4 Burst results for "Alexey Leonov"

"alexey leonov" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 9 months ago

"alexey leonov" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But that was done. ASA. The big companies do not have Redundancy for that very important departure. Ah, velocity change. And if you don't get 100% You're not going to get to Mars. John 95 80. Percent. We went to the moon, huh? We? We turned trajectory if propulsion Or other problems. We were not in more than a 10 Day orbit. But if you don't get 85% of what you're looking for, you're not coming back to earth anyway, son or I get it. You have to have a very reliable Landing mechanism. Redundancy? Yes, which helps build the reliability. John in Manhattan. You're on W N. Y. C with Buzz Aldrin. Hi. Hi. Both big Fanny is I just wanted Tosu. What you thought about maybe Tesla's work with free energy. And even maybe William Rice has worked with organ energy. And it's that we have ever come into play with trying to get into other places like anti gravity or or things like that. I'm familiar with anti gravity nuclear propulsion. None of those will get us to the star's gravity waves may And I have Ah, good friend who is maybe leading the U. S research into gravity waves, and he says the Chinese are significantly ahead of us. And he's cooperating with them. Gravity waves may Get us to Alfa Centauri and beyond. That's my science fiction story. Except they came here first One little inconvenience. I did read in your book that humans can't breathe the air on Mars. What's working, there's no air. The pressure is like 100,000 ft here. And it's carbon dioxide. It's Not to be global warming. But we grow plants where they eat beside dirt carbon dioxide. And where they produce oxygen. So you we start planting on Mars to start But that would take of course, a very long time. In the meantime, live in oxygen chambers. Well, pressurized. Yeah. Habitats. Yes, with certainly more than enough. Breathe a ble oxygen. And, uh, the water dies that is there through electricity power from the sun nuclear reactor. We can separate the hydrogen and the oxygen. And that's good rocket fuel. But it's also nice. Readable oxygen. And his water and we need to drink that stuff. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin with us his new book, along with Mary and Dyson, a physicist and NASA flight engineer. Is a kid's book called Welcome to Mars, making a home on the Red Planet. He's giving us the adult version on the radio right now, and here's a skeptic Benjamin and Morristown. You're on W, N Y C. Hi, Benjamin. Yup. I am certain that skeptic skeptical regarding cars. Okay, priorities. I don't think we have thought that through and a lot of things that we've done in space. Hi there too far too many things on Earth. We need to address first, and they will probably never be addressed entirely successfully. I'm like percentage of discretionary funds. Would you like to solve all the problems here on Earth? 100% We want to sit back and watch the Chinese Populate Mars. We want to sit back and watch The Russians populate Mars. That's not exciting or inspiring for if we're doing it, because it's because it's romantic and sexy. Which is certainly true are only because it's competitive with Russia or China, which might be true. I'm not sure that that competition is thought to continue forever. Wait a minute. We will probably take many, many decades. We come peach. At design level. And we cooperate and execute together. That's a principle. Now we went to the moon all by ourselves, mostly because we advanced our technology. Who put together the capabilities of all nations to be able to populate Mars will require all nations to advance their technology. Not one nation could do it all by themselves. Let me get one more question in here from a listener and this one, I think is going to be about the past rather than the future. Michael in the East Village on W. N. Y C with Pa's ultrahigh Michael, How are you? OK, but I've always been inspired by the story Tom Wolfe wrote about you. Singlehandedly inventing the process of working in space before there was unknown How you could even turn a wrench was one if you could comment on his description or just that period. Where it was really unknown. You would actually accomplish anything in space. Well, he's very generous. Um, my very good friend Ed White. From West point here behind me, did the first American space walk and we had to coax him back in. Alexey Leonov was the first Human being to exit the spacecraft, and he had a very difficult time getting back in again. We'll sort it Ed s. So we fixed the hatch. So it was easier to close because that was pretty tall guy. And it was Ed who fighter squadron mate in Germany, who Started coaxed me into applying for the astronaut program. He gone through test pilot training and I hadn't so he got picked. But I had to convince NASA that my rendezvous work at M I t. And my fighter pilot experience. Qualified me to become an astronaut. Okay, so I wasn't gonna fly in the Gemini program with rendezvous. It took a tragedy. My backdoor neighbor, Charlie Bassett was killed in an airplane accident and shuffling the crews allowed. Jim Lovell and I To back up that mission nine and then fly on Gemini 12 and my scuba diving experience caused me toe welcome eagerly. The suggestion that we train in neutral buoyancy in a swimming pool. To simulate the floating in space of zero gravity that worked wonderfully. Is it feasible for commercial enterprises? So lead the way to Mars. Is there enough Private center private sector incentive, like for Elon Musk, maybe in his company Space X, um, must was on Stephen Colbert's new late Night show last night. I missed him because I was watching myself. On on comedy Special. With Very well know that you were the competition, Honey, that was a very comic. So let me play 30. Seconds of what you missed. Elon Musk was Stephen Colbert. Talking about how he thinks we could make Mars inhabitable, but eventually you could transform Mars into an earth like planet. How would you do that? You needed warming up just warming up. If you want a blanket, or how about this Mars up? You know, it is the fast way. Son is the fast way on the slow way. Okay, Uh, give me the fast way. The fast way his drop them nuclear weapons over the polls. You're super villain. That's what a super villain does..

Mars Buzz Aldrin John NASA Elon Musk Alexey Leonov Ed White Morristown Stephen Colbert Alfa Centauri Tom Wolfe Tesla William Rice Charlie Bassett Jim Lovell Fanny Benjamin
"alexey leonov" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"alexey leonov" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Save on car insurance. No need to fake. An ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switching save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. Guys bobby bones host the bobby bones show and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I get all my friends together. We get into a room and we do a radio show. We share our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world if he possibly can and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country. Artists always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music to wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven w. m. c. you in Washington. Dc or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP This Day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Hi Everyone I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in History Class. A podcast where we build the time machine and all you have to do is hop. Today IS MARCH. Eighteenth Twenty twenty. The day was March. Eighteenth nineteen sixty five so viet cosmonaut. Alexey Leonov became the first person to go. On a spacewalk spacewalk is one in astronaut leaves their spacecraft to a tether it's called EDA which stands for extra vehicular activity. Alexi Leonov served as a fighter pilot in the nineteen fifties by nine hundred sixty. He had been chosen as one of the first twenty cosmonauts for the Soviet space program and was training to take his first spaceflight. The Soviet Union launched the first person to space when Yuri Gagarin's made an orbital flight. And His boss doc wine spacecraft in nineteen sixty one the. Soviet program launched is first mission on October twelfth. Nineteen sixty four. Both hide one was the first to carry more than one crew person into space. It was also the first mission to carry an engineer and a physician into space hot. Too launched just months later on March eighteenth nineteen sixty five it carried to people commander Pal Bouillon and pilot Alexi. Leonov it was Leonov's first spaceflight and billiards first and only spaceflight the hard three K. D. space craft had an extendable airlock that allowed enough to go out into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air about an hour and a half after lines billions of open the outer airlock and Leonov walked out into space. Attached to tether his spacewalk lasted for about twelve minutes. A camera mounted on the airlock recorded the spacewalk. It was reported that Leonov's body temperature jumped about three point two degrees Fahrenheit or one point eight degrees Celsius twenty minutes and he was close to having a heat stroke. His spacesuit was full of sway. Though the spacewalk went relatively smoothly Leonov had difficulty reentering. The capsule the pressure difference between the air and his spacesuit and the vacuum of space expanded and stiffened his spacesuit that made it to big heart to fit back into the airlock so Leonov opened a valve to release oxygen and depressurize his suit. He was then able to fit back into the space craft but he did start to feel some of the effects of decompression thickness namely the sensation of pens and needles. The crew. Hit another snag when objecting inflatable airlock. Which sent the spacecraft into a Spin? Oxygen levels also began to climb which came with the risk of explosion. On top of this the automatic guidance system for re entry malfunctioned. They had to turn off the automatic landing program and instead conduct re entry and landing manually. The ended up off course and the orbital module did not separate from the landing module. They landed in snow in a forest in Siberia. The flight had lasted for twenty six hours. After two days in the freezing forest the cosmonauts able to ski to a pickup location and they eventually made it to their launch site at by car. Nearly three months after Leonov spacewalk U. S. astronaut. Ed White took the second spacewalk ever when he stepped outside of Jim and I four. I'm Eve Jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If you know you already spend too much time on social media spend some time with us at t the I eight hundred podcast on facebook twitter and instagram. Four if you're so inclined you can send us a message at this day at Iheart Media Dot Com. Thanks again for listening. We'll see you tomorrow. More podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows dear. Young rocker is more than just a podcast. About music. A memoir of how it feels to survive high school when you don't fit in and the freeing feeling of picking up the tar for the first time it's also advice for anyone who is for was young and his ever felt weird or alone during rocker is written and narrated by me Chelsea Ersan executive produced by.

Alexey Leonov Eighteenth Twenty twenty bobby bones iheartradio Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin History Class apple billiards Washington Chelsea Ersan Ed White engineer Eve Jeffcoat commander Iheart Media Pal Bouillon Alexi
The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

This Day in History Class

03:18 min | 1 year ago

The First Spacewalk - March 18, 1965

"Hi Everyone I'm eaves and you're listening to this day in History Class. A podcast where we build the time machine and all you have to do is hop. Today IS MARCH. Eighteenth Twenty twenty. The day was March. Eighteenth nineteen sixty five so viet cosmonaut. Alexey Leonov became the first person to go. On a spacewalk spacewalk is one in astronaut leaves their spacecraft to a tether it's called EDA which stands for extra vehicular activity. Alexi Leonov served as a fighter pilot in the nineteen fifties by nine hundred sixty. He had been chosen as one of the first twenty cosmonauts for the Soviet space program and was training to take his first spaceflight. The Soviet Union launched the first person to space when Yuri Gagarin's made an orbital flight. And His boss doc wine spacecraft in nineteen sixty one the. Soviet program launched is first mission on October twelfth. Nineteen sixty four. Both hide one was the first to carry more than one crew person into space. It was also the first mission to carry an engineer and a physician into space hot. Too launched just months later on March eighteenth nineteen sixty five it carried to people commander Pal Bouillon and pilot Alexi. Leonov it was Leonov's first spaceflight and billiards first and only spaceflight the hard three K. D. space craft had an extendable airlock that allowed enough to go out into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air about an hour and a half after lines billions of open the outer airlock and Leonov walked out into space. Attached to tether his spacewalk lasted for about twelve minutes. A camera mounted on the airlock recorded the spacewalk. It was reported that Leonov's body temperature jumped about three point two degrees Fahrenheit or one point eight degrees Celsius twenty minutes and he was close to having a heat stroke. His spacesuit was full of sway. Though the spacewalk went relatively smoothly Leonov had difficulty reentering. The capsule the pressure difference between the air and his spacesuit and the vacuum of space expanded and stiffened his spacesuit that made it to big heart to fit back into the airlock so Leonov opened a valve to release oxygen and depressurize his suit. He was then able to fit back into the space craft but he did start to feel some of the effects of decompression thickness namely the sensation of pens and needles. The crew. Hit another snag when objecting inflatable airlock. Which sent the spacecraft into a Spin? Oxygen levels also began to climb which came with the risk of explosion. On top of this the automatic guidance system for re entry malfunctioned. They had to turn off the automatic landing program and instead conduct re entry and landing manually. The ended up off course and the orbital module did not separate from the landing module. They landed in snow in a forest in Siberia. The

Alexey Leonov Eighteenth Twenty Twenty Soviet Union Yuri Gagarin History Class Billiards Engineer Alexi Pal Bouillon Commander
"alexey leonov" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

14:01 min | 2 years ago

"alexey leonov" Discussed on Space Nuts

"The Second Guiding Been Journal and by Agnes sequence spence nats to doing real good hello yet again and thank you for joining us on another edition good how you doing well thank you sir how you tiny little good when you were at time Very briefly a few nights ago but it was spotted but I'll be I'll be there again soon in the cart era because they can't do anything they capital of Australia Center as a political world positively do you still work for them I used to but I don't anymore you're right they'd we will dodge that rather dos today though we're going to be talking about one of the great names in space history and that is Alexi Leonov who has just passed away we're going to talk about what he did and what it did for humanity in the space race we've also got some news on Venus now we talked about Venus the other day in fascinated to learn that it may well have been in a planet that was not unlike Earth at some stage well now they've got a bit more information that focuses on lava flows and even though we can't see them we you can see what they looked like and glean a lot of information from those lava flows which adds even more potential to the fact that Venus may have been a a planet that could have had life at some stage may be we're also going to answer some questions one from Berry about the planet being too big too big to get off questions about the the danger of blackhall's flooding around s solar system or our our galaxy and Mars quakes or coming up on this edition of space nuts number one hundred and seventy-five frayed oh my Gosh good thing we do one every day otherwise we could have been sitting for very long time we could have been actually we do them once a week and sometimes we do two or three a week because sometimes we just can't get together it's strange situation but that's the beauty of podcasting you can do it anytime and any place not like radio you go to be the at the right time to get on the radio to say she did lines anyway let's go to our first topic and this is the passing Major General Alexey Leonov at the age of eighty five when amazing man is an amazing and one I guess who's visit treatments maybe got overshadowed by the subsequent lunar landings because he made history on the baiting the March nineteen sixty five by being the first human to perform a spacewalk so he was in a capsule will code shot to and he a basically pulled himself out of that in a spacesuit he had Salang tether so he didn't just float into space and never be seen again I hope it wasn't made of the same stuff that might painting had and holding it up because it credited ground last night and smashed into a million pieces Ya the funny thing is we both heard it and we both looked around the entire house couldn't figure out what it was figured it was just a seismic normally and founded this morning so hopefully the tether wasn't made of that stuff because not good well you can see from the images there is footage on the number of websites the tethers pretty thick and finally looked to be about a centimeter two thirds of an inch to an inch in diameter there too scary to contemplate them big bids too scared contemplate than breaking I'd WanNa rope at least is thick as my forearm before venturing despise yeah that's right you would does but what I forgotten probably didn't know this on the eighteenth of March nineteen sixty five but he's he's space what was actually televised live broadcast on radio which gives you an idea of just how confident the Soviet Union were in the space technology tell him and I guess you could say in March nineteen sixty five they were ahead of the of the game because they had a two person spacecraft now I will need to look up trying doing very quickly when the first Gemini Space flight was which Gemini of course was the the the US to person as seacraft tentacle Gemini Yes so From Google Dot Gov my weekly they these things go gosh this is terrible and so but it was about the same time so the Gemini Program was roundabout is sixty one it started yeah the one was a young and the missions were not sixty five nine hundred sixty six around the same time yeah but was it before the eighteenth of March that was my founded in any case it means that you know the Soviet Union with capsule were doing very well Timmy. No one I really is not in sixty four there you go okay Da piglet I done they say how much research we did before we thought records so thoroughly prepared when we do these functions but that look whatever the situation was he clearly made history I space walk the the the I guess you could say that that time the Soviet Union's in the not unnecess- humans programs were pretty well neck and neck but throughout the six hundred sixty five ninety sixty six the Gemini project absolutely although I think in many ways they stole the show because they there were twelve Gemini missions I think they basically learned how to rendezvous in space up to send multiple people into space how to spice spice we'll explain the Gemini astronauts as well so I think that's probably the point which NASA overtook the Soviet Union in human spaceflight. Why did the Americans end up winning the space race in getting to the and putting people on their first because the Soviet Union had a brilliant headstart and absolutely neild it and then all of a sudden Um I got left behind Bali I think one of the reasons I'm he's in some ways it's a bit like the Americans were before NASA because until nineteen fifty eight when NASA was full moved you had multiple basically odds of the military all doing different things in space trying to and you know there was competition between them rather than rather than cooperation it was the the Soviet Union success was putting it one nine hundred fifty seven galvanize the Americans into law we've got to get everybody together on this rather than rather than the compete what we need is a space agency and that was fine it took off from there whereas I think element of competition prevailed for much longer in the Soviet Union and there were particular rocket engineers who had very differing points of view and they were basically vying four supremacy in building Soviet rockets and it was only I think it was nineteen sixty five when the Soviet n one program was introduced and one was the equivalent to the was a gigantic hundred made tool rocket stack which was planned to take two extra knows to lunar orbit and put them down on the moon's surface with a with the rover alike the three going to it was with the Apollo Program so I think it was partly they tell squabbling that slow down the progress of the Soviet Union And allowed NASA to push for what would technology wise they were actually ahead of the game in some ways the the and one program had some very advanced hardware is that a stage rocket motors probably more advanced than the Rocketdyne the giant rocketdyne engines that they The hello system had the Saturn five but they were thirty of the I I do then well and when you thirty of these things all going together introduces all kinds of neither rations and horrible things like that which I don't think they ever came to manage to solve so that record Gemini One Germany to both on crude Gemini Three launched on the twenty third of March nine hundred sixty five head on board GUS grissom and join young there you go so the Russians were ahead by five days five days in fact I think in the movie the right stuff you've tried that that very close fought battle to get the the first pairing in space and the Russians won by five days but I guess also indicates that the Americans were catching up incredibly fast there's another interesting aspect to this story involving Alexi Leonov because during the height of the Cold War there was this fabulous mission involving NASA and the Soviet space agency where they docked between a prime rib and a soya's prime rib and Alexey Leonov was on board that mission he was so the Apollo Soyuz take a fantastic stuff I remember when that happened this was a like I think mid seventies nineteen seventy five how's it I you know I felt this is fantastic the Soviet Union Nessa culp writing in space it was really great news led of course to eventually led to the International Space Station and another interesting sideline to this and this is sort of bringing in my my my radio Corre- always be fan of a band an Australian banks Sherbert who big in the seventies and they released an album not in seventy five called life and as well as doing rock and roll music they sort of ventured into an area of experimental sound experimental music and they actually used audio from the coupling of the Apollo and Soyuz probes and the meeting of the astronauts in the music and it it really does sort of it really is a haunting pace of a volume if I heard it I would suggest getting a hold of show it's life is for living album and listen to the survival reprieves at the end of the album because it's got audio in it and it just sounds fantastic it really you got the album I play every so often adore it so much but yes remembering the great man Alexi Leonov and I understand it he will receive a burial at dame military memorial cemetery outside of of Moscow at one of the national heroes no doubt about it actually national a global here yes is we I think we should be more and more cooperative in our pri- arrivals through the sixties and seventies but these days the cooperation in space is a good example of way humanity should go I think Fred Watson of course this episode is brought to you by Hewlett Packard Enterprise at a busy small business keeping up with it can be challenging hyper converged composer cloud or say artificial intelligence you know what that is you've been to the movies but what world ending.

Soviet Union Gemini Guiding Been Journal Agnes NASA five days