasy about the plan. We can be the bad guys. We tell Mom, Dad that we could beat the bad guys saying, you know, this is how it is. Are. This needs to be more spattering charge and this is the plan. We can give them generalisations of housing. Former world do play out somewhere. So we always talk on the fact that that moment actually playing together and have a ball about it that way so long that here they're putting into this.

Ohio Dr. Chris Winslow Lake Erie Ohio State University Ohio Weekly National Oceanic and Atmospher director Noah for Lake Columbus Dr Winslow researcher Mommy Bay State Park official Toledo bi weekly Higgins Mummy River Miss Michigan Khan
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 2 years ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

"As the climate warms, the Great Lakes are heating up. The Great Lakes are warming faster than the oceans and Lake Superior, which is the largest deep us. Great. Lake is one of the five fastest warming lakes in the world incredibly alarming to me and to everyone paying attention to this. That Democratic Senator Debbie Stab Nov Michigan. She says the rapid warming poses risks to her State's economy and way of life. It threatens fish such as Walleye and trout, and it can lead to more harmful Algal blooms. We have about twenty two, billion dollar tourism industry that is very much based on the lakes on voting on swimming and fishing and fact one out of five jobs in Michigan is connected in some way to the water. So it's a very serious and rising temperatures are not the only threat. Storms are getting more intense and causing more severe flooding and erosion in lakeshore communities. We have boat docks and things that are being destroyed because of the wider levels. So she says the climate crisis is already affecting Michigan and to minimize the impacts, it's important to invest in cleaner more energy efficient future.

Great Lakes Michigan Senator Debbie Stab Lake Superior
"algal bloom" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Show is on used radio 6 10 W Y O T. It is 11 50. Welcome back to the show, Erica Rodriguez. See what she's working on here for noon. Brian know his lead hurricane forecaster has some grim news. Looks like we're going to be having more scares like we did with this science before the hurricane season's up in November. And the governor in Florida's education commissioner said to participate in a round table this afternoon amid lawsuits over the push to get students in classroom desks this fall, the story's more coming up. All right. Meanwhile, News this morning and an event with our South Georgia congressman Mario Diaz Balart, Miami Dade Mayor Carlos Jimenez and the U. S Environmental Protection Agency announcing a new $235 million water infrastructure finance project, and here to talk about it happens, the EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler. Thank you very much for taking the time with us. How you doing? I'm great, Brian, How are you doing? Well, so tell us what is this whole wastewater treatment project going to Teo to do for the county? Sure, So this is actually the the county's receiving. Ah, third with E alone. So these these air three loans we've done over the last two years, the most of any end entity anywhere in the country. Um, and it's because of the leadership there with the mayor and the congressman, but this is going to help with the on the water sanitation side there in Miami. And it's all together. We will have over the last two years along the city, $660 million this is a very low interest rate, so it's going to actually end up saving the rate payers over $200 million in financing charges. So this is a great news. It's going to help with the with the alga blooms. It's going to help on water reuse this. The water system will eventually recycle 60% of the waste water. Which is great. It's great for the environment is great for jobs. This is going to lead to 500 new jobs. They're in Miami and its is just great over often environment. You mentioned the algal blooms and and the overall waste water runoff. Obviously, there are so many different pieces when it comes to this. Everything from local governments to state government to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers involving discharges out of Lake Okeechobee. Certainly your old withy Where do you think we are in this process of Making the necessary progress to really get beyond the era of algal blooms and being able to complete the Everglades Restoration Act. Yeah, we We've made a lot of progress on that made a lot of progress on that. And under President Trump over the last couple of years, um and not just on the aga blooms but also on the water infrastructure. Overall, he truly is an infrastructure. President on the alga blooms are researchers at EPA. We've been working overtime and this is one area on this this summer. You know some of our research because of covert 19 we've had Teo delay. But our ALGO bloom scientists have actually been out in the field. And so we're continuing to make progress on the algal blooms. And, you know, we know a lot more certainly part of his on the nutrient side, nutrient loading. So we do know a lot more about the algal blooms, and this project will help address that in Florida. Um, but, you know, overall, this is this is great. Not just for the algal blooms the environment but also for the infrastructure needs a CZ. You know that That's the size of the county's got over. Two million people. I think it's 2.3 million customers for the Miami Dade's Water department and that your region continues to grow. We need to make sure that they have the water infrastructure needs not just for today but for the future. And this one in particular that this project's being work on worked on Tio, reduce nutrients in the water and also improved water quality in Biscayne Bay, you know, is interesting talking about the water quality and differences. I think a lot of people have taken a greater sense of awareness to it. Maybe that hadn't been activated before during the pandemic has a lot of people are looking for things to do and enjoying outdoors, perhaps even more so than before. What do you think we are in terms of an environmental policy? Do you think that we're you know, on the right track? Absolutely, um, first of all, under President Trump. We have invested $38 billion nationwide into water infrastructure projects at the local level across the country are water today celebrate our 50th anniversary this year. And when the chair was created 50 years ago, over 40% of our water systems fail to make the basic health standards every single today over 92% of our water systems meet the health centre's every single day. Remaining systems. It's not like they're they're dirty all the time. They may have an occasional blip where they violate one of the one of the One of the standards, But we're working with all of those to get all of them into attainment and the water systems. Today our water quality is cleaner than it has been in the last 50 years. And all of this under the leadership of President Trump on the air side, our air today 7% cleaner. Then it Wass in 2017 when President Trump took office, we've reduced air pollution, 7%. A lot of people on the left say that you know that we're allowing polluters to do all these things and that the environment skinny worse and it's not Environmental indicators, and this is measured by the career. Scientist here, Deepa the same measurements reviews for the last 50 years. Air pollution is down. Water pollution is down. We've cleaned up more Superfund sites last year reclaimed up 27. Superfund sites in one year, the most in anyone fiscal year since 2000 and one. You know, it's we have an incredible environment out there, and people need to be proud of it. It's a lot of hard work. It's not just opiates us working with our state and local partners, working with the mayor there in Miami who has done a great job on the waterside. And he's been working hand in hand with us over the last 2.5 years on these water projects in which is why Miami's getting their third with E alone and two years You know, it's ah, great message you send because ultimately, technology leads to.

Miami President Trump Florida Teo Brian Water department aga blooms Miami Dade President Erica Rodriguez congressman Mario Diaz Balart forecaster U. S. Army Corps of Engineers congressman commissioner Carlos Jimenez Biscayne Bay EPA Superfund
"algal bloom" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"What about that dangerous algae from last year reopening across the Garden State getting critical stage two jerseys open, 19 restart. A man dies in state Police custody, The Attorney general's office says no use of force. An investigation continues. What commercial jingle Good New Jersey possibly come up with to pump up tourism after the covert 19 pandemic in sports. Dustin Johnson wins the Travelers Championship in Connecticut 19 under. Denny Hamlin takes the Pocono 3 50 after a long rain delay the Nets Wilson Chandler Will opt out of the NBA's returned to state with his family. They need hills are coming up now. New Jersey's first weather in a very happy birthday. Chief meteorologist Dan Zahra, Thank you so much, Patrick. Good to see you and happy Monday morning, everybody. We've got another warm day on deck today. Not as hot and humid is yesterday We did hit 95 degrees at Atlantic City International Airport. Of course, we had lots of thunderstorms out there. This weekend to starting off mainly in the sixties. Here, some patchy fog, especially in northern New Jersey, heist this afternoon 85 to 90 near 80 along the shore again, very warm with lots of sunshine on the way. Just watch for pop up thunderstorms this afternoon. Partly cloudy, tight chance of a shower lows in the upper sixties and then tomorrow will be partly sunny with scattered showers and thunderstorms possible throughout the day, little cooler tomorrow with high temperatures near 80 Right now. Deal is 74. Excuse. 72. And Perth Amboy, 72 time on New Jersey's First news 502 topping our news this hour responsible for a halt to all activities in several bodies of water across New Jersey last summer. Harmful algal blooms air, prompting additional advisories is the state enters the hottest months of the year. Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Catherine McCabe says the growing problem of harmful algal blooms is likely caused by higher temperatures, along with heavy rain events that wash fertilizer and Other waste into our lakes. The DP has a newly launched interactive mapping tool online that allows you to report suspected instances of these blooms and tells you which bodies of water to avoid the mild rash eyes just a small reaction, But at its worst, it is a very bad harmful algal bloom It can actually cause much more significant health effects. You know Flam e. A New Jersey 101.5 news time on New Jersey's first news 503 traffic in the news this hour. With New Jersey Fast traffic. Good Morning Patrick and Good Morning driver's first day for the ferry boats to come back for New York Waterway fairies Port Imperial to midtown Hoboken, New Jersey Transit Tio downtown and the Paulus Hook downtown. They're all coming back today..

New Jersey Nets state Police custody Patrick Denny Hamlin Dustin Johnson New York Waterway Perth Amboy Atlantic City International Ai Chief meteorologist Attorney NBA Dan Zahra Hoboken Department of Environmental Pr Paulus Hook Connecticut Port Imperial Catherine McCabe Commissioner
"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"With somebody outside of their how old and exposing themselves to the risk of Covid, nineteen or not going all a ruling from a separate lawsuits of the requirements should be lifted, and the secretary of State plans to wave at this longest because of that decision. However in the League of women, voters case, the judge declined to grant a consent decree. That would ease such rules. The judge said the decree match. The level of concern raised by the tests. Finally. Mary Sherman tells us. Forecasters continue to predict the annual harmful algal bloom on Lake Erie will be slower than the twenty nine, hundred, eighty, blue, the latest weekly early season projection from Noah estimates on a scale of one to ten. With us a verity between three and five four. Johnson is director of the National Center for Water Quality Research at Heidelberg University which releases the projection? She says that's a smaller bloom than others in recent years. It's probably GONNA. Affect the areas that are affected better. What so that's GonNa be through that Mommy Bay area. We don't expect it will have nearly the extent as what we saw in two thousand fifteen when it was taking up the whole. Western based on twenty bloom had a severity index of seven point three and reached a maximum size of about seven hundred square. The typical bloom season runs from July to October. This is Mike Clifford for public news service. We are member and Melissa supported and online at public news service. Dot Org yeah. I remember that I am here, not because of the path that lies before me. Because of the path that lies behind me. I remember the one hundred here's. We have caught these machines. And after a century of Lord I remember that which by small. Still. Let us. Make them remember..

Melissa Mary Sherman League of women Lake Erie Mike Clifford Mommy Bay Noah Heidelberg University National Center for Water Qual Johnson director
"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"With somebody outside of their how old and exposing themselves to the risk of Covid, nineteen or not going all a ruling from a separate lawsuits, said the requirements should be lifted, and the secretary of State plans to wave at this longest because of that decision. However in the League of women voters case the judge declined to grant a consent decree. That would ease such rules. The judge said the decree didn't match the level of concern raised by the plaintiffs. Finally Mary Sherman tells US forecasters continue to predict the annual harmful algal bloom. On Lake Erie will be slower than the twenty nineteen blue, the latest weekly early season projection from Noah estimates on a scale of one to ten. With the severity between three and five Laura, Johnson is director of the National Center for Water Quality Research at Heidelberg University, which releases the projection. She says that's a smaller bloom than others in recent years. It's probably going to affect the areas that are affected no matter what that's going to be through that Mommy Bay area, but we don't expect it will have nearly the extent as what we saw in two thousand fifteen when it was taking up the whole Western based on twenty, nine hundred bloom had a severity index of seven point three reached a maximum size of about seven hundred square miles. The typical bloom season runs from July to October. This is my Clifford for public news service. We are member, realistic, supported and online at public news service. Dot Org, a difficult time ahead of. But if we are to be prepared for it, we must I shed our. Standing here without fear because I remember. I remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me because of the path that lies behind me. I remember the one hundred years. We have caught these machines. And after a century of Lord I remember that which is most. Still. Let us. Make them remember. The.

League of women Laura Mary Sherman Lake Erie Mommy Bay Noah Heidelberg University National Center for Water Qual director Johnson
Harmful algal bloom reports are on the rise

Climate Connections

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Harmful algal bloom reports are on the rise

"During summer in central. New york residents often enjoy a refreshing dip in the regions peaceful lakes but sometimes swimming off limits because of algae blooms that can make people sick. Some of the algae may produce chemical toxins that can have harmful effects on people fish shellfish terrestrial and marine mammals and birds jennifer. Graham is a research with the united states geological survey she says reports of harmful algal blooms are increasing across the country and climate change could be part of the reason some harmful algae prefer warm temperatures so blooms may be growing more common as rivers and lakes. Warm extreme weather can also contribute to algal blooms because heavy rain can cause nutrients to run off armfield in sewage systems into waterways nutrients are basically the food source for algae in new york's finger lakes and other locations across the country. The usgs is monitoring algal blooms. Graham says they are trying

Graham New York United States Geological Surve Usgs
"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"In the rocks there's algal blooms fifty washing every year across the planet and its algal blooms just sucked up huge amounts of CO two out of the atmosphere they fall to the bottom of the arsenic filtration into the knowledge which in turn and rocks also we've warned students like weeks and things like that throughout your theater isn't limestones that are being deposited and formed and rocks are sucking the CO two out of the ocean water and incorporating nap there's one show caption carbonite carbonite this is a huge issue we've been going through this long term dangerous decline CO two and plants when they first appear on your first date later when we were twenty five hundred parts per million yen or about four hundred now so we're actually CO two impoverished that's that's one of the big tracts of people don't realize and these these apps they're called they're they're they thrive on much much higher CO two levels and there's thirteen to class we kick him again to boot kicking on you know they're just saying okay the thing is that the plants that thrive on the higher CO two levels than certainly we've got now also they emit in far as far as the plants oxygen oxygen which we need to brave so I mean how is this a bad thing right and in the other of the many benefits to increasing CO two one of the primary benefit issues is an overall increase in soil moisture content across the rest of your services and that's because CO two means the plants don't they don't need as much water so there's more water left in the ground they're not shutting it out that's huge water loss for most of the world they don't need it because there they don't have to breathe in and out breeders Cup transportation with the process of photosynthesis and when the breeze out there expelling water vapor that they've already used and they don't have to do that so much of their not requiring as much water which leaves more water in the ground which means here we go this this then leads to dampening of forest fires and also it alleviates drought so actually CO two increases are one of the main reasons we actually and yes we would decrease in forest fires across the earth after the last two hundred plus years and we have a decrease in drought and we're just about drained completely opposite which means you can moral you can more readily feed the population if you have less stressful ways and eight hundred and those crops for being turbo fertilized by increasing CO two in my in my book I have a charge there that shows ninety five percent of believe the earth's crops and water three hundred parts per million increase would do for her part per million increase which we will make may get there it would increase crop productivity forty six percent on average that's a huge concern that's a really really really good sign well there was talk about ocean levels are going to rise and swallow up great masses of land if now if we continue at this pace with our production of carbon emissions and releasing more CO two into the atmosphere and all the other things that are not science it what you're talking about is science from a geological standpoint which is how you measure actually what's you know we we've only been recorded actually only been recording temperatures and climate a man has for the day officially for about a hundred and fifty hundred sixty hundred seventy years may be about that and and you're talking about going back hundreds of thousands and then millions years Gregory writes down our guests let's hope that if there is a phase four of the stimulus package in there talking about it that Nancy Pelosi doesn't try to stick a bunch of this Yossi green new deal crap in it again to take advantage of a.

"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"More minutes right stone inconvenient facts the science and al gore doesn't want you know and the inconvenient facts happen Greg as I said at a professional geologist so there is science at work here people should respect the science will I do a respected scientist and respect my guest who got it back on the line Greg let's let's take off a couple of the inconvenient facts that you list that people like Al Gore and gonna ton Bergen bill Nye the science guy who's not a science guy don't want people to know it I think the biggest one is that carbon dioxide is fish this is this is the dean what they're trying to make out to be the demon molecule that we need to reduce that's what they're after its carbon oxide leave you mean the the plants and trees breeds carbon dioxide acts exactly am they they say that we have three unprecedented levels of CO two United States so we wait too much is dangerous but if we look in and I'm a geologist while I look at things in a big yes the geologist we don't look in hundreds of thousands were we looking under G. thousands of millions of years and we look at that what what actually the CO two levels we are today which is a little over four hundred ten parts per million it was the average for him were about four tenths the average over a century since the three cameras with twenty six hundred parts from our system have sometimes wondered as to that and then it's it's so we're actually when we look at it we've been in actually one hundred and forty million year decline in interest if there weren't any fossil fuels being burned back then now what what you're right exactly what the what what's happened is over time the earth's in the oceans have naturally sequestered CO two in other words say they it's been locked up in the rocks there's algal blooms fifty washing every year across the planet and its algal blooms just sucked up huge amounts of CO two out of the atmosphere they fall to the bottom of the arsenic filtration into the knowledge which in turn and rocks also we've warned students like weeks and things.

al gore Greg geologist scientist United States bill Nye
What are the long-term effects of climate change

Environment: NPR

03:03 min | 2 years ago

What are the long-term effects of climate change

"Which is thinking about global health over the last two decades. The world has made so many strides vaccinating kids lifting millions out of poverty childhood. The deaths have been slashed in half adults are living an average of five and a half years longer but now scientists are warning. This progress is under threat from climate. Change the researchers for more than two dozen universities and the World Health Organization have published their findings in a sweeping new study in the journal The Lancet Pearson read Eisenman has more all this time the world has been doing so much to improve health. Climate Change has also been underway slowly pushing up the average temperatures experienced around the planet. Today it's about one point. Eight degrees Fahrenheit hotter than pre industrial times one consequence the conditions for growing all sorts of crops around the world have become less favourable each of the major crops We difficulty trek as we track Ri- within as bringing winter weight. Dr Nick Watts of University College London lead this study study. He says the research team found that the yield potential for these staple crops is now down as much as six percent. which might not sound like much but here there is GonNa be the most vulnerable children particularly in poor countries? Fewer crops drive up prices. People get less food which leads to malnutrition. That's devastating for kids. Because their bodies are still growing they end up with these health impacts with them for the rest of their life gastrointestinal cardiovascular disease cognitive defects lifelong only impact that he irrevocable another effective climate change. It's improving conditions for the spread of bacteria called Vibrio all sorts of problems cholera cholera wound infections and diarrhea in poor countries. And especially big killer for kids as the surface temperature of the ocean rises the salinity patterns in the water shift shift. And then what you start to see is over a period of time. Those ideal conditions develop into Algal Bloom Algal blooms that then produce critical levels of Vibrio bacteria which which make it into the water supply and humans condemned up ingesting. We have seen the number of days suitable around the world that transition to the Abreu double as much as these impacts packs are disproportionately hitting poor countries. Every nation is affected. Dr Rini Saleh's is an emergency room. Doctor and Harvard professor who authored the report section on the United States people living in the United States experiencing the health harms of climate change today last year in the US. They were three point. One million incidents in which elderly people were exposed to heat waves because of climate change solace saw the impact in her own er at Massachusetts General Hospital last July during a massive heat wave in Boston an elderly man was brought in in a terrible state of

Dr Nick Watts Algal Bloom Algal World Health Organization United States Dr Rini Saleh Cholera RI Massachusetts General Hospital University College London Harvard Diarrhea Eisenman Boston Abreu The Lancet Professor Eight Degrees Fahrenheit Six Percent Two Decades
Climate change and mental health

Forum

16:58 min | 3 years ago

Climate change and mental health

"Joining us to discuss the toll climate change could take on our mental physical health is Paul R. Bucky's professor emeritus of emergency medicine Stanford at the university Medical Center and also co author of enviro medics the impact of climate change on human health welcome professor about good to have you with us good morning Michael thank you good morning to you and we also want to welcome robin Cooper who's here with us in studio psychiatrist in private practice in San Francisco and co founder of climate psychiatry alliance welcome to the program thank you I'm glad to be here glad to have you with us here and Tucker about let me begin with you and let's begin by just talking about what we know generally at this point we know certainly that the extreme weather and sea level rise or really affecting all kinds of illnesses and creating all kinds of problems in our physical health sketch that out for us if you could the list of health related effects from climate change our is is enormous there are the obvious that you mentioned the heat waves the heat stress the extreme weather events floods hurricanes nine it cetera but there are many others that haven't come to the forefront yet like the migration of factors like mosquitoes and other creatures that cause communicable diseases that will move as the planet warms you have a superb mental health expert on the show with this which is terrific because there are profound mental health the facts and then all the issues related to lack of access to clean water migration of people food security the issue of increased allergic exposures the harmful algal blooms that we're seeing from microorganisms that are proliferating in the ocean and then the broader range of problems that will relate eventually to lack of bio diversity to the erosion of ecosystem services all the inter relationships and how it all winds in so it's quite an impressive list and an overwhelming listen anyway so we wanna staggered add just all the things that can result or they can be consequential from climate change and you mention mental health let's bring robin Cooper this one of the main things you find that you really need services to be aware of in terms of the affected impact on mental health problems well let me start first with just kind of alerting people climate change is a health emergency it's a mental health emergency and a health emergency and I think in regards to the mental health impacts people tend to think about the good that kind of things that you can easily relate to how traumatic the posttraumatic stress syndromes and depression when people lose huge amounts of things in their lives due to the enormous weather related to disasters so what we know about the wild fires what we know about floods what we know about the impact from hurricanes it some are the posttraumatic stress is enormous what I think is much much less understood are that there are profound behavioral thinking problem psychiatric problems that are specifically related just to heat extremes themselves to air pollution that people tend to think about air pollution as affecting their as my lung disease but it actually has a very specific attacks on the on the brain and pervasive this affects throughout the lifecycle so I think it's important just as our previous speakers spoke on that the mental health impacts are very diverse and very expensive and very serious one ought to add because they also include things like more aggression and violence you kind of alluded to this your intimated about it but it's definitely cause and effect were talking about that absolutely he extremes we all kind and this went in our colloquial language hot under the collar I am so angry my blood is boiling or the admonition Hey be cool man when we're really angry she actually but our scientific evidence supports this we really know that heat extreme heat impact aggression anger and make it much more difficult for people who are vulnerable to not being able to control their behavior to act on their aggression and anger that has very specific impacts for domestic violence for impacts on women and children and I'm very concerned about that robin cook again as a psychologist in private practice in San Francisco co founder of climate psychiatry alliance Paul about his professor emeritus of emergency medicine Stanford Medical Center and co author of enviro medics the impact of climate change on human health only go back to professor are back and just talk about since this was alluded to by robin Cooper the vulnerable populations who turned out to be well the most vulnerable as one would expect the greatest impact in fact on health and physical health is on poor people and on the youngest and the oldest but also on minority communities in on immigrants and homeless and disabled absolutely and that's been well studied and before I address that I'd just like to go back for second and just add to what robin said because there's a whole nother large overlay on this mental health issue which relates to socially disadvantaged populations which is this general increase in cultural anxiety all are feeling somewhat helpless in the face of this and having been a disaster respond or in the past you walk into really nasty situations and it can seem overwhelming and you can you can question your ability to do anything and I think we're facing that now a little bit and part of this because it's not necessarily a happy talk is to be real but to say there are absolutely things that we can do that might not have immediate effect but if we all pull together in unprecedented ways based on modern times and the political situation we can make progress and we can start to turn things around I don't want people to give up hope but what specifically you're talking about here because we need that help I think you're absolutely right bring it up here because you can get really down just thinking about what we're talking about well this is a this is a problem we can solve for if we have the will to solve for it it's not a zero sum game I think we have to start looking at the fact that we're going to need to make changes just with regard to the climate in how we approach our economic system some of the industries that we support and the changes that will have to make in the way that people live their lives in order to protect their men to reverse the degradation that were imposing on the planet and that takes a collective will it takes functional governments it takes citizen response it takes upon ourselves up now and realizing that we're in the biggest battle that we've ever faced this is uncharted territory so I'm not laying blame anywhere I'm saying okay we've got a problem now let's bring the best and brightest minds together and let's deal with it and as you said it affects disproportionately people who can't take care of themselves it's it's hard to argue with someone not to burn fuel in a kerosene stove when they need to do that to survive so we have to give people alternatives we have to be able to present people that are displaced with places to live in health care and hope and respect and all the social determinants of health that go into having a functioning properly oriented society in a big company and I think from you Dr Cooper's don't panic don't panic the chronicle put out a piece this weekend about panic let me just address and I can't agree more fully with the the comments that have already been made but let me go back to some of these distress and drums that I think we're all kind of preoccupied with now this kind of umbrella term it's a shorthand climate on the eco eggs ID climb in anxiety that's a shorthand term for lots and lots of big feelings and it is absolutely appropriate for us to have anxiety worry our brains are wired for us they have intense feelings when there are threats and this is a real threat in fact I learned a new term thanks to your research cell steadier this helps in certain terms about existential grief and psychic distress of people feel over well this concern over their homeland and environmental changes that have to do also with the child's psychological development those kind right this call without you it's a fancy word and it kind it relates to that intense distress but from this Dow Jones looking back on what used to be that intense grief when we experience the lack of ability to soothe ourselves from our environment in those soothing places that we use to get on a soulless from that's only one component and I think we're spear seem much more now people who are in a cute states of worry and anxiety as I said those are the feelings that alert us to do something when we're in danger the trouble is when the when the emotions are so big so into ends so overwhelming that we can't contain them into manageable ways to respond we also have brains that that can be planned full and strategic and that's really important to in gender that sense that there are things we can do and that we can make a difference in important ways both then sue the in these very very big feelings but I'm not also in the game of just let's feel good I want us to translate that big energy from big feelings factual effective action no I'm with you there is a good doctor about his many of our listeners are but he's from a mental health standpoint this can be overwhelming when you think about really what you're fit with what we're all facing here I mean in particular when you're thinking about well children in the future and when young people are thinking about their future and so forth it can be downright depressing and is for many people as you discover no doubt your practice absolutely I saw I'm sorry I see this in my practice I see this in my practice mostly when there's an intrusion from some awful event has that has just happened parents who came in a mom after the solutions to what you tell your patients and I want to go to professor about because I know he wants it here I mean some specific tools of people can have other than you know I can exercise my will I can do something and maybe compel yourself in that fashion toward action it's not what I tell my patients it's not that I tell my patients that's not my job as a psychotherapist my pet my job with a psychotherapist is to listen understand validate and help to them to contain their feelings so that they can translate that into effective ways to make a difference in behaviors in their lives and then the world's they live in we have the same okay it's the scope of psychotherapy we can help but psychotherapy isn't the place has since then has to come from them I understand that you are what you wanted in here well I'm I'm with that a hundred percent because I think I'm going to say it just a slightly different way and that is in my experience action is the is the overwhelming solution to the inner behaviors that we see when people get depressed it's getting about bad bad it's getting them to begin to engage in the activities of daily living and it's to find solutions through self help and through empowerment so this all comes to how do we begin to relate to each other and less polarizing fashion how do we get climate change to be a problem that we all are going to face through whatever means we have through our expertise through our government's it cetera the medical profession is starting to step up big time to support this we certainly need are governments to step up and begin to put aside their relentless differences and start to act in a functioning way to support the people that they were elected to support we need to integrate environmental responsibility into our own lives granted that won't have the same impact is reforming the fossil fuel industry but it gets everybody on the same page about the importance of it and I would say that the single most important factor is to take a personal responsibility for your fellow human beings it's really easy to step back and say it's not my problem but it is our problem no I think those are very good and an important and valuable sentiments the fact is so there's so much to we have no control over when we're talking about extreme events like hurricanes and floods and the effect that they have on people psychologically or the destruction that it causes and wreaks in people's lives these are things that the along with pollution and along with some of the other things we've touched upon here that we we don't have many things in our tool kits to to fight against a I think that's where it becomes so frustrating for many people and your thoughts doctor Cooper I actually don't see it that way I actually think will more stuck in it is so big all of the things that you've outlined that promotes a kind of psychological defensive retreat there's nothing I can do I might as well back off I actually don't think that's true I think that there are many many ways and I strongly I think they're both for managing our own feelings but also for the active involvement in the many many ways that collaboratively add up there is an incredible importance to fend off the kind of hopelessness you've outlined the offender and hurricane the psychological no but you can act and you can act in ways that are collaborative with other people the worst thing to do is to retreat into personal isolation the most healing thing to do is to engage with others in shared action I want to be brilliant a psychological intervention from our leader Nancy Pelosi don't agonize organize and there is a place for everyone to move with groups of people outside of that isolation in many ways to have contributions I think it's like viewing a puzzle and there are pieces of the puzzle that all add up together and they can go across the board Paul are back with the vice we're getting and I think it's on advice from robin Cooper about for example we have to worry about our nutrition because food is being affected by climate

Paul R. Bucky Stanford University Medical Center Professor Michael Robin Cooper Private Practice San Francisco Co Founder Hundred Percent
Water utility collaborates with farmers to clean up pollution

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Water utility collaborates with farmers to clean up pollution

"I'm doctor Anthony lies words and this is climate connections when heavy rainfalls in northwest Wisconsin fertilizer manure can wash off farm fields into nearby waterways. This pollution contains phosphorus which can cause Algal Algal blooms and foul surface water as the climate warms. The problem could get worse. We know we're going to see increased precipitation events. We know we're going to have more severe precipitation events here. In holding is with new water Green Bay's wastewater utility state regulations require the utility to reduce phosphorus in the water it discharges but instead of building one hundred million dollar treatment plant new water decided to tackle the problem at its source the utility worked with crop and soil experts and farmers minimize runoff they experimented with planting cover crops tilling the soil less and planting grass buffers alongside fields keeping keeping those nutrients in soil where they need to be on those fields and really working for that farmer. She says the early results are promising so new waters expanding the project project into a twenty year plan. The utility is confident that by preventing run off in the first place it can reduce phosphorus pollution without an expensive new treatment plant climate connections is produced by the Yale Center for Environmental Communication. Learn more at Yale Connections Dot Org.

Yale Connections Dot Org Yale Center For Environmental Doctor Anthony Green Bay Wisconsin One Hundred Million Dollar Twenty Year
"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Pete digit what I'm your president you'll get ahead of environmental protection who actually believes in climate change and a president determined to do something about it and world leaders at the U. winter expected to make climate pledges this week mineral there ought ABC news New York. the latest traffic and weather together interstates looking good right now one broken down vehicle downtown and nine street west at Central Avenue you might want to avoid ninth there if you're heading down to Oktoberfest. his forecasts from the advanced dentistry weather center we moving your fear of seeing the dentist with the help of IV sedation learn more at no fear dentist dot com the summer weather continues today with highs in the upper eighties over the tri state mostly sunny skies with slim rain chances tonight is a different story as we see showers and storms move through the region after midnight resulting in a wet start to the work week severe weather station I'm nine first warning meteorologist Austin when field newsradio seven hundred W. L. W. sunny and seventy seven right now news is a service of Columbia Hyundai another shooting in west price hill about five o'clock this morning in the sixteen hundred block of Gil C. Avenue this comes as a March to end gun violence is planned for today in Avondale of four thirty the person shot in the foot is expected to recover today's great Ohio River swim is postponed due to a potentially harmful algal bloom was found in the Ohio River near Cincinnati and northern Kentucky it's been rescheduled for October thirteenth a burn band is now in place due to the dry weather west Chester township fire captain bill Borman says the ban is mainly focused on those who burn items like brushing trash saying the embers could flow through the air and land on other properties and with little rain and hot temperatures dominating the forecast it could start a fire there are some exceptions for cooking campfires bonfires in outdoor work which requires a welding torch in southeast Indiana Switzerland county has a Perm banned in effect in in northern Kentucky Gallatin county has one too I'm Sean Gallagher newsradio seven hundred W. L. W. Reds update the right stick on the Mets in the finale of a three game series today Trevor Bauer has the first pitch at one ten the bangles update the bangles looking for their first win in buffalo kick off at one on WTVN and fifteen thirty ESPN FC Cincinnati played to a scoreless tie with the Chicago fire at Nippert their last home game of the season is next. Sunday our next news update at eleven thirty I'm sandy Collins newsradio seven hundred W. on the be a flu fighter with a free flu shot from Walgreens it's no cost to you with most insurance it's quick easy with no appointment needed plus it lowers your chances of spreading the flu with people you care about most get your flu shot at Walgreens and get five dollars off an eligible purchase of twenty dollars now through November thirtieth this is your shot to protect you and the ones you love the a flu fighter Walgreens trusted since nineteen oh one coupon offer not valid in Arkansas New.

flu Walgreens Ohio River president Cincinnati ABC Trevor Bauer Kentucky Gallatin county Mets Hyundai west price hill Kentucky bill Borman Pete New York. Avondale Sean Gallagher Indiana Switzerland
"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"To prevent fire emergencies in area parks fire captain bill Borman says the ban is mainly directed at those who might be looking to burn trash brush and other items on their property there are some exceptions which include cooking campfires bonfires heating tar and welding torches Switzerland county and southeast Indiana has a burn band in effect in Gallatin county in northern Kentucky has one as well I'm Sean Gallagher newsradio seven hundred W. L. W. cleaves man arrested on Friday and during the arrest he was able to disarm a cop forty three year old Michael Rymer had warrants and when stopped by police took off on his bike they caught up with him at three rivers campus and in the struggle Reimer gothic officers taser he's charged with resisting AG robbery and obstruction Reimers in the Hamilton County jail today's great Ohio River swim has been postponed due to a potentially harmful algal bloom found in the Ohio River near Cincinnati and northern Kentucky is reschedule for October thirteenth today's final day of Oktoberfest's Cincinnati downtown admission free gates open at eleven and at nine tonight red update the Reds beat the Mets three to two today Trevor Bauer has the first pitch in the series finale at one ten our coverage begins with the inside pitch at twelve ten and the bangles update the bangles looking for their first win of the season this afternoon they're in buffalo for a one o'clock game you'll hear on W. EVN our next update at nine thirty I'm sandy Collins newsradio seven hundred WLW this report is. answered by eat this school year I want you to kiss expensive.

"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"In Idaho's expanded program begins on November first study other Emily Brown and Assistant Professor of pediatrics metrics at the University of Washington says a few claims about the benefits of Medicaid expansion drove this research the fact that Medicaid expansion was associated with improved mental outcomes for low income parents some studies and also improve financial stability while would drift believes expanding medicaid is good for Idaho. She's worried about about state. Legislators decision to apply work reporting requirements busy families with busy lives that are already in stressful situations. We have parents that are possibly working. Two jobs bombed and finally bury Sherman reports a midsummer. Algal bloom is once again turning western Lake Erie's waters green and vase predicted to become fairly severe ear researchers say it could be even worse. The severity of this year's bloom is forecast to be a seven point five on a scale of zero to ten director of the. The National Center for Water Quality Research at Heidelberg University Law Johnson explains that's larger than last year but smaller than in two thousand fifteen when a bloom exceeded the scale L. at ten point five and she says this year's bloom started to form a couple of weeks ago fairly mild not much there but it seems like it's really shown up with this heat. Wave that came through. It's moving around. It's growing in some spots or not another's or starting to get mixed into the water column in different ways in any of these things are possible she adds the current aren't. Algal Bloom stretches from Mommy Bay north along the Michigan coasts in about thirty miles east along the Ohio coast to the Portage River. The bloom is expected to stay confined to the Western basin and peak in September by the way Tuxes in Algal. Blooms are dangerous for people and animals. They have for local fishing boating and other recreational activities seventies. Mike Clifford from public news service. We are member listener supported Iran line at public. Do Service Dot O._R._G...

Algal Bloom Emily Brown Idaho Assistant Professor of pediatr Algal Mike Clifford University of Washington Lake Erie National Center for Water Qual Iran Sherman Heidelberg University Law John director Portage River Michigan Ohio Mommy Bay
"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Service still this cat for Wednesday July thirty I twenty nine thousand nine hundred by Clifford Round two of the democratic debates set for tonight and why Iowa voters want to hear more about climate change also on our Wednesday rundown Virginians on alert after the capital one data breach plus summer brings a large algal bloom to lake Erie topping our news the first ten Democratic candidates including front runners Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren to made made it on C._N._n.. Last night tonight will be Joe. Biden and Kamala Harris on the debate stage among eight others in Detroit Meantime Democratic presidential candidates lades campaigning in Iowa are feeling lots of questions about how they plan to address climate change climate scientists attribute the burning fossil fuels to global warming ng which in turn causes extreme weather events like the spring floods that have caused more than two billion dollars in damage to Iowa towns and farms this year environmental science professor Sir David Courard Howie at Drake. University is an advocate for adding more renewables to the states grid were at the point that buying renewable energy costs less been just buying the coal to run a coal plant. Let alone building new coal and those prices continue to go down he as technology advancements are allowing people all to develop renewable energy not because they're being paid or subsidize but because it's cheaper Iowa is one of the nation's.

Iowa Bernie Sanders lake Erie Sir David Courard Howie Elizabeth Warren Kamala Harris Detroit Biden professor two billion dollars
"algal bloom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"The Senate after passage today by the house the funding extension runs for decades NYPD detective Louise Alvarez push lawmakers to pass the bill just days before his death from cancer embattled labor secretary Alex Acosta will step down in a week alongside a cost at the White House this morning president trump insisted that it was a cost his decision to resign fantastic job is a friend of everybody in the administration as I got a call this morning from our cost was unable to knock down a growing controversy over his role in what many see as a sweet heart plea deal for sex offender Jeffrey Epstein that happened in two thousand eight one Acosta was a U. S. attorney in Florida immigrants in the tent cities targeted by ice this weekend are being informed of their rights using social media some politicians in sanctuary cities have done their best to assure immigrants that they have rights and they have been informing them of what those rights are mayors of some of the targeted cities are speaking out over lingering questions about whether city law enforcement will play a part of the raids that the trump administration has called a method of deterrence Mike our NBC news radio World Cup champion alley long says someone broke into our LA hotel room yesterday and stole her wedding ring cash and the key to New York City which he just received from the mayor you're listening to the latest from NBC news radio the Pentagon is looking at providing military escorts for oil tankers in the Persian Gulf president trump's nominee for chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general mark Millie said yesterday the US is working to put together a coalition to protect ships Millie's comments came a day after a runny and ships were accused of trying to block a British oil tanker near the strait of four moves Millie told the Senate Armed Services Committee the plan to protect commercial shipping will be developing over the next couple weeks to Indiana brothers are facing terrorism charges for allegedly trying to sell guns to ISIS federal prosecutors unveiled the charges Thursday against twenty one year old my yacht down in and twenty year old my D. Dan in Indianapolis both men were arrested last week and accused of plotting to make fully automatic rifles using a process to make them untraceable the FBI special agent in charge of the Indianapolis division called it a case of homegrown violent extremism the brothers are being held without bond pending trial Brian shook NBC news radio this year's algal blooms on Lake Erie will be worse than last year no us says this summer will see a law large harmful algal bloom in western Lake Erie last year's bloom had a severity index of three point six this year though is expected to hit around seven point five the bloom is expected later this month that's because the lake has been relatively cool thanks to higher than average rainfall experts point out that the size of the bloom doesn't necessarily give an indication as to how toxic it will be however a seven point five could have an effect on tourism water treatment and more I'm Jack Crumley.

Senate twenty one year twenty year
"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

"Getting closer to testing and marijuana breath testing device triple beam technologies has patents for their cana buster in as well as a partner who says they will build the device the company says they're currently recruiting law enforcement agencies as well to test it the algal blooms on Lake Erie this year could be the largest recorded no was says this summer will see a large harmful algal bloom in western Lake Erie last year's bloom had a severity index of three point six this year though is expected to hit around seven point five the bloom is expected later this month that's because the lake has been relatively cool thanks to higher than average rainfall experts point out that the size of the bloom doesn't necessarily give an indication as to how toxic it will be however a seven point five could have an effect on tourism water treatment and more I'm Jack Crumley there's also a new mixed use development for the north market that will add to the Columbus city skyline renderings released today the twenty eight story tower show that the one hundred ninety two million dollar facility will house office and retail space meeting room some residential units the existing north market building will also be expanded the north market development authority approved the plans last month and Columbus city council set to vote on the plan at their next meeting a week from Monday we're is expected to begin mid twenty twenty with completion in late two thousand twenty two Scott Jennings news radio six ten WTVN and Jim beam is expected to be fine now for the recent warehouse fire that destroyed about forty five thousand barrels of Bourbon as well is contaminated nearby waters and streams with Bourbon and fire fighting chemicals killing fish and other wildlife I'm Alison why into your A. B. C. six first warning weather forecast in sixty seconds this is Barbara Harris for green very cereals you may know the Granbury is known for nutritious whole grains and natural anti oxidants but now I'd like to tell you about new Granbury cereals with remarkable onyx onyx black sorghum was perfected a Texas a and M. university.

Texas M. university Granbury WTVN Scott Jennings market development Columbus marijuana partner Barbara Harris Alison Jim beam Columbus city council Jack Crumley Lake Erie one hundred ninety two million forty five thousand barrels
"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

"Six ten WTVN the president is accusing social media giants discriminating against conservatives today he held a social media summit with conservatives at the White House this afternoon where he also expressed his disappointment in now about not being able to get a citizenship question on the twenty twenty census as the courts have blocked to that question the Supreme Court kicked the issue back down to a lower court saying that the trump administration's rationale for adding the question in the first place was inadequate destructive ministration for months has been fighting a legal battle over a citizenship question on the twenty twenty census but now a change in strategy president trump's expected to announce he's backing down instead he'll take executive action instructing the commerce department to survey Americans through other means some immigration and civil rights advocates say even without a citizenship question on the census the damage has been done their concern that senses response rates in immigration communities could be negatively impacted if people are suspicious about what will happen with that data Karen Travers ABC news the White House meanwhile Twitter had a rough day the social media site says they suffered a service disruption this afternoon that prevented their users from properly accessing the Appan the website the outage started around three o'clock this afternoon apple meanwhile lease disabling its watch walkie talkie app because it might be vulnerable to hackers they say they disable the apple last night as he develops a fix for the issue they apologized to customers adding they were not aware though of any instances where people were listening in on the walkie talkie conversations the algal bloom and like you read this year could be one of the largest ever recorded no one says this summer will see a large harmful algal bloom in western Lake Erie last year's bloom had a severity index of three point six this year though is expected to hit around seven point five the bloom is expected later this month that's because the lake has been relatively cool thanks to higher than average rainfall experts point out that the size of the bloom doesn't necessarily give an indication as to how toxic it will be however a seven point five could have an effect on.

president White House Supreme Court trump Twitter Appan apple Lake Erie WTVN executive Karen Travers
"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on WTVN

"Been established in Ohio to address the complicated issues surrounding it protecting water quality as highlighted in the national oceanic and atmospheric administration's recent like every summer algal bloom forecast Ohio agriculture conservation initiative was formed to assess for practices in the state and create a new voluntary certification program for farmers overnight looks like porn down two and a half beans down a penny and three quarters week down three and a half this is the Ohio right now seven eleven has more drinks than times you've been caught singing in your car and random lyrics stored in your brain combines choose from big gulp flavor starting at seventy nine cents like Fanta orange minute maid fruit punch power a mountain very Blas strawberry melon iced tea plus many more only at participating seven eleven stores this summer your favorite song and hit the road with a thirst quenching big gulp drink starting at seventy nine cents today plus taxes where applicable actually if your employee offers an employer match Mike Martin as in the pageant group can show you how you can effectively manage your four oh one K. plan with brokerage link imagine having your four oh one K. actively manage regardless of your employer while you're still working take full advantage of your four oh one K. let Mike Martin as in the pension group manage it learn how you can build your four oh one K. assets to control risk call my guy Mike Martin as at eight four four four two three forty six hundred don't short change yourself eight four four four two three forty six hundred or the pentagram dot com investment advisory services offered through the pension traffic and weather for Columbus WTVN days after a body was found in a shallow grave an arrest in connection to the murder this is a five thirty report on six ten WTVN good morning I'm.

Ohio Blas strawberry melon Mike Martin murder Columbus WTVN one K three quarters
"algal bloom" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"The chance of government shutdown would be the next step in his disagreement with the legislature over the state budget i want our families to know the come monday july first our investments in them will be made without delay and that state services will be available to them murphy has objected to some spending by lawmakers to the budget and is doubtful its tax collection targets can be reached which seems to increase the odds of a line item veto you plans to announce his action on sunday new jersey environmental officials say people should not swim in link capac hong or even touched the water there because of the presence of harmful algal bloom the warning issued thursday urged people tonight eat fish caught in the lake or windsor surf kayak paddle board or ride jetskis their pet owners are also advised to keep their animals away from the lake officials say the advisory could remain for weeks if not longer an increasing number of jersey teens and twenty somethings or taking valium xanax brings i._d. and insomnia but some are also using these drugs recreationally angela valenti of the partnership for a drug-free new jersey says a new study shows overdose deaths from these drugs has increased more than eight hundred percent since nineteen ninety nine surpassed by overdose deaths involving synthetic opiates or heroin so there's no question about the fact this is an alarming statistic he adds there are alternatives for treating these conditions that parents young people in doctors need to be aware of and as park woman who fatally stabbed her neighbor in two thousand sixteen has been sentenced to twenty years in prison thirty year old jenny column pleaded guilty in march and the death of equality prosecutors say she stabbed her new neighbor in the shoulder after an argument he later died at the hospital a puppy about to start seeing eye training remains missing in north jersey andrea a fourteen month old female german shepherd was last seen in wanted sussex county there have not been any confirmed sightings of the dog which is microchip and has a number tattooed in a right year anyone who sees her urged not to chase her but immediately call the morristown group this scene i a five hundred dollar reward is offered for information leading.

murphy angela valenti jenny column sussex county insomnia heroin morristown eight hundred percent five hundred dollar fourteen month twenty years thirty year
"algal bloom" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"algal bloom" Discussed on KOMO

"Ninety seven seven President Trump is now taking aim at his handpicked FBI director as the showdown with congress escalates over the Muller report, president has been resisting efforts by Democrats to investigate him on several fronts. FBI director Christopher Wray recently distanced himself from the attorney general's claim that the FBI spied on the Trump campaign ABC's. Rachel Scott has details. It's a showdown over separation of power, the sharp divide between Democrats and Republicans only deepening in the weeks following the release of the special counsels. Redacted report house intelligence chairman Adam Schiff, standing firm on Democrats zyu- to here from special counsel Robert Mueller. We now know we certainly can't rely on the Torney general who misrepresented his conclusions in house. Democrats also considering imposing fines on Trump officials who refused to comply with congressional. Pena's? I think if you find someone twenty five thousand dollars a day to their person until they comply it gets their attention. Republicans believe Democrats are more interested in subpoenas than solutions, the Washington Post reporting, the president's allies are working to block more than twenty democratic probes. The latest example instructing former White House counsel, Don Mcgann, not to cooperate with a congressional subpoena. President Trump on Twitter calling the investigation, quote, a total scam a witch hunt that yielded, no collusion. No obstruction. But the report did outline eleven instances of possible obstruction, even though it found insufficient evidence to prove the Trump campaign conspired with the Russians effort to meddle in the two thousand sixteen election. Hidden danger lurking in the water has one family Jefferson County warning others their dog suddenly passed away after drinking out of a lake in Anderson state park, south of port Townsend in the water. A toxic algae bloom meteorologist, Abby Coney explained. So harmful algae could be a growing problem this summer. Yunwei more can't believe that any of this is real she was leashed the whole time, and she was within eyeshot, and I tried not to let it get too far ahead of me. But one point she ended up kind of falling into where the lake intersects with the trail new way got her out of the water within seconds. But even just a short exposure to algae was enough to create significant harm clue die just three hours later at the hospital suffering tremors and seizures eventually going into a coma. It was horrible. I felt so bad for her because I imagine what it must've been like for her to be with her people and be walking. And she doesn't she didn't understand. Why what was happening water quality experts in the area closed off the lakes Thursday due to the toxic algae levels. I son multiple signs posted by Washington, state parks and rec warning of detained shirt if I'd known that being anywhere near that water would have killed my dog. I would. Not have taken her on that trail at all experts. Tell me to other dogs died due to the toxic algae there in two thousand six anecdotally. They've heard reports if people also getting sick because of algal blooms parks and rec tells me, the lake will likely stay closed all summer because like Anderson doesn't have fast-moving water or stream next to it. So the system is not flushing out summer is the peak time for algal blooms to develop.

President Trump Trump president FBI special counsel Christopher Wray Rachel Scott director Washington Post ABC Adam Schiff Jefferson County Robert Mueller Abby Coney White House Pena Muller Anderson state park Twitter port Townsend
Science News Briefs From All Over

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Science News Briefs From All Over

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. And here's a short piece from the April two thousand nineteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the articles titled quick hits, and it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Jim Daly from Greenland. Scientists have found the massive ice sheet covering Greenland is melting about four times faster than it was in two thousand three the gigantic hung of ice could become a major contributor to sea level rise in coming decades from Hawaii a fourteen year old Hawaiian snail named George believed to be the last of its species has died the archipelago's population of land snails, which was once incredibly diverse has substantially declined with perhaps seventy five percent of more than seven hundred fifty species now gone from guy. Hannah the guy in these government signed an agreement with the European Union to curb illegal logging improved forest management and expand the South American nation's legal timber industry, which exports to the EU from Australia. Overuse of water from the Murray, darling. River systems sparked a massive die off of fish in the down under state of New South Wales. An estimated one hundred thousand to one million fish suffocated because the river levels were too low to flush out farm runoff, this lead to algal blooms that resulted in bacterial proliferation, which caused a drop of oxygen from Liberia health officials announced that they found the Abol lavar is in a bat in west Africa for the first time previously had been found only in bats in central Africa. The discovery could help reveal how the virus jumps to humans. And from Northern Ireland bacteria in a soil sample effectively halted the growth of four types of antibiotic resistant superbugs, including methicillin resistant, staphylococcus aureus, better known as Mersa. Researchers say the discovery is an important step in the battle against such resistant bacteria that was quick hits. By Jim Daly.

Jim Daly Greenland Steve Mirsky Editor Abol Lavar Liberia European Union Hawaii Murray Methicillin Hannah South Wales West Africa George Northern Ireland Africa Mersa EU Australia
Sometimes it takes a big prize to solve big tech problems

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:02 min | 3 years ago

Sometimes it takes a big prize to solve big tech problems

"This And marketplace podcast is brought to you by pinata for businesses. And universities Panatta was everything YouTube isn't with enterprise grade security Bilton recording and live streaming and a unique search engine that finds any words spoken in any video Panatta was how professionals share knowledge and by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more and sign up for your free trial. Sometimes what it takes to solve big problems is a big prize from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Amy Scott in for Molly would. It's been called American idol for science geeks. The George barley water prize will award ten million dollars to the team that develops the most promising technology to remove excess phosphorus from freshwater lakes and streams phosphorus pollution from chemical fertilizers and septic tanks has led to the growth of toxic blue green algae in the Florida Everglades. And elsewhere, Lauren par is director of the George barley water prize. She says the goal is to spark innovation the way that we've previously been looking at the issue or sometimes is reported on is attempting to remove the blue-green algae. And so while you can probably effectively skim off blue-green algae, you're not really tending to the root cause of the problem, which is excess phosphorus and so kind of like an it to the algae being a symptom of the flu. And so you might be able to sue the cough, but unless you actually attack the root cause of the. Thickness. You're not really going to affect the overall wellbeing of the system. What are some of the ideas? The teams have come up with so far. We've had a great showing from all around the world from the beginning of this program. We had over a hundred applicants from thirteen different countries. And so again, it just really drove home. The fact that this problem is not specific to Florida or the Everglades. It's a global issue. And so we've got, you know, a number of different technologies a number of different approaches one that I really love talking about. We actually have a US Geological Survey agency team participating in the program and they've essentially decided to use a local byproduct in iron ochre, which is really specific to the industries in West Virginia where this group is out of and they've decided to use that waste product as the filter to help remove phosphorus from water. And so they're taking this essentially waste products and transforming it. Into a technology that could affect in clean the waterways. Why do you think we need a prize to solve a big, social and environmental problem like this? I mean, obviously Americans love could competition, but why shouldn't you know, the companies that caused this problem be solving it sure. So, you know, I think part of why we've been so successful in garnering stakeholders is because our prize in our program, again, president general are just really solutions oriented programs and around the world, there's such a rich rich history with the global implementation of prizes. They've been using the past to solve problems that the free market simply wasn't addressing quickly enough on its own. And so this infrastructure of rewards and prizes has historically helped catalyze significant accomplishments certainly were hoping to do that with the barley prize. But things like the artigue prize in nineteen twenty seven which spur. For Charles Lindbergh's. First transatlantic flight from New York to Paris that reward at the time in nineteen twenty-seven was twenty five thousand dollars, which today is all of three hundred thousand I think, but it was that flight that led to today's three hundred billion dollar aviation industry, which is something basically impossible to imagine at that time. And so what we know is that historically this prizes can help catalyze massive changes in huge technological breakthroughs. And we're really hopeful that the Varley price can do the same has the competition actually, spurred those breakthroughs new ideas to remove phosphorus, or they ideas that were being developed prior. And they're just getting a boost from this. Now, you know, I think that we collected a number of ideas that were in different stages of development. But certainly none of these were being implemented on a commercial scale yet. And so we've definitely. Moved the needle without doubt on research and development, but I would go so far as to say that our third stage which was an actual field test in Canada really did manage to move the needle on the economics of phosphorus removal here in Florida. The most typical way to address the phosphorus pollution issue is through storm water treatment areas, which are STA's, but the problem with TA's as while they're remotely effective, they're incredibly land intensive and so with each of our teams to get as far as they've gotten this competition, they were given pretty strict land constraints because we want to be able to do is implement these types of technologies any in the world, regardless of available land. And so that alone the shown efficacy of being able to remove phosphorus from water and removing the massive land component necessary here in Florida is a huge win for us to if we don't solve this problem soon. What are the stakes the stakes get higher? Hire every year. So we know with global warming with sea level rise. What we're seeing is not only more frequent algal blooms, but they're more intense. They're more damaging on their more harmful not only to human health, but ecosystem health, and so certainly in Florida. What's at stake is the drinking water supply for a third of the state and our state here in Florida relies so heavily on tourism. And so without clean waterways. Without pristine beaches were missing out on the number one driver of the state's economy. Lauren par is director of the George barley water prize. It's sponsored by the Everglades foundation and the Scots miracle. Grow foundation. Scott's the company still uses phosphorus and some of its fertilizers, but dropped it from lawn products several years ago the competition is now down to five final teams. They'll spend the next year testing and refining their technology that ten million. Dollar grand prize will be awarded next year.

Florida George Barley Lauren Par Florida Everglades Amy Scott Director Everglades Foundation Youtube Panatta Charles Lindbergh United States Grow Foundation West Virginia Canada STA Varley President Trump
Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

Climate Cast

04:07 min | 3 years ago

Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC good morning. Twenty one percent. That's how much of the world's freshwater lies in the Great Lakes. Thirty four million people live in the Great Lakes basin. Now, a new study finds climate change in the Great Lakes is happening faster than the rest of the US study co author Lucinda Johnson is the associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth for the US as a whole to average temperatures have increased by one point two degrees Fahrenheit, whereas for the Great Lakes in the states bordering the Great Lakes that is one point four degrees Fahrenheit. And actually if you just look at the base in itself, the increase has been one point six degrees Fahrenheit over that. Period. Of the last century. So the Great Lakes is warming faster than the rest of the United States. It looks like it's also getting wetter. I saw this in the study US annual precipitation increased four percent between nineteen o one and twenty fifteen but the Great Lakes region saw about a ten percent increase with more of this precipitation coming as unusually large events what jumps out at you there in that piece of data. Well, the problem with large events is that they are just so destructive. They are distracted from the standpoint of our infrastructure and just the destruction to people's homes is is heartbreaking. But similarly, we see these large events responsible for moving a lot of the sediment and nutrients from the landscape into nearby water bodies, which has a very detrimental effect on what a quality. And we hear about algae blooms we know that lakes like Erie that are much shallower. Are more prone to those what about lake superior? I know it's a cold lake. We don't get a lot of algae blooms there. But as we wash these nutrients in and as the lake temperatures warm is that's something we might expect more of in the future. Well, one of the things that we are really quite concerned about is the fact that we have been observing algal blooms in lake superior. We've seen three blooms that happen to coincide with these very very large rain events. So just this past summer. There was a bloom around the little town of cornucopia. And although this wasn't the toxic algal bloom that we know of it is a huge concern to us to begin to see elbow. Blooms in water body, like lake superior, which is known to be very pristine. Now, we have a terse base to Konami where people in -ticipant that the water quality is going to be very clear and the thought that we might be. Experiencing algal blooms this very clear and pristine body of water is of huge concern to both the ecologists as well as to society as a whole big picture Lucinda as you look at this study, what changes on lake superior will you be monitoring closely and keeping an eye on in the next ten years or so the most important changes that we think are going to be the surface water temperatures and the number and intensity of these large storm events. So the combination of these warmer temperatures with increase nutrients coming in from the land have the potential to really change the ecosystem along the shoreline. And and we have a lot of concerns about that loosened Johnson associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth. Thanks for your insight today on climate cast. Well, thank you, Paul. And I. Really appreciate all of the great reporting that you joined climate change that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner.

Great Lakes Lake Superior Great Lakes Basin United States Lucinda Johnson University Of Minnesota Duluth Associate Director Bank Of America Fdic Paul Hefner Konami Erie Chief Meteorologist NPR -Ticipant Four Degrees Fahrenheit Six Degrees Fahrenheit
Toxic red tide blooms are creeping up Florida's west coast, killing marine life

KDWN Programming

00:33 sec | 4 years ago

Toxic red tide blooms are creeping up Florida's west coast, killing marine life

"A red tide in Florida has. Killed, tons of fish it's closed smelly, beaches and keeping people away from restaurants the toxic algae bloom. Has overrun Florida's southern Gulf Coast the summer devastating see life and driving. People from the water experts told the Associated Press they've never seen one like red tide is otherwise known as a harmful algal bloom and generally during marine waters And they occur because of nutrients in the water. And the presence of, a microorganism called Dino

Tesla Elon Musk Chris Collins Twitter Elder Jones Florida Dino Flagellate USD Associated Press Russell Congressman Gulf Coast Taunton York Exchange Commission CEO Georgia One Hundred Pounds
Pence tells Central American leaders: End the exodus, respect U.S. borders

Midday on WNYC

01:58 min | 4 years ago

Pence tells Central American leaders: End the exodus, respect U.S. borders

"Their fight to prevent diabetes heart disease and obesity but some local government officials fearing the prospect of having their hands tied on all future tax hikes reluctantly backed the legislation for npr news i'm hettie lynne hurt he's in los angeles and from washington you're listening to npr news vice president mike pence is urging central american governments to do more to contain illegal migration speaking in guatemala city late thursday pence told the leaders of guatemala honduras and el salvador that the exodus of migrants from those countries must end those countries are home to many of the migrant families detained and separated in recent weeks after arriving in the united states from mexico pence's wrapping up a regional trip that included stops in brazil and ecuador before while malo hundreds of dead sea birds are once again washing ashore in alaska as elizabeth arnold reports from anchorage scientists attributed similar die off in two thousand sixteen to warmer ocean temperatures that affected the birds food source six birds were sent this week to the us geological surveys wildlife health center in an attempt to figure out what's killing thousands of birds mostly common murders that are showing up on beaches in northwestern in alaska residents reporting that some birds spotted off shore or struggling to stay above water seabird biologists are focusing on whether the die off is linked to toxins produced by algal blooms that occur in lasca when water temperatures are warm die off of common murders in two thousand fifteen sixteen was the largest ever recorded in alaska with forty two thousand carcasses collected an estimated toll of hundreds of thousands lost the ocean sea water temperatures in the bering sea this year have been significantly warmer for npr news i'm elizabeth arnold in anchorage on stock markets in asia shares are mixed lower in tokyo following gains on wall street i'm shay stevens.

Alaska Asia Mexico Guatemala Lynne NPR Shay Stevens Tokyo Elizabeth Arnold Bering Sea Obesity Ecuador Brazil United States El Salvador Honduras Guatemala City Mike Pence Vice President