23 Burst results for "Alexis Mcgill Johnson"

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

06:31 min | 4 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"On any given day. There's a lot of debate about reproductive rights happening and congress state legislatures and across the courts the most profound conversations about this issue or taking blake clinics across the country to health healthcare providers and their patients. His conversations aren't about scoring political points about science medicine public health day to day reality of pupils. Lives about what. I've experienced when i was a kid. And people yell at me about my parents positions on choice or these days when people yell at me on twitter i think about just how much all of that pales. In comparison to what doctors like clean mcnicholas experience every day. She was planned. Parenthood missouri state where politicians have worked really hard to limit access to worship care and yet every day she provides healthcare including abortion to patients who are making the decisions they know are right for them and their families. I'm incredibly grateful that she could be with us to talk about her important one. So dr mcnicholas. Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you so much chelsea for bringing this topic to your listeners. Check so doctor nicholas. Could you just describe what you're doing. You're up for anyone who might be listening. Who has only heard of planned parenthood when it's uttered as a curse instead of as a place where anyone can go to access any care that they might need. Just can you tell us a little bit about about your job. One of the great things about planned. Parenthood is the diversity of services that it provides. yes it most certainly provides abortion karen. It's proud to do that. But it also provides a breath of different sexual reproductive health access in services things like breast exams in annual wellness exams prevention of hiv through services like prep many affiliates also provide services to transgender communities. Affirming gender through therapy. There are so many things that planned. Parenthood provides to the community that go beyond abortion. But i think true to our core. We recognize that abortion healthcare. It is part of the reality that pregnant capable folks across their lifespan will encounter in some way shape or form. And if i have learned one thing over my time as an obgyn. Everybody has an opinion about abortion until they face the possibility of needing one in. It's at that point that they really think about. What do they believe right. Do they deserve access to in a way that talking points to end. Political pundits can't really inform. Can you just talk about what it's like to be a doctor. Working at a state where the political leadership clearly has very different values in a very different approach. You know missouri's one example of many states across this country where we have just one clinic left that provides abortion in although we talk about the promise of row and for many people even those who support abortion access. They don't actually understand what it means to have. The reality of roby actualized. Right if you can't pay for your boertien if you can't figure out how to have your children cared for while you travel hundreds of miles and it misery that means multiple times then. Rome means nothing to you and that's the reality for so many people across this country not just in missouri. I have to tell you. And i started my obgyn residency. Although i knew that abortion would be part of the care that i provided i really envisioned my career as a obgyn who practiced a broad spectrum of of services and that abortion was just one of those things. But i never really envisioned myself in the space. I am now. It really was through experience with politicians in missouri. That i came to this space and i came to the space as i realized with Bill after bill regulation after regulation committee hearing after committee hearing that the voice is being heard had nothing to do with medicine had nothing to do with the people who are accessing the care who need the care and it really felt like an insult to my medical degree and that of my colleagues that we spend this time and in this country money to get educated to be able to give of ourselves in that talent to help the community be more healthy yet it is a completely separate system with largely no medical background with no public health degree or education that is driving public health policy and so for me that became an inflection point it became important for me to then step into the arena of public policy and to be a voice for people who need this care. You know we don't ask people having colonoscopy he's to go to the capital and talk about why deserve access to a colonoscopy but somehow we've gotten to this point where we are asking and demanding in in some ways feel like we need people to talk about their abortion to justify access for that very basic and routine health care for your patients. Do they see these choices. They're considering or if they do decide to terminate a pregnancy. Do they see any aspect of that experience as political or is it mainly the politicians who see it as a political issue. You know the interesting thing is those who are affected. The most by these regulations in laws are those who are already disproportionately marginalized who are already facing so many barriers in their life and the truth is once they decide that pregnancy and parenting or expanding. Their family is not right for them today. They jump through hoops after hoop and they attempt to do whatever they can to be able to access that care folks who access abortion span the spectrum. There are religious folks. There are black and brown and white folks. There are young folks. In older folks there are republicans and democrats and independents all who have abortions. And i will say this for folks who are not accustomed to being marginalized who are not accustomed to being told what they can and cannot have in how they have.

congress nicholas twitter hundreds of miles today one clinic republicans Rome Bill democrats one thing One one example one of those mcnicholas so many people missouri chelsea
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

05:39 min | 4 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"I have some you know. Decades.

When Healthcare Gets Politicized

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

01:36 min | 4 months ago

When Healthcare Gets Politicized

"One of the most galling things that we've seen over the last year how in some states politicians have exploited this moment to try to further restrict access to the reproductive healthcare that every woman in our country should have access to. Can you talk a bit about how you responded to that as an organization but also how you've supported your providers in your patients for whom this isn't just political rhetoric. It's it has deeply personal. Covert gave us a real peek behind the curtain. To why a world without row would look like we saw at the beginning of the pandemic politicians across the country particularly those hostile to sexual reproductive health. Were using the pandemic as a cover to limit access to abortion and what we saw was not people not seeking access to abortion and sexual reproductive healthcare. We saw people in fact getting in their cars and driving fifteen hours from texas to colorado. Because they were seeking. They needed to live full and free lives. We know that without row. Roughly twenty five million women are going to be in states with respect ends might not have access and so the work that we've had to do as an organization with our partners has had to think about what is the infrastructure. Look like how do we support the travel hoped you. We support through telehealth. Where will the fights be. Move into our contentious state legislative season to ensure that the majority of people who support access to sexual and Healthcare aren't thwarted by a vocal

Colorado Texas
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

04:33 min | 8 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"We're planned parenthood's roller be. I think our first roll should be an is around ensuring that people take the vaccine right. We are like a very highly trusted organization brand people come to us looking for trusted information helping them cut through the noise of all the things that they are hearing whether that is an advocacy or in healthcare and and so i think first and foremost there has been so much distrust and mistrust that is some of which is legitimately born because our healthcare system has not been <hes> has not been trusted for many communities of color on some of it is just in the discipline. Nation that we've seen on the rise of the last few years and so we are working to be that trusted voice at partner with the administration to to make sure that we are lending are kind of name and and supporting that work We also are healthcare provider. You know first and foremost and so making sure that our health centers You know Ideally can be part of a community solution and making sure particularly those who who don't have access. Maybe don't have the time to spend hours on the phone. Trying to track vaccine for their parents We'll have access in In community and so you know. Some of our health centers have been playing a really critical role. Doing am cova testing. Before the covid test. They were playing a critical role doing strep tests and flu tests to make it to help. Save those precious tests. Ppe so wherever we can get in as part of the public health infrastructure is what we are trying to do because we think it is our responsibility to our community to the to the people that we serve and again we want to. We want to be a partner so the hhs nominee for by go back to the by the administration the hhs nominee hobby ever. Sarah has a very strong relationship with the reproductive rights community with planned parenthood. He's also been targeted as one of the only nominees that republicans in the senate are saying they feel are controversial. Do you think those two things are related. Because he's bad. I mean like come on i mean i am so excited about eight. Gb sarah i think that He is a tremendous proven tremendous fighter at the intersection of a lot of issues that we care about again. First and foremost we are planned. Parenthood is a healthcare provider. But we also you know center when you censor the patients at planned. Parenthood serves you know that when they leave. They may be affected by a bad public charges. They may be affected by by the police. You know stopping them in their cars and so like to have someone like sarah come in league. Hhs and actually really understand the self and the whole experience of a patient and built bill policy and and allocate resources based on the experiences of the most marginalized. Yeah of course he'd be scary to To the gop because that's not how they built policy And so you know i. We are going to be doing everything that we can to support his nomination to make sure that people understand His really critical record You know he's like hundred lawsuits against the trump administration's harmful policies. He's fought to to to To fight for health care coverage other safety net programs bringing on. Because i don't think that you know the fact that actually even lives with a healthcare provider his partner who works on maternal disparities like down. We're all in. He's living it thank. You really can't beat that. Well alexis thank you so much. Emily tisch sussman host of your political platelets. Podcast alexis mcgill johnson. President of planned. Parenthood you have been all that and more. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks thank you for listening to this episode of your political playlist. Don't forget to follow us on instagram. At your political playlist where you can see video of alexis. His interview and join us live to ask questions for future. Ones for more alexis follow her on. Twitter at alexis mcgill. Join us every week for smart but bite. Conversations with women at the seat of power and activism subscribe. At you like us leave us a rating and comets. Let others know talk to you next time.

Sarah Emily tisch sussman sarah Twitter two things one alexis First first republicans instagram first roll hundred lawsuits alexis mcgill trump eight mcgill johnson last few
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

Your Presidential Playlist

04:07 min | 8 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Your Presidential Playlist

"Legislators majority right so like twenty nine states are anti women's health states let's just say that Which means that The number of bills that we expect to see. We expect to see a very robust state legislative session. We expect to see you know. We've already seen it right in south carolina on the senate bill one in south carolina was a six week bam and so you know they're definitely coming out blazing missing. Almost one hundred fifty bills be introduced already. So this is This is where the attention is going. Where are the challenge that we have right is that typically. We have relied on our courts as our stopgap in order to persuade. Sorry there's being going back nears. Typically we have relied on a gap. And so you know the work that we need to do. To really fight back these legislatures and And really reclaim. Our in states is going to be a really important Additionally the federal Companion to that is is a bill lipa right. The women's health protection act. That can help you know isn't in the process of being kind of reworked in organizing strength into to meet this this moment knowing that You know the the federal Having congress able to act in a way that limits these these vans these restrictions will be really important as we have upwards of eighteen cases that are literally a case away from the supreme court Could irrevocably overturn roe. So that is that is also part of the the work that you're doing all levels. Sylvie yeah how much does that worry you. The supreme court overturning roe are chipping away so much that it becomes meaningless. You know. I mean i think it's the reality realities. The rose kind of meaningless in a lot of places already right. It's it's definitely is our rj. Perjure say You know the the floor not the ceiling and so if you have a right name only and then you have restrictions that force you to drive however many hours to see a provider and then take off from work and then come back three days later you know like all of the ways in which these barriers have been put into place designed to Shame the the patient. Shame that provider like. That's that's the reality of what's happening under. Row the worry about the chipping away in the overturn is what we've already seen during covert right. We saw at the of april Last year the number of executive orders that were put in place by conservative governors who were at limiting access to to abortion saying. It wasn't time sensitive. I mean just the kind of ridiculousness embedded there it. You know what we saw where people getting their cars driving sixteen hours you know to to neighboring states put sometimes their kids in their moms in the cars driving sixteen hours to get there because they you know what the because they needed access to healthcare and what we didn't see is people not seeking access to healthcare rate and so i think that the worry is is is there obviously because the because the the courts now have that supermajority and yet we also know that the burden is going to be disproportionately by By low income women women who probably will largely be of color and so we continue to codify racist discriminatory policy in our country and in a year like last year like no other is just unconscionable. Can you talk to us about planned. Parenthood's role in the vaccination that in kobe vaccination Are you looking to have. Where are you looking to fit lead. Not just in your role society but also by order like by through h attic. Are you looking for a particular funding through the relief bill. Can you help us understand..

Sylvie south carolina sixteen hours congress six week eighteen cases april Last year last year women's health protection act twenty nine states three days later one hundred fifty bills supreme court senate bill one
Alexis McGill Johnson, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood, Discusses Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

03:38 min | 8 months ago

Alexis McGill Johnson, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood, Discusses Politics

"Alexis. How are you. Oh i'm wonderful. How are you sean t. It's so good to see you again is so good to see you and i love the fact that you are. I repeat guests. Or what am i. Favor people. I know i was super ecstatic with they. Do the permanency yell a planned parenthood because vine while was there any other choice. I obviously can't tweet that. That's what a deke. So i just wanted to tweet my congratulations congratulations. Thank you thank you. I i didn't think it was gonna feel as different to become permanent. You know like when when somebody actually puts a ring on it When you live together for a long time and then you're like a that. I felt so honored and humbled that that organization in the boards would put that kind of faith in me to carry us. Forward won't the perfect well-deserved at twenty twenty was quite the year as we know in twenty twenty one is already giving twenty twenty a run for its money so i do have to get your thoughts on insurrection at the capitol because the fact is it was it is direction in way you and i had our first chat just our first girlfriend have i leading organizations chad. We talked a lot about what going on in the country particularly racially in how the trump administration was feeling a lot of the. How are you feeling about everything that has happened. It was devastating. And when you actually think about the the day of january six you know for most of us particularly i knew you were as i was like up all night watching the returns for the georgia senate race in trying to just hold onto that. Lash shred of hope. You know as you said. Twenty twenty just tried its level. Best to get rid of. And and like reverend warnock said Thirty five joy comes in the morning right. Joy will come in the morning and it did and it did by midday to watch that. Just full throated unapologetic demonstration of white supremacy and anti democracy and the weaponization of racial anxiety. Over and over again. And you you think about just like when they said win at all costs this is what they met right that they were really winning willing to destroy democracy to destroy the integrity in the belief in that just really underscores everything that america is right. We are at beth. You know we are. We are a nation state because we are imagine community right. We have to bind ourselves together with these notions and while so many particularly black women have been on the front line trying to claw our way into democracy right like foot in the door that we are not gonna let this door democracy close on as they were they're trying to destroy it and so it it. Just it's it's a wound you know to know after the november election. That half of america's still supports misogynistic patriarch girl racist. Yo pick at the same time that they are so willing to to fight for that last gas that it is just terrifying.

Sean T Alexis Reverend Warnock Senate Georgia Beth America
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:08 min | 10 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's the story that I feel we should be telling right now, Mister Crabs is a pleasure talking with you. Thank you very much. Thanks A lot. Steve Chris Crabs led the Cyber Security and Infrastructure Security agency at the Department of Homeland Security. President Trump appointed him to that job and later fired him from it. During the Trump administration. Abortion rights have been restricted now, with President elect Biden coming into office. Reproductive rights advocates are expecting many of those actions. Be reversed. But as NPR's Sarah McCammon reports that might not be so easy. Sal McCloskey is feeling good about battles one under President Trump, He has probably done more pro life things than many Republicans who have had two terms. McCloskey is with the anti abortion rights group, the march for life. He points to Trump's reinstatement and expansion of the Mexico City policy, which forbids foreign aid groups who provide or refer patients for abortion from receiving US funds. The Trump Administration has made similar rules for family planning providers here at home. Those same policies that McCleskey is celebrating are a top target for abortion rights supporters who want bite into immediately reverse what they call gag rules. Alexis McGill Johnson is the president of Planned Parenthood. The harm that has been done by the Trump administration, the harm that has impacted again. A lot of low income and Rural communities around access to the basic family Planning services have been terrific. Trump's policies have reduced the availability of those services provided through the federal Title 10 program almost by half, according to an analysis by the Guttmacher Institute, which supports abortion rights. Gretchen Bore Shell with the National Women's Law Center says Biden will take office at a time when those rights are under threat on many fronts. We're at a crisis moment for access to abortions. War, Schultz says. That's not just about Trump. It's the culmination of decades of effort by groups who've worked to restrict the procedure at the state level two and so we need this administration to recognize that crisis. And take steps not on Lee to undo what the Trump administration did, which was add more and more restrictions, but actually to move us forward and get us to a better place than we have been. Meanwhile, anti abortion rights activists like Carol Tobias of the National Right to Life Committee are fearful of what Biden's inauguration will mean I think will be a dark day in history for unborn Children. Tobias says her group will continue working at all levels of government to pass abortion restrictions, including laws aimed directly at challenging Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide. We've had it for almost 50 years. There are legislators who want to be the sponsor of the bill that goes before the Supreme Court that overturns Roe v. Wade. Tom McCloskey of the march for Life, says abortion rights opponents are feeling optimistic, with three of President Trump's conservative nominees now sitting on the high court. It's not just the Supreme Court justices, but they've put in some fantastic I mean, A couple of 100. Circuit court judges as well. Polls indicate a majority of Americans support the Roe decision, which guaranteed the right to an abortion, but allowed states to increasingly limit the procedure as the pregnancy progresses. Later, rulings like Planned Parenthood V. Casey in 1992 gave states more room to regulate abortion under certain conditions, given the uncertainty around abortion rights in the courts. Biden campaigned on a proposal to codify a row in federal law. Mary Ziegler, a lot professor at Florida State University, says it's unclear what that legislation would do. We don't really know what he means by that, other than the common denominator that there's Right to worship and you can't ban abortions. But beyond that, who knows what he's talking about? Biden also would need cooperation from Congress unlikely if Republicans maintain control of the Senate. And with an increasingly conservative judiciary. There may be little Biden conduce as president to stave off a wave of abortion restrictions in Red states..

President Trump Trump Administration Biden Sal McCloskey President Steve Chris Crabs Supreme Court Roe Department of Homeland Securit Infrastructure Security agency Carol Tobias Alexis McGill Johnson Gretchen Bore Shell Guttmacher Institute Sarah McCammon McCleskey NPR Mary Ziegler Florida State University Senate
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 11 months ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Alexis McGill Johnson. It's been great talking to you. Thank you so much. Thanks, right. Alexis McGill Johnson is president of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. Women of color for progress trains. Women who want to run for public office at all levels of government co founders Karen Coronel and Amanda Farias joined to tell us more Hi, Karyn. Hi. Hi, Amanda. Hi. So, Amanda, let me start with you. You are an elected office holder, and we're going to get to that victory in a moment. But you also ran for City Council in your home district in the Bronx. And you didn't win. But you were motivated and tell us what motivated you and why you stepped up. Yeah, I was. You know someone that Came back to the Bronx after working on Obama's reelection campaign in 2012, realizing that all of the inequities and all of the things that were really important to me that were happening on a large scale federally were also happening on a hyper local level. I just saw the the gaps that were happening in our communities of misinformation or people really lacking social safety Net and services and resource is On DH. That is what Pushed me to step up. So so I lost in 2017 and realized that the community neat wanted new leadership. There was a state committee position that Had an elected there that hadn't shown up for a meeting since the year 2000 on DH, So I took that as an opportunity to continue pushing back against the establishment. Andi won just by 86 votes. So what I get to do, fortunately is B, that middle person between the assembly member and the local community members and really fighting for party reform. Hope democracy small. The democracy work for people is my job and Karen as another co founder of women of Color for Progress. Tell us how the organisation trains and supports women and also how you got involved. Yeah, it was a group of us working in different levels of city government and we were motivated by the 2016 election and also just everything we had seen within working and government and elected politics. We want to change. We wanted more representation, and we came together and felt that women of color really needed to be at the forefront of that representation. And Amanda, I'm just going to wrap up with you. So since you have run for office Andi, You know what it's like, and what the emotional journey is. And how much time it takes. What would you say to someone who was your age and who was like? Yeah, I'd like to help my community. But I'm not sure about this whole running for office thing. Yeah, I would say that it's okay to feel that way and that there are many levels to get involved. Find something that you really are passionate about whether it's climate emergency. Whether it's equal pay, whether it's you know, economic development and growth and communities or, you know, reproductive rights, find the thing that you care about and take that first step in trying to organize around that issue. On DH. Then I would say you won't know It's not for you and this you join a campaign like your your expertise is needed on every single campaign. So you have to figure out in all these little steps on all these little pieces to help you realize where you fit and how you want to fit in, But there's room for everyone..

Amanda Farias Alexis McGill Johnson Bronx Karen Coronel Obama Planned Parenthood Action Fund Andi City Council Karyn president co founder
Democrats continues to speak out about Trump selecting Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court

America's Morning News

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Democrats continues to speak out about Trump selecting Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court

"Hearing begins. Senate Democrats are demanding Amy Cockney Barrett recused herself from any election related cases that might come before the Supreme Court again. Totally ridiculous. The president of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, Alexis McGill, Johnson, Claims of Amy Cockney Barrett will not stand up for women like Ruth Bader Ginsburg did. Apparently, even though Judge barrettes are highly achieved. Woman a working mom was seven Children. She is not clothed into what it's like to be a woman in today's America. Finally, there's this. Joe Biden blasted the nomination of Judge Merit plugs, claims that she will pose a threat. To the health care of millions of Americans. Nancy Pelosi joined Biden and that absurd accusation. She says that Judge Barrett could destroy life saving protections. For 135 million Americans who have pre existing health conditions, folks. The Democrats know they Khun Dune, uh, thing to stop this nomination. This is what fear and frustrate shin smell like and it reeks.

Amy Cockney Barrett Joe Biden Ruth Bader Ginsburg Planned Parenthood Action Fund Khun Dune Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi America Alexis Mcgill President Trump Johnson
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Hysteria

"Hello and welcome to hysteria I'm Erin Ryan, and I'm Melissa Astro Monaco. This week on our one hundred episode planned parenthood CEO Alexis McGill. Johnson chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus Karen Bass. reread Cheney and Megan gaily joined to tackle the following questions. What does the fight police reform look like when it moves from the streets to Congress. Why does some men hate wearing masks so much? Is Chief. Justice John Roberts good now? and has the pandemic turned all of us into nosy neighbors all this and more right now. Halabja Aaron Good Day to you. Good Day to you to guess what today is. It is. Day One, hundred, nine in quarantine for me hundred nine. You have like a. we have a calendar. We have a calendar right here next door. I record like prison. I was GONNA. Say if you started just making tally marks eventually they would kind of make their way down to the floor, and across the floor, and we're on our fourth month right now of Mark's. Oh Man, well, at least you guys are kind of. It's kind of under control for you guys because not really. Not really over here on the West Coast. It's I mean. We're trying to keep it down, but like is there. What else today earned? What else is happening? Say today is the one hundredth episode of hysteria. This is the hundred time that you and I have talked about the news one hundred one hundred. How many times do you think we've talked about? Abortion Oh my God. God, like one hundred and ten did the court rule in the in favor of abortion rights this week because of us because they didn't want to be the ultimate. Fuck that guy this week, the ultimate fuck that guy. It's funny I was looking thinking back on the hundred episodes and I was thinking about the first episode, and it really did start with the fuck that guy. Because! If you recall, we were in. New York. Guess it was me. You Z., way and Blair Money Oh. Yes, and we recorded a whole episode one morning, and then as soon as we got out of the studio, we got news. That Anthony Kennedy was retiring from the Supreme Court, yes, there is an immediate fuck that guy situation. Everybody needed to be reconvened in the night, and we had to record a super special holy Shit. What's going to happen episode? And it was like also just the ethos of hysteria going forward because you made us a pound cake earlier that day, and then we had cocktails when we re recorded later that night which I feel like really like just represents the Ark of who we are. It was from a homemade pound cake to some cocktails for sure I was really into baking back. Then so much has changed now I've just given up. But. It was kind of reflecting I was reflecting last night on all the things that have happened in the. It's been about two years to two. Hundred episodes. all the things that the show has talked about an how much the news cycle and American politics have been driven by women and issues that are super important women and issues at center. Women like the Cavanaugh hearings. Yeah. a lot of metoo stuff yep Remember when we all got to hate the Houston Astros at the same time. Oh Shit totally forgot about that. When baseball comes back, we can resume hating the Houston Astros. Praise Beano twenty eighteen elections I mean the blue wave, the blue wave with the blue wave that was led by you know Nancy, Pelosi, and people like Ao, see and women who, on a press lay on a Presley Ilhan Omar. There is this whole wave of women that took the house back from Republicans. Now let's see what else have we been through in this last record number of women who ran for president. I was just going to say. One way or another? We're going to have a female vice president by the time. This is all over. That's true well. I mean assuming this is assuming that like. Joe, Biden wins and well I mean the only way Joe Biden's not GonNa win is if statues can actually vote for Donald. Trump, if statutes. I don't even know if they would vote for Donald Trump. I know I mean. They're not really saying much now because he's defending them. But what are they really feel I mean. If you take a look at a lot of statues, they're in these sort of humiliating poses. I would be like. Just put me out of my misery. Take me down. I don't want to be on this I. Don't want to be on this cocky horse with like an undulating buttocks. This is an embarrassing. UNDULATING. Because this. For me to be remembered Also I was thinking. Remember how the president got impeached. The president got impeached. Let us not forget that. This is the era of time where Vonda has proved herself to definitely not be a feminist and just be an asshole. I was reading this morning. That jared Kushner has a disapprove rate among Democrats of like six percent approve. Who are those people who are those people that think he's okay. I don't know I. Think the People He. He knew it at the Observer. Whatever yeah something like that? I also wanted to reflect a little bit on some of the incredible people that we got to talk to on the Yes. Yes, who are your favorites? We had Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. Who was our first guest that you and I interviewed together because that was the day when Donald Trump tweeted that she may or may not have given sexual favors to donors, which is crazy, and it was the first time you and I figured out how to jointly interview someone and we did it with like music stands, and it was like very cute. Obviously our Hawaiian rider die. macy Hirono, who talked about making paper cranes, which I've been trying to figure out how to do on the Internet, I hope she can come back and give tutorial. Who else who are your favorites We Gloria Steinem on which was a real a real to me. That was really fun. Katie Hill. That was a great episode. can really crenshaw was was a thrill. She was so great. Yeah, it was like she's without question like top three. It was such a thrill to talk to her. She's so smart and then we got to welcome in people who are sort of in the members of the crooked media family accused by a few times. Always good see her love. AKILAH PRIYANKA COMES BUYS them. It comes by sometimes we also have had some favorite writers on the show. Sam Irby has come on the show. I mean that was like a moment. Yes, TAFFY BOTAS US or Ackner Julia, Phillips and Yeah. We've had some really great people on the show not to mention the CO hosts right now. The group that we have right now which is like A. I'm going to say murderers row. It's murderer SRA. It's me, you grace, par Megan, Gaily Kirin, deal, Z. Way Michaela Watkins Dana Schwartz, ten Tran Rewrite Cheney and the Omega and you know I think that the true test of Camaraderie and chemistry is when you can all zoom when you consume, and no one can tell that you're zooming. Everyone thinks her at the table. I feel.

Donald Trump president Houston Astros Joe Biden Megan Cheney John Roberts Erin Ryan Melissa Astro Monaco CEO Alexis McGill New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Anthony Kennedy vice president Johnson baseball jared Kushner Gloria Steinem West Coast
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Are rain. I mean like that is that's the core of a freedom right? It is like I I know. Why am I know what freedom looks like? I have a vision around in, and once once you get that taste. You are not going back. You're going to continue to fight for what it means for you to live your life on your own terms, and I think that intersection of these movements and having these conversations and lifting up is incredibly powerful. Powerful. Yeah, yeah, you know Alexis. I WANNA. Tell you and if you don't have this already, you can take this idea. I want a t shirt that says abortion equals healthcare. Yes, right because that's that's missing. I want everyone to understand that that abortion healthcare you know it is abortion and I don't want to. As people to not shrink away from abortion in the way that sometimes happens in these debates, and that it is healthcare, so if you are not voting for people who are in favor of abortion access for all, you are voting against healthcare. That's just my comment. Present I, am you I take it I will I will send you a T shirt. It is happening I mean just last week in the middle of night. You know what happened Tennessee these politicians? Lake created a one of the craziest bills to ban abortion at nearly every stage of pregnancy including before he believe in know that they're pregnant, right? It's like the most restrictive in the country. It will be the first worship band to be enacted this year, and you look at something like that and like. If people understood, it is healthcare, they may have a different a different reaction to it rather than letting something like this craziness. Pass in the dark of. Of night. Right exactly, and that's why I wanted on a t shirt. Right because I have these conversations, but they're. They're conscious between people like you and I. You who kind of understand that we read the books and you know we're lead. You're leading an organization right, but the average person I think you know even on the Progressive Democratic Side I. Don't know if everyone can say that. They believe that abortion is healthcare. They view it that way I. Think they still think of them as two separate things healthcare, and then there's abortion, right and I think it would help. If. We started talking about them. As if they're the same thing I think you're absolutely right and I think that you know what planned. Parenthood is again first and foremost a healthcare provider and receive abortion as as part of sexual reproductive healthcare, and that's what we provide everything from CI screenings to cancer screenings to out to birth control to abortion and an olive. Those are tools to as healthcare is right tools to help you live a fully free life, and so I. I am one hundred percent. Abortion is healthcare I think it's very simple. I think it is you know. I think it will make a great shirt. I think. So. So at this point what I know, this is the thing that keeps you up at night, but you know. How do we begin to turn things around? I know that there's multiple things to do you know, but what's the most pressing thing and the most pressing three things is that you know electing people at the local level who are champions for reproductive rights? You know obviously it's voting, but the average person like what should they be doing to help? You know if there if this is a concern of theirs. I mean it is vote vote vote, I think you know it is. It is absolutely vote vote vote. I think we're heading into an election. That is, we've been saying. Is. Unprecedented is the most important election of our lifetime and I think that making sure that are focused on that educating ourselves about what is happening to access to reproductive healthcare specifically abortion I think is GonNa, be really important. And you know I think lifting up champions and and being it for the long game I think part of the challenge here is that it's taken us a while to get to this point where where access to reproductive health care is is literally on the verge of being lost, and it's going to take a long time to to restore right. This is a fight that will be. As been relentless, it has been unyielding, and we have to prepare ourselves for what it will take to not only to restore democracy, but also to ensure that that people people's access to healthcare doesn't depend on their on their zip code, and so you know voting is a key piece of that. Having a long game is a key piece of that and staying focused and strategic and relentless back and I think making sure we're lifting up our our champions and you know and focus on the on the real momentum. We saw it just in in twenty, twenty, eighteen, twenty, nineteen in in state legislatures twenty eighteen. We got a pro-choice. pro-choice Congress, that was the largest pro-choice majority that we've ever seen. Because we stayed vigilant from to sixteen in Twenty Nineteen We got governorships in Kentucky and in Virginia and that state legislature in Virginia flipped back rats, and we're able to undo a lot of horrible legislation that was done around access to abortion healthcare. So you know it is a long road on politics, you know these are these are moments in inside of movements, and that elections are critical, but we you know if you have a movement Lens. That means that you were involved for for the long game and I think it's really important for folks to gauge. So it sounds like we need to t shirts. We need you know. Abortion is healthcare, and we need you know vote for your state legislators it indeed yes, and. I'm just GONNA add another line. which is basically, movements are never settled. Movements are never settled. We have to stay engaged. We have to stay vigilant and had had we known you know at I know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three when I was coming up. This was going to be the fight that I was having forty seven years later. I wouldn't have ever said I thought that was settled. You know. Now? That's really profound now. That's a really good thing to end on while. Well Alexis Me Johnson. Thank you so much for all the work you're doing and I truly appreciate you and thank you for joining me today. Thanks for having me down so Dr..

Alexis Me Johnson Virginia Congress Tennessee Kentucky
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Makeup, the legislatures changed because of the way that the districts were gerrymandered. You actually have people with a minority view who now have more power. Prior ten fifteen years ago, the electorate was more reflective of communities. I think that's the fundamental shift in. In change that we have to look at and that's what we have to look at at restoring, and it will take you know it will take another decade right? I think we're. We're at halftime now at twenty twenty and we're already. You really have to go back in the locker room and get ready for the next fight after this election because it's GonNa take a while to undo a lot of the damage that we've seen through the last decade. Yeah, you know I think for me and again you can correct me if I'm wrong. There seems to be a missing piece in the way that people I'm speaking specifically about people who don't vote consistently for Democrats. Because would be Republicans in that. If they do support access to abortion. They aren't necessarily making the connection that they're. They're voting decisions at the state level local level. It's counter to what they actually believe. And that seems to be the missing piece, but Yup, look I. I think that that traditionally folks who have been not progressives have not actually voted on the courts as consistently and I think that that is also what's missing. Missing, it's the local level, but it's also kind of with very clear eyed view of what the court makeup should be, and that's really where our you know our big. Our big battles are right now I. Mean I'm if we if Rogan's overturn their twenty five million women who were living in states right now, who would not have access to abortion that in itself if you think of. Women of Reproductive Age would also overlap with a universe of voters. That's a huge impact that we have really consider how we awaken and make sure that they understand what's at stake right now. We're talking to someone. Recently about the number of changes since Roe v Wade was was passed, right? hasn't been forty years. Actually forty. forty-seven like thousands and thousands of restrictions right and it feels like. Maybe I'm not being fair. It feels like it's taken us a really long time to wake up. Yes. The reason I say forty seven is because I I'm forty seven years old. I'm told his row. I didn't grow up with. This was ever going to be a thing. Right? I mean I of course there's always there's always more that we can do to support real meaningful access right because you can have the have the right, but not actually have the ability to execute on the right, and that's know has a lot to do with our healthcare system and other other intersections, but like the fact that that wouldn't have. if they were seeking abortion just was not something that you know I. think my generation really was was growing up. You know worrying about and quite frankly we were taking advantage of all of the fates that had. been had before us, and and I think that's why it feels like this guy is falling like I, WanNa say this guy's roaming really happening and there are a lot of people who are who are you know are realizing how it actually on the line when they see all of these structural pieces. Come together now you're exactly right. We're in the same boat. I mean I am thinking back. You know when I was in college. Or you know when these things should have been really important to me. I just took them for granted and thought that they would always. Always be there and things were happening. That were really important. That should have been paid attention to by myself. You know back, then you know in the same is true for planned parenthood. Mean I just a bit of a personal story. My mom was a nurse and I remember. You know she'd sometimes she would work planned. Parenthood clinics right and I was ages ago by remember that and it just you know kind of not really thinking about it. It was something that planned parenthood. It had been around forever. It would always be here and you're still here thankfully, right? But you know. Going anywhere. You've been a first century, but you know just thinking that these attacks would not be effective right one of the things that I have noticed recently about planned parenthood under the trump administration specifically in around the role that you have in the community is how intersectional your work is right. I mean because you know going back to the story about my growing up I made the connection of planned parenthood to abortion which A. A lot of people to make that connection right, but looking at you now see just how intersectional it is I. Mean You've been partnering with the Movement for Black lives I saw something about that. And you know with you know activists from the DACA movement and lgbt community his name a few, so am assuming that's been strategic, but have partnering with these organizations. Has It helped? Make your coalition stronger going forward. You think absolutely it. It has been strategic work, but it is been on very intentional heart. Work Right when you actually when parenthood centers the patient right, we are first and foremost a healthcare provider affiliate health centers are providing actual caring communities and the people for whom they're providing care are living at the intersection of all these issues that were providing care for you know undocumented immigrants for black communities for for workers for folks who may not have access. Access. may not even have the ability to pay an planned parenthood. Health centers provide that CARE regardless of immigration status regardless of ability to pay, and you know I think the the decision to to align with organizations, like Movement for black lives or to be involved in the duck fight, or you know to fight for Trans Lives. You know has a lot to do with the fact that you know all of these issues are. Interconnected right there in our. In our workplaces in our schools in our public institutions, it's in our healthcare system, and we have I think a big platform to to really think through the through line. which is that you know we, we fundamentally believe in freedom, and we believe that you know you should not be criminalized for seeking access to abortion for determining your own life. Course you should not. Not Be criminalized for seeking access to freedom through immigration. You should not be criminalized. You know just as we were talking earlier around some of the the crazy microaggressions that people are just living wild black, and we won't be able to ever achieve access to justice if people don't have the right to bodily autonomy and definitely won't be able to achieve freedom and so. Thinking about how we imagine them and fight for freedom. I think that's actually what we're seeing now and it's been you know again. It's been very intentional work. It's been very hard work inside of our organization inside of of bringing movements together, but what we're seeing right now is still real like the grassroots momentum that is taken the country by storm that has led by young people that is led by Black Brown people by Queer people. People really requires not just us as an organization, but as as movement leaders to to align and make sure that we are fighting and standing on the same page. Yeah, it's really beautiful. It's in the midst of all of this. All these terrible things that are happening. You know people in the street scene, even though it's, it's hard because you think like. Are they risking their health? You know, but it is really beautiful to see. Is. Very Liber Tori when I watch it. I have to be honest. I think that it is I. Keep saying like people are like how journal like. Just have this laboratory vibrate now because I'm seeing these folks who were just so unapologetic about they.

twenty twenty DACA Rogan Black Brown Roe Wade
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"August, I'm the impact, Evatt the resources on particularly for an organization like planned parenthood that Sir forty percent of titled Ten patients. The impact was very tangible. Right, it was. It was people who oftentimes don't even know that they were getting public assistance for their for their birth control. All of a sudden had to. To start paying in ways that they weren't expecting to her. Anticipating and I think it's just a great example. This this gag rule that was asking providers to give a full range of options for patients If they found out, they were pregnant. It's it was asking our providers to give substandard care, and that was just completely unacceptable, which is why we were forced out of the program. Also we'll emphasis curious I was thinking about that. And if about what that looks like practically you know, someone comes in and to healthcare provider, and they say you know I need help, and you know following this gag rule. The provider does what and says what? Well I mean I. If you come to a planned parenthood. You get the full range of information because we we decided we weren't going to comply with a a gag rule that asks us to provide substandard care, but it would have looked like you know we can't. You know if you if you came in? And your pride in you asked with our termination. The provider would have to say if they were accepting titled ten money. I cannot give you information on that or go try Google or You know I mean it was. Ridiculous rate in a and I think like the heart of agenda honestly is is the relationship between a patient and provider is a very intimate. It has to be based on trust. Right on getting the right information to take care of your healthcare needs, and if you are a provider and you all, Seddon cannot give the full range of information that someone is asking for in seeking, it is compromising that that level of trust between the patient and the doctor, and so I think it's really important to understand that this isn't just about cutting off access because because people don't. Don't want to support access to abortion. It is also undermining the basic tenants that should be guiding a a relationship between a patient and the provider and I think that's really where planned parenthood in particular, stepped an on side of our providers enter patients to make sure that as a trusted messenger as a trusted resource, particularly around on sexual and reproductive health care. We would not be compromised. Yeah, one of the things that I hear more people talking about or beginning to talk about is the appointment of these conservative antiabortion judges and I like to call them anti healthcare. Just because abortion is healthcare. And you know the important thing about it. Is that all of the other changes? We've talked about the changes to title tanner the closing of clinics. You know those can be undone with majorities in Congress or the Senate, or with the White House, but this can't write these wife time judges. Trump himself said that you know I. Think he made a comment about overturning Roe v Wade would happen automatically because he's putting in pro-life judges right like He. He's aware of this. So, what does the picture look like now? How many judges have been appointed? Who have these views? I mean we're almost looking at almost two hundred judges that have been appointed head during the trump. Trump administration. It is I as you say I mean. When you layer on the number of restrictions that we have seen over just last year, we saw three hundred and three abortion ban restrictions introduced in forty seven states and state legislatures. So like let's like let's like pull the picture together and why these judges are so important. You've got three hundred restrictions in forty-seven state. State you have almost two hundred judges now that have been confirmed and you know as as organization quite frankly as a movement, we've relied on courts as our stopgap when when very harmful bans and restrictions to healthcare come out, we are able to to actually use the court to stay to have it be considered. Now we have these two hundred judges have up incredibly restrictive thoughts. Thoughts on access to healthcare abortion healthcare out somebody like Corey Wilson who's about to get confirmed he actually holds a record that demonstrates incredible hostility towards not just health care, but also voting rates racial justice. You know I mean we have Sarah Pit Lick, who doesn't even believe an Ivy f you know we have like Berry Conservative judges on access to reproductive health care that will. Will now be adjudicating as to whether or not these bands should be upheld or not, and so when you think about the impact, obviously, we oftentimes have a conversation about the Supreme Court. which is also critical on crucial may have a case before the court right now, but when you think about the the pipeline from the the the bands through these circuit federal judges to the. The Supreme Court where there are already I. Think Eighteen cases now winding their way up in addition to the one that was hurt in March. You know the the the world of row the for. Road to remain the Lai land is not only subject to potentially being overturned. It also just gutted to the point where it's a name only and that's that's what I think we. We really have like tell the the big picture of the stories in how strategic those who've been anti healthcare have been in and trying to push their agenda while so correct me from wrong, but it feels like ten fifteen years ago. Even considering judge with these kind of archaic views wouldn't have been considered even. Is that fair to say I absolutely? I think it's fair. Fair to say and I also think I mean ten fifteen years ago. you know I started working as a volunteer with Planned Parenthood in twenty ten right right at the beginning of the twenty ten congress, and it was in that moment during the redistricting during the obviously the census redistricting odd the tea party that came in into play and the this alliance around. Pushing, bands in restrict restrictions targeted restrictions just for abortion providers really started to escalate. You know this is the reason why. Matter. This is why you taking the census matters. This is why are really focusing on restoring core tenets around how democracy functions in the checks and balances matter because we've had now these excessive of elections that have completely transformed our state legislatures created the opportunity for these these bands to be put out, and then we're also. You know having to unwind so much right? I mean it like that is that that's what keeps me up at quite frankly just thinking about the massive damage. It's already been done and what we will need to do if we get a women's champion in office. Come November right, right, yeah! Yeah. Sorry I was so stressed out listening to that. Already now it's crazy. Good. Okay, well so I guess my point was. Is that even ten or fifteen years ago? I mean it's obvious that Democrats considered a judge. Some judges with these us, but I think a lot of Republicans would have rejected such extreme views. Maybe, Look I think that I think then what we have now. Is that small a vocal minority who has the levers of power? And you know when you consider the fact that the majority of Americans actually do believe that rose should be the law of land when you when you consider the fact that there is no state in the union that the leaves that abortion should be banned and yet because of these technical changes right because of the.

Supreme Court Google Trump Seddon Corey Wilson Supreme Court. congress Berry Congress White House Roe Senate Wade
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode I have a conversation with Alexis McGill Johnson the president and CEO of planned parenthood. I'm so excited to bring you this episode because I put a longtime supporter of planned. Parenthood Alexis and I discuss planned. Parenthood is broaden their coalition to include organizations and activists from a variety of different movements, making their work, truly intersectional and inclusive. We also talk about planned. Parenthood will continue to move the Movement for reproductive healthcare forward, and how they plan to counter the attacks on reproductive rights, including those put into place during the pandemic, so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Alexis McGill Johnson. Johnson welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me is planned. Parenthood has been around for a century over one hundred years, but it feels like it's been under attack at least from conservatives since forever at least that long right. Yeah originally long time, but you know under the trump administration is like there's been a steep rectory upwards with the attached. They've been really emboldened with these attempts at abortion bans complete abortion bands. You know clinic closures, but I think the thing that I'm most appalled about lately is the use of the pandemic to accelerate the attacks right? What are the ways that they've exploited the coronavirus outbreak to further restrict access to reproductive care? Care I mean. Can you believe that? Yes, they that we are all in the midst of sheltering in place we are all in the midst of worrying about our own healthcare, and really kind of looking at how healthcare system, generally the the disparity within that the healthcare system is laid bare and the trump administration and many folks who have been aligned with the trump administration in states like Texas and a High Oh and decided to use the pandemic as a cover to push executive orders around access to abortion, and so in several states are. Keeping in mind, we're supposed to be staying at home. We are supposed to be limiting our travel out of out of state in order to to flatten the curve, governors in several states decided that. Now is the time to basically push a political agenda, and they created executive orders limiting access to abortion care saying that it was in some. Cases Outright banning it saying that it was elected, it was non essential and what we saw with you know people leaving state going from states like Texas to Colorado Texas to California, driving in many cases, dozens of hours to just to get access to medication abortion because they weren't able to access it in their own zip code, so look since day one we know the trump administration has been pushing policies to undermine access to sexual and reproductive health care, but just in the last. Last three months particularly at the height and sheltering plays you know many who I think had cover from the trump administration were so focused on using this time to push a political agenda, and it was really just unconscionable, saying that abortions were essential. What actually happened was and I? Think and you can confirm this for me as a love. The clinics had to cancel active appointments is is that true and when it happened? What people actually do? Yes, absolutely I mean look. Look, we had just heartbreaking conversations with providers that are limited health centers across states in need in some states where abortion hadn't been banned because there had been a lot of confusion, so providers are getting on the phone. They're calling their patients. They're saying you know either. You have twenty four hours to get in here or your appointment has actually been canceled We can no longer serve you and we'll have to refer you to a place out of state. We've had patients calling. Calling into the health centers in the call center is trying to really just so much confusion that was being sown during the executive orders as the orders came down. You know planned parenthood along with Aclu ends and reproductive rights. Organizations are fighting each ban in in each state that was putting them down because we wanted to ensure that those clarity and to ensure that our our patients had access to the care, so there's just a lot of confusion that was happening and you now. Abortion is essential healthcare, right? It is time sensitive, and so you know so. The choices that patients were faced with were were essentially to travel out of state to secure access, and you know I mean putting themselves more at risk rate, both for coronavirus or spreading coronavirus throughout the through the areas where they were traveling, and then also through stairs, the story of a woman that was in one of the briefs. who had to put her children in the car with her elderly mom drive across state lines I think twelve hours to Colorado and back, and those are the those are the people behind these orders right? Those are the people who are experiencing you know on the on the other end of the political agenda that you know it's just so so unbelievable. It is, and you know what's interesting is that this isn't much different from what it was before like people in. In certain communities had to travel across state lines to get an abortion. So this just exacerbate those obstacles. Yeah I mean we take for granted that that is still the La La land, and the majority of Americans believe that Roche's wildland land, but there are, there are states where there are you know no abortion providers and there are states were access is so limited because of the multiple restrictions that have been put in place that it makes it. Extremely difficult particularly for low income families, particularly for people, of color he asked. Can we talk about a few? The restrictions are put into place before the pandemic and I think one of the big ones was titletown gag rule right in band providers from telling patients about how they can you know safely and legally get access to abortion and just a comment. This isn't necessarily a question, but I think that. It should be legal and all forms of healthcare to withhold information. That's useful to patient for the purposes of manipulating their decision. Right I. Just think that should be illegal. You'd never do that to person with a heart condition, right? Do that right now. You told me. You totally wouldn't. It's right so first of all like for for for listeners who don't title ten program it is a program that is the nation's oldest and first family planning grant that provides access to birth control, and particularly in low income communities, rural areas. And when they came out with the decided to enforce the gag role in last.

Alexis McGill Johnson executive Texas Colorado Jim Taylor skinner president and CEO Aclu La La California Roche
A conversation about race, privilege and making space

Unreserved

05:33 min | 1 year ago

A conversation about race, privilege and making space

"Watch a dot. Say Nin, hello, and welcome this unreserved on CBC Radio One I'm Rosanna dare child. In October of two thousand and eighteen I moderated, a panel called inside outside at six degrees held at the art gallery of Ontario. It's an event that invites authors, academics, politicians, and big thinkers together to discuss pressing issues. And Right, now there is one issue that has captured the world's attention. The death of George Floyd a forty six year, old, black man and in Minneapolis police officer now charged with second degree murder. His death was witnessed around the world and sparked support for the black lives matter movement with protests from Merika to Australia. We are at a turning point in our history, so we thought it was a perfect time to revisit this conversation. Today on unreserved. We're talking about power, privilege and asking. How willing are we to make meaningful change? Joining me on stage, our Alexis McGill Johnson of the perception institute. Is Your allure author speaker and Internet yeller not to know bed. National Inuit leader and president of new tap read Cana Tommy and Sassy assassin professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Okay so I'm afternoon. We're going to have a conversation around place. Power Privilege, who hasn't who doesn't and perhaps more importantly how we are shifting to create new spaces. I want to start with of course are beautiful panelists here? I want to ask you first of all to tell US share with us. Where you come from because as my elders teach, you cannot know where you're going until you know where you've come from. or at least that's what my mother would say when she sent me to the store. my first question to each of the panelists are what is the place that you come from? Perhaps we'll start with me. Thank you very much I guess I'm still trying to figure that one out. I. I thought I came from Canada. I was the young person and I'm not quite sure if that's the right. Way To think about where I'm from now. Nuts. which is. A region in new one of our four regions northern Labrador and we very recently got self-government, two thousand and five. But I grew up. There I also grew up in the United States I I grew up. Kind of between a lot of different worlds so I, Can i? Also say that I'm a global citizen as well so I am the national leader I am in Okinawa proud indigenous person. But it doesn't. Then, take back any of the other parts of me, that exist as well and I'm I'm comfortable insertive in that space, and I think that is sometimes confusing to the rest of the world that I have not indigenous ancestry as well that my mother is none dishes. That's fine and getting the acceptance from. Canada and North America that I can be indigenous, but I can also have non indigenous parts. That is a part of this power dynamic that I hope that we can discuss this afternoon about assertiveness in. Indigenous. Without the. The qualifiers that indigenous people put on us. And if we don't fit into those myriad of boxes than we somehow lose all of our rights altogether. And we will get into that because that is an interesting place of privilege to. TRY TO KICK doors. Down into so that we're GONNA. Wait to Alexa. So, we're my from. Kind of like to say I'm from a period of time. I was I was born in Nineteen, seventy two, which is important to me as a social identity really. but it's important for me. Because it was, it was halfway I was born kind of right in the middle of a post wave, second wave, feminism, and the Black Power Movement and my parents, both particularly my mother lived at the intersection of both of those movements growing up. She was incredibly active as a woman is. She, she had US marching in in our Shakey's an Afro puffs as as children I'm pretty sure I learned the words to. We shall overcome before I learned the US pledge of allegiance. My choice of professional careers always been trying to to understand interrogate these these. Frameworks power and Privilege Ed. I studied political science. Which I think is a study of power. But have found myself now consistently in these rooms, as one of few one of only, if not the only woman woman of Color, and so I've been this bridge I think kind of connecting. Connecting the dots in a lot of different iterations from a cultural perspective where I've worked with a number of artists and democratic organizations, organizing young people to the current work that we do have perception which is around translating the science of our brains and bodies understand difference in how we connect to each other in those ways.

United States Canada CBC George Floyd Shakey Black Power Movement Minneapolis Ontario Second Degree Murder Alexis Mcgill Johnson Australia Alexa Perception Institute Officer North America National Inuit Labrador Okinawa Columbia University Professor Of Sociology
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"Salon. But now she's rate if I knew ways to color her hair and get a natural standing look with half of the cost of her salon. Bill so I got her on board to color her hair at home using Madison. Reed Cynthia's super particular about what she used this for. Her hair wants. No harsh chemicals are animal testing. Unlike many other hair color brands. Manson re doesn't have harsh ingredients such as ammonia. Pd parabens gluten SOS and Titanium dioxide. If you want to join Cynthia you can take the Madison Reed online quiz to find the best color for you. It's incredibly convenient with delivery right here door and there is even an option to set up auto delivery as well whenever you're ready you do it on your own schedule in under an hour. In the comfort of your own home get ammonia free multidimensional hair-color delivered right to your door. Starting at twenty two dollars visit Madison. Dot Dot Com and use my promo code the BG. You'll get ten percent off plus free shipping on your first color kid again. The Promo Code is BG at Madison Dash Reed Dot com to find your perfect shade. That's Madison Dash Reed Dot Com. What are some of the ways that our listeners could be supportive of the work that planned parenthood is doing during this time? Well one of the things that we've been doing is we really kind of need the watchdog community out there and I think for folks who are at home and kind of absorbing information differently in recognizing the fact that people are exploiting this crisis texting to. I'm texting Enough E. N. O. U. G. H. Two two two four two two has been away of us to like starting to build a community kind of watchdog group to help us really track the information. Because you know we're all these. Various communities are sheltering in place and keeping up on the various restrictions that are coming out state by state in the impact of that. We really needed to channel people locally to understand the best way to fight back when people think about planned. Parenthood they always just send the think. Oh this is about women but we know that this is an issue that all people should care about even man one of the things. I really appreciate it. During the Democratic primary debates is you did have lots of men speaking on this issue as stirred cory booker. He's always been you know very adamant that men should also Care Abou- choices while and reproductive freedom. So what advice would you have for the men because we do have male listeners? We appreciate them too. In addition to all our brown girls are non Brown girls. That don't think that they really have a stake in this and why they should care about reproductive freedom as well. Well Planned Parenthood Certainly also provide services for men to right so we provide you know full range of sexual and reproductive health care so that might include the sesame that might include gender affirming Care Trans Care and so so you know. I'm I'm talking largely about about him getting access to abortion but the reality is you know. We should all be engaged in these conversations. These are these are also critically important to understand that I mean does control her own her own body and her the self determination that comes there is really important but men also obviously play a role in sexual and reproductive health having them maintain a level of of health is critically important and they need to be engaged for their for their their sisters. The daughters their their friends their partners their spouses to make sure that when people need access to care that they can receive. It went advice. Would you have for the people who are listening are women who know that they want to get into the fight for reproductive freedom? Either by volunteering are getting into this work. We know that it's hard. There's like a lot of emotional heaviness that comes with it would advice. Would you give to them? Who are thinking about it and also tell us how do you like grapple with the fact that you have this big job during this really important? Time where so? Many people are counting on the services. A planned parenthood. I think it's really important. Understand that that we find leadership in everyday experiences right and for a lot of US particularly around the civil rights movement and the women's rights movement were kind of the backdrop of my formative social justice experience you know it was the everyday indignities that really woke people up so to speak right that just kind of recognizing the fact that you were being profiled walking through you know a story that you had every right to be in or recognize the fact that the pay disparity was such when you were doing the same if not twice amount of work as your male or white counterparts and so you know those those indignities actually league really inform the Struggle East. The the expression is the personal is the political. It does help you understand and make meaning of why. It's so important to be engaged and so I think there's something that I've always held really closely. I also think sometimes you just see a fight and you want in on it. So that's what I say in terms of like getting gauge. It really does start with that. You know that kind of it literally hits you in your gut it hits you in your belly. Hits you in your heart and you just really need to find. We engage in going to the organization going to planned. Parenthood action can help you figure out the best way to channel your resources getting your time talent and treasure as we like to say for me in terms of just like navigating. Look I think this this pandemic has hit us all in such a profound way. I'm really inspired by the ways. In which kind of communities are coming together and supporting those in most need getting groceries for folks who can't get out you know all of those sorts of stories. I think have been really heartening. Also recognizing the fact that it's incredibly challenging to to lead in this not man and literally sitting in my hiding in my laundry room while my kids are zooming. My Ironing Board is my desk and trying to like get the information out in the way so many other people Ra. I mean because like the work doesn't stop in fact even for for us. The attacks are so fast and furious that it's added a whole other layer on top of the complete disruption that we're all experiencing and so. I'm really holding onto the fact that we have been able to continue to provide in many ways in that we are supporting folks getting to where they need to be if they can't identify service in state I'm really proud of our our clinics. That are that are on the front line. That are that are offering tests They're they're able to offer tests because of their credit primary care service role in all of the ways in which were just showing up as a critical piece of the public health infrastructure at a time when public health has been so decimated over the years. And so I'd have to take stock in that and you know have a really big big bowl of humility every morning and recognizing that it's incredibly hard to do it. Under these circumstances we appreciate you an all the work that the team at planned. Parenthood is doing. I have so many friends that work there and I've gotten to know some of the other amazing women as well and I do want to close out by asking. You are signature question when advice you have for all the brown girls. There are listening there are saying. I want to be just like her. My advice is to is to do your homework. And have a theory of change. I think it's really there's part of me. That's kind of always has a little bit of professor in my kid a backbone. That's outset some that just is it's really important to understand kind of history. It's really important to understand kind of current work and to constantly training your brain around new engaged ways of innovative ways of of of doing work. And I think that's one of the things that I see even even right now in the middle of Co Ed. It's it's such an accelerator for for healthcare provider like planned. Parenthood move so immediately into telehealth right the burgeoning field. That we've been you know we. We've literally moved ten years in ten days in doing this work but it's because people came into it with a theory of change in what needed to be done early and so I think particularly for Brown girls all young young women who you know. Want to lead really understanding what your contribution is going to be and knowing that your contribution is different than your ambition and while both are incredibly important you have to have something that helps translate that and I think that theory of changes. It did have a moment. Please take the time to rate and review us. Wherever you listen to podcasts. Stay up to date with us on the BG website www dot the BG dot com and on our social media facebook instagram and twitter at the guide the BG PODCAST is produced. By wonder me a network you can find them on Instagram at Wfan dot media and on twitter at Wfan media until next brown girls..

Madison Dash Reed Dot com Madison Reed Cynthia twitter Madison Reed cory booker Manson BG Bill US Brown Co Ed E. N. O. U. G. professor Wfan
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

09:50 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"To politics. The BG podcast is about creating a space for Black Brown and indigenous. We'll know color to about the current state of politics to support others breaking into the political sphere and to celebrate incredible women change the course of the country and its history. My special guest today is Alexis. Mcgill Johnson. She's the acting president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. I you enjoy the conversation and talk to you soon. Hi Alexis how are you doing today? I'm Great Ashanti. How are you good so excited to talk with you especially during this time of doing what cove it and learn more about the work that planned parenthood is doing but I I definitely want our listeners to learn more about you so everything that she do? It's really rooted in social justice which I admire so much and advocacy. What brought you to want to do this. Work like many of us particularly black women women of color we were kind of raised in the backdrop of social justice movements I was born in nineteen seventy seventy-two actually just about five months before Roe was decided so I like to say I'm as old as row. But what that meant for me is that you know I. Also benefited from all of the the fights with respect to you. Know to Making access to and control of our bodies legal and you know and so for the most part during my formative years while my parents were really active in any number of causes for me. The idea that I couldn't control my body kind of growing up was never something that I would probably take take it for granted and it wasn't until ten years ago eleven years ago. I was walking down the street in New York City and I saw this billboard with his cute little black girls face on it she must have been about five years old and just kind of instinctively reflexively looked up to see what was she selling. 'cause you know had to be an ad for something you don't always see us advertising for things and I got closer to it and it said underneath the most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb. Just I could not get my head around that free me. The attack of you know black woman always been demonized for our reproductive choices. And you know our healthcare's always have on the line and the idea that there was such a targeted focus and such ed monarch way just literally couldn't stop talking about it and I had spent you know. Virtually my whole career in politics and working at the intersection of race and social justice in politics and I ran into Cecile Richards of former president of planned parenthood. And I said you know. Do you know about this billboard. You know what they're doing. Do you know what they're saying and she was like yes hate you and I was like well. You need to do something about it. And she said no. Actually you need to do something about it and she recruited and said she recruited me to the board. And you know where. I spent almost ten years really digging deep at the intersection of not just the work that planned parenthood health centers do everyday to to provide care but also to consider all of the ways in which you know women of Color and particularly are impacted. And you know I've been here percents. That is a such a great story and when you mention that billboard that poster that you saw it reminded me of like seeing those two and just getting that feeling that instinct of just. Wow any chance. People have to kind of demonize women of color especially black women like they will take it and even put it on a billboard just to say this is truly what we think about you but with planned parenthood. I also WANNA take the time to talk about the fact that there are lots of services that planned. Parenthood does offer for women. So can you tell us a little bit more about your health centers? Yes of course. Look I mean planned. Parenthood for more than one hundred years has been providing essential sexual reproductive healthcare in education and also fighting for that access to care. They're almost one in five. Women have been to planned parenthood in their lifetimes and they've seen our providers for cancer screenings birth control sti screenings testings and treatments. And of course portions well and so. I do think that planned parenthood. Ten people tend to understand planned. Parenthood is only providing a service of a bar planned parenthood's provide primary. Care Service there on the frontline of covert right now but we are oftentimes the provider of choice and the and the first point of entry into the healthcare system for many communities when we have such a limited access to public health. Care so you talked. Abou Cecile Richards. Who are some of the other women who have inspired you along the way while you've been doing this work you know? I mean yes is been a dear friend and a great thought leader around reproductive health care. Kimberly Crenshaw's workaround intersection -ality. I'M GONNA academic by trade political scientist by trade and win. Her work around. Intersection came out. It really gave a name and a frame to what so many of us experience right that we don't we don't take off what identity to become a woman and we don't take our gender identity to express ourselves as as black women but we can literally sit at the center and understand the multiple experiences and how they show up and I think you know the intersection work. And how that has informed the work of Reproductive Justice Communities folks like Monica Simpson at Sister. Song folks like days on Yellow Out Loretta. Ross who've just been Really icons for me in understanding from a movement centered side. A people centered side. What it really means to actually deliver to deliver on the promise of the CARE. Not just actually provide the service and so you know those are the kind of how I've lived most of my social justice life and the that I've chosen to do I'm constantly thinking about how this shows up at. The epicenter intersection shows up at the center. Becomes really important for me Some so you stepped into the role of acting president of planned parenthood. You're definitely leading an organization during this tumultuous time and we're actually seeing that a lot of people are using the Cova pandemic as an opportunity to again just a full out assault on reproductive freedom. What are some of the ways that planned? Parenthood is fighting back against this. I mean this is crazy right. I mean we are in the middle of a global pandemic. People are just trying to survive. I mean some of us is I just preparing for this interview. Our home home schooling children many women are you know are in the low wage jobs that have been deemed essential. And so they're trying to grapple whip getting to work and also taking care of their kids win the majority of healthcare workers. And you know when you've probably seen the Kobe just the preliminary cova data around some of the disparities but that black and Latino communities in particular are facing not just the harshest economic consequences but also the the disparities in terms of treatment and death given the amount of bias built into systems. And so all of this is happening and these politicians who are so anti women and wounded help have decided to exploit the and the fear and the urgency in this moment to push their political agenda. And you know I think it's it's completely insane that governors in several states states like Texas states like Iowa Alabama. Oklahoma have decided to issue executive orders suggesting that abortion is not an essential service suggesting that it's not clearly not time sensitive service we know abortion is essential. We have been you know working with all of our partners in states to get that critical information for you know to to fight these policies litigating against them. Take them to court. I'm and yet we're also having to support our patients in getting the care that they need so some of those ways in which we're doing we're identifying how may get from Texas to one of our affiliates in California said a woman from Texas came to to Los Angeles last week for medication abortion like just to highlight the absurdity of the attack that someone is literally getting in a car getting cars or planes trains under the guise of because they've been told that abortion is not essential that they're are actually traveling and making themselves more at risk and other people at risk with respect to the pandemic because they need this time sensitive procedure special thanks to Madison Reed for supporting this episode. Cynthia the producer of the BG podcasts. And I talk about heroin. Cynthia usually dies her natural logs at her local.

Planned Parenthood Federation Planned Parenthood Action Fund acting president and CEO Cecile Richards Texas Reproductive Justice Communiti Alexis Cynthia Mcgill Johnson New York City Oklahoma heroin acting president Kimberly Crenshaw Roe
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Just Between Us

Just Between Us

14:04 min | 1 year ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on Just Between Us

"Today we have Alexis McGill Johnson. Joining US hello. Hi there thanks for having me. Can you tell us a little bit about what you do? Yeah well I I run the Action Fund which is a You know planned. Parenthood is you know is a health provider we provide reproductive health care services across the country. The Action Fund is there to defend the kinds of health. Care that we provide because you know when you start providing care around Sexual health care like abortion. People find ways to attack it and the action. Find the defendant and right now while we're in quarantine those sneaky. Republicans are trying to attack abortion more than ever right. Can you believe it? Can you believe they would actually use a global pandemic to play political? Yes I can explain to our listeners. What's going on for sure? Absolutely I mean you know centrally. Yes I mean. They're essentially using a global pandemic to push up political agenda around people live They are trying to make an argument that they should you know essentially abortion because it would It would hire people to come out During the pandemic that it wasn't time sensitive which of course we know planned. Parenthood abortion is time sensitive. We know that access to healthcare is time sensitive and it is essential and And what we're seeing is. Actually you know Women continuing to do what we always do is take matters into our own hands. Driving hundreds of miles out of state and certain Certain parts of the country to To access safe and legal abortion and it's just unconscionable what are some things even an anecdotally that you're hearing about people doing During the pandemic to try to access abortions or access planned parenthood's care. Yeah so There've been a number of states Back up a little bit rate so that Obviously many states are in sheltering in place they have the place. Orders Which is a great thing to help us. Latin Kerr and some states decided to extend that to To offer executive orders through the through the governor's to to essentially ban and restrict further access. Mine do these are. These are many of the states that already have really restrictive access on abortion and what people have done. Is they've gotten on planes. They've gotten in cars driven hundreds of miles which means that they are taking the risk not only of exposing themselves but also others to the new corona virus Some patients they have been attempting to manage self self manage abortion And then of course there will. There will be many who are simply just forced to wait until it's too late and they can actually get their care that you yes. I think you said in another interview that they're using the pandemic as a cover for this political move of like trying to make it impossible to get an abortion and I and the problem is like in in Texas especially the court upheld. That decision right. Yeah it did but like it's kind of like whiplash rate so So over the last three weeks were happened in Texas to the executive order came down Than not we sued along with Center for reproductive. Cry It's and The lawyering project and then it went to the fifth circuit. And then it you know and then we had to go to the to the Supreme Court and then the cigarette back and they're all the ways in which we've had to rely on the legal structures to protect to protect what is already a constitutional Ray And just recently I guess in the last I don't even know what day of the pandemic is but but I but I think just recently in the last couple of days we were able to To get a stay to provide medication abortion in Texas and so but you know the situation continues to be really fluid. This is temporary relief and behind that what we have our stories of providers and patients who are literally calling patients. And they're saying you know I know you're appointing scheduled tomorrow. It's now cancelled Or calling the back and saying you have twenty four hours to get in because we don't have happen next you know and so it's just the. The legal whiplash is accompanied by such a clash for for both the providers and the and the patients and You know that's you know the the sham piece to cover piece really fact that you know all of this is in the guise of the of the safety of the patients and yet now were exposing them to you know to other to the we're also exposed them to such emotional turmoil and just the idea that it's non essential is just like a basic misunderstanding of the procedure in general. I can't really think of anything more time. Sensitive slowly yes well. It is completely time-sensitive and And it is essential and you know no one stops needing sexual reproductive healthcare in a public health crisis. In fact they need more. Will you also just have spoken on a little bit? How it's even tougher for a lot of women. Right now who are stuck at home with their abusers or an intoxicant relationships and having access to this healthcare. It's almost like you said like more necessary. Now Yeah and I think look I mean. People are trying to survive crisis. I'm I'm here in New York City Right. Now is my family and it is. It's eerie scary. It is we are to be the center of the pandemic but we see what people are experiencing all across the country. They're just trying to survive the crisis rate and I think women in particular are bearing the brunt of a lot of work already in this great is right there home schooling children. They're the ones who may be working low wage jobs because they've been deemed essential they They're making up the majority of Healthcare Workers. And you know when you layer on Race and class on you see that black and the next communities have base hersher economic consequences right in some way. It's like you know they've been deemed essential workers and then at the same time told Actually but you still don't have control over your own body and you know I think when you think about the kind of structural inequalities that impact people of color that impact women and You know to play with healthcare On top of that just feel Incredibly wrong can you speak to a little bit about what planned. Parenthood provides in addition to abortion services. Oh absolutely I'm parenthood provides The only planning birth control Sexually transmitted infection testing with the eye testing treatment Hiv PEPPER PREP prophylactics And you know and also obviously safe and legal abortion planned. Parenthood also provides sex education sex expertise sprayed so also the time that people are staying home and sheltering in place. And you know with with folks. Even if you're not in a in a situation that is the that it's complicated that maybe loving you know that may be a a big person of what you may be doing now and planned. Parenthood is continues to remain open Online through telehealth for access for You know to get access to those services. Oh Yeah I see. Us Planned Parenthood all the time in college because I was the only affordable thing and I think people have misconception that it's just an abortion clinic and look I think that We we proudly and unapologetically provide safe and legal abortion. And you know I I believe that you know The more I can't say that more parents can say that. I think it's critically important. Because you know people people choose to worship for all kinds of reasons and we should not stigmatize that And there are also other Abortion sits within a broader spectrum every healthcare Identity care things like gender affirming hormone therapy. You know that you know coming up when I did. You know like we like. We went to know. Regard Girlfriends went to planned parenthood. Totally in secret. Not just because it was affordable that because we couldn't tell her parents that you know Or WE DIDN'T HAVE RELATIONSHIPS. Parents have have those kinds of conversations and so the fact that for a century planned. Parenthood has been An incredibly important trusted provider in community and that people have seen it and understood it as being kind of that safe space to care no matter what in that range of services that you know that includes abortion but certainly expands the full The full care is really important understand. Can we talk a little bit about Outside corentin what has just been like the Republicans plan of Attack In terms of getting Roe v Wade overturned. And what you guys are doing to prevent them. Of course yeah. You know 'cause people have asked like aren't you supposed to Christ uses a pandemic and you know to your earlier. It's like no because in fact has been It's been going on for quite some time I joined the board of planned. Parenthood actually almost a decade ago. Right at the beginning of the two thousand ten Congress and it was during that time. A lot of GERRYMANDERING. A Lotta redistricting that we thought it's really be push around Around creating restrictive target restrictive laws. heuristic access to abortion and abortion providers and they Those laws just in the last year we saw three hundred three of them being introduced in almost forty seven states. So you know in state legislatures. And so you know Only only a smaller percentage of them were Were able to get through. But the idea that that under this administration in particular the sense that that Anti Women's health legislators have become so emboldened around pushing All of these kinds of severe restrictions in the name of women's health that are really anti antiwar top of that The the courts have been remade in Under senator McConnell so They've confirmed I think. Almost two hundred ninety conservative judges. Some of them have so little qualification Except you know for them. They believe that they They will They will work to dismantle ro there's one There's one federal judge who was confirmed on the on a On the bench in Missouri and Sarah P. Like who doesn't even believe in like how is that okay how that quote Unquote pro-life. Also let me say having people drive far and wide and potentially spread the virus. How is that pro-life right exactly exactly It's not It's not and I think this is like the it's really just exposing the the Sham Right. It's exposing I mean literally patients who were driving several hundred thousands of from Texas to California rate to get access to medication abortion so driving to get two pills that they will take with you. Know within twenty four hours of each other and then getting in a car and driving back and you know. They are exposing themselves to To Kobe they're exposing people around them. They're traveling they're stopping me have had to get childcare. Taking care of you know I mean all of the role of the ways in which You know it one would expect people to behaving In the middle of this crisis they're asking people to go out and do something differently. So you know again it's consistent. This has been going on for the last decade really intensified under this administration. And you have these bands. You have these judges you have Nineteen cases one one of which is already been stupid into the into the Supreme Court but eighteen others that are winding their way up challenging these feeds restrictions and so to the bigger question around dismantling Roe You know we. We are definitely and preparation mode to You know that if roe is not overturned in any number of these cases of the next few years now that the judiciary remain It could very well be gutted to the point where access you know really depends on what state you live in a very somewhat like that now depending on the level of restriction but could really be Could really be good to a point where it would you could have access in California and New York and not in not in Alabama Texas if it was overturned. Would it go back to state by state deciding if it's allowed or legal federal would go back to the most recent law On the on the state book so again in New York you have the reproductive health. Act Up past few years ago. That was also a decade in the making Where rose been codified in law and you have states like you know like Michigan that I think has like an eighteen. Thirty thirty one law on the books. that That doesn't codify rose. So you know so there will be a lot of work patchwork of of states where you might have reasonable accessibility Other states you would not And and our best estimate is that twenty five million women would be living in states every productive age would be living in states without access in.

Texas Supreme Court Action Fund executive roe US Alexis McGill Johnson New York New York City Kerr California Michigan senator McConnell Congress Alabama Texas
As Missouri Clinic Awaits Its Legal Fate, Abortions In State Have Virtually Halted

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

As Missouri Clinic Awaits Its Legal Fate, Abortions In State Have Virtually Halted

"Missouri could soon become the first state in the nation without a clinic providing abortions Planned Parenthood officials say the state's last remaining clinic has performed only a few abortions in recent months and peers zero McCammon has more the clinic is at the center of a licensing dispute between Planned Parenthood and Missouri Republican governor Mike Parsons administration and could be forced to stop performing abortions a new analysis provided to NPR by Planned Parenthood shows that the vast majority of patients seeking the procedure in Missouri have begun crossing state lines to obtain it when parenthood acting president Alexis McGill Johnson said the shift is the result of strict abortion laws in the state what it means is that abortion access have narrowed so dramatically that it's almost a rite in name only according to the data just three patients were provided abortions at the Missouri clinic in February of this year down from one hundred seventy four one year before a decision about the clinics fate is expected in the

Missouri NPR Mike Parsons Acting President Alexis Mcgill Johnson
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Work together call by ten PM tonight triple eight plane wreck that's triple eight plan Rick CBS news update hood says it's giving up federal funds intended for the health care of low income women rather than follow the new trump administration rule that prohibits clinics from referring women for abortions acting president Alexis McGill Johnson we believe that the trump administration is doing that as an attack on reproductive healthcare if you keep providers like Planned Parenthood from serving our patients she says Planned Parenthood centers across the country will remain open as they continue to fight the new rule in court Illinois governor JB prince Kerr says his stable fight back and will not comply with the new federal guidelines in Illinois we have not and will not support this gag rule we will make sure that access to these services remains available because in Illinois we trust women he said the rule is destabilizing women's health care CBS news update on Pam Coulter the nice of search engines and social media sites were unbiased platforms they didn't choose a side politically keep dreaming in twenty sixteen that Tekeli to Google bragged about donating millions of dollars to Hillary these big tech companies that restrict the free speech rights of conservatives are the very same corporations were trusting to handle our personal data online I don't want them using my web history or video searches against me that's why I use express VPN every time I go online when I use express VPN these tech companies.

hood Illinois Pam Coulter Tekeli Google Hillary Rick CBS acting president Alexis McGill Johnson JB prince Kerr CBS
"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"alexis mcgill johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"President Alexis McGill Johnson to appear on this program we're told she's not available this weekend but we are hoping to talk with her in the coming days in much of the United States including here in Washington DC temperatures have hovered near one hundred with heat indexes as high as a hundred fifteen degrees the National Weather Service has used words like excessive heat and oppressive humidity warning everyone to keep cool reporter coming the card does I visited some folks trying to do just that at some swimming pools in southeast DC and sent us this audio postcard my favorite one well I walked to the corner store this morning at eight Saddam Hussein toenails is an added then Satan's tell me so that you can pretty much right best place to be is that a swimming pool I brought my children my grandchildren my nieces and my nephews it's about ten of us and the pool is take showers drink plenty of fluids images they are the woman was a lot better than a lot of fun is more people out here to give it my house anyway so I rather be out a I all day long I only get one I wish I now definitely have a beer or two beers it is hot is what I imagine H. E. double hockey sticks with I was on the news Natalie so is really is crippling.

Alexis McGill Johnson United States National Weather Service reporter DC Natalie President Washington Saddam Hussein H. E. hockey hundred fifteen degrees
Planned Parenthood CEO Dr. Leana Wen Is Out

KQED Radio Show

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Planned Parenthood CEO Dr. Leana Wen Is Out

"After less than a year in the job lean a win is out as president of Planned Parenthood and payers minister promo reports that the move comes as the organisation and abortion rights come under increasing attack Selena when left her position as Baltimore's health commissioner to lead Planned Parenthood last September replacing Cecile Richards but now the thirty six year old is out when an emergency room physician was only the second doctor to home the group in a statement posted to Twitter she says she had clashed with new board chairs over quote philosophical differences over the direction and future of Planned Parenthood when's removal comes at a critical moment for the organization several states have recently passed severely restrictive abortion laws that could end up before the Supreme Court ultimately overturning roe V. Wade longtime Planned Parenthood board member Alexis McGill Johnson will temporarily take over the NASA Romo NPR

President Trump Baltimore Commissioner Cecile Richards Twitter Supreme Court Roe V. Wade Alexis Mcgill Johnson NPR Selena Thirty Six Year