19 Burst results for "Alex Worley"

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Brian. Welcome to the show. Now, let's check in with Alex Worley for good reason. She's always got somebody great, Alex. We're here to inspire, inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex Worley. This is business rock stars and my guest today, Mina her school and she is the co founder of Sandbox. Fitness. We're so glad you're here. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Yeah. So did you always want to be an entrepreneur? Yes. Ever since I was a kid, I have been working for my dad's company. And, um, I just loved what he did. And I wanted to grow up one day and on my own business as well. What kind of company did he have? He actually has One of the largest dog kennels in Maryland. Oh, wow, probably on the East Coast. Yeah. So what was the main thing that you learn from him watching him as you grew up? I guess it was like, work hard. Play hard, Okay, she you know we would hustle and work like crazy and it was like whenever people had vacation. We didn't because we were watching people's dogs. Yeah, when the normal vacation times we're going on and then you know, when we went on vacation, it was, you know, not the normal times, but we We went on vacation all the time, and I just wanted I just loved how our family dynamic growing up was just always so far. We would go on trips all the time. And just because you put in the effort, you're able to take vacation and Enjoy life. Yeah, So would you say that that work ethic is crucial for what you do now? In your business? Yes. Yeah. I mean, we're I'm Brand new. So our business is like, not even at the point that I can go play hard yet that's the goal is just to get it to the point where you know I can work, work work and then eventually be able to take take vacations. Take off when I what I want and, you know, work when I get thanks a lot of work to get there. Yeah. How did you come up with sandbox fitness? At what point did you decide? I want this to be my entrepreneurial endeavor. Um, let's see. Well, I've been a trainer for like since I was 18 for like, 11 12 years now, um And I always of entrepreneurial and spirit because you have to get your own. Oh, yeah. Being a trainer is like you gotta hustle because it's like you can go to a gym and just stand there and be like, you know, people are coming to you guys really work and sell and talk to people. It's your your own salesman. Uh, um. But I was buying witness in particular. At what point Where you like? This is gonna be my business. I think it Was a few years ago I got injured and my husband as well and we went to the beach. We worked out on the beach. And it was like one of the best workouts we've had that didn't bother us, and we kept going back. And we're like this is so amazing. Like, why does no one have this? You know? Yeah. Then we decided we started looking into it. It must have been, you know. Two years before we opened, and we started looking into it and decided just to go for it since no one had it. Oh, wow. That's amazing. What were some of those first steps you took to actually execute the first steps? I guess it was more just like looking Doing research and is finding out. You know how to keep it clean. Because we're like, What do we do with like a giant indoor sandbox like that? Could be nasty. You know, we're like, What if it smells? What if it? You know what? You're sweating on it? It was just kind of we thought it might be a good idea Might not So, um, that was our first step. We start doing research and we found especially sand that we can get made. That was You know, silica, free and super clean. And then once we kind of got that out of the way business loan because we have no money and had no money of our own. So we were just like all right now we've got to get a business loan, and that was a pain in the butt because no one's giving business loans out at the time. So when we finally to get our business, and we were like one of the first s B, a loans from the bank and like the that year, what's another big challenge or obstacle that you've had to overcome as an entrepreneur? Um There's so many of them, I'm sure. Yeah, I mean, the biggest challenge I but I feel is more just like knowing how to allocate the money. You know, It's like everyone wants you to advertise with them. Everyone wants you to, you know, Put your money here, Put your money here, and it's just like you have to figure out Where you know, went to hold back and went to actually go for it. Because, you know you can lose your money. And just like a split second advertising. So So how do you figure that out? Um, I mean, I guess we did. A bunch of research only kind of were like, alright each month. We have this much set aside for advertising and whether it's going to go into a few things or one giant. Advertising or marketing. Um Think either will do it. You know, we just kind of put the money aside and we we go from there. You got to have the budget. Yeah. Yeah, This is business Rock stars were here to inspire, inform and connect a community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex Worley, joined by miniature school if she is the co founder of Sandbox Fitness, So what would you say? Is your strength and your weakness as an entrepreneur? Um, I would say my strength is just people skills. Um, I love you know, talking to people meeting people, everyone that comes in. I just I'm really good just with a different Personalities and injuries and everyone's got something else going on. And just about adapting to every situation in every person making everyone feel welcome. Yeah, exactly. It's like one big family at our studio, so it's really fun. My weakness. I mean, I've got lots of weaknesses, but, um, I I would say Love. How that one's harder for me to think about than the other one. It's like when you're in a job interview. Yeah, week this. How do I say this in a positive way? I mean, my weakness, I would probably say is organization and dealing with lawyers. I am like, I don't know. Lawyer lingo. I just think it Yeah, So it's a different whelming. Oh, my God. So I make my husband do that. Okay. Got it. So it's always missing. You have people who compliment your strengths and weaknesses. Yeah, Going back to organizational skills. What are some, too Tools or tricks that you've incorporated to help you with those skills. Calendar on your.

Alex Worley Maryland Alex Brian Sandbox Fitness Mina Sandbox. Fitness 11 18 today first step first steps Two years before each month 12 years East Coast few years ago one big one day One of the largest dog kennels
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:21 min | Last month

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The planet. I'm Alex Worley, joined by Brian Smith, chief wine officer and co founder of Link. Thanks for being here. So you mentioned in person experiences Tell me how you leverage fats. In person experiences. Yeah. You said that you your digital first and then a lot of times experiences are do you mean in person events? Or what does that mean? I mean, we really call them experiences, But I think what when you look at the wine space, um Historically, people have built the way they build awareness and brands is, um is on premise, which is restaurants and retailers, which we partner with a lot. And then in retail, and you don't necessarily well, let me back up on premises really exciting Because what you're doing is you can imagine you've got to Somalia or someone at the bar or a server and they're putting wine in your glass. And you're getting sort of this trial experience where you get to try it in the context of a great restaurant, and you know, they have good taste and things like that. When we talk about experiences. We're talking about an at home experience where we do a similar thing. Right. So where we're delivering a wine, um, where there's context around wink wink is sort of, uh, a badge of honor, or like a a symbol of quality and taste and perspective on the wine world. And we're delivering that with with some context so we get when we think about experiences. It's really trial trial for the customer to try new things and trial for us to try new products that they might like. Yeah, it was one that's so important because they need to be actually trying the wine to see if they like it. You have to taste it. Yeah, that's the beauty of my background is as a sommelier, the beauty of being a Somalia. It's like you have to taste wine in order to get really good. And it goes the same for people who are enjoying it. Yeah. To taste it so interesting that you used to be a Somalia. I'm sure that helps you in so many ways. If somebody is thinking about breaking into the wine industry, would you recommend? That's where they start versus? You know, starting a wine company. All of said, I'm sure that that would be really difficult without knowing the nuances of the industry. Yeah, I think for for entrepreneur, Certainly. Certainly. Um, I think in the wine space, it's a great Way to start because it's the interface of of customers and product right? Like you're the you are. You are sort of that that interface. You are the marketing. You are sort of, Um You're near the connectivity with the customer. So hugely important there. I think one thing that we found, you know, with our businesses, you know, always challenge the status quo. So like, even if you don't would encourage entrepreneurs, even if you don't know about an industry that can sometimes be a benefit right because everybody thinks that Oh, this can never happen or this isn't how you do it. And so I think sometimes not knowing everything can be a real advantage. And to some degree that's that's helped us. Talk about how being able to sell direct to consumer has really changed things for the wine industry because the alcohol industry in general is very, very complicated. Where, um, if you're not selling direct to consumer, you need a distributor. If you could, if you could kind of break down that aspect of it and how it's really change. Used. Yeah, it's changed. It's changed quite a bit. Um I think if you look at other consumer categories, um wine and spirits or beverage, alcohol greatly under indexes, you know, electronics or apparel or any CPG category in terms of how much of the businesses online But I think you're seeing that change rapidly. Wine is a $70 billion business about wine represents about 80% of total beverage, alcohol online sales. You're seeing, um, rapid adoption from consumers. It's about 41% compound compound annual growth rate over the from 2000 and 15 to 2018 of new consumers purchasing. Why not online? Um so you've got a dramatic shift happening? Um, but we're still we're still you know, far behind sort of other categories. Um, So, uh, there are a couple different ways to sort of by, why not line or connect with consumers Direct consumer. Historically, it was really tasting rooms. So you had to go to Napa Valley and visited tasting room and then you can sign up for their wine club, and that's still the bulk of it. Our model is is quite different. We're connecting with people online and sort of creating a new experience in a new gateway to the category. And then you're seeing the emergence of on demand delivery, um, through sort of Amazon Prime or whole foods, fresh, direct things like that. So that's that's kind of where it's happening and where it's evolving. Um, we believe that Um, you know, connect connection with the customer and and and strong brand identities and personalities in the community that we're building with wink sort of crosses over to all three of those different categories. But again, the importance of the, um direct consumer is the connectivity with the customer and the ability to build that relationship. And that just hasn't existed in the wine business. You know, the wine business is historically been like I have a piece of land. I have a vineyard. I'm going to farm it. I'm going to make it and then I'm going to send it out into the world. You know, to an importer and then a distributor and retailer and hopes if I hope it finds a customer and I get to tell my story, um, what we're doing is we're connecting with the customer first. Sort of working in reverse fashion all the way back into the vineyards. So very you know, our customer feedback that we get will inform next year's harvest plan, which is what we're going through right now in preparation for harvest. Wow. So I think it changes the it's an emerging category is still very small in the mind space, but but it definitely changes the customer producer maker dynamic a lot. Let's end with this. You are thriving in a very competitive industry Would advice do you have for entrepreneurs who are wanting to make it in a competitive industry? I think I touched on this before. But, you know, we say this internally and our organization and our organization has challenged the status quo. Right. So what you think to be true or what? Everyone around you thinks to be true. And, uh, Is not always the case. Um, innovation happens in the most unlikely places. Um, so continue to challenge yourself and challenge sort of the category. Um, and then I think one thing as we've grown as an organization is it's really about the people like if you have a strong vision, and you've got a great products and great concept, it comes down to surrounding yourself with an amazing team. That can be from your first partner to five people to 10 people. But people are the most important thing and the most exciting thing about sort of growing the company. Awesome, Brian. Thank you so much. Thank you. I'm Alex Wehrli. And this has been business rock stars. Does your negative thinking slow You and your business down. Shift your negative mindset to positive thinking with these three tips. I'm Alex. Really with the business Rock stars minute number one.

Brian Smith Alex Wehrli Alex Worley Brian Alex $70 billion Napa Valley Somalia 10 people 2018 five people Amazon Link 2000 about 80% three tips next year first partner 15 first
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:24 min | Last month

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Alex Worley, joined by Robin Young, co founder of Robin Young and coat Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me Yes. So we are going to talk all things branding. I love talking, branding so so happy. The you're here, and you can start out by giving us a little bit of an overview of your entrepreneurial journey and how it led to you starting this company. Sure, Sure. Gosh, I don't know how much time we have to try and keep it. The Reader's Digest version. Um, so my my entrepreneurial journey started out actually in market research. So I worked with this company Gallup and Robinson, you're probably familiar with Gallup Survey is pretty big for them. I did market research for big commercial companies like Nike and Target and Robbins brothers. And really not the most fun work but really, really important to learn. How how customers and respond to certain commercial aspects like taglines and editorial content and in store experiences and things. So I had a really great foundation in branding. And then I switched more into the creative side, and I worked as a stylist. That was the first time I moved to L A. So I did that. Within, you know, magazines and whatnot. And then everything was kind of making the shift to digital. So I followed suit I and worked with two different digital agencies, mostly working on influencer brands and with you know, with pseudo celebrities on their branded content, So this was way back in the day before, you know. Grand strategy or putting a brand identity was even a thing. So I really had to kind of guest me. You know what? What is my, You know, my clients like brand really. It was something that I kind of had to figure out on my own. And then I finished off by working with a major major companies. So U C l A Who's got you know, 100 years of experience, so they have a very, very like solid Brandon place. But I had to work within those confines and really create a way to take this. Existing brand and make it feel really fresh. And I worked on everything from like email campaigns to social media to like websites just ran the gap it a different marketing materials. So really got a very like robust understanding of how branding words and I have to my experience off it. General Assembly, which is a text school, and for them, I was more of like a producer.

Alex Worley Nike Target Robin Young Gallup 100 years Robbins Reader's Digest L A. Brandon first time Robinson two different digital agencies
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:19 min | 2 months ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"That content so that we are sharing professional expert advice with our audience, and it's really been great because there's such a connection between wellness and And wealth. And, um, it's not really so much having money and having a lot of money. It's more about being in control of your money. So there are studies done that actually show that you're You are more confident and that woman's number one like the thing that things them the most confidence is being in control of their finances. I believe it so Yeah, yeah, that's cool. And I love that you have honed in on this mission, not only because there is such a need and it's so powerful and leads to the confidence that you're describing. Also from a business perspective, you know, I think it can be very tempting and I've been tempted myself in a fallen into this and this whole before where you want to be all things to all people. You want to cover all those things just be general lifestyle, But I think that there's so much power and and having focused and and people knowing what to come to you for. So do you feel like from your seat that that's been a really powerful thing for you to be known for this financial advice it is, I mean the content. That we create in our company in is really to inspire women to feel see and own their power. So, however, it is that they feel most confident and more most powerful. We want to help them guide them down that path and finance for all of us. Um, we may you know, be shy to talk about it, but it's something that we should be talking about when we should be learning more about so Uh, so so? Yes. So I think even though we do cover a lot, a range of different topics. We always try and go back to our mission. And the the reason why we started. You have a north star that guides you see, you're not all over the place where you know ultimately what? That mission is just so important. Love it. Okay, We're going to talk more about how media companies are changing when we come back from this quick break. I'm Alex Worley. And this is this is rock stars. No entrepreneur. You can keep the sun from setting or add hours to their day. But there are strategies that will help maximize work habits and productivity. Here are a few strategies for efficiency.

Alex Worley
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:41 min | 2 months ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The planet. I'm Alex Worley, joined by Brian Smith, chief wine officer and co founder of Wink. Thanks for being here. It's my pleasure. Thanks for having me. Yeah, you bet. So we've got to address the chief wine officer for a second. Where'd you get that funky title? I love it. You know, when you When you start a business from nothing, it's a if you're lucky. It's not just you in a room, but if you beat On the room. Uh, as you grow the business, you do just about everything you could imagine. But eventually you want to have an official title that people respect. And so my background is in why my passion is wine. And so as we grew, the business chief Wine officer seemed like a title that was both, um, relevant to the passion but also appropriately executive with a fun conversation starter. I like it. So let's talk about wink. A lot of times people would think about. Mine is a traditional industry. But you guys are very modern company with a modern business model Subscription business model. Tell me a little bit about this. What makes you unique? Sure, That's right. Yeah, it is a it is a you know, a relatively unchanged space and it's an incredibly diverse or over 200,000 different lines available in the world. And and what? What we've set out to changes how people connect with the space. So, um, the original concept was to create an easy way for people to explore. Um, taste new lines find new lines that they love and really develop their own personal palette. And so where we started that business was with subscription e commerce model. Where you go online. Take a brief palette profile. We don't ask any wine questions. So it's like, how do you like your coffee? Do you like it? Frappuccino, too, Or do you like an espresso? But from that we can pull just like as a sophomore year would and sitting in a restaurant. We can pull some initial information. And from there we start to build a pallet profile for you and make recommendations of wines that You may never access on your own. But you might like. Yeah, and I feel like you know, we're speaking to entrepreneurs. A lot of times, an entrepreneur will feel feel that they have a really great idea. That's different than the way the industry is doing. It's one thing to have a great idea. That's another thing to have a great tested ideas. So how did you test this to to realize this is actually what Our customers want. Yeah. So we, um we were very lucky. I mean, so you know, our go to market strategy initially was all digital marketing. So really a performance marketing, um, finding customers online through Facebook Instagram, Um, things like that. And, um, you know, you mentioned sort of always test everything. What we found is that we were just trying to create a great experience for customers by delivering Coal mines that they couldn't find on their own and great stories and sort of delivering it on to their table at home was a lot of context and content around it. And what we didn't realize which we discovered later on is that there was all of this all of this potential value created through that connection with our consumers. So, um, you mentioned wine is is sort of like an unchanged space. It's historically significant. That's part of the beauty of it, but we what we found is when we set out to connect with consumers. We did just that, and we got amazing sort of first party data and information on people's preferences, um through behaviors through ordering ratings that never really existed in the in the wine business. And what that allowed us to do is start to create products. Take that information. Take that relationship from this really great.

Brian Smith Alex Worley Facebook Wink Instagram both over 200,000 different lines wink first one thing second
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:24 min | 5 months ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"I'm Alex Worley. And this is business rock stars. I'm joined by Paul flung. He's the CEO of raw green organics. And I'm so excited to chat with you. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Yeah, So did you always want to be an entrepreneur? I did I You know, my dad was an entrepreneur. And I grew up, you know, working for him and have always envisioned, you know? Doing what I'm doing. That's a seam. I hear a lot of lot of times entrepreneurs had entrepreneur parents, so there must be something about growing up in it. What did you learn from growing up in it? I think it's probably because you see the possibility of being able to run your own business. So I think you know, the parents have a big influence on What you envision and what you think you can do. So you know if your parents were in a employees and all their employed for 20 years by a certain company that maybe that's what you see is being possible. But if you see your parents being able to start businesses that maybe that's kind of something like it's always a back room. I like. Hey, I could do it because the center reality is a lot of businesses fail. But if you feel like, Hey, I've seen people defeat the odds. I can, too. That's probably really encouraging. Oh, yeah, for sure, I think You in the course of any startup or business on you encounter So many challenges on Deacon really quit at, uh At least 100 different points along the way, but it's I think it's zero ones that are able to kind of preserve ear because they know that they've seen it happen in work that they kind of fight through it. So what's that thing that keeps you going? Um I think you have to be passionate about what you're doing. You really believe in What you're building with the product or service. And I think if you really believe that this is something That can be useful in society. You just keep it on you. Do you don't let the negatives stop you. So you worked for family. Sounds like you had a positive experience. Would you ever hire family or hire a friend? How do you feel about that? Yeah, I think so. I think some of your best referrals are from family and friends. I have work in previous companies with Friends. And so, Yeah, I think it's I think it does help when you know how the other person operates. Yeah, And if you like, how that Alfred, I think a lot of people have the rule of no family and friend, work relationships, but that's great that you have had success with it. Yeah, I think so. I think you know, knowing what their strengths are and what your strengths or weaknesses. You can kind of, you know, play off of that. And I think knowing how people react versus how they really think. Um, you know, that's important, too. So I think a lot of Well, sometimes friends family can be Better in certain situations. So what is your strength and weakness as a CEO, Huh? Um, strength. I would say maybe Being able Tonto, try to go. Recruit the best people to work with me. Um and I have a lot of.

Alex Worley Paul flung 20 years Alfred Deacon 100 different points zero
Interview with Duncan Palamourdas of 'Why Alex Beats Bobbie At Poker'

Smart Poker Study Podcast

01:55 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Duncan Palamourdas of 'Why Alex Beats Bobbie At Poker'

"Got an awesome author and poker educator. Dunkin paulo mortis on the line with me. Dunkin teaches the mathematics of poker and poker education at ucla. He's written great articles for awesome sites like upswing poker news card player and is written his first poker book. Why alex beats bobby at poker. Thanks for joining. Alex worley ending dunkin. Absolutely it's my pleasure. Yes no aleksei. I mean we love. Alex i like. I like to believe that. I have a part of me in alex although i i like to think of her as you know the idealistic version i like to think that a part of me is is in there. So that's a compliment actually good good. I'm glad to hear in. And i have to say that. There's quite a bit of bobby in me. Still i played. And i'm a loser. But some of that bobby action. I'm i'm doing that occasionally on the felt all of us for sure it. Yes yeah definitely so thank you very much once again or you know doing this interview with me. I appreciate it now. Yeah definitely your book. You actually even signed it for me. And i really appreciate that. Rich and famous edition signed book. I really love this book and you explain. It's pretty obvious. You're a good educator right good at communicating your Your thoughts and your ideas haven't seen your actual presentations seminars and south via the written word. You really know your stuff. And i love how this book. So you're a math guy. But you don't overcomplicate things crazy. Tough math as you know poker. Math is pretty simple. Lots of addition subtraction multiplication division. But you didn't bog the book down with math and you did something great. Which was you took these two players. Alex and bobby alex at the top of her game bobby just beginning or maybe he's just kind of losing player. But you gave so many real world relatable examples that really illustrated all of your points. I i just. I thought i just gotta say it's an awesome

Dunkin Paulo Bobby Alex Worley Aleksei Alex Dunkin Ucla Bobby Alex
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:19 min | 9 months ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Taylor Freeman. He is the CEO of Upload answering the question. How do you align your employees to your vision? So once you've hired the right people, hopefully you obviously have to start implementing these visions and values. So how do you go about doing that? Sure. So a couple things that I found to be effective or during the weekly meetings we do every day Monday at 10 am full team meeting we actually at the end we go through the values and we talking aloud and we also sort of look at you know examples of how people have lived those values and will reward people that have demonstrated Successful sort of execution on one of the things and give me an example of what your reward them with. Um, so I think, for example, like surprise, surprise and delight is one of our values. And so you know, there's there, folks in the organization that will come forward and out of nowhere. They'll just bring an incredible opportunity that they were never tasked to create. But like they just understood the vision of the company. They understood where we wanted to go. And they manifested this opportunity. So for that, you know. Cash is obviously one form of incentive. And so I think cash is important in some ways, but recognition within the community highlighting sort of their effort as someone that really stepped up his part of the team and making that sort of a focal point so that the team has a reference point for what stepping up looks like I think it's very important and then everyone is so driven by different motivations, right? Some people are like very far in the spectrum of cash. Some people are very sporting the spectrum of just recognition and appreciation. So I think it's incredibly important to understand your employees and understand as individual as individuals. Yeah, and like because you know with your friends, like different things will incentivize them in different ways and so understanding how to actually get someone really genuinely excited and inspired and then reward them with something that they're just so incredibly grateful for. I think that's really sort of the secret. Thank you so much to my guests. Taylor Freeman. He's the CEO of up Load. We're here to inspire, inform and connected community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex Worley, and this is business rock stars..

Taylor Freeman Alex Worley
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:15 min | 9 months ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Alex Worley. And this is business rock stars. I'm joined by Paul Phone. He's the CEO of raw green organics. And I'm so excited to chat with you. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. Yes. So did you always want to be an entrepreneur? I did I You know, my dad was an entrepreneur. And I grew up, you know, working for him and the have always envisioned, you know, doing what I'm doing that Seem I hear a lot of lessons. Entrepreneurs had entrepreneur parents, so there must be something about growing up in it. What did you learn from growing up in it? I think it's probably because you see the possibility of being able to run your own business. So I think you know, the parents have a big influence on what you envision and what you think you can do. So you know, if your parents were in it important they're employed for 20 years by A certain company that maybe that's what you see is being possible. But if you see your parents being able to start businesses that maybe that's kind of something like it's always been back from my like, Hey, I could do it. Yeah, because the set of reality is a lot of businesses fail. But if you feel like, Hey, I've seen people defeat the odds. I can, too. That's probably really encouraging. Oh, yeah, For sure, I think you In the course of any startup or business on you encounter. So many challenges on Deacon really quit at, uh, at least 100 different points along the way, but it's I think it's It's the ones that are able to kind of preserve ear because they know that they've seen it happen in work that they kind of fight through it. So what's that thing that keeps me going? Um, I think you have to be passionate about what you're doing. You really believe in what you're building, Um, with the product service, And I think if you really believe that this is something that can be useful in society, um you're just keeping all of you do you don't let the negatives stop you. So you worked for family. Sounds like you had a positive experience. Would you ever hire family or hire a friend? How do you feel about That? Yeah, I think so. I think you have some of your best referrals are from family and friends. I have work in previous companies with friends. And so Yeah, I think those idiots I think it does help when you know how the other person operates. Yeah, And if you like how they offered a lot of people have the rule of no family and friend, work relationships, But that's great that you had success with it. Yeah, I think so. I think you know, knowing what their strengths are and what your shrink her weaknesses. You can kind of, you know, play off of that. And I think knowing how people react versus how they really think. Um, you know, that's important, too. So I think a lot of snail sometimes friends family could be better in certain situations. So what is your strength and weakness as a CEO? Uh, strength. Um, I would say, maybe being able Tonto, try to recruit the best people to work with me. Um and I have a lot of weaknesses that started.

Paul Phone Alex Worley Deacon CEO
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Now let's check in with Alex Worley for good reason she's always got somebody great Alex how and when to hire freelancers we're here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs I'm Alex Farley this is business rockstars and Michelle's explains CEO and co founder of public she is here to help us answer that question so Michelle obviously when you're in your company and you have a tight budget sometimes hiring full time employees is not an option right yeah exactly and so sometimes you need to turn to freelance work yeah and how many full time employees do you have we have two full time developers and they are in Cairo Egypt which is where our co founder and CTO is also but we have still needed to bring an extra help it's a lot of work to develop an app accidentally how many freelancers are you currently working lans or maybe has worked with total I would say we've probably worked with total three to four over the last I'm here share and we're currently working with one right now I see I definitely use freelancers for different types of jobs and one of them is Q. a testing and that's been a really great role to hire a freelancer and extras that is that is basically like quality control I was going through and doing a deep dive into your product testing all the ins and outs and I'm putting together a very comprehensive list that we had lost our developers and it's something that you know my cofounder and I we also do all the testing ourselves but having a dedicated to a person is has been really valuable so what are some of the other areas that you hire freelancers for us so we are working with I'm like a freelancer who's kind of also an intern and doing our social media that's another really great areas to get help and I we also have another freelancer who is helping on the development side so our full time developers they do all of the big names stuff and all the day to day but we have some areas that are maybe on a tighter time line that we want to get taken care of so we bring in a freelance developer to calm and help us move a little quickly some items and you hired a freelancer towns like from the lower skills to the higher skill levels Exencial media for instance that hasn't really made plans for you to have someone full time yeah exactly yeah how do you direct them to make sure for instance that you are having that quality control you on brands as well as media so we so my co founder Brian who runs all of our marketing and the social side I we work directly with freelancers we had weekly meetings where we brainstormed the contents we also have all of our branding docks which we always do we have certain rules that we always stick to with our social media and how we're posting a couple examples and that's a great idea for one of our biggest rules for Instagram account is because we are video and photo app we're only actually posting videos so we do not allow any photo like still photographs on her Instagram so that's just one little insinuating continuity and it's also just a little more visual what are you guys are all about and then you also like you mentioned hire hire someone with more of a higher skill levels because he really just wanted them to do a great job I don't have to go back and pay more I know you were on a deadline so when is that the better thing to do to maybe higher the more expensive so I think the way we did it was we had a full time line and budget for what we can spend money on in when we needed to get something accomplished and you know there's definitely areas that you can kind of cut corners on it and you don't have to go extremely expensive with freelancer that you're hiring but there are also areas that might be the core of your business to the core of your product that you really you don't you don't show up and you really want to make sure someone's eye you're working with someone who is knowledgeable and so these are the areas that we brought in someone to help with our development team is just achieved what we were trying to accomplish in the time frame that we were one this is this is rock stars were here to inspire inform and connect the community of entrepreneurs I'm Alex really drove by Michelle McLean CEO and co founder of Pablo I might be watching girls okay great but how do I find these people and you find them very easily thanks to websites what are they yeah so we used a no co and of course and they've been really great both are a little different how are they different so where is that purely for hiring angel call has a whole other side to it you can find other co founders if you're looking to bring on a co founder using me investors it's it's a whole different type of networking platform okay so hire freelancers as well of course it is solely focused on transport have you had a different or similar six ask less each side I I would with each arm and we found our cue a tester show of force and we've worked with hands multiple times now and we found one of our developers that we bring on freelancer angel call we've also worked with him several times and the first time you go to.

Alex Worley
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"When he wants to be on the so I'm most any subjects so I'm thinking that is amazing our meetings we spend time with people who are very accomplished very senior people and and cars a lot of things very quickly and you know he's always so helpful as my mom whether it's texting her stuff for sudden stops so trying to get her to learn how to use your AOL account since two thousand and two so I guess that's fourteen years five times or once a week to try to explain their how to open her inbox like everything that brings progress the greatest struggle is always with ourselves if you're looking to take control of habits and choices here are a few things you can do to master self discipline Alex really with the business rockstars minute number one remove the temptation like this thing goes it may seem silly but offers powerful advice basically removing your temptations from your environment you'll greatly improve yourself number two you know your weaknesses shortcomings whatever they may be it's okay you can't overcome until you do number three set clear goals and plans a clear plan outlines each step you must take in order to reach your goals figure out who you are and what you're about create a mantra to keep yourself focused people use this technique to stay on track and we're finished mine I'm Alex Worley and this is a business rockstars minute this.

Alex Worley AOL
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex Worley visits Business Rockstars. And this is my rock star Leon. Woo. He's the founder and chief product officer of sharp suiting such amazing conversation. Love what you're doing. And a lot of publications have as well. You know, a lot of publicity specially in the beginning, how did you get this publicity? Thanks. We'll, you know like kinda started with doing Kickstarter campaign. Okay. You know, anyone who's run a successful, Kickstarter campaign will tell you that publicity is actually part of that. You know you wanna make your. Crowdfunding campaign something that's known to be, you know, a local publications to whatever your target market is that community for us. You know, we started racing to friends that we knew publications I kind of building our own PR list. Emailed them out. Hey, I'm doing this kicks her campaign. Are you interested in featuring it? Yeah. Yeah, exactly. We had some friends that Huffington Post Mitchell for the advocate out magazine, like we've been in probably I dunno at least fifty different publications in the last three years, and it's just kind of was something that we started off with. Very kind of controlled list that kind of just brought about more and more different refer people probably saw you. Yeah. There was a lot of reaching out first, and then what happens was, you know, other people who work at other publications overeat about somewhere. And then they'll contact us now we're seeing publicity coming in. So the fashion brand, you'll was kinda wanna start working on your PR lists. I and in continuing to let people know what you're doing is a business, and then sooner or later, you'll kind of get the ball rolling people start contacting you. But I didn't hire PR agency, right? Well, we did actually work with the PR agency. About a year ago, and that was also very effective as well. But you even started your PR before that so by emailing yourself. So that was affected too certain point you decided at what point that you wanted a PR agency. Yes, so we, we did work with pure agency about a year and a half ago. And that was strategic because we wanted to reach people in Canada. So we work with PR group called dress code codes, but with a q. And the founder set that we worked with. There was really affective. I'm he had more of a kind of an east coast and Canadian representation so he's able to spread the word about sharp in, in those regions. Yeah. So really tap into your own network. But then if there's a new network that you don't have connections. And when it comes in handy, but it sounds like in the beginning, it was very, very grassroots. And a lot of that is just lock. And if your message resonates with your fans your audience your followers, but is there any strategy to grassroots marketing you guys implemented absolutely? I would just focus on on when you're writing a lot of the content that goes sees publications are begin with write ups, that you provide for them. So it's kind of, like telling us story just be very authentic until your story. So many brands these days, it's all about a specific purpose. Or in an inspiration or a social mission like talk about that, and you're right up, you know, and just be very authentic passed alternately, what people care about the most of the nation so much more than the fashion. I mean the fashions incredible. But then it's really the mission behind it that really resonates with people. Yes, yeah, people wanna identify with the brand, you know. Like actual course that you take in in business schools brand identity, so yeah. And like you said, this is a huge trend to have a mission driven business. I hope it days of what's been your experience. Why do you think this is resonating so much people to have these mission driven company? Yeah. I think it's because, you know, people really wanna feel emotion, you know. With something like fashion where it's not necessarily thoroughly a commodity air, you're spending. You know, you're disposable income on this product, you know, and you wanna feel something wanna feel confident you wanna feel empowered. You wanna feel great when you put on your sharp Jack any go out somewhere, or you go into a boardroom, you know, time so that I think that going forward, it's all gonna be about identity in experiential marketing so the way somebody feels about brand is going to be equally important. Connect with. Yes. The French next is so important, not just that it's a good product. Definitely definitely. Have a good product. Make sure it's quality and then work on in connecting with your clients and your customers a little bit about your background and how you transitioned into being entrepreneur and being the boss of your company. You know, like a lot of people in my family Mike Senate pant, family are very entrepreneurial. So growing up. You know, I've always been more that kid that was the leader. I knew I wanted to do something leadership growing up. Which route that took in specifically fashion wasn't necessarily indicates me until much later. I you know, did IT for a little while as my corporate job. And I took a leap of faith start sharp and jump out of the industry about four years ago, basically fashion has always been a part of my personal life, and my hobby, growing up, Audrey few, I would think, in to my that's closets triumph men's were all the time, I would envision myself in men's wear, and, you know, I even styled for men's fashion shows, I was that person that other people who identified similarly to me that is masculine presenting or drowsiness. They would come to me and say, hey, I need to wear something to this wedding, or, you know, I can't find jeans that fit me. Where do I go here? Developing this expertise in need. Didn't even really know it here, the go-to person because it was more of a hobby, it was something that I enjoy doing what point did you decide, I'm going to make this into a business? Yeah. We'll actually, you know, I started this after I took my friends, one of those Hollywood sued outlets, you know, and it was just a terrible experience. And, you know, I'm not going to go through the story of a base tweet about tons of publications but. She had an awful experience, and they should basically didn't fit any of the. That they had there and. The rep actually said that to us as a tow them. I think it's the other way around, you know, that fits her. So at that point, I just got fed up, and I said, I need to start this I'd already developed contacts when I had traveled overseas. To asia. And also when I was in New York for business school. I got my first custom tailored, suits. So, you know, I slowly kinda tried to develop a contacts that I would formulate into a business at some point. So after that, experience, my friend, that was that decided I'm just going to serve working in on the nights and on weekends. I formed the team that would help me with this. And then at a certain point, I just left my fulltime job jump straight into it. And that's when we air Kickstarter campaign. How how interesting such great work. Thanks so much for joining us. Loved learning about your business. The founder and chief product.

founder Alex Worley Canada New York chief product officer Huffington Mitchell Mike Senate Jack Audrey asia Hollywood three years four years
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Towards the same goal. And I make sure those goals every single week. Yeah, that's a good point because a lot of times departments, get so bogged down with what's right in front of them and lose sight of that bigger picture. But if they're connected to that, bigger picture, it's gonna make them more passionate to your point earlier. Yes. So what would you say is when the challenge so far? Full this company to I would say the biggest challenge is to nail the quality of contents right and force. That's the core business, obviously, now we have the platform that we need to put contents with that by phone users. And you realize that the quality of common weighty matters. And when we say, premium content, there's a lot of premium content, and you can have amazing engagement with weeds from content. But if the bar is too low the users on noggin engage. Let's talk about content for a second because the only getting Bayer officially video content. And our entrepreneurs are regardless of what industry, they're in. They're probably content creators in some fashion, if nothing else, just on social media. So in your opinion, what is doing? Well in contents, I think a lot of folks out there are we thinking content of formats for mobile, I, which is really good. That makes you consume the content and engaged content. A lot better. I think there are a lot of folks thinking about the quality of the content. But in my opinion, there is so many. Social snack, all for quality content pranks, you know, fails all that stuff that you seek cute animals all day long. And in my opinion. It's an oversaturation of that kind of content, and we need to rise raise the bar and get into what you can consume on the longer form premium content bring short form and right is not necessarily Albany. Okay. Let's end on this note, and that is if you weren't an entrepreneur, what position or role would you wanna have on the world? Holy politics, politics. Oh, fun. I think that's something that I love and very passionate about we'd love to be brought up that picture awesome. Well, thank you so much for stopping by pleasure meeting, you and learning about your journey. Thank you so much. I'm Alex Worley, and this is Business Rockstars..

Alex Worley Albany
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Like this is crazy. People are like this is you have to do this Limoges. I had, we had so much support, and so many people like pushing us over into that, knowing that we could if we didn't mention it too much. So, so. Yeah. And we didn't actually get that first project, which is funny, because that now looking back was blessing disguise. We were able to pit it and go for a lot of other types of work that we wouldn't have been able to. And so, you know, it's like everything happens for a reason. Yeah. Oh, wow. The game. Not first project fell through. Do you know just just that are self in what our dream accounts, but we always say, we wanted to work on whether we got to or didn't to in our family life now at the beginning sees because we're worth past that now. So what's our dream? What are we to work on Libya, go after? And we have in did. And we'll continue to. Weird. It was a weird feeling because, you know, I think we in my mind was like this, or nothing. And so then, when it didn't work, it was, I didn't have we didn't have a backup. We were we weren't like one now. So it was it was that hustle mentality of sink, or swim. We've already created the name the brand. We know what we stand for. We know what we want. We are to a point where we have a lot of great connections network of people. So let's get out there and hustle. And that's just I mean, it's it was literally fingers when we're in had gone to that point where the band had been ripped off. So if we had kept our jobs and pitch that didn't win it, this carry blanket would have been our jobs, and we would have just stayed. So it's, it's good that stout on everything. That's happened in the last year. And we have a mix of, you know. Terrifying insecure with. Immense highs then pride so it. Wow. Easily. Well, we're gonna take a quick break. When we come back, we're gonna talk more about their journey of making it in that first year, also influence, marketing, they are experts in this area so much more. The compounders of one hour agency, we are the biggest entrepreneur destination on the planet. This is Business Rockstars. Remember, it's all about the customer. I'm Alex Worley with the Business Rockstars minute. The customer is always right. You've heard that before it's the backbone of customer service..

Alex Worley Libya one hour
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Alex Worley, and this is Business Rockstars. Do you have a great idea for a product or a business worth millions? But you don't know how weird. Tired of building somebody else's dream will go build your own Business Rockstars dot com. Amazingly, anybody who wants to become an entrepreneur start for throw your own business. Go to Business Rockstars dot com Business Rockstars dot com. So you sit down, and you do your budget, and you look at all your monthly 'cause your bills, your income, and it seems like there's never quite enough. You know, it would help would really help binding five hundred dollars a month to help balance things out. And that is the typical savings five hundred dollars a month for a family, when you switch to medishare, for your healthcare, meta share is a Christian healthcare, sharing ministry, and it works. No wonder more than four hundred thousand people are doing this now. And look, whether you're single or married, or you have kids, this can make sitting down to a monthly budget, a lot more fun. Just think what you can do with five hundred dollars a month that can cover par payment or payback loans, or whatever, join meta share and go out to dinner to celebrate. Find out more the meta share people are so easy to talk to. They can answer any questions. They're super friendly. Call eight four four ninety one bible that's eight four four ninety one bible. Eight four four ninety one. Bible in store for your business this week at Staples. Token and toner of our appreciation.

alex worley
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is Business Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien. Welcome to the show. Now. Let's check in with Alex Worley for good reason. She's always got somebody. Great, alex. We're here to inspire inform and connect a community of entrepreneurs. I'm Alex wirley this Business Rockstars and today's rock star Roger staff, hold owner arise nation. And of course, you probably recognize him from the Los Angeles. Rams. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you. Yes. I'm sure football was a part of your life for a long long time, probably your entire life. What about entrepreneurship winded that enter your life? I didn't really know much about it until I started getting into is school. You know, just started to tell myself like, hey, I wanna have my own company as well. Especially when I started going to school in college. I really wanted to be my own boss. So, you know. Learned through playing football that you want to invest in things Japan about and you know, I starting my own company turn into seen watch grow amazing. And I'm sure a lot of times people become professional football players there. One track mind, they're just like I'm going to become a professional football player. And that is, but you always have this other dream background, right? I think it's just because you know, I've been want worn by so many people about how short you know, that you're NFL career can be. So even though I know that was my main goal, and I mean, my main goal since I was nine years old..

football Alex Worley Alex wirley Pat O'Brien Los Angeles NFL Rams Roger Japan nine years
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Much. I'm Alex Worley and this is Business Rockstars. Guys. Religiously expensive little blue pill is now generic which means you can get prescription medication that tree at affordable prices in hymns. Makes it extra affordable right now. Get your first month supply for free all you pay just five dollars for your medical consultation. Would you go foreheads dot com slash doctor after that? It's just thirty bucks for a month's supply. Sure beats paying big bucks for just one blue pill, doesn't it you won't need an awkward in person. Doctor's appointment to get the prescription hymns has doctors online who could prescribe the medication and a pharmacy sends it right to your door. It's affordable private and incredibly easy. Nobody likes dealing with the now. Thanks to him. Nobody has to and that's really good news to get your first order for just five bucks. You need to go to this exclusive address four hymns dot com slash doctor. That's four hymns dot com slash Dr fear first month for just five bucks. Four him dot com slash Dr prescription products required online physician consultation, and are only available at the position determines the prescription is appropriate. This is Fred dryer. Former rams. Offensive in football season just ended and you can bet teams are already hard at work scouting new talent for next season. But if you're running a small business, you need to know where to go to find top recruits linked in. It's where people go every day to make connections growing their careers. And discover new job opportunities linked in jobs takes the time to learn more about who you're looking for. And then recommends the qualified candidates you want to spend time talking to to make a quality higher. You're excited about customers. Right. Lincoln jobs, number one and delivering quality hires and posting your job on link then gives you the best chance of finding and starting a conversation with your next star recruit. It's no surprise. The new hires made every eight seconds using Lincoln so build you winning team by posting your job opportunity on linked in and visit Lincoln dot com slash solution. Get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's Lincoln dot com slash delusion..

Lincoln dot Lincoln Alex Worley rams Fred football eight seconds fifty dollars five dollars
"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"alex worley" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The planet. I'm Alex Worley. Welcome to Business Rockstars. We've got to Rockstars for you today. We've got Jeananne grubs and Abby Lewis Evans co founders of our one agency. So we were talking about how you guys are experts in influencer marketing, so for those of you to them. What is it for? Well, it's I mean it basically came out five years ago early beginnings. But over the last two years, it's just everywhere all over the place, but it's taking influential people within their own perspective on respective bright avenues areas and partnering with brands to kind of get a product out there and talk about a product organically with what that influencer does. So it could be anything from fashion. I think one of the biggest categories. Lot of fashion Thursday and also it can be. You know, an education or science. Tech or someone that has like a hobby or interest that they share can be collecting things or certain films or anything like that. And they become an advocate and a person that has credibility in what they're talking about. And they have a niche audience, which is a unique opportunity that didn't exist before. When you connect with a very very specific audience. Of course, the people that you want to be connecting with the avenue like you said somebody credible. Yes. So how do you determine whether or not somebody is an influence are or not. But that depends on a few a few factors, and it's always a little bit different takes a little bit of a different I into depending on what the brand wants out of debt or if it's a fake. Pacific reason for looking for the influencers so you can find an influence or based on solely numbers, maybe looking for awareness within a certain audience, you can influence her more based on high engagement if you are looking to maybe push a product or promote fails at something just knowing that they have an audience that is actually not only watching what they do. But doing what they do kind of what kind of business realistically expect from doing influencer marketing is that four awareness, or is it more sales or awareness is great. But you can also get awareness on like much level. I mean TV or something I've traditional forum for for this space because you know, you're not like eyeing impressions necessarily while. You're trying to do is make a really natural pairing. So if you're selling a a beverage of some sort find someone that you know in what they create. And what they pose. That is a works. Really naturally orbits like if it's a tool, and you're working with someone that building things every single day like the tool brand should be working with that person because they're already using your products and for wariness that's great because we can get that. But I think the the not seeing the products in action and seeing the product in use how an average person would be using it is worth brands really gonna win. So you really have to strategically picks. Sure you help. Yes. The identification process is the most important thing. So what we do is. We look at the objectives of the brand. And we look at the product they're trying to get in the hands of consumers in what they're trying to achieve so demographics, all of that, obviously part of the process of taking the right person. And then we find the most influential people that have that hit those demographics and hit on something that doesn't feel like a departure for the brand, you know. So it's against something. Very seamless you work at Ed. Yeah. In fashion. I think is a big part e-e-e-e-no find someone that is just always giving style tips and things like that. And and working your products, and that sort of way, you know, I think the force one can backfire. So if you're throwing something towards an audience that these you just kind of sponsored postage just feels like you're not really funny, and that's really all you're going for with using influence, the marketing is off. Intensity. True fan of the brand using it that just so happens to have a ton of fans of themselves. We offer trying to find people that are advocates for the brand the brand may not even know about. So we find someone at turn airline all the time. And every time they're getting on that airline and the airline. We need we go this airline needs to be working with this person as opposed to finding someone to actually never fights her airline or something like that. And it's fake and their audience doesn't care. How do you actually create content to bridge that gap between the brand of the excellence? Our I we worked with them because they're the bad thing know, their audience to that they are experts at knowing what works on their channel. So you have to listen to them and have to create how they want to create the brand doesn't really get that. They can give them some guidelines. But they can't really say can you post this for me? And if you do that, you're basically just buying impressions brand create something influenced or just it's not true. It's not how it works that. That's for sure. Because for some influencers still photo does great. Just great influencers video does better like influence or has a fury. For a certain aspect of product brand in their own, right? And just giving them that creative. Liberty is going to go so much further and in a natural way that the audience doesn't feel like they're being sold to because I don't I think that's the opposite of what they want. Right. Can you guys work at tongue with social media, obviously with influencers? And without is there something that you've learned when it comes to specifically marketing that does well versus doesn't do. Well, it's so funny. There's like if everyone everyone thinks they have the secret sauce. What what goes viral or what work, and there are ways to know what you know? There's there's things we can know for sure it's like we should be putting money here and there, but it's really you learn space for sure it's optimizing constantly and. And not getting disappointed when something doesn't perform all because that's valuable information that we need to know nothings a failure from it right here. And on that note. Thank you so much. Thank.

Abby Lewis Evans Alex Worley five years two years
This Woman Went From Hollywood Startlet to Start-Up Queeno

Business Rockstars

04:42 min | 3 years ago

This Woman Went From Hollywood Startlet to Start-Up Queeno

"Business rockstars. I'm Alex Worley for by Sarah, Michelle Gellar and brag Fleischmann they are the co founders of food stores. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having the children's. So for those who are not familiar if you could explain what food stores. Is a clean comforted company. We started out with baking mixes that you can purchase it anywhere in the country at physical retail or online. And then we also offer a subscription based kit offering that you can get once a month in your house. Huge dessert lover. So love that. It's a little less guilt or a little more guilt free. Very cool. I'm so the next question for you is what would you say is your definition of being an entrepreneur? What does it ultimately take? It takes everything that you have. And then some more I thought that I knew it working hard was until I joined the start up world, and you realize it's harder than having newborn twins that it is full-time nature. Attention your brain doesn't shut off. But it's also the most incredibly rewarding when you actually realize you can hit those milestones. Yeah. Absolutely. I'm curious. How has Hollywood prepared you for this difficult world of startups. It's interesting there are some aspects of it where I think that Hollywood definitely has help in preparing. And I think that mainly has to come with the amount of knows that we got the rejection, I look at most people in their lives, and you graduate college and you look for a job, and maybe you don't get a few. And then you settle in a job. And then maybe five or six years later you switch. But for me, it's constant it's additioning processes such a constant and very personal rejection. That happens so often on a large scale that it makes it a little bit easier in terms of leading the nose in the business world Roloff you a little bit and make you tougher as opposed to really feeling it as a personal rejection. I always said that we know we have a great idea. And we know we're going to kill it. And we'll find the right people, and this one just wasn't it as opposed to really internalizing that. Yeah. There are a lot of mistakes and many failures that happen and entrepreneurship, and I can't imagine being an actress that would prepare you for that. You know, a common fear is of failure. For entrepreneurs you ever deal with that we have a very specific definition and for us fail is just the first attempt and learning it just the first time, we tried something. If that one didn't work, it's only a failure. If we don't learn from it and improve upon what we initially set out to do. And you can't be fearful of failure and run business. If you are. Your perspective about what failure really is. And that's what Sarah Michelle talks about. Yeah. So you guys have been at it for a couple years. Now, if you could go back to those first few months, what advice would you give your early entrepreneurial self goodness. Well, I think the big one would be stamina. So you're going to be putting in long hours, and there's gonna be some sacrifice along the way. So if you go back and talk to yourself you would prepare. They weren't even harder. Well, you'd say, hey, look, there's going to be days like this where you want to quit. And after if you knew that that was coming then you would prepare better for it. And that could be all the things that you would do to decompress. Then that could be exercising hanging out with family, traveling to find those things that will get you through that difficult moments in being an entrepreneur. And if you're prepared for that which most ninety percent of first time entrepreneurs are not and makes it so much easier, and so much more joyful. To be challenging Sascha, which is at all are ultimately doing to really utilize the community to look for people that are facing the same struggles or have experienced the same struggles. And learn and grow from that. And and propel each other up. It's a team sport. Yeah. If you could create a startup toolkit, what would be inside of it. It could be more tangible technology could be intangible like a characteristic of personality trait that you need. So what would be inside my God? But that would be our next startup. We can't tell you that unless you send the not answer that question. Capsule. Okay. The big one is if the for not doing tangible be you gotta be visionary. You got to be strategic got to be creative. You've gotta be relentless. You have to have situational awareness and self awareness. But that in the box, and then you have to have that stamina to be able to work eighty hours a week. I think also stellar interpersonal skills seem to always be a prerequisite for successful entrepreneurs that we ought to communicate sell your idea. Get people to come over to your side do Steph when they don't want to to help you out. And and I think also nice comfortable shoes. How

Sarah Michelle Hollywood Alex Worley Michelle Gellar Steph Fleischmann Sascha Ninety Percent Eighty Hours Six Years