35 Burst results for "Alford Alford"

Boston Man Convicted Of Police Bombing Asks For Compassionate Release

WBZ Overnight News

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Boston Man Convicted Of Police Bombing Asks For Compassionate Release

"Officer officer and and the the severe severe wounding wounding of of another another asks asks for for a a compassionate compassionate release. release. WBC's WBC's Karen Karen Regal Regal says says it's it's because because of of covert covert concerns. concerns. Attorneys Attorneys for for the the now now 64 64 year year old old Alford Alford strangler strangler say say their their client client convicted of building the bomb that Killed Officer Jeremiah Hurley and severely wounded his partner Francis fully should be released because his heart issues make him more of a covert risk. Strangler did refuse the vaccine while in prison. His attorneys say their client was worried about how that would affect his heart. His attorneys also argue he has served more than enough trying for the crime of which he was convicted. But Hurley's daughter, Leanne, TN, herself, a Boston police officer. Well, the judge of a man who loved his job in his family officer fully son, Frank, a Boston firefighter, told the court of a severely wounded man with PTSD, he said of this compassionate release request. Alford Strangler chose his fate. Cameron Regal WBZ Boston's news radio. More

WBC Karen Karen Regal Regal Alford Alford Jeremiah Hurley Strangler Francis Boston Leanne Hurley TN Frank Alford Strangler Ptsd Cameron Regal
Man Sues Hertz Over Receipt That Cleared Him of Murder

Todd and Don

01:15 min | 4 months ago

Man Sues Hertz Over Receipt That Cleared Him of Murder

"Eye. Michigan man who spent five years in prison for murder that he did not commit, is now suing Hertz rental cars for failing to provide the receipt that would have cleared his name before he was convicted. 2015 Herbert Alford was convicted in the 2011 murders murder of 23 year old Michael Adams, even though he swore that he was picking up a rental car at the time. However, the Hertz corporation they ignored and disobeyed numerous court orders requiring them to abuse that produced the documentation and that would have exonerated him. That's according to his attorneys now hurts eventually did come up with the receipt five years later. Precipitating operates released in February of last year. Alfred is now suing hurts for $25,000. I don't think he's suing for enough For their part hurts. Officials claim that they did their best to find the much needed evidence Now, while they were unable to find the historic rental record of 2011 When it was requested in 2015, he continued. They say they continue their good faith efforts to locate it. Now, with advances in data search in the recent years following, they were able to locate that riddle record in 2018, and then they promptly provided

Herbert Alford Hertz Corporation Michael Adams Hertz Michigan Alfred
Hertz sued for not producing receipt that cleared man of murder

The Boxer Show

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Hertz sued for not producing receipt that cleared man of murder

"A man Long Philly convicted of murder is suing a car rental company for failing to produce a crucial receipt in a timely manner. ABC is Chuck Secrets and tells the tale pervert. Alford from Detroit, was convicted for a 2011 murder. A receipt from Hertz Car Rental was finally released in 2018, leading to exoneration last year, but Alford spent nearly five Years in prison and jail. The Hertz receipt shows that Alfred was renting a car and Lansing area airport around the time of the shooting hurts, says it's deeply saddened about what happened to offered. Company says it found the record after advances in data search, the suit alleges hurts ignored to subpoenas and three court orders demanding the

Chuck Secrets Alford Hertz Car Rental ABC Detroit Alfred Lansing
Brandon Bernard executed for role in 1999 murder of couple

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:32 sec | 8 months ago

Brandon Bernard executed for role in 1999 murder of couple

"The trump administration carried out another federal execution last night. Brandon bernard lethally injected for the nineteen ninety nine murder of two youth ministers in texas strapped to the death row gurney. He said he wished he could take back. That offered an apology to the victim's family and to his own for the pain and suffering. Afterwards georgia bagley. The mother of one of the victims said the apology helped to keep her heart today. Another execution is scheduled alford bourgeois convicted of beating his two year old daughter to death for spilling her potty chair.

Brandon Bernard Lethally Bagley Texas Alford Bourgeois Georgia
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"Like to extend a very personal and special thanks to all of our contributors and guests who have helped to make all of these episodes. Possible. You could find sworn on facebook twitter and instagram at sworn podcast. And follow me your host. Philip. Holloway on twitter at Phil Holloway Es Q.. Our website is sworn police cast dot com, and you can check out other tender foot. TV podcasts at www dot tinder foot dot TV. If you have questions or comments, you can email us at sworn at tinder foot DOT TV or lease a voice mail at four, zero, four, four, one, zero, zero, four, one. As always thanks for listening. Hey. This is Jason. McIntyre join me every weekday morning on my podcast straight fire with Jason McIntyre. This isn't your typical sports pot pushing the same tired narratives throat every day straight fire gives you a level of authenticity. You just don't get in sports media today honest opinions on all the biggest sports headlines, accurate stats to help you win big at the Sports, book and direct conversations with all the best guests. Look I. Know What Sports Fans Want. You want the fluff the list the hot takes, but I give you what you. Need can't say that I'm going to be right all the time. But unlike the rest of these shock jocks, I'm always real. Let me tell you Patrick Mahomes is not the Michael Jordan of football, but he is the Steph curry and you know what else Janas. Pulling Kevin Durant and leaving the small-market Bucks to build a super team would be great for the NBA? These are just the facts folks do yourself a favor and listen to straight fire with Jason McIntyre on the iheartradio APP apple podcast or wherever you get your podcast If you crack open an American history book. It's short to be filled with founding fathers bloody wars in the inventions that brought this country to the industrial age. But there's a whole other world that waits for us in the shadows tales of unlikely heroes, world changing tragedies and legends that are unique to this country spirit. So join me Lauren Voelkel bomb for tour of American history unlike any other through new podcast from iheartradio and an monkeys grim and mild get ready for American shadows. was into American shadows on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts..

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"CEESAY for client to admit that he burglarized somebody's house but nobody. Admits that they molested Chow. That was ray Gerry a retired judge and defence attorney. So a lot of those cases, end up going to trial. Because you know, they'd rather go to trial lose the trial get sent to prison for a long time. Then Met The dead. And the same thing holds true with any crime, but especially in you know sex grams. And Alford plea saves a lot of trials. So I think it's valuable to because. If you've got a case where the judge. Is wanting to take a plea bargain. Along with the prosecutor and the defense lawyer and the defendant, and the only problem is the Ga.. One. Admit it. Then on the Alfred play. Thank you say, well, we agree that. When the prosecutor the evidence, this is a significant chance a Gerry might find me guilty even though I'm innocent. So I'll go ahead and agree to the punishment I'm not admitting I'm guilty and so on paper you're guilty. But. You just don't have to say those embarrassing words and court. So I like Alford Pleas and they've saved a lot of cases from going to trial which saved a lot of people from getting you know much longer sentences than they would have gotten. Like, so many things in the legal system play deals can be extremely complicated like a high stakes jigsaw puzzle with moving pieces that defend us simply may not be prepared for a big part of my job as defense counsel is to provide clients with as much information as possible so that they can make the best most informed decision possible when deciding whether or not to accept a plea bargain. For example, we have to talk about what happens if they enter a guilty plea or a not guilty plea what kind of risks are involved in taking a case to trial I have to let them know everything that is happening and everything that foreseeably might happen with their case. It gets tough sometimes to give people the news that their case may not win or that going to jail might be their best or even their only option. But at the end of the day, it's always the client's choice whether or not they take any given play deal and my job is to inform and support. The role of the prosecutor is not simply to get a conviction. A prosecutors role is to pursue justice whatever that might look like. On the other hand, my primary role as defense counsel is to be a zealous advocate for my clients. Legal interests. I'm looking for the best outcome for my client whether it be defending them at a trial or working to negotiate the best possible sentence in a plea deal. The judge then serves as the referee and is tasked with making sure that everyone is following the rules judges injuries alike in the case of a jury trial must remain impartial when deciding guilt or handing down a sentence the justice system cannot function if any of those pieces are missing and it's everyone's job to keep checks and balances on the other players. I completely understand where judge rakoff is coming from in thinking that Alford pleas at least on paper may seem like a problem in the justice system that only guilty people should be punished but when someone is facing the very real risk of getting an inflated sentence by going to trial sometimes the best decision they can make in our imperfect system is to take a plea deal and the punishment associated with it in other words sometimes, it's best to cut your losses and take the better of two very bad situations and a person may not have a family at home or like Kevin, said, a trial may not be something that they can afford financially. In cases like that there has to be a mechanism in place for them to save themselves from the gamble of trial even if they don't think they did anything wrong. There's also the reality of the situation that Jesse Evans brought up in the last episode, our legal system would simply collapsed if we did away with plea bargains, the vast majority of cases and in some type of negotiated deal and there simply isn't enough room on the court dockets for it to be any other way. Every person has the right to a trial. But if every person exercised that right, the courts would be overloaded in the extreme and the backlog would be unfathomable. Our system is simply not built to handle every defendant having their day in court, and that's an important reality to keep in mind individuals can't afford to always go to trial and neither can the system. In the end, the system of plea bargaining saves time saves money and offer more certainty put simply plea bargain is necessary to keep the system working. For the next few episodes were going to cover a case that hits very close to home with me, it's a case that I worked on for many years the cases about a woman who hired me to defend her after she was charged with murder in the wake of the shocking death of her husband. There are a lot of pieces to this case and there's much to unpack. We're going to dive into everything that happened and all of the impossible choices that had to be made next time own sworn. SWORN PRODUCTION OF TENDER FOOT TV an iheartradio. Our lead producer is Christina Dana executive producers are pain Lindsey and Donald Albright for ten foot TV Matt Frederick and Alex Williams for iheartradio and Myself Philip Holloway additional production by Trevor Young Mason. Lindsey. Mike Ruini Jamie Albright. Original music and sound design by makeup and Vanity set our theme song is blood in the water by layup show art and design by Trevor. eyler. Editing by Christina Dana Mixing and mastering by Mike and Cooper skinner. Special. Thanks to the team at iheartradio. From Uta Oren Rosenbaum and Grace Royer Brian Nord and Matthew Pappa from the North Group Back Media and marketing and stationed sixteen. I'd also.

prosecutor ray Gerry Mike Ruini Jamie Albright iheartradio Chow Lindsey Jesse Evans Christina Dana Mixing attorney Trevor. eyler Ga Uta Oren Rosenbaum rakoff murder North Group Back Media Christina Dana Kevin Cooper skinner Grace Royer Brian Nord
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"Where you will hear more reasons to vote iheartradio's Wyan voting countdown to election day. Your vote is your voice. What if you could learn from one hundred of the world's most inspiring women now, you can introducing Senecas one hundred women to hear a new podcast brought to you by Seneca women and iheartradio. I'm Kim as a rally in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of American women getting the vote where bring you the voices of a hundred groundbreaking and history-making women listen to Seneca's one hundred women to here on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts Ashleigh merchant and see very similar types of cases in our law practice. So I wanted to get her thoughts on Alford please and on judge rakoff assessment of what he sees as the problem with Alfred. please. She brought up this new point, and that is that Alfred is another area where prosecutors can control the charges by refusing to even offer a plea bargain unless the defendant admits guilt I, have another case that I can give a parallel tale where I have a child who was fifteen years old at the time he was alleged to have abused his younger cousin and he said He. Didn't do it and he was fifteen was a kid but he was charged as an adult. It's a twenty five year mandatory person sentence on that. So he was offered ten years pretrial and but a lifetime sex offender registry and pretrial. He just said I can't agree that I did something I didn't do, and in that case, the prosecutor was not willing to accept this. Alfred play. Part of the plea deal in order to reduce the charges from the charges that carried that twenty five year mandatory minimum said if you don't admit guilt I'm not GonNa get rid of that charge and let you get the ten year sentence. He said I can't do it. I can't admit that I did something I didn't do. So we went to trial he was convicted only was the testimony of his cousin he testified that he didn't do it and we're now on a appeal I didn't represent him at the trial but I now represent appeal and we've got an offer to fifteen years speed and he's told me he wants to take but he CanNot admit killed and I told the prosecutor I can't put him up and have him under oath admit guilt because I don't think he did it and I can't put him up there and have them commit perjury and of course, they're saying, well, he's not committing perjury he's lying you. But how do you know he's asked me do I need to lie to get this deal and you can't lie I can't have you lie on the stand I can't have you under oath why about something but at the same time I don't WanNa be the reason that he can't get a lesser sentence and can't get out of prison. You know he's a kid. I think a lot of times criminal defendants get up there and they lie and say they did something they didn't do just to get the deal and I cannot say I blame them Jove Rakoff said the federal system where he works think he used the phrase theoretically possible and Very not. So subtly indicated relative exception rather than the rule at least in framework of cases that he sees in the federal system and acid judge, you know what? If I told you that it's really really common done several already this year in the state system here long he seemed to be a little bit surprised by, but it's really something that's used a lot and it's used as a way I think to permit. People to take advantage of the offers because they think they're going to get hammered by judge or by mandatory minimum sentence. If they don't take some count plea deal and survey hapless mechanism colon health and play, and they use it to get past that question. The judge says, are you in fact guilty? You gotTA. Do Say I'm pleading under alka versus North Carolina and we think that it's in our best interest to take pleading. I think it's important to parallel the two systems. SORTA understand why he would say that the federal government operates completely differently than the state government in prosecutions. When the federal government comes knocking, they have a solid case they've got you do federal work but when I get it, I'm like Oh because I just there's not a whole lot I can do as a criminal defense attorney for the actual charges, what we can do as a criminal defense attorney as we can. Work on sentencing once the federal government indicts or charges you, they usually have significant evidence against you and so the State Court has to have these Alfred please because they can't move cases otherwise we're the federal system, the judges they don't want to take a plea from someone that didn't do it. They don't want to take that to them is just a it's awful. It's a miscarriage of justice were in the state system. They're just like line up. We gotta move them. The second thing is they also have a couple rights Bilton that we don't have in State Court, they have a federal speedy trial act, and so you're not going to sit for three years in jail on a federal case like you do in State Court and that delay is one of the reasons that people wanna take Alfred please because they don't WanNa sit in jail for three years. The other thing is they tend to give folks bond in federal cases. They've got a bond act also bail bond act where the judges have a very thoughtful bail hearing and they don't incarcerate pretrial like they do in State Court in State Court. If you're charged with a felony a serious felony, it's impossible to get in most cases when I was in Fulton County for example, at the public defender, my clients couldn't afford bond. So. Maybe, they'd have a five hundred dollar bond, but they didn't have five hundred dollars. They would be in a position where on like the Federal Court where they've got a speedy trial, Anna right to bail there in the state court they've got no bail and they've got no statutory automatic speedy trial rate and they feel desperate. You know there arrested they're in jail. It's an awful scary violent place and they just WanNa go home and. They're offered probation and a fine and boom they become a convicted felon because they've taken a felony just to get a jail and we saw that a lot in Fulton county where they would make a lot of street level arrests where someone who maybe have drug residue they went arrest ten people for the same crack pipe and ten of them couldn't make on until they all put out and boom. Now they're all convicted felons out. In cobb county we see that here out in the suburbs but is a little bit different here they're scared of the jury they're scared that the jury is going to not believe them and they're gonNA convicts and they're scared of what the judge is going to do if they lose a trial so they're scared of that trial tax and those are really the two reasons to get out of jail and they're fearful of that trial tax..

State Court Alfred federal government prosecutor Federal Court iheartradio Seneca perjury Alford Fulton County cobb county Ashleigh merchant Jove Rakoff Kim Alfred. North Carolina
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"Voting where you will hear more reasons to vote iheartradio's Wyan. Voting countdown to Election Day your vote is your voice. Not only is going to trial a risky proposition in that you no longer have control over the result Kevin is very right here. Going to trial is extremely expensive. Financially, we've talked throughout the season about all of the financial barriers that. Defendants face in trying to win their trial. These things ranged from overwork public defenders to the costs associated with paying for forensic testing and expert testimony. But like Kevin said those costs add up for everyone. Many people who are not indigent can become indigent just by being accused of a crime. If a defendant wants their day in court, they will have to consider a lot of things including the trial tax as well as the financial costs of which are less costly if they decide to take a plea deal. To. Take a plea deal defendants normally have to admit guilt under oath. This can present a huge problem for people who are actually innocent. There is though a way around this dilemma. If an innocent person wants to take advantage of a more or less favourable plea deal rather than risk getting hit with the trial tax or perhaps a mandatory minimum sentencing following a jury trial, they can enter a special type of plea known as an Alford plea in the state system I see Alford pleas quite regularly many of my own clients have opted to enter Alfred please rather than risk going to try. They felt it was just in their best interest to do so. But while working on this topic for the show, I had a surprising conversation with Judge Jed Rakoff. The federal judge from New York. As you'll hear is not a huge fan of this type of plea. The federal law and the law on some states. Allows theoretically. person to come into core a defendant and say. Even, though I'm innocent idol want to take the risk and I think government is probably likely to convict me. On prepare to accept that. So I pay my innocence but. I will take the consequences of the guilty. This has been a proven Supreme Court school now. But you almost never see. You'd never see it in the federal system and very very rarely in the state system and and here's why our criminal justice system is not an administrative law system. It is all we may slot or. To be based on application of basic moral transplants. And no judge Western accept a guilty plea from stone says he's Anderson and no cross good or for that matter feels comfortable accepting clearly from someone who says he's innocent. So while ironically an outer lane may be. Closer to the truth, the one drilling going on and some surgery Samson's. You almost never say. What if I told you. I'd practiced in an area where Alford pleas are in fact routine. I guess my question that is. To you why are prosecutors going along with it? Well. I can tell you this based on my own experience not done a handful of Alfred. Please myself just this year in two thousand nineteen. And a the short answer is that. They are aware of how powerful mandatory minimum sentencing is they are aware that. They can use this leverage to avoid having to go through the hassle and expensive trial and judges are happy to take an Alford plea because it takes one less case off from a crowded docket and. Moves the Business Lotus food. Were you just a gratify which makes sense from A. Efficiency. Wearing is my mind totally repugnant from any moral standpoint? The prosecutor is saying. Judge he claims he's we don't believe for one minute. But rather than have to go to trial prove that we don't have the resources will just take a play. The. Defense lawyer says all judge my guys really innocent and he's never did this at all. What by Gosh? We're dot prepare to take the risk when the trial that's that's too dangerous. So. Rather than try to prove our innocence, we will take the play. and. The judge's sang at all sounds fine. The baby cries I've got twenty cases I've gotta hear her and this elise grams and nineteen. What you're saying is a total disregard for finding out the old for the true a total disregard putting the government to its proof, a total disregard for a judge's obligation to ascertain it best he or she and whether a person is really guilty or not. It becomes instead of justice it just becomes convenient. The having said that the reason this is going on is because in most cases, the very high pedal, the news that you. Go to. Trial. The basically, the way the plea colloquy works very similar to one. You described in the federal court where you said, you get to the part of the questioning where the the court says to the defendant. Are you. In fact guilty it's a simple yes or no question. If. The person is under oath and I'm a lawyer I can't have some body under oath that's knowingly committing perjury. So if I want a car it who is willing to take advantage of a plea deal basically to avoid say a mandatory minimum. But at the same time they they maintain their innocence, we can't give a yes or no answer. So we've got to telegraph to the court ahead of time that this is going to be plea made under an offer in basically all the judge does is say You know you're lawyers told me that you want to enter a plea event. You still maintain your innocence in order for me to accept your plea Mr Mr. You've got to satisfy me as the dodge that you think that the prosecution may very well be able to convict you and that because of that, it's in your best interest and take advantage of this plea is that what you WanNa do so then they boil it down to a different yes or no question, but it takes about five minutes or less. Let us certainly streamlined. I was in court wig and I, saw judge and we were one of the cases literally stand I. Think it was twelve defendants in the well of the courtroom and have them standing side by side with their council doing mass please Just, going through the questionnaire the you Mr so-and-so you miss so and so just yes or no all the way down and they were doing you know ten or twelve o'clock. Blaine in part is on all of us because this would not be occurring or not occurring in the extreme way were describing if there were more judges more. For criminal defense lawyers, especially for indigence more in depth enquiries, lower handle teams. Why do we have this? We have on this. Because the legislature toughened up in their view being the nineteen seventies, eighties and nineties to combine what was undoubtedly Rajin crime.

Judge Jed Rakoff Kevin prosecutor Alfred Supreme Court iheartradio New York A. Efficiency Samson perjury Blaine stone Anderson
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"Part of the system and that there just aren't enough resources for every case to go to trial. I think a bad habit has developed where they're not scrutinizing the plea deals is carefully as they should. They should make sure that plea deals aren't being used by prosecutors to go after the small fish and let the sharks get out with a shorter sentence. The thing I, I try to emphasize that. I relatively privileged I had. A great deal of education. I was relatively well off. But what people don't understand is when the government comes after you. You can't. Fight, it's on you. You can't afford to fight it. Will say things like, Oh, you're going to trial's expensive. It's not expensive in a sort of throwaway line that like you know a new vacuum cleaners expensive my two trials and appeals cost two million dollars. And I didn't have two million dollars I had to I. Mean my brother took out a mortgage on one of his houses I spent all of my family savings to try to prove my innocence. I lost all of that money than my voyeurs were pointed as public defenders to finish the second trial and appeals. You just can't do it. That's why ninety seven percent of all federal cases now in plea deals. Trials had vanished because no one can do, and so that's the thing when somebody says, what do you think about indigent defense and the idea that you know we should pay somebody to happen a defense I don't like that term because I don't think only the indigent can't afford it since. No one tim. Blood on the tracks is a new podcast about legendary music producer Phil Spector in the murder, of Lana cloudy. This podcast is hosted by me Jake, Brennan, creator, and host of the award winning music and True Crime Podcast Graceland and twenty seven club. This new serialized podcast is part true crime part historical fiction impart spoken word Lo fi beaten are each episode is told from the perspective of the people who knew Phil Spector best his so called friends season one features ten episodes and is released weekly episodes packed that secrets, confessions and revelations and narrated by the fictionalized voices of real people like Lenny Bruce, Ronnie, Spector I Turner John, Lennon, Debbie, Harry more. Just like Phil Spector, this podcast sounds like nothing you've heard before because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Led on the tracks contains adult content and explicit language listen to blood on the tracks iheartradio APP apple podcasts over you get your podcasts. John Legend is making his voice heard no matter who you are where you come from I. Don't care if you're voting the same as me or not. We want your vote to be counted. Every one of us has a reason to vote. That's millions of voices that needs to be heard, and that's why iheartradio launched the why I'm voting podcast a place where music artists, celebrities and people like you talk about why they vote and why it matters. We have to actively maintain democracy and the only way that we do that we're all. Citizens here and the only Chore Way. That we can hold them accountable is to make sure we participate in these elections. We know this is a historic election and our partners at Seventh Generation WanNa remind us that our.

Phil Spector John Legend iheartradio Seventh Generation Wan Lana cloudy Lenny Bruce producer apple murder Brennan Jake Turner John Harry Ronnie Lennon Debbie
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"The voice at the beginning of the episode. Was Justin Brooks the current Director of the California Innocence Projec- last week we started looking into the high costs and the extreme risks associated with taking a criminal case to trial and how because of that risk people sometimes will plead guilty to things that they have not done chief among this extreme risk is the risk of a higher prison sentence that often comes after someone refuses to accept a plea bargain. There are many factors that can affect the ultimate sentence imposed in any given case. These factors frequently include shotgun charging and high mandatory minimum sentences. So we asked Kevin Ring about this trial tax. Kevin is the head of Families Against Mandatory minimums. While Kevin himself was on trial, he had to make this agonizing choice about whether or not to plead guilty to crimes that he didn't believe he committed or face an extended prison sentence following trial. Kevin gives us his firsthand account of his experience with the hidden costs of trial including the trial tax and the more straightforward costs that come with taking a case to trial. I think the trial taxes something that's not well understood. I. Think they've been brainwashed into thinking that. If you're found guilty, then you should have taken whatever deal was offered put aside the fact that you might have. In, put aside the fact that you have a constitutional right to go to trial. Even if you think you're dead guilty, you have a constitutional right to put the government to it's proof by going to trial but there has developed in our culture. This sense that if you don't do what the prosecutor decides noodle plead guilty and you use the resources of trial, you're gonNA open yourself to a longer penalty. I think when people are confronted with individual examples of it, they see it but it's not something they think about because unless we're involved in the system, it's just not something you think. Kevin had to deal with this firsthand when he went to trial. They brought me in and they said, you know after two years of cooperating and other other evidence gathering. Here's what we have against you. And if you plead and cooperate will charge you with these things and if you don't and you go to trial will charge you with all of these different crimes. Gets the point where it's not even your conduct it's what they decide to charge as your conduct that can determine the outcome of your sentence. Just like mandatory minimums sentencing guidelines which are not statutory they're usually created by commission are just as malleable by prosecutors they can you know sometimes implicate certain enhancements for use of a computer or being the leader of conspiracy they can use and manipulate the sentencing guidelines just like they do mandatory minimums so that even to similar defendants get much different sentences. Kevin points out that prosecutors will sometimes incentivise a defendant to take a plea deal rather than have him or her exercise their right to a trial. A normal plea bargain is the defendant will come in and if he or she is guilty and the government. Wants to dispose of the case without having to go to trial, they'll say, look this crime carries a up to five year penalty. We will tell the judge that you cooperated and you should get a shorter sentence. When a mandatory minimum attached to some of these crimes, the prosecutor will say. We'll charge you with this lesser offense that doesn't carry a mandatory minimum if you plead and then recommend a shorter sentence. But if you decide to go to trial and put us through the hassle of having to prove our case, win it conviction, we're gonNA bring all these charges against you and some of those charges carry mandatory sentences and when they do that doesn't matter what the judge thinks that point if you're convicted, you're going to face a much higher penalty. It's just become too much of a game where once the prosecutor decides you're guilty. Your options are very limited. I had friends of mine who are law and order types who said look I don't think you're guilty but you have to plead guilty just to make this go away. There's something wrong when that's happening. Once again, Kevin saw this play out in his own case when he went to the sentencing phase. The. Ringleader of this lobbying conspiracy had been sentenced to four years. The government asked for Seventeen and a half to twenty two years for me. And the judge said, how can this be possible? You know that he was an underlying how can you deserve this much time? You're currently punishing him for going to trial and the prosecutor said, no, we're not punishing him going to trial, but he's just not getting the reward of pleading guilty and cooperating. And she said, isn't that just the different side of the same coin? I don't think there's any philosophical issue. With giving somebody some credit for pleading guilty at propagating I think if somebody is guilty. And they are willing to spare the government and taxpayers the cost of a trial, and they're willing to accept a shorter sentence which they're gonNa get if they accept responsibility. I think the fact that they might get a shorter sentence is okay and I think that incentive. By existing. Will you know cause some people? To plead guilty and that's okay. The problem that happens is they not only get a shorter sentence but those who don't don't just get the sentence that the other person would have got they get a much longer sentence because once you decide to go to trial, they usually add charges and penalties. The delta is not just if a was the utopian perfect punishment and the person who played got two years less than A, and now you get a for going to trial note you get a plus I. If I had pleaded guilty and cooperated the government was all but offering me a no jail deal. But when I went to trial in loss, they were now asking with a straight face for seventeen and a half to twenty two years, and so luckily, I had a judge who was a former criminal defense lawyer and a senior judge who wasn't just accepted governments arguments at face value and really pushed back. Kevin says, this sort of thing happens in courtrooms all across America every single day. In Florida. For example, there are cases where people have used a gun to fire what's called a warning shot. For example, during an altercation, somebody might fire the weapon up into the air as a warning and they would argue this is a form of self defense to deter an attacker. You're not supposed to use a gun that way but these people felt threatened and the prosecutor said, well, that's aggravated assault. You've threaten people by shooting a gun and the person will say, no was acting in self-defense I felt threatened. The prosecutor may say, okay, will listen just plead guilty to this crime and I'll let you go with three years and the person was annoyed. I acted in self defense. I'll go to trial will once they go to trial that aggravated assault and the firing of a weapon if they're found guilty curious a fifteen year mandatory minimum. So we have cases in Florida where people are serving fifteen year sentences even after the prosecutor offered them a deal that would have had them served three years that twelve years has nothing to do with public safety. It just has to do with the fact that the defendant for reasons good or bad wanted to go to trial and try to approve his her innocence and so mandatory minimums can make the difference between pleading not pleading so great it courses people into pleading guilty whether they're innocent or not. Kevin recognizes that judges are sometimes in a tough position. Judges understand that plea deals are eight necessary and important.

Kevin Ring prosecutor Florida Justin Brooks assault Director America
"alford " Discussed on Sworn

Sworn

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Sworn

"Villa's. Voice heard if you care about these issues, enough fear is a direct and fast way to articulate that we know this is a historic election and our partners at seventh generation. WanNa remind us that our vote today will have.

Gotham Knights doesn't have Batman in it and Suicide Squad

Gaming Ride Home

04:50 min | 1 year ago

Gotham Knights doesn't have Batman in it and Suicide Squad

"Gotham Knights is the next game from the developer behind Batman Arkham. And Batman isn't in it? DC held its massive DC fan dome event this weekend where they shared all kinds of panels and trailers for DC related stuff. They talked about wonder woman nineteen eighty-four, which looks cool and the Snyder cut of Justice League which look you know I am ecstatic for you. If you're excited about that I don't think making that movie longer it's going to make it any better, but you know that has nothing. To do with video games. They also showed a trailer for the Robert Patents and Matt Reeves Batman Movie, which I thought looked pretty great. I'm excited for that. But the most exciting news for me was learning about what WB Montreal was working on and learning a lot more about rock steadies suicide squad game. So finally, officially, WB Montreal revealed it is working on a game called Gotham knights the trailer for the. Game Open with a newscast revealing that Bruce Wayne is dead and then a cut to a video. Batman had recorded in case of his death and what needed to be done in his absence, and then we got to see back girl night wing Red Hood and Robin basically stepping it up to be the new protectors of Gotham from there it looked a lot like a Batman Arkham game which I am. Saying as a complement, each of the four heroes appears to have a distinct set of abilities and are able to drive bat cycles around Gotham. Bad girl seems perhaps the closest to playing as Batman. As we know him in the Arkham Games, a brawler uses a zip line to move around night wing was playable on a few occasions in the Batman Arkham Games and he looks similar here uses batons as weapons. Red Hood. Who sometimes bad guy. But seems to be a good guy in this instance uses guns. He is former Robin Jason Todd who was resurrected, and now you know very angry general. And finally, we saw robin the Tim Drake version. Of Robin, who appears to use a lot of tech gadgets I was certain. We were looking at Damian Wayne Bruce Wayne's biological son during the trailer who is Robin in the current Comic Book Canon. But after the fact, it was made pretty clear that this is Tim Drake. The trailer ended with a tease we have been expecting for long time with the Court of owls taking center stage. We saw familiar locations from the Court of Appeals, comics people wearing court of appeals, masks, and hundreds of coffins that store the immortal superhumans at the Court of Appeals tends to use to do its dirty work. After the trailer premiered, they showed about seven minutes of Gameplay. The game play footage took place about a dozen hours into the game and focused on a part of the story revolving around Mr Freeze we saw back girl wearing a different costume than what was shown in the trailer running around the city, zipping up to rooftops and attacking enemies from above Robin joined her similarly wearing a different outfit than the one seen in the trailer, and they made their way into Mr Freezes. Fort I guess you could say where he had this crazy weather machine going multiple approaches to taking out enemies were shown bat girl was more of a brawler uninterested in a stealthy approach but robin was shown sneaking up on enemies Alford called the duo to give them advice and we also saw and bat girl team up for a single attack it culminated with a boss fight confrontation Mr freeze before too much progress could be made against him. The video came to a close the game going to be an up to two player coop game and will apparently have lots of leveling up options over the course of the game and enemies will level up with you. Implication is you tackle things just about any order as a result if you're level five when you fight freeze, he's level five. But if you love of fifteen, then he is little fifteen in that changes things. Afterward. Zachary Levi. She's Zam himself asked WB Montreal a few questions. They didn't offer a whole lot of additional information. They did say the mystery is bigger than the court of owls though and later it was also confirmed that the game is separate from the Arkham universe it's a standalone new Batman Universe the game is planned for next year I love the narrative conceit of Batman being dead I. Hope they lean into that and it's not just a big endgame twist that he's been alive the whole time I, liked the. Idea of that crew of four trying to figure out how to protect Gotham without Batman I. think that's really cool I. also love the Look of writing the bat cycle through the city and how at least at this point it it does look close to Arkham game play.

Robin Jason Todd Gotham Knights Batman Arkham Gotham Montreal Court Of Appeals DC Snyder Red Hood Tim Drake Damian Wayne Bruce Wayne Court Of Owls Bruce Wayne Zachary Levi Justice League Alford WB Mr Freezes Matt Reeves
Interview With Phil Penman

The Candid Frame

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Phil Penman

"When you decide to go into business for yourself, it's as much about your hustle as it is about your talent. Skilled and talented as you may be if you're hustle is not on point. You are going to struggle not only getting into the game but also staying in it. Phil Penman understands that which is why he's managed to establish himself as a celebrity street and commercial photographer. The links that he had to go to his Paparazzi could make the difference between getting the shot or not, but also more importantly the difference of thousands rather than hundreds of dollars. That kind of work is not for the faint of heart especially when it involves negotiating the streets of new. York. City on a bicycle. But as Phil understands, you've gotta do what you gotTa do this is Ebonics and welcome back to they candid frame. Jones, thanks for making time for me. I appreciate it. Thanks for your patience and finally getting round here. Thank you for inviting me I. So you're up you're up to like five, hundred, twenty, eight. So is man gets because you sent me your book months ago. I, talked to my wife who's that producer to try and make sure that we got you in somewhere but it can be quite the juggle because there's so many people that consider. Really I love the Book I love your story but one thing that's fascinating in before we get into talking to you about your photography is just like man you have held so many jobs. So many things. List as well. So it was just was just the the nature of being like a hustler that you were just like just did what you needed to do in order to get by that is that why you? or so many different at one hundred percent of house. So when I was in college I was studying photography and a box. If Alford like a hundred sheets for safe thirty pounds and that's a of money to a college student and you having to crank this week off the week. So I had I would study and I had to free jobs that I was doing waller's in college. So in the daytime, I would serve lunches to like rich preppy boy, Colt prep school kids at a nearby like boy school than a night I worked in a bar and unlike club four nights a week, and then the weekend I used to work even Lego land or Twickenham rugby Stadium. So I would literally our work all day through the night and then have like free hours sleep got a college study as. You did this casino the the bitch would be like we used to do five transparency. Not only will take was the chew to say, have to stop off and the fuck that's enough free. Way, worked in the bar and he go pay to twenty an hour. Like notes it. Hasso Hasso. When you're young. You don't need that much sleep exactly now I'm just like I'm Pasta by seven o'clock. So, when did you get the bug? When did you discover that you wanted to study photography in photographer it was my backup believe it or not i. was fifteen and I wanted to be a sports teacher. My Dad was like, well, you got to have a backup. And he was a professor I so I kind of I grew up with a darkroom and seeing prints in the bath tub being washed and stuff. So he's like, hello go for this newspaper, pick out the picture the you think and if if I agree with you then I'll let you study photography as a backup and I ended up being a terrible sports teacher so You know I virtually failed sports studies by a my photography. So I'm like that's the way man to find out that photography is your fallback. It's funny. Because most people it's like. Repeats the first choice, not the second. It's like my lap was always insistent on you always have a backup everything. So that was my backup and then. Studied like the next freeze I guess and then. Started working straightaway into. Work you started doing initially. I did a year as a local newspaper photographer where it was tree, we do a jobs today and it would be like they had us going every thirty minutes. So you're driving around hundred miles per hour from job to job walk in the room sheet the paycheck next job, and it was like a fos learning cup. So you'd be like sports, events, politicians, babies, presentations, and then I landed a job working for news agency where I was doing hard news but I'm still doing. I basically landed a GIG. She will the cool proportion shift for Microsoft and like I like twenty, one years old and boss was worked for is making so much money from that the it was great for him. So I did I did about six months with him and then I got the opportunity to work for A. Company in Los, Angeles and just jumped

Phil Penman Professor Hasso Hasso Jones Colt Prep School Twickenham Rugby Stadium Microsoft Alford Waller York Producer A. Company Angeles LOS
Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

Here & Now

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

"Of the continental US, the covert 19 pandemic is happening as the push for social justice continues. Natasha Alford is a journalist for the Gri Oh, and Pulitzer Center grantee. And she traveled to Puerto Rico shortly after the island's political protests in 2019 to understand another uprising taking place on the land What she calls the Afro Latino revolution. She joins us now. Welcome to hearing now. Thank you so much for having me, Tanya. Yes. And Natasha. What? Through lines? Are you saying between the Afro Puerto Rican community and what's happening in other parts of the country in the protests for racial justice? How does PR's history and culture Play out in the construction of race and racial experiences. Yes. Oh, there's so much to unpack there. But you know, the first thing I'll say is after the death of George Floyd, we immediately saw protest. We saw vigils and we saw memorials in honor of his life right in Puerto Rico, So obviously there was something that really resonated with people there. And specifically in Afro Puerto Rican communities. Now often times when people think of Afro Puerto Rican Sze, they may associate them with just one community. One town one neighborhood. I'll give you an example. Louisa has a really high proportion of residents who identify as Afro Puerto Rican. But the reality is that there are black people everywhere in Puerto Rico. It's just his divers as the United States. And so we saw that what was happening in the continental US was really resonating. It's resonating because there are similarities. What have you found in terms of health disparities without for Latinos and other types of disparities? Do they mirror what we see in the continental United States? Yes, I think that there are parallels, and it makes sense, right? Because well, you think about the history of Puerto Rico. There was slavery there as well. Right? Even though our societies may be different, you know, we think of the continental US we think of segregation and Jim Crow. Ah, lot of people just don't know the history of Puerto Rico and and slavery and the aftermath of how it played out. They often assume that Puerto Rico is a Nyland of racial harmony that it is a racial utopia. The phrase La Grande Familia, Kenya. Is about being one Puerto Rican family. But a lot of people will tell you that that's actually not the case. And so with health disparities, one thing that researchers have found is that darker skinned Puerto Rican Sze report poorer health outcomes. And some of the reasons for that are social treatment. The communities in which they live in are sometimes poorer exposure to social stressors. There's ah great research paper that was written that came out of the University of Puerto Rico by Jose Caravaggio, Quito and S. R Boudreau and they talked about Changing the way that we measure those disparities by changing the language we use. So we often think of black and white in the United States, but they did a study where they asked people to list the shade of their skin tone. When they did that they actually got more information that showed what those health disparities were, and the key was using local language and understanding of race rather than trying to impose the continental US is language when it comes to race. Of course,

Puerto Rico Afro Puerto Rican Sze Afro Puerto Rican University Of Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Sze United States Natasha Alford George Floyd Pulitzer Center Tanya Kenya Louisa Jose Caravaggio R Boudreau Jim Crow
House holds hearing on Russian bounty intelligence reports

Ben Ferguson

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

House holds hearing on Russian bounty intelligence reports

"Officials before a House panel over reports Russia paid Afghan militants to kill U. S Service members in Afghanistan. General Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs and Defense secretary, Mark Esper, say they have not seen corroborated intelligence that Russia offered bounties to the Taliban for the debts of U. S service members. Congressman. To the best of my recollection. I have not received a briefing that included the word bounty versus intelligence assessments, alleging the Russian bounties was not produced by a Defense Department agency. The top Pentagon officials also told the House Armed Services Committee, there's no evidence payments led to the deaths of service members. Karen Alford,

Russia Mark Milley Mark Esper House Armed Services Committee Joint Chiefs Karen Alford Defense Department Taliban U. S Service Congressman Afghanistan Pentagon Chairman U. S
"alford " Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"alford " Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

"All crypto locker and suddenly like. Oh we know what to do. Shut everything down psych okay. Great it's not like you've had time to prepare right. Yeah I talked to a vendor today. Had a very interesting proposition. They back up active directory and a very clean and very discreet. Way such that. It's not a backup of the VM. Where the bare metal or the OS itself where they're literally backing up just active directory. Plopping it of the infrastructure ecosystem as part of saving it off to the side. Whammy at all you want to you bring it back very quickly And you could restore it from VM. To a server from a server to of em you resort to the cloud you know. I it's because you're backing up. Active directory itself. It doesn't matter what platform it lays on top of and so the bad guys hit the the underpinnings. It's like fine nuke those all you want we can be back up and running in hours With a full with a full forest restored right and I thought that was a very challenging proposition. That was an interesting meeting today. Is that is taken. Like containerization to the yeah. Let's say is that? Is that the next evolution of Of BACKUPS OR RESILIENCY CONTAINERIZE. I mean that concept of containerization. Let's just go home? Put everything in. Its little bucket that way. We can Does that make us more? Resilient though I hope so. I think it's a good restoration point. It certainly quickens that recovery. Like you said people get hit with ransomware. It happens So what do you do you? You HAVE TO RECOVER. You have to start rebuilding well. Your choices are pay the ransom or or start the painful process of rebuilding if rebuilding a full active directory forest with you know fifty domain controllers or whatever it is takes you days or weeks And this solution can get you back up hours then. Then that's impressive. And what else does vendor offers on the proactive side is they also do a lot of active directory monitoring looking for ski stuff looking for tricky stuff alerting and etc. So if you if you go with their full solution and of course. This is one conversation with one better. I've yet to demo it right. That's the next stage. Obviously proof is in the pudding right but architecture looks amazing. The architecture brilliant The smoke and mirrors the dogs ponies. It was all there. It really looks. It really looks like a good proposition. It really does active monitoring upfront and reactive rapid recovery on the back end if necessary so couple of years ago dot to pick on Gartner but I will I went to a gardener to the last one I was ever allowed to go to And there's this huge in at the at the Gaylord senator. You're going down. The escalator to the vendor area where the booths are knows. This huge sign Palo Alto put up and God bless Palo. Alto love those guys. They do some pretty cool stop but It was at a time when everybody is sort of shifting away from prevent into detect and respond. And they had this this this tagline. It's it had a dinosaur ended said Dinosaurs DETECTED RESPOND. Real security leadership prevents or something like okay. The maybe have that backwards because we've tried to prevent thing. I mean I've been there since we started trying to prevent thing right. It's worked out really well in that I'm still employed his sold absolutely nothing in the true sense of like solved the made to go away. It's kind of like we're going to radically diseases right. We're going to completely wiped off the face of the Earth Never And it's it's you know we worked on it And we can prevent as much as you can but resiliency had talked about this topic when I was with. Hp It's gotTa be twelve years ago ten years ago like we were talking about this you know black swans events and what was the anti fragile? That was the big that was a big thing of the day. Anti fragile right so One of the things I came out of g with a lot of experience with was those Those change what does windows during a retail. Freezes we call them right from the week before Thanksgiving until like second week of January could make changes to production anywhere urgency change that you had the make. Somebody forgot some fixed to a major APP. They made the change and everything broke right right. Well we learned that. Perhaps the oldies monolithic. Change windows and changes were a bad idea. Entered devops years and years and years later. Have things actually changed? I think they have. I think they have. I think think develops. Has You know at least from application development side of the house right I think the devops mindset is certainly better than agile which is certainly better than waterfall. There's there's no getting away from the fact that rolling out. Applications is now more streamline more rapid more responsive more operation centric than it used to be. Now whether it's more secure is a whole nother questions right healthy with that is not right and you know I. It's interesting to me because there's a lot of debate out there. Everybody DOVE ON DECK OPS. And then there was the no no no it should be sect of ops because security is that important it comes first and then they ransacked ops is not a thing should not be in that conversation. Exactly exactly. Let's just call it devops. And let's if we're doing it right. Make sure that security is actually embedded integrated and part and parcel just like breathing right. It's like you don't refer to your lungs as oxygen lungs you just refer to as lungs. The oxygen should be. They're sort of inherently by design. Amen to that. That's the same thing I'd say about the SEC. Like why don't have to have security? I'll see just have FDIC right and you have security embedded into it. Well they don't want security. I don't want the security in the I I just WANNA regular S. TLC. Want when it happened in fifteen minutes when I don't don't include security like who still does that. Nobody wanted that in the first place but we were in this is I don't know because the twenty year old probably maybe this is the problem that securities had this entire time. And it's that we want to stand out so badly we want to be the the the thing like the orientals guys are Super Cool. Ninja warriors over. There do a Jedi. Mind tricks on everybody. We're just a piece of risk management like we get ourselves please right and we're bad at it so there's that right. I mean look at every everything like suddenly you know the most popular Conferencing APP you realized Sweet mother of mercy the things you know Swiss cheese by the way China gets your calls to just just because right That sounds like a good idea to somebody but we want figured this out years and years and years and years ago that you gotTa have security built in. They got it. In fact I argue. They got more right than anybody else. Lately they learned their lessons. But it's it's I don't think it's there's never been a point where somebody else. I don't care about security like yeah. I want to do that. But that's that's one of my priorities. It's one of my priorities. A nasty challenge right there at to your point. Yes we suck at risk as security practitioners. All we really are risk practitioners. And we're still novices. We're we're kids at the GROWNUP table. Eyeing the Turkey and being handed chicken nuggets. You know But to a certain extent. We're we're asking for Chicken Nuggets. And that's part of the problem we've got to elevate our game we've got to raise it. We've got a mature it. We've got to sit down and say let's talk Turkey You Know I. It's risk is a mature disciplined. Security is not..

Turkey Palo Alto Gartner ski FDIC Hp senator Palo SEC Gaylord China
This bill to protect children may also put your privacy at risk

The 3:59

09:03 min | 1 year ago

This bill to protect children may also put your privacy at risk

"Alford. You've got a nice explainer on the earn it act and you've got to break this down for me because it is extremely dense first off. What does the earn it? Act Propose yet you're right. It is extremely dense. But what the heck is proposing is basically making Tech Company's earned section to thirty protections now section. Two thirty is a part of the Communications Decency Act in Nineteen Ninety six basically protect platforms from being sued or content. That's posted on their own. So if I'm a restaurant and somebody needs a bad review on yelp. I can't sue YELP for that. I would have to sue the person that actually posted that. So it's a big part of what allows Forms to grow and also what allows for three expression on why So that is what they're proposing there saying. You have to follow these standards to protecting children online or you do not at this protection. That would basically keep your website alive and that is. That's a deal breaker for tech companies. Right if you don't have section two thirty protection you're basically just it's open game terms of lawsuits. They basically companies could not function without production. Right if you think about it like thinking about how many posts are on facebook a day and I. I think there's something along. The lines of like one billion hours of video is being watched on Youtube every day. Now think about like how many lawsuits could comfort that. And there's a very good chance it could lose these lawsuits end. They which shut down like immediately. Or if you're like a new website like looking to start out and you know you all of us are liable for all of this because you don't meet the standards Yeah it's not really much of a guideline or best practices so much as it is basically. If you don't do this you're done so let's take us through. What are those guidelines? What exactly is the government? Proposing in this instance the guidelines are not established by this bill guidelines are going to be established by mission Established by this bill where the three of the members are the heads of the Justice Department the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Homeland Security. That is where the issue really comes in for a lot of privacy insecurity experts because the Department of Homeland Security and the Justice Department has spent many years basically trying to get rid of end to end decryption saying that it prevents them from catch criminals. It prevents them from being able to solve investigations. And you know in the past the just had this at the FBI mover encryption for terrorists and then before that they were saying you know drug dealers are using this online and we can't like catch like these drug kingpins because that those arguments clearly didn't work because you know we're still afforded encryption and technically he's not really into those pressures but now with the earn it act. The idea is going at this from the angle of child exploitation which is a much harder political angle to fight against right. Legislators can go out there and say no I actually support you know our children online. Yeah that that's that's what fascinated me is because there there's a different goal and the goal is not as never outright stated right. It's ultimately what they WANNA do is is to insert a back door into facebook apple various systems. But it's never outright ever said and interesting like the press conferences that have been scheduled. The public statements of May have all been about a exploitation of children online. And how to prevent that? And it's it's interesting the way it spawned because you're right politically you can't be on the other side of that argument right. It just doesn't make any like you can never win that argument by saying yeah. I'm I'm for that but just as work right. Yeah and I think that's kind of why. So many tech policy experts have been looking at this thinking. It'll actually does have a pretty good chance of getting momentum on Capitol Hill and I think you're right to point out the security risks at privacy risk here because like encryption is what protects your communications not only from being viewed by people who have stolen your phone or potential hackers but also government regimes and the idea that the government has been trying to propose is. They can't do these investigations when things are encrypted and they want waffle acts as which is basically. Give us a specialty. That only police officers or only investigators can use to messages. But that that's kind of fall short when you look at all. The government ater leaks. That have happened in cybersecurity. Tools have been stolen from the NSA and the CIA where these are were also tools. That were only meant to be used by the government and have been used five militias hackers because right when the government says trust us. We'll we'll make this will michigan this back door safe and only use by us. It's hard to buy. The argument given there have been a lot of examples. Where that's that hasn't been the case right. Yeah and that. That's definitely the biggest argument against Lawful access I had a hearing about this December where Apple At basically told Congress look like we can't make a key just for the good guys like that's not how that works so it'll be interesting to see where this goes on Capitol Hill. There's definitely a lot of noise about it from privacy and security advocates. But also you know there. There are organizations like the National Center for missing exploited. Children backing this bill and like seven out of the ten senators. That are backing this. Bill are on the Senate Judiciary Committee which will be having a hearing on this tomorrow. It's important to note. This is not a Parson issue. There are there are senators and representatives on both sides both parties. That's what this bill. I believe it's four. Republicans and six Democrats that are sponsoring bill right so it was a rare instance where we have these parties. Who agree on an issue. I guess what's interesting to me is I mean beyond beyond the spinning. It's interesting that they're taking this tack now because you know I think back in two thousand sixteen we we we saw this before apple versus the FBI were. There was a big battle there. Fbi wanted some sort of way to get into the iphone apple refuses really kind of when it crystallized apple's kind of big pitch on security and privacy as a featured in its products and clearly in the court of public opinion the the need for security and encryption for the services kind of one out. So that's why it's interesting to me that they're taking this different tack than really going after making this an issue about protecting children as opposed to getting getting you know having backdoor access for the good guys quote. We started seeing that angle Around the time. Facebook said that they were GONNA start encrypting. Their Messaging Services says facebook is responsible for reporting about sixteen point eight million Cases back in two thousand eighteen to The National Center for Missing Exploited Children. So the idea was that if you're going to encrypt these messages. That is a big way. That child predators get in touch with kids in groom them into you know meeting them later on and things like that and if you're encrypting these messages as you're not going to be getting these kinds of signals you're not stop. These pedophile is using FACEBOOK MESSENGER. So that is around the time when? I saw this guy you front and this new angle the Justice Department and I think the fallacy surrounding that from what tech policy experts have told me is that yes. It's true that facebook gives like eighteen like sixteen or eighteen million reports per year. But the difference would be that. Not much of that is actually enforced. So there's like they'll give them these reports but like this center is not like law enforcement agents a they. Just give the COPS AFTER. It's very like it's not clear. How much of that is actually acted on? There was a New York. Times report about you. Know faced with not being able to handle all of these These chat exploitation posts or ramping up like a severe amount and how much they reported. But I think I think the problem still comes down to the federal government doesn't have the funding or resources te actually tackle that so even if you know they provided a back door ear or follow these guidelines. Whatever they might be. I think it still boils down to the question of this actually protect children and you know unless you have investigators and resources that can actually use that kind of

Facebook Apple FBI Justice Department Bill Yelp Department Of Homeland Securit Alford. Youtube Cops National Center For Missing Ex New York NSA Michigan Congress National Center
Maryland man who transferred HIV to women he met on apps sentenced to 9 years in prison

Larry O'Connor

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Maryland man who transferred HIV to women he met on apps sentenced to 9 years in prison

"Prison thirty seven year old Rudolf Smith is HIV positive but he didn't tell three women he met on dating apps and had unprotected sex with that he has a virus today he was sentenced to nine years in prison followed by five years of probation for giving the virus to the women he entered an Alford plea in September which is a type of guilty plea where the defendant doesn't say he did it but admits there's enough evidence to convict him state's attorney Charlie Smith says while there are effective treatments for HIV today these victims will be forever impacted by Smith's

HIV Charlie Smith Attorney Thirty Seven Year Five Years Nine Years
Alfred Jackson, Prince’s Half-Brother, Dead at 66

Lori and Julia

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Alfred Jackson, Prince’s Half-Brother, Dead at 66

"One of princes six siblings who inherited the prince's fortune passed away in his sleep today how for Jackson princes older half brother died this morning at his home in Kansas city Missouri at the age of sixty nine police suspect no foul play and they believe that Jackson died of natural causes and he was one of the first family members to speak out in twenty sixteen following princess death and Alford who had the same mama's friend said he hadn't spoken to his brother in years but followed his career and he was

Jackson Alford Kansas Missouri
"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

14:12 min | 2 years ago

"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

"The waterfalls my favorite place at ever stayed was in lia in the swiss alps <hes> really bad with the the german names but it's also known as the cliffhanging hostile so oh you take a cable car to the top of this mountain and then you hike with all of your stuff through like ancient caves up to this <hes> this hostile hostile that's literally hanging off the side of the alps said the inside of the hostile wall against the mountain is open mountain in face those unbelievable. I'll put it on the list. Challenges are just doing some reading. I learned that you had a <music> extreme bad food. Sickness incident in you also ahead malaria <unk>. How did you get more area. I was was a bit ignorant. I went to at. I spent the summer two thousand eighteen traveling africa. I think i was there for somewhere around three months and know they always say you should take these malaria pills and the ones that always give me really bad nightmares <unk>. There's no way that i could have nightmares for three months straight and also pack that many pills i just didn't really could as much importance on it as i probably should house but i think that i was bit i got ravaged <unk> attacked by bugs dogs at night <hes> mosquitoes and some spider by it's on my face that made my face glow up like my lips were like three times four times. The size usually are in senegal started. Thinking <unk> started in senegal in then by the time i made it to average on in the ivory coast. <hes> i had to cancel my flights might clams and just lay in a hot bedroom. Some random hotel there into decided to head to the hospital and they speak french bear. They're only exclusively french couldn't find was soul of a person that sparking <unk> but found a taxi driver who kind of understood understood what i needed to be hospital. It was where within likes five minutes of walking in the hospital. They were like drawing my blood all of this and then they gave me a prescription for the dose for malaria is just three times the malaria medication that i usually take so it felt like i had the flu for like a week. Which is the area of the world really want to <unk> flu but i it went away relatively quickly. Apparently i'm more susceptible to getting it again now but we'll see lexi with you're by yourself or with others during the trip <hes> during the <unk> thankfully i was with my dad because if i they had been alone. I don't even know what i would have done. That would have been the worst travel nightmare ever and i do really love solo travel but i enjoy travel the most when i get to share it with people that i care about the most so i i had to try to talk my friends and family into coming with me <hes> as much as i could when you have that situation you know y- yup thankfully your dad was there for support but nonetheless you're in ivory coast. <hes> neither of you guys speak french in your sick. You're in pain discomfort art. Is this one of those points where you're wondering what you're doing. Why am i in this country. Kind of isolated alleviated in dealing with the sickness. I would never get back home in america what what's going on thought process wise of what's the whole all point of this journey yeah well. Those were definitely running through my head at that whole like month of my life in africa kind broke me in a lot of ways but i just have to remind myself that if you you can't have all of these <unk> experiences without having the bad ones too so i have always anticipated that there were going to be problems i was going to feel we'll uncomfortable in pain a lot along the way but all of that genuine discomfort is absolutely worth feeling because of what's on the other side of it very good attitude in that leads me to ask you what was the lowest of the low points. Was there a point where you said to yourself. Thought like okay this is i'm throwing in the towel. I'm just heading back home home. I've had enough in this was at the mall area situation. Was there something else but was there a real low point during your travels yeah i would say that the malaria was the start of lying low point of just <hes> you know traveling through central africa and not not having the money to go out and see the things that i really wanted to see <hes> just feeling doing <hes> just very aware of all of the situations happening around me that could have been any that are really sad in some of these these countries there is a lot of lot of poverty and <hes> just yet feeling very affected <unk> feeling affected by those kind of situations and being alone in a way from my home for so long mm destroyed a relationship or two along the way and yeah i would say that that was was the lowest point in coming home and and being alone again sitting in my room realizing that i still had so much more ahead of me was was one of those really defining moments where i knew that i have to finish what i started with <hes> with traveling every country i can't i. You can't just give up when it gets hard. That's great you pushed on and what was the biggest challenge so when you look back you did one hundred ninety five countries. What almost prevented you from fulfilling this journey. What was the thing that almost tell you back the most i would say just politics and it's the bureaucracy of obtaining pieces really really sucked a a lot of my soul out of my passion for for traveling just having to to worry about this paperwork erkin think about it every single day. Am i gonna get this visa soon. My flights coming up <unk> just so so stressful <hes> so logistically that was the most difficult part was just how much energy and time in focus it took plan dan traveling to every country especially in a somewhat short period of time. I didn't really have friends. I didn't have relationship asian ship. I didn't get to see my family. I sacrificed most of the things that spent all my money sacrificed so many anything <hes> along the way so that just the sacrifices were were hard but yeah the loneliness of course as well lexi when we spoke for the first episode you said your biggest challenge at that point was the money and whether it's yourself yourself for some of the other people like catchy coal. <hes> you know there's a ton of supporters that you've had i've read some of your social media comments and then of course there's there's the haters out there and one of the questions that comes up is young. You're eighteen or nineteen twenty or twenty one however you affording this is how are you able to do this. Yeah i get this question so many times every single day from almost every every person i mean one of their first questions today afford. It and i honestly don't have a very exciting answer for you. <hes> <unk> basically it boils down to a few very simple things <hes> working very hard prioritizing travel travel or whatever it is that you want the most over everything else in your life especially material possessions and <hes> you know smart saving and dan smart spending so putting in the work to research to make sure that you're not getting the best possible deal that you are which takes so much more time than just looking the first thing that you see. I also like great <unk>. I am lucky enough to come from a family family that works in the travel industry so i have grown up around a group of people that whose job job is to find the best deals in trouble us utilizing points miles was a huge part of how i <hes> i paid for all look my flights end some of my hotels and also starting to create content for social media and doing a influence or trips like in pakistan where you are providing service and product to a accompanies hotels whatever it may be in exchange for them them hosting you and bringing you to their country helped a lot along the way as well. Do you have a sense of what this question cost you. How much money to tell the would you ballpark. It set you book. I honestly don't have a very specific number. I would say <hes> out out of pocket for me. I don't think that this record was more expensive than getting a bachelor's degree from the you see in california. I don't have a very specific number though because a lot of it was a exchanges trading in announ quinton miles as well. Did you have a sense. Did you ever have a budget so we'll pick like central africa for an example apple. I mean were you on twenty bucks. A fifty bucks today. We budget driven at all. Doing some of these areas was central africa's vata example because you don't have options there really the flights are unbelievably expensive hotels as well because there isn't very many options actions so the providers have the market completely corner there <hes> in places like central america south america. I could get by ryan in less than thirty dollars a day. I think the cheapest i ever stated a hostel for was two dollars a night in guatemala. It's it's very much based on the region that you're in. I can usually get by on thirty dollars to fifty dollars a day most places in the world world except for maybe the middle east and africa did that two dollars at the hostel guatemala come with breakfast. I <music> no. I don't think it did came with bedbugs though okay well. At least you got one one statistic. I noted in. I have to ask you about this because i got exhausting reading the sentence. <hes> i noted in one twelve month period you visited. I believe leave ninety countries yeah so that was <hes> a bit of an exaggeration actually by <hes> the person person who wrote that article <hes> i transited through fully ninety countries i think including the layovers but i didn't actually visit that many countries in the year <hes> that was a lot of li- saved all over the country that i needed to go back to you had already been to for two thousand eighteen so there were countries like <hes> granada for example that i spent week or maybe more than that when i was with my family growing up at but i just didn't have the plane tickets. I didn't have any witnesses. Parents don't count not that. I had to go back to so on my way to surinam. I stayed there for a night to the evidence so that's including some of the the countries that had to backtrack in in. I also read. I'm curious to know if this is true you do. It says that you never get a local sim card. When traveling that is true. I have not gotten a local sim card before so this is mind-bending to me so even though i used to travel pre smartphone i mean i'm now addicted to.

malaria africa swiss alps america senegal guatemala Sickness surinam lexi flu li dan middle east california pakistan south america ryan
"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

16:07 min | 2 years ago

"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

"But my my passport got me really fire but those are the only places where in american passport will not will oh not carry you. I hope to hear more about your return visit to both of those countries and lexi is is account for guinness world record does is an airport visit count in airport transfer. Only if you have a visa if that's necessary stamp out <hes> you can take some photos to prove that you're on the other side of immigration and can provide the witness statements as well so okay so stamp in in stamp in then that counts. You have to have this damps. Did you have any airport visit now lexi. You're lashed on counting in countries. You're at you're at one hundred forty countries. I want to go back in time two hundred forty two today angle over some of the highs and lows of the second part of your journey so what what were some of the best experiences <hes> for the last fifty five countries allah. I definitely have the opportunity to fall in love with some of the least visited countries in the world <hes> two countries stories that have absolutely claimed my heart since then our venezuela and pakistan and <hes> <unk> actually so for venezuela. I've not been on a been there. It's of course a list. I know you went to angel so that definitely caught my attention. That's on my bucket list. Venezuela lls country in civil unrest or failed state type category to challenge in place is the easy to visit. Is it easy to get a visa at this time. I would definitely not say that it is easy in any way <hes> i. I can't speak about the situation now. I haven't been following much about our what it's like to be a tourist in venezuela <unk> at this point but when i was applying i i applied. I was in two thousand eighteen and i got my abuser rejected. I think because that was during the time of the elections and they didn't want to have any north americans in the country. That's just a speculation tation from loan the someone working at the embassy <hes> felt very discouraged found a different fixer <hes> applied again a few months later and got it approved and flew down to crack s and end. I made it to a portal or dies. Which is where you take a smaller flight to academia. Which is the in the town based around where you launch on your journey to angel falls the any any security issues for you it. Did it sounds like you didn't spend too much time in caracas but when you got to the <hes> pushing off point for angel falls sir i mean we're seeing this stuff in the media in other words whereas they're starving people on the street where people mugging other people in front of you now also wednesday got to kanaya. There were absolutely no tourists. I we took a ah boat for like five hours. Ours is something out to the point where you can out. There is not a soul was was around you had the entire place to ourselves was was crazy because the tour guide was telling us that just a few years ago there would be like a few hundred people camping at the at the base in doing the hike and went to the hike swimming pools at the base of angel falls and it was absolutely surreal looking at one of the most beautiful points on the planet and having completely to yourself <hes> that was definitely one of the most incredible moments of my life and when nine returned to porto or dawes from kanaya i got picked up by some some friends like a friend of a friend that had been teaching english down there and let sharia and he drove us from puerto dazs bacteria. We did some island hopping off the coast and then he wanted to drive me back to cross and i was very hesitant agent towards that i had been warned just not to not to drives in venezuela's especially not drive to crack is like have you. We've had the negative comments. All you're gonna get kidnapped or you're gonna die. That's dangerous. There are people are gonna see that your your foreigner in rob you and all all of these horrible things but my friend had been living there for four years and was confident that you know it's fine. There's a lot of security checks might get hassled a little bit at the checkpoints. It's but nothing bad will happen so <hes> we we did the drive back to crockett and it was beautiful. We had amazing street food on the side of the road. Everybody was friendly friendly really excited to see a foreigner had one jecklin got stopped checkpoint one time they look through our bags in let us go there. Were we're no problems. I actually went also dancing in caracas one night and that was amazing as well. I felt very safe. The whole time the only the only situation that i thought was was bizarre in that could give you some insight into the situation there is that crack is is a very metropolitan city and i and the power would go out for hours during the day at night and that was just a glimpse into how dysfunctional it can be it into fall up on that any issues like you know getting buying food ordering food or how did that work well. <hes> the venezuelans. I was with a group of young venezuelan people. Maybe like early twenties unease and they were just saying that nobody uses cash there <hes> because the cash is obviously very very big denominations nations you carry around like stacks of money. We got some currency changed. Some like sketchy money dealer at the airport pulled like a pound of money out of a bag which was also pretty funny but <hes> everyone uses a uses cards and like money transfer online line to avoid <hes> having having those problems but this they've definitely figured it out. It's i don't think it's as inconvenient as they make it out to see him in the news lexi. How do you pull off a trip like this meaning. This isn't going to paris whether seven seven million reviews on trip advisor. How do you plan in figaro. A trip <unk> getting to angel falls when from tencent purposes. No one is doing it anymore yeah well. It's it's definitely a very difficult thing in my confidence really improved when i started traveling willing to more strange countries like going yemen with <hes> with gunnar garforth was my first real experience like in a country that is dysfunctional and really odd and you need to know you're doing and how to get there to make that happen yourself but for for me the biggest thing that has helped me get from <unk> to all of these really obscure destinations is networking so i really believe that your network is your net worth and that you can get to wherever are you want to go just by by talking to people who have also experienced it even if they're just strangers or something that you found on the internet i used used a lot of a lot of help from my friends that were also travelling to every country <hes> finding people in the otas physical every passport stamped group just finding all of these niche groups of people. I have had that experience there because usually they're really we helpful with giving recommendations giving you contacts for fixers in guides in tours and all of that so it really came down to to finding the people that that will tell you exactly what you need to do it. Can you give us her share with us. In actual example so in other words i'm curious who were you able able to reach out to to figure out how to get to angel falls others others that drip come to fruition all right well when i ah was in africa before i started talking to now in my best friends might corey from. I found his instagram <hes> <hes> page and started talking to him about i. I really wanna go change a falls like my bucket list stuff and he's he's like all i have a friend in venezuela that teaches english. Maybe i should talk to him and then his friend in venezuela newell fixer that does a tour company in then i got both their numbers was communicating through voice messages on what's app and i got the number of the fixer in the fixture told me now you gotta do this in this will help you with your visa <unk>. It just kind of all comes together and it's been like that exact situation for so many countries honestly just finding the people on the internet who are interested in what you're doing. <hes> might even wanna do with you <hes> yeah. It's crazy like you're you're only a few degrees of separation away from anyone that you would ever want to meet is my agree a few degrees from everybody in the entire world and you're referencing mike corey who's a youtuber you can check out his channel fearless fearless and far which is pretty cool. Let's take unique unique out there content. I've ever seen and let's pivot. Give it over to pakistan. I will hopefully be there in a month or two. My visa comes to fruition so are some of your pictures there. What like you had a great rick trip. Give us an idea of what your ternary was. What did you do there pakistan. It was an absolute dream. Come true so pakistan was probably probably the most difficult visa that i had to get just because some reason it took six months to in person in interviews for visits to the consulate in person so many phone calls so many emails three different fixtures. It was is just so difficult in there. I have some speculation of maybe why that took so long but i ended up finding again through a the friend mike a company called c._p._i._c. who were looking to do an influence their promotional trip for <hes> for northern pakistan so this is a private company completely private funded that takes influences influencers from around the world brings them to pakistan to create content to show the real pakistan. The name of the project was called changing perceptions so we traveled for ten days from islamabad all the way up into the north and <hes> saw like hudson valley and all the beautiful mountains in gotcha really experienced the culture also also with <hes> a few pakistani influencers as well so some somewhat local people with us and it was just sash incredible incredible experienced be with so many creative people and <hes> really just doing our best to capture what this really misunderstood austin country is really liked to be there so for those nod in the know would is pakistan really like well. Pakistan does not have a very developed tourism section. I know the government is starting to realize how much power there is an positive tourism and being positively represented in the media but so because of this lack of tourism mm-hmm the locals haven't been jaded to tourists in the way that they are in greece or italy or somewhere aware just flocks of tourists combinator behave disrespectfully in a trash they land and all of this so the people were really what made pakistan so special for me was just how incredibly welcomed i felt especially as a woman i could would walk down the street. I didn't have to have my my hair covered or anything just of course dressing modestly <hes> but everyone was so excited to take a photo with you. They wanted to take photos with you themselves. <hes> the biggest smile some of the biggest smiles i've ever seen in the whole world are in pakistan pat's so excited to show their food culture with you and is just absolutely ideal travel experience experience. I couldn't recommend pakistan more. You've got me excited for mind of coming and you also have me scared that my visa's gonna take six months. I'm going to be doing some of the same <unk> traveling to some of the same areas as you. I think you're referring to the the karakoram highway area from perspective of someone who's been there. What's one of the most beautiful things i'm going to see up their best experiences which brings <unk> have well. It's up in like that. Hyundai at caricom region cara combs as well as himalayas are are some of the tallest mountains in the world and they're all. I think there's something lake butcher this stat but it's like sixty out worlds hundred tallest mountains in pakistan something like that crazy statistic <hes> i went to i hiked to the place called fairy meadows which is at near the base of <hes> nanga parbat which is also known as the killer mountain. <hes> ferry meadows was lived up to its name. It's rounded by these beautiful snowy peaks. There's snow oh melt lakes with reflections of the trees in it's just this beautiful alpine region and also after too bad lake which is a elect formed accidentally but it's also just this beautiful turquoise turquoise lake surrounded by mountains and in your mountain lover like i am an photographer. It's such an amazing place to be very very <hes>..

pakistan venezuela angel falls caracas lexi mike corey Hyundai paris himalayas tencent crockett figaro islamabad yemen advisor porto gunnar garforth rick africa greece
"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

"I also have a brief discussion with chris duncan. He's a product manager for africa for g adventures check out the link to see some of their trips and let's listen into my conversation with chris before we hear from from lexi chris a warm welcome back to counting countries. I know the audience knows you but please introduce yourself again. Yes <hes> my name's chris duncan. I am from south africa but i live in toronto canada now. I've worked for the adventures as a guide or as we call it cer newark there for three years as a guide <hes> in southern in east africa and i've been the product manager africa at head office toronto for royal's and little something about me. I love to trail run and i use that as a mechanism days to travel and see new places and undo runs a beautiful spots around the world a unique mechanism for tourism. I like it so chris. There's been a i think increased awareness us in terms of how to interact with animals how to treat them. I live part time in thailand and i mean there's two things i can point to quite readily. There's a big movement moving away from riding elephants because it's you know the training to get these elephants ready for tourists pretty cruel. The second big example that you can point to in thailand is a place known as tiger temple which i believe is now finally been shut down but this was a place where you could sit in pat and walk <hes> wive grown tigers. I know g is on the forefront of this. What jeff venture some of their guidelines on interacting with animals with are some best practices when i am traveling yes i we adopted wanted a new animal welfare policy a few years ago which was developed by the association of british travel agents abt a._b._t. A. m. which was which was in conjunction with the bone free foundation saw alfie policies also being endorsed by dr jane goodall <hes> which which is really great endorsement to have ama- something which we very proud of <hes>. We have a few tips. Would you like to give people in travelling. <hes> the one is to uh-huh <unk> businesses that might have wild animals as pets in this might be at a hotel or restaurants <hes> done pay money to go and supposed to get a picture taken with an animal which is meant to live in the wild done to feed animals touch wild animals obviously along with that. I'm yours wanna maintain a safe distance from wild animals while the animal socks unpredictable by nature so you don't want to get to them and you don't. I wanna be picking up on animals. No matter how small they are <hes> annoncee obeying these subsidies we rather suggests that us support <hes> sanctuaries that law animals to run free on they need the entrance fees and the visitors to support the work that during some some great advice. They're just thinking when you're speaking. I did a visit to the independent de facto country of abkhazia recently and and i was driving around with the driver he only spoke russian so our conversations were very limited and he made the random stop. After visiting a monastery it was literally at a guy's house on the street a ghetto and he opens up the gate to the house in the front yard. He had chained three three bears with short chains. They sought thin and the bears look so depressed it was it was pretty tragic hydric sal. I tried to explain to my driver in russian that you know i'm not supporting this in. We gotta leave because it was just it was just kind of depressing experience experience yeah. That's the thing we <hes> we work very closely with all of our ceos around the world for them because you know this isn't sometimes it's quite a new thing <hes> globally that young people moving away from the people who worked as guides for the companies worked even as gods full g n._f._l. For g._e. In the post on where we used to maybe visit these places but now's just changing that perception to move away from those types things and get the understanding behind on why we don't want to buy <unk> okay. Let's talk about something a little bit more positive and uplifting as an african share with me one of of your favorite special experiences on the continent ma'am there. There's so many unfortunate today would say this many <hes>. I'd say you know wherever you travel around the will. Oftentimes you get to a place in reminds you of another place where or time when you saw something or felt something similar and the one thing i feel africa really has which is which is really unique is the wildlife and <hes> some of the my most list memorable wildlife experiences have been that i've had in namibia is just the first time you drive into the country or the first time out on the rudge and you spot your first zebra or ostrich or a spoke or whatever it might be on the side of the road is just something like it's just it's really early special <unk>. You can't take it away that feeling when you see something for the first time after the second that i was in in namibia area last year and i stayed at the lodge at toshio national park and this lodge was centered on a giant bryant watering hole and it was it's one of those experiences you simply. Don't forget <hes> everybody gathered around this watering hole in the evening at sunset and watching the animals come up there in that way was truly memorable. <hes> maybe as awesome offers so much what l. st like about that country. Yeah thank one of my <hes>. My favorite parts about the country is just the scenery. It's just it's a land end of <unk>. Horizons amid site unique there. It's a lot a desert site. It's hard to explain to people what makes it so beautiful <hes> but it's just i the feeling that you get the it's the sense of solitude in many places. I'm just because it's so fast and the population is so small. There's so much space around rob but my one of my favorite experiences there is visiting the dunes near <unk> yet you can climb the famous june forty five potentially and she got watch the sunrise or the sunset from there you can hike into the stunning deflate which is this watt <hes> dried up mosh a- surrounded surrounded by these massive sand dunes in one of those big sand dunes. It's actually called big daddy. It's about three hundred twenty five meters high and it's wonderful high standards in the world i how would she got attention to try and climb if you onto that the scenery the landscapes are stunningly surreal there another fantastic stick police. <hes> somewhat in the neighborhood is a victoria falls touch on getting to see that yes victoria falls awesome. It's really great. It's some considerate may be the the adrenaline capital of the southern africa. There's so much to do they <hes> you can spend spend many days and many dollars in victoria falls <hes> the the full themselves <unk> taking <hes> yeah. It's it's the at expense of rock which covers the border between zimbabwean zambia <hes> and depending on the time of the year that you visit there can really be very different. I am it's at times when the level really high you will you encierro. Here's a stink <unk> completely drenched by the spray and when you come in another time of year where the way the one level is down and you just see these big slabs of rock and you have the opportunity <unk> <hes> what they call the gables fool which ages little section of what's that right up against the age of the full set really is just spectacular at any time of the chris. Thanks for joining being me again. Everybody check out the winch to g venture so he can check this trip and others. Thanks chris for your time. In all my listener you can support counting countries through booking your trip through my link to g adventures lexi offered became the youngest person to travel to to every country in the world completing the goal as a twenty one year old. She'll soon be applying to earn the guinness world record for youngest as she gathered <unk> over ten thousand plus documents during our conversation lexi share some of the highlights of her journey to pakistan to venezuela and shares some of her frustrations during her technical visit to syria and north korea. I encourage you to subscribe wherever wherever you listen apple podcast google play stitcher spotify writer review keep the podcast going but for now here's my conversation with alexi who is in the city of angels while i was in the windy city. Please listen in and enjoy welcome back lexi. This is your second appearance on counting countries in. I'm hoping you can re introduce yourself yeah. I'm happy to be back. Acme name is lexi. I'm american twenty one years old and i recently broke the guinness world record for the youngest person to travel aval to every country. I'm passionate about storytelling and sharing the world with other people and that that is why it did want to speak to you again today so congratulations pretty cool on being the youngest person to travel to every country in the world and i guess you've probably heard this question a number of times but how does it feel in in a word at just i feel so much relief. This has been a project project that i have been focused on so intensely for about two and a half years now and the idea that it's finally starting to come to a close is so satisfying k. while ball done. I've been watching your journey since we'd been <hes> since we spoke in lashed don counting country so excited that you're able to accomplish that and let's dot some avar is and cross our t.'s so i know there's a lot of documentation in for guinness world record. I mean is it officials. The guinness world record official at this point or the reviewing paperwork. Where do we stand on that. Yes so at the time of this recording. It's july sixteenth twenty nineteen. I have officially finished the travel portion of guinness world record and i'm now diving into the nearly ten thousand pages of evidence that i will be needing to submit for againist. I did a little bit of procrastination so i have some catching up to do with my evidence. I am hopefully going to be submitting sometime in the next two to three weeks and i'm really excited for it to be officially completed. I know that my audience audience and people are very eager to see it. See it officially recognized. We definitely wanna see official in the books. Let's talk about the challenges as you said ten thousand documents to me that sounds daunting at the very least so give us a quick overview of what type of documents you're collecting electing while this is the source of all of mines -iety so i right now i just spent the past week making what are called content statements eight minutes for each of my country's so i'm writing down what flight or bus or train i entered the country in <hes> what they did while i was there where i stayed who i was with <hes> including the photos passport stamps videos and how i exited the country so doing inada hundred ninety five times a lot so and i mean again challenging challenging task anything specifically typically when you mentioned all those different records is one area more challenging than the other is one part easier or is it all equally equally difficult. It's all difficult to <hes> the passport. Stamps are always a challenge because sometimes the immigration officers didn't have enough ink on their understand to be able to read the day in the name of the country <hes> getting together. Some of the witness statements that i didn't get while i was is in the countries are having to recontact a lot of the people i met along the way asking them to fill out these witness statements and one one of the hardest parts is putting it all in chronological order so i started traveling when i like before i can remember with my family and where i can draw the line where mike guinness applications starts is basically just whenever i have enough evidence wants to prove that i was there..

chris duncan africa guinness lexi victoria toronto official product manager thailand south africa mike guinness canada abkhazia newark dr jane goodall A. m. tiger temple zambia
Ravens, Robert Alford And Arizona discussed on The Jim Rome Show

The Jim Rome Show

00:12 sec | 2 years ago

Ravens, Robert Alford And Arizona discussed on The Jim Rome Show

"Ravens Nickelback table young expected to miss the entire season with a neck injury Robert Alford of Arizona suffered a tibia fracture it's going to cost him a significant amount of time as

Ravens Robert Alford Arizona
"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"alford " Discussed on Counting Countries

"Well I already mentioned at Nanga. Parbat the killer mountain in Pakistan. Seeing mountains were unbelievable. I also have the chance to take a small airplane ride over Mount Everest out of Kathmandu. That was by far one of the most incredible things I've seen more recently. When I went to Indonesian I went to a small area Coral Triangle called on pot. And I was diving there for ten days and I found myself in the middle of this big basketball school of fish and for some reason the only scuba diver in the middle of this and I was actually crying in my masks because it was so beautiful. The corless like you've it looked like a cartoon like the how they draw the colors of curling cartoons. Just look exactly like that in Indonesia and one more. If I had to choose I would say that being able to see the Hieroglyphics obelisks and the Pyramids in Egypt. Like especially like the less touristy Egypt's are less touristy pyramids than Giza like out in Sikora Being able to climb inside of five thousand year-old human creation By yourself the heat you're dripping sweat. You can see the smoke on the on the ceiling from when they were laying the pharaohs tunes is the most surreal experience as well excellent lest great that you share that beyond that when you are traveling. Do you have a specific inspiration or raison d'etre to be each Monday these countries in other words? When you go visit the country as you go to the museum you've got to check at the UNESCO World Heritage it's Some sort of extreme sport or it's the nature of the wildlife. Jeffey must do when you visit each country. Yeah well the. The situation changes a bit by region. But my favorite thing to do whenever I get to country is to get as far away from the capital city. As I can with time that I have I feel that you really get to see all of the unique aspects of culture when you get a little bit away from the more developed US cities and I'm also a nature lover. I'm most happy when I'm doing something active outdoors so I like to find the the adrenaline activities that heights the dives all of that and just being able to connect with the natural environment in the countries that I visit. Can you give us an example? One of those active extreme experiences that you had that was awesome well other than the climbing into the angel falls in the DIC Really enjoy Switzerland for the active activities in interlocking that they call it like a like the Mecca for paragliding. So when paragliding for the first time they're a bungee jumping off the third highest waterfall when River Rafting River. Diving hiked more than ever hyped in my entire life in the Over over steam region. It's the waterfalls. My favorite place at ever stayed was in Lia in the Swiss Alps Really bad with the the German names but it's also known as the cliffhanging hostile so you take a cable car to the top of this mountain and then you hike with all of your stuff through like ancient caves up to this This hostile that's literally hanging off. The side of the Alps said the inside of the hostile wall against the mountain is open mountain face. It was unbelievable. I'll put it on the list. Challenges are just doing some reading. I learned that you had a extreme bad food. Sickness incident in you. Also ahead malaria How did you get more area? I was a bit ignorant I went to at I spent the summer two thousand eighteen traveling Africa. I think I was there for somewhere around three months. And they always say you should take these malaria pills and the ones that always give me really bad nightmares There's no way that I could have nightmares for three months straight and also pack. That many pills. I just didn't really could as much importance on it as I probably should house but I think that I was bit. I got ravaged Attacked by bugs at night Like mosquitoes and some spider by it's on my face that made my face like glow up like my lips. Were like three times four times. The size usually are in Senegal started thinking Started in Senegal in then by the time I made it to average on in the ivory. Coast I had to cancel my flights might clams and just lay in a hot bedroom. Some random hotel there into decided to head to the hospital and they speak French bear. Only exclusively French couldn't find was soul of a person that sparking But found a taxi driver who kind of understood what I needed to hospital. It was where within likes five minutes of walking in the hospital. They were like drawing my blood all of this and then they gave me a prescription for the dose for. Malaria is just three times. The malaria medication that you would usually date so it felt like. I had the flu for like a week. Which is the area of the world really want to have the flu but I? It went away relatively quickly. Apparently I'm more susceptible to getting it again now. But we'll see you with your by yourself or with others during the trip during the Thankfully I was with my dad because if I had been alone. I don't even know what I would have done. That would have been the worst travel nightmare ever and I do really love Solo travel but I enjoy travel the most when I get to share it with people that I care about the most so I had to try to talk my friends and family into coming.

malaria Egypt flu Mount Everest Pakistan Senegal Coral Triangle Nanga basketball Indonesia Swiss Alps Kathmandu Sikora River Rafting River UNESCO World Heritage US Jeffey Switzerland Lia Sickness
Apple's MacBook news: The good, the bad and the meh (The 3:59, Ep. 583)

The 3:59

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Apple's MacBook news: The good, the bad and the meh (The 3:59, Ep. 583)

"Slugging his research i understand ben fox ruben i'm oscar gonzales apple unloading some a big mac book news today oscar you're on top of it what what's going on so they upgraded and killed a some mac books a so early mac book twelve inch no longer their new mac book air that was just four ninety nine their entry level no long on apple's website so they are gone okay i but what they did as part of their backs school program now only ten ninety nine a mac book air it's been a little bit with its retina display an available for nine ninety nine a thousand bucks should for college students only let's keep that yes none of us qualify for this discount so yes not anymore so effectively what they've done i mean yes there's a college student discount which i don't think it's actually that that that that sort of throwing up donut folks the way they're giving something to you but they're taking away a lot right effectively increased the entry cost to buy a mac right is now if it went from the ninety nine ninety nine mac book air to now there's ten ninety nine new mac book air with the retina right right to be fair that nine ninety nine mac book air starting to look pretty pretty old pretty miserable especially after they updated the mac book air and as much as i really wanted to see them keep that price at nine ninety nine for the newest mac book air you knew they weren't gonna do that and i thought the new one anyway so yeah i mean i have one an icon regretted 'cause the keyboard is not great now speaking of which then the new mac book air in the new macbook pros to get the new survey jen mac a keyboard which still still the butterfly keyboard stood about keyboard but there is supposed to be like a little bit of rubber underneath please give it a little bounce to protect from a debris in dust that that's what they do with the second generation one other thing that i think they did that was smart was killing off the twelve inch mac book has that was a really strange edition inside the lineup after they already moved in the pro any air 'em what what exactly was the value of the twelve inch mac up in the air was definitely the the twenty eighteen air definitely made it a mac book relevant right much faster heavy sbc portillo's delivered slimmer sexually almost the same size twelve inch mac book so 'em yeah not surprised that it's dead yeah yeah it's it's thick he'll be as the i phone assay too so it's going back to your whole point about you know getting rid of getting all the budget options all the budget options sorry you're so yeah sorry it yet if you're on a budget doesn't care bye bye all right so next up the research teams out to figure out which is the best voice assistant when it came to recognizing requests were specific brand but what did they find out a what was really interesting about this why is that there have been a lot of studies already that have looked into different places then this one really not only reinforced by a showed how strong google assistant is when compared to other voice assistance so it wasn't even close like if you're asking about different brands like jet blue or chevy or starbucks just any sort of basic questions like what is chevy or where do i buy starbucks google assistant in general was able to answer it was something like ninety percent of the questions especially on your smartphone allow whereas alexa siri and bixby weren't even close it was about fifty percentage point difference lougee if you really wanna get a voice assistant that's gonna work for any number of questions i've seen a lot of these reports and unfortunately the truth is is that google assistant continues the outpaced the competition titian by a pretty significant margin does the burning question and like if you're if you're not go home like mine is like is it worth upgrading to a google lineup of list assistance maybe maybe i know alford if he were here i'll never did that that for that very reason you know he saw the the google assistant had actually been functioning better and decided to switch the good news with alexa is is that it works much better what smart home capability and then it has a lot more of those smart home partnership so it's not like it's terrible

Oscar Gonzales Twelve Inch Ninety Percent
Los Angeles, Kawhi Leonard And Lakers discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

This Morning with Gordon Deal

01:33 min | 2 years ago

Los Angeles, Kawhi Leonard And Lakers discussed on This Morning with Gordon Deal

"Morning well didn't take long for the rivalry among basketball fans in Los Angeles to heat up Kawhi Leonard who spurned the Lakers to sign with their arena makes the clippers has been banned from a local coffee chain for good measure Paul George who was traded to the clippers to join kawaii was also banned by Alfred coffee that she made the announcement and promised more details were coming that even if the band is meant to be tongue in cheek it hasn't some clippers fans are getting riled up about it Yahoo sports says fans bombarded Alford coffees Instagram page with comments complaining about the van forcing them to turn off comments on at least two posts wow this is an interesting business move here chords we've seen this before right where they don't athlete leaves for another team and then you know and then they get banned from you know particular place in that city but they usually go to a different city like you're not usually within the same city right right you're betting kawaii from going to your to your establishment but a you know a lot of clippers fans are normally would probably go there so if it's kind of a strange situation here well nothing else its publicity yeah I was right there we're talking about Alford coffee here you know the other joint so it's I guess so clever I guess so and and again that perhaps they're thinking that there aren't as many clippers fans maybe the cook maybe the clipper fan boycott is not going to dent their business quite possible as if they say you know angered the Lakers fans that's just a guess on my part what I mean so popular that trough comments on to the post yeah sure so that's not yet in favor the kind of publicity I wouldn't I would presume I guess so they're they're they're gonna make out okay it's just coffee promotion in sports MEM it's not life or death I suppose so

Los Angeles Kawhi Leonard Lakers Clippers Paul George Alfred Coffee VAN Basketball Yahoo Alford
It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

The 3:59

05:30 min | 2 years ago

It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

"The. The three fifty nine I'm Ben FOX Ruben. I'm forgetting, yes, it's time again for Amazon's prime day, the annual shopping bonanza that this year will include over one million deals worldwide. So exciting Alford. Do you ever buy anything on prime mostly by useless stuff on prime day last year I bought a cot it was half off? It was like a half off Kat. Okay. I don't know why don't use it anymore. And then I think the year before that, I bought a cat tree for like thirty bucks. That's a pretty good. Catch that catch Ray also. It's eighty dollars like when it's not on sales. So there are some good deals on prime day. There are also some stupid deals on prime day. You can just rest assure that they're going to be a lot of deals. And I'm sure people are going to be really excited about it. It's one of the new things that's going to be happening this year is that I know you're gonna love hearing about this. Amazon is planning on making prime day more of like an experience. So they had a live streamed concert with areana 'Grande last year. And they told me without many details, obviously to expect a lot more entertainment stuff, because it's not just for shopping, it's, you know, we're celebrating our prime members hate it. When brands do that. Like, look, we don't care about you, as a company or as an experienced, like people come to prime day or Amazon, at least for like deals like Jimmy cheap stuff. I'm not here to like see, like how cool Amazon is. Has a brand like wow. They got Milly vanilla to do a life dream concert. Get outta here like. I feel like they look at prime day as if it's going to be like the next Christmas, or for jars basically, that's exactly what they're doing. It's, it's, it's a primate tradition. And it's like no get out of here. We just want cheap stuff. Literally, it you don't you're not a person to me. You don't matter to me. I don't care that there's a person behind that screen, you are a company and I just want cheap stuff from you. I like this. I like this part of Alfred, and we look forward to doing a lot more of this type of prime day coverage. So look out for that. We wanna get to our next story cybersecurity for firm. Cyber reason cyber reasons, cyber is terrible name said it uncovered vast hacking operation in which hackers infiltrated multiple mobile carriers for years. They even had the ability to shut down communications at a moment's notice. How did this happen? Yes. So they had hacked more than a dozen mobile carriers in the Middle East Africa Asia, and Europe, not the United States. No, there has been no activity in North America that they discovered which doesn't mean that they're not in the network is just that they haven't found it. But yeah, so they basically hack them through either these companies had a public facing server, that had no password on it, which seems to happen a lot, or they fished in employee who just happened to cling, on any link link that pops open their inbox pretty, pretty typical hacker tools. Yeah, yeah. So it's not anything like really crazy, but the sophisticated but is about how they spread. So once they were in the network. It was basically. All right. How many computers does this log in have access to this many computers? Okay. So then let's access all those computers. And then, from there, once they have access to those computers continues, like breaking down, like a really bad pyramid scheme. But essentially, they do all that until they get escalated privileges which then they create accounts for themselves. Basically posing as the IT team sign crazy. Yes, they worked as kind of this shadow IT team within these mobile carriers, which gave them a lot of privileges like they were able to shut down the network communications that they wanted to fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't know from what your perspective is the focus of this attack was more about espionage rather than disruption. So they wanted to be in the network and steal information from specific people. So they had access to hundreds of millions of people's records, but they chose to only download gigabytes of data on, like targeted individuals like less than one hundred people this pretty while the sounds like a government was behind it. Yes. So it's suspected to be the Chinese government, even because it's all the all the hacking tools. Are, you know what the Chinese government has used same methods, same kind of, like think philosophy of, you know, stay there, quietly and steal as much information as you can. They did it. The noise. But the thing is, is that, you know, this could also be a government like NC trying to frame the Chinese government on this attribution is extremely hard insiders security, so it's still unclear but, you know, all signs point to China as so we're out of time, but I did want to mention one quick story, the head of Instagram confirmed that a social network has no policy on deep fake videos, defects, is obviously, in area that we've been focusing on a lot of nuts. So it's interesting to see that Instagram doesn't even have a policy yet about it. But we'll see if they end up getting one in the future, the still trying to balance what they say the difference between safety and speech, either way, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on Ben FOX Rueben now Malvern. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Chinese Government Ben Fox Ruben Instagram Alford KAT Ben Fox Rueben Areana 'Grande Milly RAY North America Middle East Africa Alfred Europe Jimmy United States
It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

The 3:59

05:30 min | 2 years ago

It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

"The. The three fifty nine I'm Ben FOX Ruben. I'm forgetting, yes, it's time again for Amazon's prime day, the annual shopping bonanza that this year will include over one million deals worldwide. So exciting Alford. Do you ever buy anything on prime mostly by useless stuff on prime day last year I bought a cot it was half off? It was like a half off Kat. Okay. I don't know why don't use it anymore. And then I think the year before that, I bought a cat tree for like thirty bucks. That's a pretty good. Catch that catch Ray also. It's eighty dollars like when it's not on sales. So there are some good deals on prime day. There are also some stupid deals on prime day. You can just rest assure that they're going to be a lot of deals. And I'm sure people are going to be really excited about it. It's one of the new things that's going to be happening this year is that I know you're gonna love hearing about this. Amazon is planning on making prime day more of like an experience. So they had a live streamed concert with areana 'Grande last year. And they told me without many details, obviously to expect a lot more entertainment stuff, because it's not just for shopping, it's, you know, we're celebrating our prime members hate it. When brands do that. Like, look, we don't care about you, as a company or as an experienced, like people come to prime day or Amazon, at least for like deals like Jimmy cheap stuff. I'm not here to like see, like how cool Amazon is. Has a brand like wow. They got Milly vanilla to do a life dream concert. Get outta here like. I feel like they look at prime day as if it's going to be like the next Christmas, or for jars basically, that's exactly what they're doing. It's, it's, it's a primate tradition. And it's like no get out of here. We just want cheap stuff. Literally, it you don't you're not a person to me. You don't matter to me. I don't care that there's a person behind that screen, you are a company and I just want cheap stuff from you. I like this. I like this part of Alfred, and we look forward to doing a lot more of this type of prime day coverage. So look out for that. We wanna get to our next story cybersecurity for firm. Cyber reason cyber reasons, cyber is terrible name said it uncovered vast hacking operation in which hackers infiltrated multiple mobile carriers for years. They even had the ability to shut down communications at a moment's notice. How did this happen? Yes. So they had hacked more than a dozen mobile carriers in the Middle East Africa Asia, and Europe, not the United States. No, there has been no activity in North America that they discovered which doesn't mean that they're not in the network is just that they haven't found it. But yeah, so they basically hack them through either these companies had a public facing server, that had no password on it, which seems to happen a lot, or they fished in employee who just happened to cling, on any link link that pops open their inbox pretty, pretty typical hacker tools. Yeah, yeah. So it's not anything like really crazy, but the sophisticated but is about how they spread. So once they were in the network. It was basically. All right. How many computers does this log in have access to this many computers? Okay. So then let's access all those computers. And then, from there, once they have access to those computers continues, like breaking down, like a really bad pyramid scheme. But essentially, they do all that until they get escalated privileges which then they create accounts for themselves. Basically posing as the IT team sign crazy. Yes, they worked as kind of this shadow IT team within these mobile carriers, which gave them a lot of privileges like they were able to shut down the network communications that they wanted to fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't know from what your perspective is the focus of this attack was more about espionage rather than disruption. So they wanted to be in the network and steal information from specific people. So they had access to hundreds of millions of people's records, but they chose to only download gigabytes of data on, like targeted individuals like less than one hundred people this pretty while the sounds like a government was behind it. Yes. So it's suspected to be the Chinese government, even because it's all the all the hacking tools. Are, you know what the Chinese government has used same methods, same kind of, like think philosophy of, you know, stay there, quietly and steal as much information as you can. They did it. The noise. But the thing is, is that, you know, this could also be a government like NC trying to frame the Chinese government on this attribution is extremely hard insiders security, so it's still unclear but, you know, all signs point to China as so we're out of time, but I did want to mention one quick story, the head of Instagram confirmed that a social network has no policy on deep fake videos, defects, is obviously, in area that we've been focusing on a lot of nuts. So it's interesting to see that Instagram doesn't even have a policy yet about it. But we'll see if they end up getting one in the future, the still trying to balance what they say the difference between safety and speech, either way, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on Ben FOX Rueben now Malvern. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Chinese Government Ben Fox Ruben Instagram Alford KAT Ben Fox Rueben Areana 'Grande Milly RAY North America Middle East Africa Alfred Europe Jimmy United States
Suspect in deputy's shooting may be linked to more crimes, police say

Mike Slater

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Suspect in deputy's shooting may be linked to more crimes, police say

"A man accused of shooting and killing an LA deputy is expected in court today deputy Joseph Solano died last night. We've now learned that the suspect may be connected to a series of robberies at seven eleven stores across San Diego, Newsday tabby, Alford has more on the store, hundreds of deputies lines LA county USC medical center to salute fifty year old deputy Joseph Salona. He was shot and killed at random awaiting for food at Jack in the box and brought. Really good. L A. Police say this suspect it shooters, thirty year old retina Elson of Utah. The same suspect who Senegal police Shariff and Carlsbad PD are investigating in connection to a series of armed robberies at convenience stores around the county

Joseph Salona La County Usc Medical Center Joseph Solano LA San Diego Alford Senegal Utah Jack In Thirty Year Fifty Year
Amazon's Ring cameras are building out surveillance for police (The 3:59, Ep. 566)

The 3:59

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Amazon's Ring cameras are building out surveillance for police (The 3:59, Ep. 566)

"The. Welcome to three fifty nine. I'm Joanie Saltzman, Alford. Ing, Amazon's ring smart home doorbells are helping police departments build surveillance networks, right from your neighbors front doors police departments across the country and major cities like Houston down to smaller towns with fewer than thirty thousand people have offered free or discounted ring doorbells to citizens. Sometimes using taxpayer funds to pay for the products. Ring owners are supposed to have the choice of providing police footage. But in some cases, the giveaways come with the stipulation that you have to turn over footage to police requested Alfred talks about what's going on here. Yeah. So a lot of people by rings very popular. They think that will help them. Stop package thieves or find somebody suspicious in your neighborhood and you think, oh, well, if it's just facing up, my doorstep, it's not really anything affecting me or my neighbors, until you realize that your neighbor across the street, also has this ring, and it's facing your house, and it can. Get footage of you and just build that out to your entire neighborhood because that's what it is for a lot of for a lot of police departments. Now they've been seeing that residents have ring so they call up Amazon, and they partner with them in this program called neighbors, which is less social media app available. It's kind of like next door where, you know it's just among your neighbors, and you post footage up. They're like, hey, look look at this person stealing packages watch out for him now when police partner with Amazon, they're allowed to request for footage directly from people so they can kinda put a GIO fence around, like a block, or something like that say, hey, we've been looking for this guy. We believe he's around here, can you send us kind of footage? That's supposed to be optional. But the problem is in some giveaways. The requirements are there are strings attached. Hey, like when we asked for footage, you're giving this to us, that's because we gave you this camera for free, and essentially, that's kind of setting up like a an open surveillance network for a lot of police officers who were never able to get cameras in these places. You know, when you get a security camera, that's usually for like a city or a big area not, you know on your block, and now they have it in, you know, these residential areas that they never really had surveillance footage of before. Well is the shock as reporting, this was shocking thing I think that's the MO the biggest thing that stuck out to me was just how much money Amazon is making off of this. So when you have a ring camera, you don't have to plan for it, but it's basically you don't you can't store any footage. Otherwise, you can just see, like alive, you, but you can save that video. So it's kinda useless unless you get subscription. The cheapest one starts at three dollars a month. And so, in some cases, Amazon will give these cameras away for free or heavily subsidize it. Because it's kind of this model of, like we're going to sell the the blade not the razors. The. I don't know. So in one case where they donated about, like eighteen thousand dollars to one town in subsidies. It turns out that, you know, they gave out six hundred cameras in that town. They can make all that money back in less than ten months, and then just continue to see their profits rise from that. So, you know, it's police like Amazon is asking police and do you wanna partner with us? And then police then go to residents. Do you wanna buy this, Amazon product, right? It's weird. Yeah. And all the money just goes back to him as on. Right. We also have an interview with Sony's, PlayStation CEO are e insure interviewed the CEO, and found out that game console maker is vowing to release have shared saved games backwards. Compatibility and more on its upcoming console often referred to as the PS five unofficially. Yes. So I mean, just trajectory wise, you know, it's probably going to be the PS five, they haven't said anything about that, but yeah, the CEO Jim Ryan this first interview since he started. In April, and he talked about how, you know, cloud gaming is gonna be the big thing Google with their stadia pitch is kind of moving toward that, too. They you might be able to play more games with your friends on XBox. And we might be able to play more games with just people on your old consulate. You might not even have to get the new PS five to play with your friends on that consulate Suming. That's its name a grant feature. We don't have all to play the council. Also on our own Ben FOX Reuben has a story. Also about Amazon unveiling the latest class of Alexa, prize competitors, who will be setting out to make the conversational Botts more real for these other stories, checkouts dot com. I'm Joanie salsa. Elfferding. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Partner CEO Joanie Saltzman Alfred Alford Houston Ben Fox Reuben Jim Ryan Alexa Google Botts Sony Playstation Eighteen Thousand Dollars Three Dollars Ten Months
"alford " Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"alford " Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Can't buy anymore. The best chance to walk up by ticket to see us play on the road. That's the best chance you got to watch us play. And so it's been it's been a blast. And and and our our students, and and Auburn has really really really caught caught fire for often basketball coach Pearl ESI. The champions year ago, co champions champions were hanging a battle. We don't put co on it. All right preseason top ten with a team that's going to continue to get better. As you get healthy. You have a great season. Enjoy the odor and a trip to Hawaii. I will be watching us from the friendly confines of Bristol, Connecticut. Are are sweating your rear end off, remember like colors and sweat? Don't go out. Just all right. Maybe short look at a t shirt would be a good luck. But as you try to cocker, the Maui invitational. It was four years ago or so separate you, and I were partners in crime at ESPN and the offer came in. And we looked at each other and said, what do you think and and it all wanted to get back into it? I wanted to get back in the NFC because we had some success at Tennessee and to be in a position where the program at least relevant at least, we're we're not holding the league down anymore. It makes me it makes me pretty all. Right. Have a great start to the season. Appreciate better known as the player that then dockage took from a mediocre jump shooter to a national championship. Coach alford. How's life? You survive hanging out with doc each..

Coach alford Maui invitational Pearl ESI ESPN Bristol Hawaii NFC Auburn basketball Connecticut Tennessee four years
"alford " Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alford " Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Oh my god this stop at walter schaub who are with the ethics a guy i said today we would have been the last of my fiveyear term as director of the office of government ethics but the director works for the president and lacks tools to make the boss do the right thing by last summer i learned what it means to have a president who was uninterested in government ethics sadly that is says that it really is the fact that he had to resign early the fact that we we know richard painter only because he was bushes ethics guy and the fact that we look to bushes that w's ethics guys kind for thority is kind of a add although richer painter seems to have really um uh learned a lot of lessons in these days of trump yes and he he keeps saying things like you know i've been uh i've been a republican for thirty years but i don't know better i keep saying that i've been republican for thirty years but i keep waiting for him to eventually say and i've changed my mind i'm tournament independent or a democrat because it keeps happening people keep doing it yeah because they know better now all bre elbow which is a breaking news source on twitter says a kansas state representative alford offered alford on restricting marijuana usage quote one of the reasons why i hate to say it was that the african americans they were basically users and they basically responded the worst off to those drugs just because of their character makeup their genetics matt oh my god yes he said that finally after just everyone piled on he said that he gave it sort of a fake apology i was wrong i regret my comments and i sincerely apologise to anyone whom i have hurt some gone he said in the statement substance abuse as a blight on our society and legalizing marijuana only opens.

walter schaub director president twitter alford african americans marijuana w thirty years fiveyear
"alford " Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"alford " Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"We know that steve alford and everybody at the school are doing cartwheels when they found out that he pulled lee angelo out of the school i mean they had a party they were shooting off fireworks in pauley pavilion for crying out loud indoors which is very dangerous and i don't recommend that anybody but they were thrilled but you know what we asked the question when is this guy going to learn when is this guy going to get it what is this guy can wise and i think the answer is never really i think it's never and he's running out of bullets he really is okay because he talked of one kid but he was going to be the greatest things and fly spreading the nba and he talked about lee angelo how he was going to make this tremendous impact that ucla and be a bona fide star in the nba and they know he himself that sage basketball tutor that he is is gonna develop lee angelo and make him a high first round draft pick at an nba superstar let's see how that one turns out i wouldn't exactly bet the ranch on that one either and then who knows what young woman was going to become if i'm lamella why go get my name changed that's what i do i tried to distance myself from like the ball family pirie like i dunno go find religion or something come up with like a new professional name like a stage name like one of these entertainers or something like that maybe just go like with one maybe just call yourself melo no last name nothing l melo and then people maybe of forget that he's part of the ball family because that's the only shotty us film ashani as you call that he wasn't doing lonzo any favors what about the trickledown effect to the other boys it's the same thing.

steve alford lee angelo pauley pavilion nba ucla melo basketball
"alford " Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"alford " Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"And the crowd is all over you the entire time i i was at you tap i was out i mean i've been in a lot of places where crowds get on you a long time ago i was a young coach and i worked for steve alford and i always admired his of his poise in a arenas on the road and he got at worse than any coach i've ever seen just because of his background and his hair and whatever else you know he he took it as bad as any body and i sat on a bench watching him just be completely oblivious to it coaches team never brought it up never talk back to anyone never thought about it and i and i i watched that and i've watched other head coach is over the years that i've other been around or whatever and i've seen them interact with fans and get caught up in it and i mean it just kind of shows a lack of composure and a lack of poison all think that's good for your team um and that was that that's the last thing i would ever want to construe to one of my teams either whether it's game or any other big game we're going to be a part of my job is the coach the team and keep them calm in the face of adversity and the last thing i'm gonna worry about is what some fan may happen to say to me or or anybody else so i didn't really think much about it or or get too caught up in it i was trying to win a basketball game and and do everything i could to do that oh that the let's follow up on that with this it actually two pieces of it um one of the things that that i recall impressing me as eyewash coach offered as a fan of liberal basketball here in albuquerque was that he always seemed to be in control inc you talked about him being in control of himself sure but he also seem to be in control of everything rounded like he had.

steve alford basketball albuquerque
"alford " Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"alford " Discussed on KOIL

"The russian alford but was it acceptable or wooden event accepts support for the democrats to accept help from the ukrainian government in this camp know when the apartment the democrats to accept help from the ukrainian government but i think if you look at the political article and we're talking about just a a single article here if you accept all the facts in the article the scale of what the russians did it is not comparable to anything in that article if it were the comparable analogy would be that the ukrainian president directed ukraine intelligence agencies to steal the hack donald trump's campaign steel emails publish them direct to the social media army to influence the election and sat down is represented sat down with chelsea clinton and john podesta in which they indicated they wanted the dirt on donald trump there's no suggestion anything of that magnitude of the scale is firm acknowledged that this is problematic as the train meetings problematic and your oil it would be problematic to get any kind of support from a foreign government but again i think to compare the two is a bit like comparing a bank robbery with the writing a check within sufficient funds both appropriate money from the bank improperly very different degree of seriousness and involvement by a foreign government highest vero long that was jonathan turley alan dershowitz and even congressman schiff saying everything that we have been telling you about all of these issues everything anyway glad you're with us eight hundred nine four one sean toll free telephone number you wanna be a part of the program sarah carter senior editor.

alford president donald trump chelsea clinton robbery jonathan turley alan dershowit congressman schiff senior editor ukraine social media john podesta sarah carter