35 Burst results for "Alexander I"

Gilgeous-Alexander, Dort lead Thunder past Nets, 130-109

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

Gilgeous-Alexander, Dort lead Thunder past Nets, 130-109

"The the nets nets lost lost for for the the sixth sixth time time in in their their last last seven seven home home games games absorbing absorbing the the one one thirty thirty one one oh oh nine nine defeat defeat against against the the thunder thunder J. J. gill gill just just Alexander Alexander delivered delivered thirty thirty three three points points ten ten rebounds rebounds and and nine nine assists assists for for the the thunder thunder he he scored scored twelve twelve straight straight points points to to give give Oklahoma Oklahoma City City a a twenty twenty one one eleven eleven lead lead coach coach admitted admitted a a few few days days ago ago that that there there was was to to boost boost start start games games the the worst worst movie movie ever ever one one of of the the worst worst use use of of the the star star games games and and I I kind kind of of took took that that personally personally kind kind of of being being a a leader leader I I want want to to go go to to a a good good start start rookie rookie Josh Josh Getty Getty provided provided nineteen nineteen points points to to the the thunder's thunder's first first win win in in six six games games the the nets nets were were without without Kevin Kevin Durant Durant and and Kyrie Kyrie Irving Irving as as they they fell fell to to eleven eleven and and eleven eleven in in Brooklyn Brooklyn James James harden harden carried carried the the nets nets with with twenty twenty six six points points nine nine assists assists and and seven seven boards boards rookie rookie camp camp Thomas Thomas had had twenty twenty one one points points off off the the bench bench in in the the loss loss I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Nets Thunder Thunder J. J. Gill Gil Alexander Alexander Thunder Thunder Oklahoma City City Josh Josh Getty Getty Thunder Kevin Kevin Durant Durant Oklahoma Kyrie Kyrie Irving Irving James James Harden Harden Brooklyn Thomas Thomas Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
You're About to Live Through the Greatest Citizen Movement of a Generation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | Last week

You're About to Live Through the Greatest Citizen Movement of a Generation

"The founders believed, and this was explicitly written in Alexander Hamilton, John Jay's, James Madison's private journals, that only God should be able to have the executive legislative and judicial authority. This is why they intentionally separated everybody. They separated it because they believed that no person on this planet should have that much authority. But they realized that the true immediate authority needs to be invested in all of you. This is one of the great dangers of these independent regulatory agencies of people that are largely untouchable that run these bureaucracies in D.C. of which you've never met them, they're unelected, unknown and have almost unaccountable power. But the trajectory of 2020, that were on, if we keep it up, if you keep on praying, fasting, showing up to events, showing up to school board meetings, running for office, if you feel so compelled, consuming news and information, knowing it's happening around you, even though it might be slightly depressing at times, is that you're about to live through the greatest, most unexpected citizen movement in a generation. Let me say that again. You're about to live through one of the greatest cities that all of a sudden they're going to look back and they're going to say when it seemed the bleak and it seems so negative and so dark and it was led by the church. I really believe that's where it all comes down to.

John Jay Alexander Hamilton James Madison D.C.
Rangers sit atop NHL after Kreider, Strome help beat Oilers

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Rangers sit atop NHL after Kreider, Strome help beat Oilers

"Ryan Ryan Strome Strome had had a a goal goal and and two two assists assists to to lead lead the the Rangers Rangers to to a a four four one one victory victory over over the the Edmonton Edmonton with with three three straight straight wins wins the the Rangers Rangers are are tied tied with with Washington Washington for for the the most most points points in in the the league league at at forty forty eight eight Alexei Alexei laughing laughing yeah yeah Barclay Barclay Goodrow Goodrow and and Chris Chris Kreider Kreider with with this this twentieth twentieth also also scored scored Adam Adam fox fox added added a a couple couple of of assists assists Alexander Alexander Georgiev Georgiev made made thirty thirty three three saves saves to to earn earn the the win win Ryan Ryan McLeod McLeod scored scored for for the the Oilers Oilers who who had had just just won won twice twice in in the the last last twelve twelve games games the the NHL's NHL's leading leading scorer scorer at at Minton's Minton's kind kind of of a a David David was was held held scoreless scoreless might might make make you you so so New New York York

Rangers Ryan Ryan Strome Strome Edmonton Edmonton League League Alexei Alexei Barclay Barclay Goodrow Goodro Chris Chris Kreider Kreider Adam Adam Fox Fox Washington Alexander Alexander Georgiev G Ryan Ryan Mcleod Mcleod Oilers NHL Minton David David New New York York
New York City ushers in 2022 with ball drop in Times Square

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

New York City ushers in 2022 with ball drop in Times Square

"New New York York City City welcome welcome the the new new year year and and big big good good riddance riddance to to twenty twenty twenty twenty one one as as confetti confetti and and cheers cheers spread spread across across Times Times Square Square the the crowd crowd of of about about fifteen fifteen hundred hundred spread spread out out and and masked masked up up across across Times Times Square Square how how did did cheered cheered as as a a giant giant ball ball drops drops for for Alexander Alexander Vargas Vargas it it was was magical magical the the confetti confetti does does mean mean that that yeah yeah leave leave the the dance dance scene scene the the scene scene the the vibe vibe of of everybody everybody does does and and just just to to be be here here it it was was one one of of a a lifetime lifetime Erin Erin Chapple Chapple says says it it was was on on our our bucket bucket list list my my son son said said you you know know what what you you turn turn fifty fifty let's let's go go and and it's it's every every single single thing thing I I ever ever ever ever ever ever you you can't can't do do it it alone alone her her son son Tyler Tyler table table says says he he is is just just as as much much fun fun if if not not more more in in Times Times Square Square I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Times Times Square Square New New York York City City Alexander Alexander Vargas Var Erin Erin Chapple Chapple Tyler Tyler Julie Julie Walker Walker
President Vladimir Putin's influence on everyday life in Russia is spreading  to fashion

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

President Vladimir Putin's influence on everyday life in Russia is spreading to fashion

"President president Vladimir Vladimir Putin's Putin's influence influence on on everyday everyday life life in in Russia Russia is is spreading spreading to to fashion fashion with with the the launch launch of of the the first first potent potent branded branded clothing clothing store store the the potent potent team team store store is is run run by by the the federal federal ministry ministry of of industries industries and and trade trade in in is is that that Moscow's Moscow's main main International International Airport Airport the the clothing clothing has has the the colors colors of of the the white white blue blue and and red red Russian Russian tricolour tricolour flag flag with with the the logo logo Putin Putin team team Russia Russia because because they they did did that that because because the the general general director director of of the the brand brand Dimitri Dimitri Shishkin Shishkin says says he he has has been been given given the the green green light light to to launch launch the the project project by by the the Russian Russian president president himself himself what what was was up up with with a a shiny shiny and and he he says says every every detail detail every every textile textile was was calibrated calibrated and and honed honed only only when when we we were were one one hundred hundred percent percent convinced convinced that that we we could could create create a a high high quality quality product product we we launched launched the the opening opening of of the the retail retail chain chain Alexander Alexander unless unless you you have have was was one one of of the the first first customers customers he he bought bought a a red red baseball baseball cap cap with with Russia's Russia's coat coat of of arms arms at at the the navy navy hoodie hoodie he he says says the the clothes clothes are are good good and and the the ambiance ambiance is is very very pleasant pleasant adding adding new new rules rules you you lose lose a a job job he he said said I I love love Russia Russia and and respect respect the the president president I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

Russia President President Vladimir V Federal Federal Ministry Minis Main Main International Intern Putin Putin Moscow Dimitri Dimitri Shishkin Shish Putin Alexander Alexander Navy Navy Baseball Donahue Donahue
NBA-leading Suns win 5th straight, beating Thunder 113-101

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

NBA-leading Suns win 5th straight, beating Thunder 113-101

"Devin Devin Booker Booker poured poured in in thirty thirty points points a a camp camp Johnson Johnson added added twenty twenty one one while while making making all all five five of of his his three three point point attempts attempts in in the the son's son's fifth fifth straight straight win win one one thirteen thirteen one one one one against against the the founder founder Booker Booker splashed splashed home home a a long long three three pointer pointer in in the the third third quarter quarter buzzer buzzer to to give give the the NBA NBA leading leading songs songs in in eighty eighty two two sixty sixty nine nine lead lead after after they they trailed trailed by by three three at at halftime halftime the the Andrea Andrea Ayton Ayton finished finished with with nineteen nineteen points points and and twelve twelve rebounds rebounds well well Chris Chris Paul Paul added added sixteen sixteen points points and and seven seven assists assists to to the the win win J. J. gill gill just just Alexander Alexander had had twenty twenty nine nine points points for for the the thunder thunder who who shot shot under under thirty thirty nine nine percent percent and and had had their their three three game game winning winning streak streak snapped snapped on on the the ferry ferry

Devin Devin Booker Booker Booker Booker Johnson Johnson NBA Andrea Andrea Ayton Ayton Chris Chris Paul Paul J. J. Gill Gill Alexander Alexander Thunder Thunder
Gilgeous-Alexander's triple-double leads Thunder past Denver

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Gilgeous-Alexander's triple-double leads Thunder past Denver

"J. J. gill gill just just Alexander Alexander recorded recorded his his second second career career triple triple double double as as the the thunder thunder dump dump the the nuggets nuggets one one await await ninety ninety four four killed killed as as Alexander Alexander delivered delivered twenty twenty seven seven points points eleven eleven rebounds rebounds and and twelve twelve assists assists in in the the first first triple triple double double by by a a thunder thunder player player at at home home since since Russell Russell Westbrook Westbrook over over two two and and a a half half years years ago ago Derrius Derrius basically basically had had seventeen seventeen points points eleven eleven rebounds rebounds and and Lou Lou Dore Dore had had fifteen fifteen points points in in the the thunder's thunder's largest largest margin margin of of victory victory reigning reigning MVP MVP McCauley McCauley okay okay chat chat a a quiet quiet night night for for the the nuggets nuggets finishing finishing with with just just thirteen thirteen points points seven seven boards boards and and three three assists assists I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Alexander Alexander J. J. Gill Gill Nuggets Thunder Thunder Russell Russell Westbrook Westbrook Derrius Derrius Lou Lou Dore Dore Mccauley Mccauley Thunder Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Gilgeous-Alexander, Thunder beat Grizz in Morant's return

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Gilgeous-Alexander, Thunder beat Grizz in Morant's return

"Josh Josh Getty Getty scores scores the the go go ahead ahead bucket bucket with with fifty fifty seconds seconds to to go go to to help help the the thunder thunder upset upset the the Grizzlies Grizzlies one one oh oh two two ninety ninety nine nine in in a a game game in in which which both both teams teams squandered squandered double double digit digit leads leads the the thunder thunder survive survive behind behind a a double double double double from from Getty Getty who who tallied tallied nineteen nineteen points points and and eleven eleven assists assists J. J. gill gill just just Alexander Alexander notched notched a a team team high high twenty twenty three three for for Oklahoma Oklahoma City City which which won won its its second second road road improved improved a a ton ton in in nineteen nineteen Desmond Desmond bane bane poured poured in in a a game game high high twenty twenty five five for for the the Grizzlies Grizzlies who who dropped dropped their their second second straight straight John John Moran Moran had had sixteen sixteen points points eight eight assists assists and and six six rebounds rebounds in in his his return return after after missing missing twelve twelve games games to to a a knee knee injury injury and and a a stint stint in in the the league's league's health health and and safety safety protocols protocols I'm I'm Danika Danika

Thunder Thunder Grizzlies Josh Josh Getty Getty Getty Getty J. J. Gill Gill Alexander Alexander Oklahoma City City Desmond Desmond Bane Bane John John Moran Moran Oklahoma Danika Danika
What Would the Playback Be for Eliminating Large Portions of the Population?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | Last month

What Would the Playback Be for Eliminating Large Portions of the Population?

"To eliminate a large portion of the population? What's so incredible to me is how close we are in historical terms, meaning not so far away from the intentional attempt to eliminate entire races of people. This is not just done by the national socialist Workers Party in the 1930s and 1940s in Germany, despicably and evil. But it's also attempt to be done by Mao Zedong and Joseph Stalin. If the 20th century told us anything, it told us a couple things as Alexander social needs and famously wrote in the gulag archipelago. He said that all of this was thanks to ideology. Now, Alexander social needs an reflected in the gulag archipelago, which I encourage you to read. He went into a deep reflection saying, what did I personally do that might have contributed to this great evil? It's very profound. And actually, that book was largely responsible for the downfall of the Soviet Union. There's another great book by Victor frankel, which is called man's search for meaning by writing that book he ended up starting a whole new psychological kind of school of thoughts called logo therapy. The will to meaning. Usually you have the will to power the will to pleasure. He says that we as humans have a moral obligation to have a will to meaning. Viktor frankl famously said in man's search for meaning there are only two types of people, the decent. And the indecent. We are so close to the committed and attempted elimination of entire groups of people. Why is it that anytime anyone says that the government might be trying to do that again, they're called a conspiracy theorist and you're not even allowed to talk about it. It's a very

National Socialist Workers Par Alexander Victor Frankel Gulag Archipelago Joseph Stalin Mao Zedong Germany Soviet Union
Georgiev stops 36, Rangers hang on for 2-1 win over Sabres

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Georgiev stops 36, Rangers hang on for 2-1 win over Sabres

"Alexander Alexander kirke kirke have have stopped stopped thirty thirty six six shots shots in in the the ranges ranges extended extended one one of of the the best best start start in in team team history history with with a a two two one one win win over over the the Sabres Sabres there there are are a a lot lot of of shots shots I I don't don't have have too too much much time time to to to to think think about about anything anything else else today today right right I I scored scored two two of of them them so so I I felt felt really really good good to to get get that that W. W. because because the the Bennett Bennett Jack Jack got got his his first first goal goal in in fifteen fifteen games games and and Alex Alex love love for for near near also also scored scored as as New New York York improved improved to to eighteen eighteen five five and and three three with with its its eighth eighth win win in in nine nine games games the the record record matches matches the the Blueshirts Blueshirts best best twenty twenty six six games games start start tying tying the the mark mark set set by by the the nineteen nineteen ninety ninety four four Cup Cup winners winners the the Rangers Rangers hung hung on on after after a a video video review review determined determined buffalo buffalo defenseman defenseman Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin was was offside offside negating negating Victor Victor all all of of his his goal goal with with fifty fifty seven seven seconds seconds left left I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Alexander Alexander Kirke Kirk Sabres W. W. Bennett Bennett Jack Jack Alex Alex New New York York Rangers Rangers Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin Buffalo Victor Victor Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Buchnevich's OT goal lifts Blues over Panthers 4-3

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Buchnevich's OT goal lifts Blues over Panthers 4-3

"Available available to to David David scores scores fifty fifty three three seconds seconds into into overtime overtime to to give give the the blues blues a a four four three three win win over over the the Panthers Panthers Florida Florida had had tied tied the the game game with with five five thirty thirty two two left left in in regulation regulation on on a a goal goal from from Jonathan Jonathan Hooper Hooper singles singles also also gets gets goals goals from from Vladimir Vladimir Tarasenko Tarasenko Brayden Brayden Schenn Schenn and and Brandon Brandon Saad Saad who who like like the the way way the the team team responded responded to to a a slow slow start start they're they're great great hockey hockey team team they they changed changed transition transition well well that that speed speed talent talent lot lot of of skills skills so so I I think think we're we're lucky lucky to to get get out out of of the the first first period period one one nothing nothing nothing nothing it it was was and and then then just just re re refocused refocused tree tree said said play play a a little little smarter smarter out out there there man man way way more more success success Alexander Alexander Barkov Barkov and and Brandon Brandon Montour Montour also also light light the the lamp lamp for for the the Panthers Panthers Charlie Charlie Lindgren Lindgren wins wins in in that that taking taking over over for for an an injured injured Billy Billy who who so so late late in in the the third third period period the the loss loss goes goes to to Spencer Spencer knight knight hi hi Mike Mike Reeves Reeves

Panthers Blues Blues Jonathan Jonathan Hooper Hoope Vladimir Vladimir Tarasenko Ta Brandon Brandon Saad Saad David David Florida Hockey Alexander Alexander Barkov Bar Brandon Brandon Montour Montou Charlie Charlie Lindgren Lindg Billy Billy Spencer Spencer Knight Knight Mike Mike Reeves Reeves
How Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris Came to Know Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:50 min | Last month

How Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris Came to Know Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell'

"Welcome back to one on one with me Sebastian gorka and breitbart's Emma Joe Morris. Emma, I'm curious, I'm not a journalist, if anybody calls me that, I correct them very, very rapidly. But I'm very curious that I want to want you to walk us through the inside story, give us a little bit of inside baseball because I love the New York Post. It is, I believe the oldest extant newspaper we still have founded by Alexander Hamilton. So as you're breaking this story of the laptop from hell, what is it like at the post? What is your management think about the impact your coverage is going to have and then walk us through is just before the election, Jack Dorsey, Twitter and Facebook just memory hole this orwellian New York Post story just has to disappear. Yeah, I mean, so we became aware of this laptop in September of 2020. So just before the election, about two months before the election. Was it through Rudy or Bernie or yeah? So I can tell you that. So Steve Bannon has a producer named vish who I knew from New York. He's from New York. He was not previously in politics. This was his first job with somebody political. And I knew him from my days back in Hannah. I used to hang out with him a little bit. He was friends with some mutual friends, and we had kept in touch, and I went to the New York Post in any way. They obtained the laptop or Rudy does actually. And then Bannon becomes aware of it. And these are copies, right? So the story. Certain people to download the hard drive. Exactly. Exactly. He gave, well, he gave Rudy's lawyer the first coffee that was out and they were looking at it. Oh, multiple laptops. One. A one, because they were two in the stool, weren't there? No, well, I think there's 300 laptops in circulation. Wow. The post had one. Okay. And that was the one that went through Rudy. And Rudy called Bannon because there was so much China on there and Rudy knew that Bannon was the guy for that. And decide, they need to get this out into the press. So Bannon's producer, I knew from years ago, and he was telling Dan and I know somebody an editor at the post, you got to get in touch with. And she is going to know what she's looking at and you better call her. So I got a call from Steve Bannon who was actually on Yankee poor. I'm Jewish. So I remember that way. Very intense holiday, actually. And he calls me and he says, I have to Steve actually called you. Yes. Okay. Bitch texted me and said Steve Bannon. It's a big deal. When Steve Bannon doesn't get somebody else to call you, that's a big deal. Leave a story. Oh, you don't miss it. Of course. And sex is a big deal from Steve. Trust me. Especially at 3 a.m., which is when he used to text. He carry on. So this randomized text me seems about to call you, don't miss it. I get the bone. He says, I have a story that's about to change your

Rudy Steve Bannon New York Post Sebastian Gorka Emma Joe Morris Bannon Vish Breitbart Jack Dorsey Alexander Hamilton Emma New York Bernie Baseball Hannah Twitter Facebook The Post China DAN
Nobody Wants to Talk About America's Rising Crime

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | Last month

Nobody Wants to Talk About America's Rising Crime

"Everybody, America's becoming a far more dangerous place to live. You know this. Crime is going up dramatically. And almost no one wants to talk about it. And I think it's getting so wildly out of control and of course it's all in Democrat areas with Democrat DAs with police forces that have been completely stripped down with very low morale. Let's start with this. Let's start with cut 7 Los Angeles County deputy district attorney blasts the bad law and bad policy that has contributed to the crime wave gripping the Democrat run city play cut 7. Bad law and bad policy is driving this most recent spike in crime that we're seeing in Los Angeles. If you look at the types of crimes that are concerning us right now, they are directly rooted in that law from the legislature and bad policy from LA county district attorney, George yaska. Third world country is what some of these cities are becoming. But if you ask AOC about it, Alexander Ocasio-Cortez, she says that what we just need to look at them in context and not create hysteria over them. You see, everyone's a tough guy to get mugged on the side of the street. And I mean, the crime issues are really interesting one for me. It really is because I can understand at some point how AOC can convince herself that universal healthcare is better. Obviously, it isn't and all that stuff. I'm really interested though. Has she sat down and actually used her reason for, does she have any? I don't know. For more than 20 seconds and says, ha. When things get more dangerous, I don't maybe don't want to live in those places. This is not a hard one. You know, survival is a pretty easy sales pitch. Like, hey, if you put us in office, you won't get

La County George Yaska Alexander Ocasio Los Angeles County America Cortez Legislature Los Angeles AOC
Hundreds march against COVID-19 restrictions in Belgium

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last month

Hundreds march against COVID-19 restrictions in Belgium

"Hundreds hundreds of of demonstrators demonstrators marched marched through through central central Brussels Brussels to to protest protest against against the the Titan Titan covert covert nineteen nineteen restrictions restrictions people people took took to to the the streets streets to to protest protest against against new new coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions imposed imposed by by the the Belgian Belgian government government on on Friday Friday to to counter counter the the country's country's latest latest surge surge in in cases cases calling calling it it an an attack attack on on their their freedom freedom and and rights rights prime prime minister minister Alexander Alexander de de croo croo has has announced announced that that children children must must now now wear wear masks masks from from the the age age of of six six an an indoor indoor events events will will only only be be allowed allowed with with a a maximum maximum of of two two hundred hundred people people this this is is the the third third week week in in a a row row that that rules rules of of tightened tightened as as the the country's country's health health services services are are struggling struggling to to support support those those with with other other life life threatening threatening diseases diseases I'm I'm Naomi Naomi Shannon Shannon

Brussels Belgian Belgian Government Gov Prime Prime Minister Minister Naomi Naomi Shannon Shannon
Strome scores as Rangers beat Sharks 1-0; Shesterkin hurt

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

Strome scores as Rangers beat Sharks 1-0; Shesterkin hurt

"Ryan Ryan Strome Strome first first period period goal goal stood stood up up as as the the Rangers Rangers picked picked up up their their fifth fifth straight straight win win one one nothing nothing over over the the sharks sharks the the Blueshirts Blueshirts have have won won seven seven straight straight at at home home and and R. R. nine nine two two one one know know when when their their last last eleven eleven overall overall but but New New York York finished finished the the game game with with that that Igor Igor Shuster Shuster can can who who appeared appeared to to suffer suffer a a right right leg leg injury injury stretching stretching out out face face down down in in the the crease crease just just over over five five minutes minutes into into the the third third period period Alexander Alexander Georgi Georgi have have stopped stopped nine nine shots shots after after sister sister can can recorded recorded nineteen nineteen saves saves Aiden Aiden hill hill made made twenty twenty five five saves saves for for the the sharks sharks who who had had won won three three in in a a row row I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Ryan Ryan Strome Strome Blueshirts Blueshirts Rangers R. R. New New York York Igor Igor Shuster Shuster Sharks Alexander Alexander Georgi Geo Aiden Aiden Hill Hill Sharks Sharks Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
WSJ Editorial Board Echoes Alexander Bickel: Roe v. Wade Was a Mistake

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:18 min | Last month

WSJ Editorial Board Echoes Alexander Bickel: Roe v. Wade Was a Mistake

"Coming. I don't know what's gonna happen with roe V wade. But we've got the Supreme Court getting ready to hear arguments in a case called Dobbs versus Jackson women's health. That could lead to the overturning of roe V wade. Now, I have argued for years. Obviously, I'm pro life. So anybody who's not pro life, you're going to say, well, Gallagher, the reason you disagree with roe V wade is that you're a pro life guy. You're somebody. Listen, the bottom line is, roe is one of the worst decisions in the history of the Supreme Court. With a stroke of their pen, the Supreme Court overturned 50 state laws and turned abortion into this political war. That nonetheless could not be settled politically through the ballot box. As The Wall Street Journal points out, their editorial this week, the great legal scholar Alexander bakel wrote in the morality of consent, the Supreme Court simply invented a trimester medical analysis. The court never said why? It was a mistake. Roe V wade is a mistake.

Roe V Wade Supreme Court Dobbs Gallagher Jackson ROE Alexander Bakel The Wall Street Journal
Larry O'Connor: Stop Worrying About Who Sits in the White House

Mark Levin

01:16 min | Last month

Larry O'Connor: Stop Worrying About Who Sits in the White House

"And what we saw in Virginia with the election of glencoe in the first Republican elected statewide since 2009 was exactly the power and organization and political message that we need to spread far and wide between now and election day next year Stop worrying about who's sitting in the Oval Office Does it matter of course it matters But right now what matters more How do you win this country by changing the president and then everything gets fixed Come on You're smarter than that you know better You know your founders the founders didn't want that You'd think James Madison and Alexander Hamilton and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson wanted us to wring our hands and worry about who would sit in The White House every four years Our entire country was built on the premise of divesting power from the federal government in the nation's capital The most important decisions that happen in our lives should be made at the local level and there's nothing more local than school boards Fix your house fix your neighborhood fix your community fix your town fix your county fix your school district That's how you change a country I've got more to say about that coming up in a little bit But that's what we need to focus on right now

Glencoe Oval Office Virginia Alexander Hamilton James Madison Thomas Jefferson George Washington White House Federal Government
 Barabanov's OT goal leads Sharks past Hurricanes 2-1

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | Last month

Barabanov's OT goal leads Sharks past Hurricanes 2-1

"The sharks scored an overtime goal by Alexander bye barn off to beat the hurricanes two to one Tomas Hertl with the assist to set up the game winning goal ending Carolina's four game win streak Santos he hadn't scored a goal in a hundred thirty five minutes and thirty eight seconds until Kevin Labanc tied up at one in the second period James Reimer made twenty two saves for the win the hurricanes only goals by defenseman Tony deangelo Carolina is eight one and one on the road this season Brian Lee Aung San Jose

Alexander Bye Tomas Hertl Hurricanes Kevin Labanc Sharks James Reimer Santos Carolina Tony Deangelo Brian Lee Aung San Jose
"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:23 min | 3 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And that just reminded me of like our nervous system. Not it's not just the brain by great. No it's our bodies and how that and by the way that you know i. I'm fascinated by that history to. I've seen a couple of documentaries about it. That's the level of my understanding but but the collective experience was all there in in this. This was this was a collective and so we with lots of stuff goes back and forth. That's what drove the evolution of new music. Like that's why ramaphosa flash wanted to get the break beats because he knew that's what the crowd wanted. So it drove the evolution of the turntables and scratching and and all that stuff. Yes from the collective experience. Yeah so let's hang a lantern that grand match. My i agree with your grandmaster. Flash was one of the geniuses that really got it to the next level right and yes and and the idea of the break. Most people don't think about what that is you as a musician. Exactly what that is and so you're thinking about what you know. Why the break. What's in the break. And what are the break do for them. And how did he had. He noted exploit the break way. You know what i mean. It's so interesting feedback from the collective. It was a feedback from the crowd. That said we want this and and then what exploded type of the universe hip hop museum. Actually it's going to be the mecca of hypocrisy world seem city. I wanna things that explained is a science behind that and so that's why this thing is talking about this box thing. It's really interesting was a guy in the two guys that are sort of the fathers of this space. Right now is a guy named alan shore and a guy named peter foggy as c. h. o. r. e. And then finally i'm sorry and Steven porges pr ges there. I'm without yeah porridges particularly working on the mechanism of socio emotional exchange. You know how that works. How able to tune our ear to vocal prosperity and apparent that kind of fair. Yeah yeah yeah. I'll never done f. p. p. o. r. stephen porridges and it's s. t. e. p. h. e. n. Yeah he's he's an older gentleman. Now you wanna get them while you can hear him on. Dr drew pod. Listen to him on episodes sixty three or ninety and they're they're really. I think you would have a different sort of it was good sixty. Three and ninety were five years ago. Yeah a little dated now. Maybe but the theory that he he is his klis. Crystallized the way he describes it now at a much clearer way but we were talking around the same material shower and then alan shore s. c. h. o. r. e. a. l. a. n. s. These these guys are neurobiologist shores actually psychoanalyst neurobiologist and and the eighth. Sorry but it's my job. If alan shore on the doctor podcast you can listen to episode sixty five. Yeah yeah and you got all these guys are my heroes. And and i don't know really never talked about the collective. I may have gotten into a little bit porches. But i there is. There's all sorts of uncanny information being exchanged that we are not consciously aware of all kinds all kinds and then and then my physics head always wonders and you. I'm going to sort of end with this question. Because it's a super unfair question but here we go. This is back to the physics. I always wonder if the function of temporarily of time versus the arrow of time. Which is i see that as biology in sort of from have changing but whether temporale which is time as a dimension into our biological systems in ways that we can't see and might have some real effect on us. You know what i'm saying. I think time comes through a time. Time comes through us in our bodies and brains through the generations right. What's passed onto a generation. But i always wonder if there's not some sort of some other impact of time on the biological systems. We haven't quite figured out yet. It's not strictly speaking the era of time. Something has interested in. I'm gonna. I'm gonna riff for yet another thing in my book i chapter. I explore questions about again. I speculate about i. The ultimate in enter into lober antelope and other fields. I have a chapter in biology is called the cosmic biosphere. And i tried to. I tried i had a dumb question. I was grad student learning about expanding universe in general relativity. As why do i kit. That the universe expand okay. It's expanded okay. But it has no impact on the on. I remember being shameful to even ask that question. You have you know. It's the theory of general. Tiffany what are you talking about. I decided to revisit this question. And say is there any weird link between the expansion of the universe and life itself. So because it's so let me say of thinking about this. You probably have something called. The hubble rate hubble expansion rate so hobble it's basically is basically gives you information about how far fast scouts receding away from us which is a measure of the expansionary of universe it turns out that the hubble rate itself the hovering itself is if you actually take the inverse Put a one open. It's actually a timescale. It's actually a skills a temporal scale and it captured basically information. Maybe about the age of the universe since radiation dominated. Early universe So this is how we get thirteen point. Something billionaires turns out that that rate is actually the same audit of magnitude expansionary. Inverse is the same autumn nineteen as the auto magnitude for the time life. Actually biological life existed on a second. Say say this again. I'm not got so the the time of the rate of expansion of time. Say again yeah so the hobble expansion rate which is basically the information about global expansion. We have out of the universe is is also a timescale. Timescale has off magnitude of tentative. Nine years that's a gig a year or a billion years billionaires if you look at the timescale for which life emerged on earth is the same automatic of magnitude interest coincidence. Call this thing coincidences..

alan shore ramaphosa peter foggy Steven porges stephen porridges Dr drew alan Tiffany
"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:58 min | 3 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And i've heard some people talk about like you know the screen. We look at our computer of being the equivalent of what we're looking at in the universe when in fact there's there's locality back in the body of the you know this. The screen isn't real. What's what's real is what's going on in the guts of the computer is just reflecting a thing in space on the computer screen. If that hologram yeah hologram sorta sorta exit hologram and that sort of makes sense to me that there's some there's some unity in the background and that. Yeah it's it's all so fast i like. That's a great title for a future exposed unity in the background. Because it's a play on words to you know. yeah yeah. Yeah yeah. I like it. Hopefully you can play on. Hopefully by the time you right there will be more unity in the world. For christ sake. Oh man are In so your position right now is brown right. that's right. are you assists professor professor or are you. I am a full professor. Okay so you must be. You're done you're good. You feel good now right. No well i know. A bunch of students want to graduate and get jobs basically he. Let's let's talk for a second about the The slit experiment. Because it's the millennials are hooked on that experiment. Obviously i'm clueless about it but let's go talk well. They haven't this what i want to get out about it. So it's a it's an experiment where you take two slits and you fire some through it and they. I think it was electrons and they behaved both like a wave or a particle. They could do either way. Where particle and one of the implications of this study was depending on. What you're looking for is how it behaved i. I don't know that. that's the interpretation. But the millennials are hanging onto that saying you see. It's our brain. Our observing brain affects the physical function of the universe. I there could be a million other interpretations of how do you put it together effectively. That's one was arguing that the day in his mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. The great one of the computer science if not the founded and also great entrance obama. N- argued that. If you trace the events that have to take place to collapse this way function. It realized itself at a particle. When you make an observation slip on up somehow register where your consciousness okay now. But that's different to me than saying that. I mean now whether that's no that hypothesis claim that's still debated and discussed in in my book by the way that good but i'm not able to reproduce it. You would think that after writing this book about this stuff. That i'd be clear about it. I guess i'm not but But one thing that is interesting that it's this idea of solipsism that somehow because of that you know everything i see i create right. You know like i think. That's what's the word. That extrapolation is a little bit too extreme. It's just so thing. Because my consciousness interacting with a very active process mountain an avalanche observe it and make the thing reversed itself in a mountain comes back. Yeah exactly i study. Consciousness a lot and that that kind of placement for consciousness giving it way too much power. It just isn't. Isn't that kind of thing. And i would think would have to have some theory about what the interaction is in the physical universe is it does the does the is it a quantum moment. And we're just getting into multiple worlds and you just you one way one world you look the other world is it. Is it the many worlds thing coming to bear here or something like that mitchelson. That's interesting thought One thing i would like to add to. What are your thoughts about panic in this context is that's that was a rabbit hole. I went down and we are biological entities. were not match grandes. we are biological entities. We've i i maybe some weird things happen along the way or an asteroid hit and added some stuff toward genetic material. Fine i can accept that but it's still ultimately biology at work here and as such. They're constraints of biology apply. It's not it's not magic. It is biology. And i do believe that. The human central nervous system is highly connected to other human systems. I you know what i often think of. It evolve oxes when you were in high school. They ever show you a goal. Vox picture of vox of you. It's a single. i'm sorry. It's a single cellular organism that that they gathered together and form these large spheres. And they're just this. Yeah and i might see this. Yeah and so so definitely. It is the individual biology's that are coming together to create this fear but the fear is now a different thing together. And there's lots of communication biological communication amongst these single celled organisms. You're looking good. I think it's called foal. Vox remember and and there's something much like you know when we take infinity to one. You're you're up right. Yeah that's these little spheres and each one of those little dots on the spheres organisms and Much much like when you take infinity to one. You're taking it to something else and there's no doubt that there's something else created by all of us together. But ultimately the the forces at work are still definable measurable understandable. And some of it is uncanny. Don't get me wrong. I have had experiences both as a patient in a therapeutic context and as a practitioner therapy context. Where i i cannot yet explain what happened because stone was communicated to me by the patient that was not mine and got into my head and my sensory experience and i was. I knew it was not me when i was having it. I knew something. The patient was bringing to me Because it was fully other than anything i've ever experienced before. And that's bodies in space communicating essentially that the totality. We way too much. Focus on just the brain in the last twenty years and not enough on the the brain embedded in an automatic system. That is informed by the body. And that's that is a that is an area of ongoing research is very active area right now and think about about the role of music and and those kind of group situations and their acidity. There's no doubt that that that is a way in so to speak because it in i i would argue. It's you know it's obviously it's into our pride cortex but it's also into our bodies our bodies sponsored. Our bodies have reaction to it and just think in terms of feelings are primarily things that come out of the body yes yes absolutely interesting. Yeah i'm working on a new project with hip hop museum in new york citizen. You have happy that we're going to explore. I want to explore that The sort of the fact. That when i'm from the bronx and i was doing the time when hip hop was really flourishing early stages in the eighties. And you know it was really interesting to me. Why was it that people like egypt hurricane of combat with trying to get the biggest sound systems to you couldn't just hear the baseline but feel it really feel it..

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"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Com promo code drew. Well now it's ridiculous that sizes brand new brand change. We all settle traditional retail sizes. But why why is a medium person. Even really look like different pants are made to fit one body type and everyone else has to sort of settle for that. Even when we're shaped differently no one wants to take their athletic leisurewear to the taylor. Your spend doing to mudgee already seen way. Too much money underclothing. Well that's why you gotta check out public wreck. They make elevated at leisurewear as they call it in multidimensional sizes. I wear them all the time. They feel like you wearing sweatpants by literally went to dinner in them last week and i thought okay whereas what everyone thought i was wearing. Slacks better fit comfort fabric. Unlike any other spent years engineering. The perfect blend of softness stretch durability. Come in nine different colors and they've got a whole wardrobe including shorts t shirts polo jackets. Even golf gear. This is hallways in my rotation constantly. I wear them at home. And now i'm starting to wear them out in the world as well so public record. Everyone public rarely discounts. But right now they have an exclusive offer for getting to that. I also want to mention their pockets are perfect their deep enough there. Zippers have rear pockets. That are the right depth everything it's like wearing a slack. Actually better design. Frankly you will not be sorry. They are constantly They're my constant companion. Public wreck rarely discounts right now. They have an inclusive offer. Just for the doctor do podcast listeners. Go to public. Wreck dot com. Use promo code doc drew. That's d. o. C..

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"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Thanks for listening to the doctor. Drew podcast on podcast. One come to audible for the code breaker. The latest audiobook from walter isaacson here the incredible story of nobel prize winning scientist jennifer dowden. Who created a groundbreaking tool that can actually edit dna with audible. You can access the latest releases. Plus a selection of included podcasts originals and audio books that come with membership start a free thirty day trial today at audible dot com. Hey guys this is key allow read and this is the rivera where the hose Baby mamas no drama every tuesday. We talk about parenting co-parenting lifestyle and sex hop hauteur current events. And pretty much all the things you want one podcast download and subscribe on your favorite podcast out. Listen to us every tuesday and join us with all the t- hey buddy doctor podcast as always all the usual Request and check it out at the doctor. Tv the streaming shows were gonna regular basis. And i after the up rollo which we call them faithful over there today. It's my pleasure to welcome. Hold on prints your first name right. Stephen.

"alexander i" Discussed on The Financial Guys

The Financial Guys

05:00 min | 4 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on The Financial Guys

"And already welcome back. Mike wallace legal. Financial guys mike flick in studio with us. Certified social security claiming strategist. We have an awesome guest. We have dr paul alexander. Who's going to be with us. He's on the live line here. He was so incredible last week. I'm like we have to get on. Kelsey tracked him down. So kelsey redmond in studio with us here now and i think kelsey for doing that. She went on a haunt. You were like an fbi agent. So we did. We did dave. We were able to track dr paul alexander down and get him on and with no further. Ado mr dr alexander. I thank you so much spending some time with us here. I know your schedule is crazy. Busy you were your health. You have like. I'm gonna just try to read some of this but not all of this. Health research methodology. Avidan based medicine clinical epidemiologist Former whol p. h. h. o. And us health and human services. Evidence evidence consultant. I mean the list goes on and on so way smarter than myself. Way more degrees than me but paul. Let's see if we can start off. Let's talk about what makes you nervous about Let's start with kids. You have said. And i've read some reports that you said kids are cove immune and what do you mean by that. Well i mean first of all. Thanks very much for having me and Yes i did work prior to. Who power who in washington dc as kubik consultant for evidence based Sensitive medicine and i also worked in the prior administration health and human services on the on the president trump as a corporate pandemic adviser. Now the issues that children brings such statistical zero risk to the table in terms of their capacity. Talk quiet infection and implicit please. Their ability to spread to other children Vanishingly low risk spread to doubts ticket home or become severely little die from covert and got stable data. That's the evidence you've collected for fifteen months now across the world and the cdc or the nih all fda all forty wolinsky francis collins. If anyone says differently they actually misleading the public and deceiving public. And i would say they're lying to the public. Data's clear children are are basically the bump up against this day would write us out on walkaway and i've recently written an op-ed where i made the argument that we should consider children globally effectively and effectively vaccinated already and reason so this is for several reasons one if you already immune in the sense that you've had kobe before and the evidence indicates that once you cover nuclear virus and you have natural immunity now It's a very dangerous thing to layer of vaccine on top of that You're naturally immunity is the best immunity that you can ever have particularly for this passage and It's very broad. It's very comprehensive and robust and durable and in some instances lifelong. There's some pathogenic kick boxing for that. You have immunity for the rest of your life. You don't have to take any other vaccine again. And the fact that we have this team program where the you have not even finish some people getting one shot a second shot and now they want wanna go to shot and israel. You're talking about a four chart all all under one year when you have a vaccine being boosted less than one year you know that vaccine is failing and it has failed. This vaccine is feel particularly towards the shelter. And there's no question about that so the reality is when i said the children effectively vaccinated already. I mean that when we look at research. I looked at the evidence To see well okay. There's such low rates and children The ability to become infected and you can spread it and even seattle. So i wanted to know why because the is showing us. This must be a reason..

dr paul alexander mike flick kelsey redmond Ado mr dr alexander Avidan kubik consultant for evidence prior administration health an Mike wallace Kelsey kelsey fbi francis collins dave nih dc paul cdc washington fda us
"alexander i" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Planet Money

"To listen to black scholars at the time higher education was still functionally segregated and and if sadie alexander had been allowed to be an economics professor it almost certainly would have been at a historically black college or university and the rest of academia white academia was not paying attention to what was happening at hughes so in the black world. Yes it would have made a difference. Her presence would have made a difference because she would have mentor. d- a later generation and she would have influenced the direction of their research so a. Nina banks would have been enlightened by the thought of sadie alexander at an earlier period as opposed spending a good chunk of your career recovering. The thought of sadie alexander. Yeah this career spent recovering. This thought. i wouldn't have had to recover it. Because it would have been there. And i would have benefited from.

sadie alexander Nina banks hughes
"alexander i" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

08:54 min | 5 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on CarCast

"Yeah get it. On got to get on a church getting on mandate get it on. Welcome car cast. I'm adam curl and that's met the motor raider di andrea. I'm well excited looking forward to pebble beach as tradition would have it alexander. Weaver is here of. Ram sotheby's and we're going to go over some of these Auction cars and and much more the market in general because alexander has his finger on the pulse of that patient. Good see alexander. Thanks guys you see a lot of cool cars coming up this year. Maybe we should speak in general terms before we get to Some of the patik official particulars God i was just on Bring a tray that before i came in i saw turbo supra. Maybe a ninety five one for like two hundred one grand or something There's been some Like we saw some skylines go for three hundred plus in recent weeks. Maybe one for like three thirty and the other for like three ten. These are like ninety s japanese cars. You know two hundred grand three hundred grand you know with. Not you know specific history or anything know not not owned by clark gable or anything just kind of mid nineties japanese cars that seems to be The market that seems to be climbing the fastest. It really is moving. I think honestly the stuff with with less history is better like what people really wanted to buy. Their cars haven't been modified that have had one old man owner and didn't have a bunch of gauges put on the a pillar. You know a big double deck. Cd player with a dvd screen on it and boost gauges and aftermarket wheels and vale side body kits. And all that not. They weren't cool. Yeah you know they just. Nowadays people wanna bone stock one. And that's what's with low miles and that's what's really bring in the money for that stuff right something with floor. That doesn't fall out. You hit the nas. Why are you gotta use the nylon nuts on us on this on this balts. So you've got so. That seems to be an interesting subject to me. We're you know cars at weren't formerly collector cars. I what always catches everyone off guard as time marches on. You know we're talking about cars that we think are new cars but there twenty five or thirty years old right. I still get thrown off on. Somebody goes. I've been doing this for thirty years since ninety something like ninety something feel right i always think seventies when somebody says that number for some reason but it does. Throw me off your your point about something like bring a trailer. I don't know where so many people got why they held onto these cars that have nine miles on it and not just the cool cars. There'd be like this is a pontiac aztec. It's got seventeen miles on it and someone's gonna pay twenty eight thousand dollars hunt bring a trailer for it. I don't even know who bhai who who. And who buys it. But there's there's quite a few of these cars are popping up with like no mind. Well are we talking alexander. We'll know the answer. He'll help with the answer. Are we talking about car guys. Are we talking about folks that are seeing what's going on with the economy and wanting to put their money somewhere where they think it's a tangible and be appreciating. It's both i think. And i think a lot of the really astute car guys are almost standing down at this point to some of them are guys that are like the are really into it for wanting to drive. The cars really wanted to use the car's not looking at him is just investments. Are going like you know a two thousand twelve porsche. Turbo with emmanuel bring in one hundred and eighty grand. You know twenty thousand miles and no special color or anything like that they got. This was an eighty two hundred thousand dollar car a year ago. This doesn't make any sense kind of worried so there. I think we are seeing a lot of people just watching the economy. Go bonkers right now. And everybody's going all right. Well this is a good place to put their money off the inflation. All the cash out there. At least they're having some fun with stuff right. theoretically say. Try not that pressure of getting the car with nine hundred original miles from hundred ninety four. It's like you're kind of scared to take it. Take it out and have a crossover thousand. You know but let let's talk about. Some of the cars are has coming up at the top of the list. I think the the jewel in the crown this year's the porsche. Nine seventeen k. Yeah yeah and it's just the cars action our office here in la and we're really happy to have it there and it's such a spectacular thing to see in person and you've seen over the track and they just sound incredible and they're really an amazing piece of engineering and the way those motors are built and what they did in period in the history on this car with the mcqueen ties to it and and all that it's it's a really special piece and it's in the gulf livery matches yielding which you always wind. I mean there's a few of those cars and sort of funky town livery and the daleks are pretty cool too. Yeah i mean they're great and they have history and all that stuff but when you think of that car you just think about that livery. Your pure and simple. Yeah but we don't have a gulf livery car. So we might repaint the building hawaiian tropic visitors. That way to we kinda thought about bmw art carbon. Nobody hears that talented pay that way. So maybe just well. They'll i feel like warhol and all this guy just got their assistance. Ain't did one of the cool one of the cars that i don't think it's on our list but man i've been talking about is that Ferrari five twelve race car. Oh yeah yeah yeah man. I can never can't figure out if that is a car that i think is so cool or it's like you know looking at an old playboy or something like when you're in high school like is that is that my wheelhouse now but i can see where you're coming from. But we had that car out at willow springs about a month ago with john. Morton driving it Who ran it in period and that will go back in. And maybe that'll be the pages that playboy coming to life for you a little bit. But it's then you're like all right. This is unbelievable. It's so fast. Sounds so good. And john was so excited to being too when you put an old driver that was in that car period back in it and he comes out like smiling a little kid. It's just it's so exciting to see it's such a cool cool piece. It's it's just kind of it kind of has all the things that make a car. Look look good and in just just in the right period coming off the seventies into the eighties. You know as you get too far in the eighties that the look kinda suffered a little bit but those cars are so cool there. There's always been a couple those guys in my run group. I feel like in the past definitely in those guys out there and just the was it a naturally aspirated is it a is it a it must be twelve on a flat twelve twelve. Yeah the nat- naturally aspirated real photo platform. Yeah it's a flat twelve and it just the sound that comes out of that exhausted that one. He raced that car lot. And just recently did a cosmetic have raised against this specific. I'm sure i'm sure because of a there's not that many of them out there but then some of them are like in a blue livery and stuff like that but yeah this this one i race again was was in red. So that's that's a cool piece will be keeping our eye when you click through the catalog. You guys listening you. Click through the catalog. You think ferrari it's gonna look like a corvette at first glance so pay attention to the titles because it's it's pretty unique. The front end of this car is really unique. Your car has lama history right. Yes it does and you know like you were saying it does have that really long. Overhanging look like you know like like there could be a motor front as well as in the back of nissan. Honestly which the The nineties car. That you have oh yeah similar to. Yeah are the silhouette of yeah..

alexander adam curl di andrea Ram sotheby pebble beach clark gable Weaver bhai emmanuel porsche mcqueen motors warhol willow springs la
"alexander i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

06:48 min | 7 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"We. We actually probably overtalked in our family. We would explain things we would say. Well here's what happened here. Was what your responsibility in was That's not something we can support. So let's discuss how we can keep that from happening again and it mean in order for you to really understand this you have to sacrifice something and it may be television. It may be a game. It may be an opportunity with your friends. But you know i it was. They were never punished in a vacuum. They were always disciplined in a way that had love attached to it and had Meaning and an explanation attached to it And that was true. Even when we my wife and i did a really interesting Parenting philosophy that was taught out here called research infant educators. And there's a lot of talking. There's a lot of talking even when your kids are infants. I mean my we use that people come over and they would go. You gotta be kidding me where it's called. Wry one of the ri- principles. Are you never. Just you assume your baby can be more interactive than we think they are capable of so you would never just put a baby on a changing table and put it out for them. That's what what an insult. What a right so you and hold up to outfits and you go hi gave. This is the blue outfit and this is the green said. Which one would you like to wear. And if you wait there for a minute you know. They're just in space but they'll eventually focus. There is on one of them for a second legal. You seem to be looking at the green okay. Let's put on the green. And so you know. They were participatory in their own. Lives and we follow that out by assuming they could participate in go. She ate with us even if it was two something corrective or something that they had to be punished for so it was always in dialogue. And you know as a result of that. There's a lot of talking to my has a laptop. My younger son is now models alaba. He's like look. I just grunt. No can i do this in But yet he's a writer so words he loves words. That was our system and they came out there. Sometimes i gotta catch myself. I got two teenage boys. And sometimes i'll catch myself in the middle of one of these big plato republic monologues and. I'm giving them and then i realized i gotta tone it down a bit here. I'm getting a little too deep sometimes. But listen jason. i'm just like you. My my father had me. When he was fifty years old. He was born in nineteen thirty. My mother was forty three well when she had me. So i i grew up with all the old movies all the my father was actually a stand in singapore eddie fisher back in a day so i kinda grew up in all that. My parents were a lot older. Mike is one of the things that was the downfall of that was both parents passed away before i became a father myself Because you you know your parents had you later like your parents around for for when you first had your kids. Were there throughout your kids childhood. They really weren't might my My wife and i both lost our dads six weeks apart from each other and was when my older son was ten years old. So ten and six So the boys never really got another grandfather's all as well as we would like to. But the grandma's were around. My wife's mother lives blocks from us. My mom lives in florida. So you know. There were a couple of trips every year to go. See grandma ruth but yeah they had a pretty good exposure to them You know the the hard part with my mom is again because she came from a different generation that she was so much older than their contemporary grandparents. She didn't quite know how to relate to these to these kids on a level that was meaningful to them she. She believed the way to bond with them was to tell them the stories about her and they were good about that for the first thirty minutes you know. And then she would say. I have so much trouble communicating with them and i would say ma. Maybe you should ask them about them and that was when i was a kid. You never took. You only told your grandparents with your parents. Tell grandma about what you did that. Was it like you didn't try and inform your grandparents about who you were and so that communication you know my grandparents. I had a very kind of formal relationship. It i didn't. They didn't go to their graves with me. Kinda having a true bond except for one of them but My my wife's mother. I think because she's here because she's close. She has a lot more of a relationship with my mom had a lovely relationship with them and they adored her but this time and distance and generation. Yeah it reminds me one of those principles from dale carnegie and how to win friends and influence people. You talk to other people about themselves. They'll listen all day long. you know. So that's what that reminds me of all twenty nine now puts them right at the beginning seinfeld. I know started late in the early nineties there about thirty years that you were a new dad then while this was going on what were some of the challenges of becoming famous seinfeld taking off a while being a new dad. The only challenge honestly seinfeld a four camera sitcom especially successful. One is a great schedule because most my my work week was usually four days only and it was a pretty regular schedule. You knew you were going to have your weekends and you knew where your vacations were. And you knew when you're kind of like being a schoolteacher when your downtime was It was it was a it was the most anak for like job as far as scheduling. It was a good dad schedule. The only thing that was particularly challenging because as the popularity of the show grew and i became a little more of a celebrity. We didn't want the kids to be forced into that exposure. And so when we would when we were with our kids when we were traveling with the kids that wasn't necessarily a stop sign for the paparazzi and people who wanted to come up and take a picture or whatever you can offer whatever it might be so navigating you know being able to go to a group of papa razzi who have been very decent with. May i have to say and say guys take all the pictures of me if you get the back of their head. Were good please. No put their faces out in your photographs. They didn't ask for this life. We have to take them out in public. It could help us a little bit. And for the most part they would and i have to say for.

florida ten six dale carnegie Mike six weeks jason singapore forty three first thirty minutes eddie fisher both first four days two teenage boys nineteen thirty four camera two ten years old both parents
"alexander i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

02:17 min | 7 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Think of his stand by this. Is your first time listening to the podcast. Please get over there in baghdad. Subscribe button you do not want to miss all the action coming your way right here on first-class fatherhood all right. I have got just an incredible guess for you guys today. Seinfeld's georgia stanza. Jason alexander joins me on first class. Jason alexander was nominated for seven consecutive. Primetime emmy awards for portraying george costanza as well as four golden globes. Jason is also a tony award winning broadway actress performance in jerome robins broadway which also landed him a grammy award. You've also seen in movies such as pretty woman in shallow. How i can't tell you. What an honor it is for me to have on the podcast today. I've always been a huge fan of seinfeld and george. Costanza is by far my favorite character on the sitcom which seems to continue to gain popularity as time goes on here. Jason alexander will be. You're just a few minutes so please stick around interview and today's interview with jason. Alexander was recorded on video and is available for you guys to watch on youtube channel. If you'd like to watch the conversation between myself and george costanza please let me what. I subscribe over on youtube. The the description of today's podcast episode. All right if you guys enjoy today's jason alexandra please go check out some of the other interviews. I've done acting dad's such as matthew makaay. Howie mandel dean. Cain matt lantern. Brian austin green and so many others all available to listen to what your convenience in new york podcast and visual. You keep it right here on the podcast for wednesday three time. Tony award nominated actor. Joshua henry who portrayed aaron burr smash hit musical. Hamilton will be stopping by nature. You guys follow me on instagram. At alex school at least role the upcoming guests announcements. If you missed out on last week's episode you got to flip it back and go check them out. Skateboarding legend. Tony hawk was here matron. Nfl superstar calvin johnson junior and major league baseball hall of famer. Mike piazza all join me. Right here. On the podcast. If you guys are enjoying the show police that we would rating review. Goes a long way to help me out. And there's always guys please tell me. Spread the word about the podcast. Every father india neighborhood or in your contact list let him know about the show to see is celebrating. Fatherhood family life fatherhood rocks fairly values rule and days father's day regular meat and i'm gonna be right back with jason alexander. I'm out of place and you're listening to first class. Fatherhood that sports stadiums beginning to fill up.

Jason alexander jason alexandra george costanza jason Tony hawk new york Brian austin jason alexander aaron Costanza wednesday Mike piazza father's day last week matthew makaay calvin johnson today alex school youtube india
"alexander i" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

02:33 min | 7 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Refused aaron burr even angrier challenged him to a duel. alexander accepted though. Not happy about it. Alexander met aaron burr at the dual which began at dawn on july eleventh eighteen four and new jersey when both men their guns and shot alexander was severely wounded and his bullet missed. Aaron burr. alexander was brought back to new york city where he died the next day on july twelfth. Eighteen o four. His grave is in the cemetery of church in downtown manhattan new york city. His wife elizabeth went on to survive him by fifty years and spent much of her time researching his life and writing about his legacy to share with others. She also founded an orphanage in memory of alexander who was an orphan himself. alexander's life didn't start off easy at all as an orphan. In the west indies. He often had to fend for himself. But instead of giving up he found work and learned a new trade and did what he could to stay alive. He also found that by reading. It could become smarter and figure out ways to solve. His problems like alexander. Sometimes life throws challenges at us we can learn from his example by instead of giving up shutting down by stepping back and looking at our problem learning something new and then taking action to make our lives better. Alexander was also always looking for ways. You can improve the world around him. During the revolution america could become something better than it was fought in the war and then using everything he had read began to research ways to make the new country stronger by reading. We can better understand the world around us. Alexander wanted more than anything a better future for his children and the people of the nation. Think about your community and what you might do to make it a better place. Finally alexander will be remembered for the ideas he wrote in the federalist papers which people all over the world have read in designing their own governments. If you get a chance. Read some of the ideas. He shared their thanks for listening to this episode about hamilton. And be sure to tune in next monday for an episode about the creator of the musical. Lin manuel.

Lin manuel Alexander elizabeth fifty years aaron burr next monday alexander new york city Aaron burr july twelfth both men manhattan new york city next day july eleventh eighteen four america Eighteen hamilton jersey o four west
"alexander i" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

08:39 min | 7 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"The musical film hamilton. After its release it became one of the most streamed films of the year. The film was based on the two thousand fifteen broadway musical of the same name. The hamilton musical was created by lin. Manuel miranda and inspired by the biography. He read by ron chur. Now the musical was first done. As a show at vassar college in two thousand and thirteen then is an off broadway show in two thousand and fifteen on august. Six two thousand fifteen it had its broadway premiere at the richard rodgers theatre in new york city as of two thousand twenty one over two point. Six million people have watched the live performance of hamilton. It's album has been played on spotify more than one hundred and forty five million times in over two point. Seven million people have watched the movie on disney plus needless to say hamilton has been one of the most popular musicals of all time. Whether you've seen the musical or not today we're going to learn more about the life of alexander hamilton. One of the founding fathers of the united states alexander was born on january eleventh seventeen fifty five on the island of nevis which at the time was part of the british west indies. Actually there's some doubt about whether his birth actually occurred in seventeen fifty five or in seventeen fifty seven at thirteen. His father had left and his mother had passed away from yellow fever and alexander and his brother found themselves as orphans but alexander kept going and took on his first job at an early age he became a clerk at a local interests. Export firm that traded with new york and new england. James studied with a local carpenter while merchant. Thomas stevens gave alexander a home. Even though alexander was only a teenager he proved capable enough after he was left in charge of the business for five months and seventeen seventy one while the owner was at sea. He read everything he could and later developed an interest in writing as he read and learned about the larger world. He wanted to leave the island where he grew up in october. Seventeen seventy two. Hamilton arrived by ship in boston and traveled from there to new york city. He lived with hercules mulligan. Who held alexander sell cargo this job to help pay for his education and living expenses in seventeen seventy three to prepare for college. Alexander filled the gaps in his education at the elizabethtown academy prep school in new jersey. It was there that he started learning. From william livingston. Alexander entered king's college now known as columbia university in new york city. In the fall of seventeen seventy three as a private student. They officially admitted him as a full student the next year his college roommate. Robert troup spoke highly of alexander's intelligence. He also admired his ability to speak clearly and to lead others once. The american revolution began. And after the first battle between american troops and the british alexander and other king's college students joined a new york volunteer militia. The hearts of oak a militia is a small army. Hamilton studied military tactics on his own and was soon recommended for promotion. During battle he led a successful raid for british cannons while fired on once they captured the canons his militia became an artillery company on january third. Seventeen seventy seven alexander to work in the battle of princeton. George washington rallied the american troops and lead them in a successful against the british forces. After making a brief stand the british fell back some leaving princeton and others taking refuge in nassau hall alexander brought three cannons up and had them fire on the building then. Some americans rushed to the front door and broke it down. The british quickly put a white outside the window. One hundred and ninety four british soldiers walked out of the building and lay down their weapons ending the battle with an american victory in seventeen eighty alexander married elizabeth schuyler together. They had eight children. Alexander eventually graduated from college. Seventeen eighty two. His education had been slowed down by the revolution later that same year. He became a licensed lawyer and argued cases before the supreme court of the state of new york. They appointed alex under and july seventeen. Eighty two to the congress of the confederation as a new york report. Sentitive alexander quit congress in seventeen eighty three when the british left new york. He practiced law there in partnership with richard harrison. He specialized in defending tories and british subjects in seventeen eighty four. He founded the bank of new york. One of the oldest still existing banks in america he helped restore and reopen king's college as columbia college. The school been closed since seventeen. Seventy six and was damaged during the war in seventeen eighty six at the annapolis convention. Alexander drafted a resolution for the constitutional convention in doing so he was one step closer to realizing his longtime desire to have more effective more financially independent federal government in seventeen eighty seven while serving as a new york delegate. He met in philadelphia with other delegates to discuss how to fix the articles of confederation. The articles were so weak that they could not keep union together during the meeting. Hamilton argued that the country would need plenty of money if it wanted to have a strong central government that wouldn't fall apart. Alexander didn't play a huge part in actually writing the constitution. He's one of the many to think for making it happen. He wrote fifty one of eighty five. Essays became known as the federalist papers. It was these papers and anders powerful voice supporting the constitution that helped ensure that the constitution was written in seventeen eighty eight when george washington was elected president of the united states in seventeen eighty nine. He appointed as first secretary of the treasury. The nation was facing great foreign and domestic debt because of the expenses incurred during the american revolution details when a country individual owes someone else money tears later alexander played a huge role in establishing the basis for the us meant the mendez is where coins are created for people to use. They created the meant and philadelphia in seventeen ninety two the meant issued. Its first coins in seventeen. Ninety five there is a ten dollar gold eagle coin a silver dollar and fractional money ranging from one half to fifty cents alexander step down from his position as secretary of the treasury and seventeen ninety five leaving behind a far more secure. Us economy tobacco strengthened federal government having a strong financial system which included its own coins and enough money to spend was very important to the success of the new nation during the eighteen hundred presidential elections. Thomas jefferson and john adams were running for president. After george washington step down presidents vice presidents were voted for separately. An ehrenberg intended to be jefferson's vice president on the democratic republican ticket and actually tied. Thomas jefferson for the presidency. Alexander didn't love either candidate but went with thomas jefferson and this led to him beating aaron burr as the candidate for the party as a result. Aaron burr would be vice president during his first term. Thomas jefferson often left aaron burr out of the discussions on party. Decisions and thomas. Jefferson ran for reelection in eighteen. O four. He removed aaron burr from his ticket. Aaron burr then decided to run for governor of new york but lost frustrated and feeling left out. Aaron burr became very angry when he read a newspaper that hamilton had called him the most unfit and dangerous man of the community. Aaron burr was convinced. Alexander had ruined your election for him and demanded an explanation. When alexander.

thomas jefferson Thomas jefferson lin. Manuel miranda george washington Alexander George washington James Aaron burr jefferson aaron burr Thomas stevens january third john adams alexander five months boston ron chur new jersey richard harrison october
"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Way way more balanced as far as women to men ratio. Do you know what i mean. Especially like especially on the cruise side. I mean donny was very much at the top of this project. But the tape e Louis is amazing. Shar sir she was the dp. We had a producer. Yeah i to be honest. I would say most of the production was with women which was great. I think it contributed to having a much more collaborative set and having a sit where people were heard and and that was a different experience for me i think being on a set that felt just why waymo pounced cool and it was the same that project i shot a costa role in the show. Vida which i got that set and it was. It was similar where the where the balance was was really starting to shift so i think i'm saying definitely more of that in the industry which i think is great. Yeah kind of just taking the male ego down a few notches. I think isn't the bat. I think i think. Just the energy and the the dynamics of sets is much more inclusive in productive. When win is this the scales balanced like that. And but this was definitely the first time where i think felt hyper aware of it. Yeah and again like i. I just have to go back to two danny. Being sort of leading that charge like she she. She's such an amazing such an amazing more and I think really the set that we worked on the film itself is very much an echo. Whichever league and i would imagine in your own work going forward it's probably going to have some echoes in your own work as you get in writing. Definitely you know for me riding now. The way that i am approaching my riding is is is often sitting down. I and thinking how do i feel unheard. Who else is unheard. How can i inject those feelings into to my stories. Who do i want telling these stories. Yeah so the scripted. I've kind of gotten bowed. it's sort of floating around. And i'm trying to to attach to some produces sort of moving to development stage. I guess these story with the female lead. it's it set in eighteen. Seventy s northern california. And it's about a chinese first generation. Chinese american woman who pursues her kidnapped song from his album fava and and the the template that ritual motivation for that was was also thinking of roles firstly trying to ride myself a supporting role and thinking what roles and not available to me as someone that's Mix ethnishity half indonesian widescreen and sort of thinking. Well what what roles am i not seeing and then also like well roles people in my community not getting oh see and so that was like one motivation and that sort of f- something that is a constant me now my writing and and then also like you know with this story as well. I'm like i want this story. Even though i've ridden it like i wanted to be ultimately female. Like i wanted to be told by women. I wanted to be made by women. I.

fava Shar first generation eighteen Seventy s first time chinese two indonesian one Louis Chinese american firstly northern california Vida danny
"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

03:08 min | 8 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Now. An improv is about wonderful. Blend of writing directing acting montana's lee and simultaneously and hats off to you for doing so. Well because i taught it for a long time when i taught theater but i was never tremendously amazing at it myself but i have a lot of friends in london. Who do it actually. It's a real skill being with the blackout two. Is that with the project like that because we had done so much were cleaning up to shoot on our characters on back story on non fleshing out who these people were. The the improv itself became less scary because we had fully formed characters. We can always fall back onto. We could fall back on history. We could fall back onto that traits and quirks that we created there is it all fell and that was the great thing about the rest of the ensemble working with ever felt. Everyone had done the works. Everything felt fleshed out. So don't did and never felt that with these moments of the improv. Rely blue with this going next you someone to do something like it all very organic and very yet just filled out which is which is really good so it was never a point where i kind of got. There's that failing that. I get when i when i've done in problem stage where you're kind of leaping out leaping into the abyss and you dislike row could just i could land anyway had a posting. I mean i love that sort of thrill endanger bit but in this environment is film. I thought that was very much sort of absence which was really great. I always call it being the penguin and icy shark-infested waters. Who's going to be the first penguin. Yep exactly that's exactly it but that's just the way it always feels right. I also wondered because this is obviously not your first film. Production and the covid experience has been very different recently. Obviously in terms of acting and so forth and performing. It's a whole. But i wondered if you felt on the set of this film or other films that you've worked on changing attitudes within the industry toward female filmmakers as a whole this project so we shot this actually four years ago. Okay so quite a while ago there quite a while ago. I'm not entirely sure about the specifics. But obviously being a swollen dependent feature you know post production can can sort of tab twists and turns and obstacles. Which is i think may have happened in that sort of started. Its festival wrong. I think instead of mid to late. Twenty nineteen so rewind back seven. This felt very much to me. So the first time where A production and its crew felt.

london four years ago first film seven first penguin first time montana Twenty nineteen two a while ago
"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Like what if this was his story and blah blah blah and then so we had that process in. She did that with each of the actors and the characters and then also within that she had you know she would pass certain actors together depending on their relationship. Sir sir Myself and Avi rothman who played a brother. Paolo in the film payment i go together. A couple of times and sort of Not just developed our relationship on a personal level but also developed dot characters relationships backstory. She got lia lee mc played zoe and i together several times to sort of get much for the same reasons just to kind of allow us to connect his people and then to sort of build on characters from that and so by the time we got on the set. All of us had done all. This work got together and individually that allowed immediately for extensive of trust and collaboration and the way that the film was shot as well is that we were working two warehouse in downtown los angeles. Where part of the warehouse was turned into a Turned in the apartment that the film is in. Okay but i have to say no apartment in new york city ever looked like that ever was just saying that's stor. That's the funny thing is like. I've i've always had that feeling like when i see any apartment off film and tv. It's exactly but it's particularly noticeable is more and more people come streaming in. It's like okay. There's no way no way we had that said and then we also had a common area where where we all hung out. So we were as an ensemble. We were always together like even when we when we don't set and it allowed us to to sort of bond and connect and get to know each other and just being each other space. And that i think for me really then translated when we got onto said that sort of trust each other that sense of collaboration that that's what felt really unique to me and was such a joy doing this project because So often you kind of work in that environment. Actors cannot often be separated into their entrees doing their own thing or on their phones whereas this we were we were always together and then there was a real energy in that as well and it plays. I think very well within the film in terms of that creative energy that you are all feeding off of each other and the way that her cameras specifically captures individual talents and strengths. Among all of you. That i would imagine she probably had no idea about going into the process. Necessarily new interpretive dancing in terms of within the scripting process. How much of those home truths that. Your all revealing about yourselves. How much of that was improvised. And how much of that was scripted. So that whole scene the whole circle of trusting where we get what we kind of Reveal the secrets over pottsville lives. That was all that whole entire. Same as improvised. I think the original cod. I could be wrong but for memory. Our member either dantonio or producer. Alex saying that. I think the original version of that was like an hour long if they had just left it.

Avi rothman new york Paolo Alex lia lee zoe two warehouse dantonio los angeles each of couple of times an hour each actors people pottsville
"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

05:41 min | 8 months ago

"alexander i" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Value how are you doing this morning. I'm doing great. Yeah just another another day in this strange kind of repetitive cycle constantly. It for that. I feel like i'd in any way. But otherwise i'm good. How are you feeling like. There's a bit of creative. Resurgence happening in spite of everything or not. You know for me. Creatively i have. This is the whole kind of shift into pandemic living. I.

this morning
"alexander i" Discussed on CharlaConAngel.

CharlaConAngel.

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"alexander i" Discussed on CharlaConAngel.

"Both strong..

"alexander i" Discussed on CharlaConAngel.

CharlaConAngel.

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"alexander i" Discussed on CharlaConAngel.

"In Moscow sporadic candles exploited by London. That to answer took them meeting. Let's put them because they got a little hill. Humus getting you this position that we nurse broke. Focus Karonga midday Sun Sai Differentes was embarrassing when the state is fantastic. Ema E. DOT COM with us. This is infamy. When a coach Cossiga's comes in bookstores. Say but you're being administered. It Kandar starting in three mile born when they did Miranda based in in common legal in in carrying a university continues to let them. East is a foreman in. Look at look buttery Portland. Is that calculus sties foreman in squeeze in Los Angeles Cave almost immediately amigos those who was in Qantar in style and when okay but he goes son whom. I've Seen Serious Kilemi Ki Ki hidden in the days isn't the media as you mustn't tell us case in. Kahlo skills unlimited or take payments does not intervene this enthusiasm euro. I listen Mario left for him. Blow on guard in the ASS is seen. That's pretty decent machos spiritus. Have some one. Okay so this is. The class was in federal court. Win nettles or it's not some number a little momentum entities medicine and there's another Anton. Nps is anti.

foreman Sun Sai Differentes Moscow London Mario Kahlo Los Angeles Cave Miranda Portland Cossiga Qantar