13 Burst results for "Alex Wigglesworth"

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:44 min | Last week

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Sitting as always in the earthquake chair is Ron Lin and Ron. When you're not out covering, shaking on the ground, you've been pulled into drought coverage for God. How many years now? 15 years. So, you know, for a couple of droughts now. Oh, Jesus. That's like, when mega mega drought though, so. On the wildfire wing, as always, Alex wigglesworth, Alex, if a tree burns in the forest, does it make a sound? Definitely, it's pretty loud, actually. Oh, that was supposed to be more of a mystery, but thank you. And our Cassandra of the coast, Rosanna Shaw is off to get crowned as an honorary turn. So joining us this month is breaking news reporter Haley Smith. Haley, what's your most precious drought memory? Well, I grew up in Miami, which is basically a place with too much water. So when I first got to Los Angeles during the last drought, I was so scared to waste even a drop that I was standing in cold showers instead of waiting for the water to heat up. And I feel like these days that might be a practice I need to revive. So your job now is to create a canal from Miami right to Los Angeles. Can you do that? I'll get to work on that. Awesome. Thank you so much. And thank you all you masters for joining us. And Hailey has the first timer here. You get the first question. So much of Southern California is going to go through unprecedented water restrictions and that's saying something. So what are the proposals? Yeah, this is huge news. The metropolitan water district of Southern California, which is the largest drinking water supplier not just in California, but in the whole United States, has basically announced that they don't have enough water from the state to get us through to the end of this year. So in order to make what we have last, they're ordering about 6 million southern Californians to immediately cut water used by 35%. It's the most severe cut they've ever asked for. Areas that rely on water from our other major source, the Colorado River are being spared for now, but that river is also dangerously low and we're getting warnings that similar reductions are on the table. Water water nowhere not a drop to spare. But how much water is the average person using in Southern California? So the number does vary by area, but metropolitan says, on average, each person uses about a 125 gallons of water a day. And we need to get that number to about 80 gallons per person per day. So for some context, an old toilet uses about 6 gallons of flush, newer models use about 1.3. If it's Brown, let it mellow. Something like that. Ron, you're not just our earthquake master, but you're like, the old man of drought. So back in 2007, back in the days, you wrote an article where you're talking to people throughout Southern California about that drought and that year was a driest on record. That was 15 years ago. Did people take it as seriously then too? Yeah, I feel like people took it more seriously back then because in that drought from like 2007, we only got like three inches of rain that year in LA and we usually get 15 and it was so bad that like the butterflies were staying asleep and the oak trees weren't even sprouting acorns, even the rattlesnakes were slithering into houses, including the home of Sally fields. She actually had to call a rattlesnake hustler to get the snack. They love her. They really love her. But the reason why I think that people don't take it seriously is because there was a lot of rain in December in LA, like 9 inches of rain. But compare that to the last 5 year drought between 2011 and 2016. We never even got 9 inches of rain like every rain year. So that felt a little bit more super apocalyptic than it does now. So because of that, people just say, there is no drought because it rained a lot. Exactly. And I feel like as California, we have like super short attention spans. So if there's a time in the last few months where it felt like it rained a lot, it doesn't feel super real. And I feel like that's been kind of the problem with this drought. Like, I kind of knew reading wise that we were in a drought for the last several years. In fact, we did an episode on this last year, but it was only really after we started talking about this for this episode that I realized, oh crap, it really is historic in a nature that didn't really sit with me until basically in the last couple days. That's how bad this drought is, folks. We did a drought week last year. We thought, okay, that's it. We're done with it. And here we are again. So scary, scary times. Alex, all this dryness. It's great for wildfires, obviously, but what's scarier is that drought makes things hotter. And I know that kind of seems like duh, but it's not. Yeah, so drought can make temperatures hotter because there's less moisture in the soil to evaporate and carry away heat. The earth becomes kind of like a person who can't sweat. There's just no way for it to cool off. And then hotter temperatures can also worsen drought by causing more precipitation to fall as rain rather than snow. And by causing what's not does fall to melt more quickly and earlier in the year. So instead of providing this gradual source of moisture that trickles slowly down into the streams and reservoirs and keeps the vegetation wetter into the spring and early summer when we need it most, you have a situation where the water comes all at once and things green up and then dry out. Then when you add in hot dry background conditions, more of the water will also absorb right back into the soil and into the atmosphere instead of making its way down into those streams and onto that vegetation. Conditions are only getting hotter over time due to greenhouse gas emissions, driving up global temperatures and all that increases the risk of large fires in the spring and summer. So are you saying we should just put a bunch of 5 gallon Home Depot buckets on the Los Angeles river to just get all of that water? Sure. Ron, save me here. Yeah. I mean, it's totally nuts. I was looking at Lake Shasta, which is California's largest reservoir. And I was looking at how much water is in Lake Shasta at this time of year. And in my lifetime, based off of the data that I have on my screen, it's never been this low, and it should be almost full because the winter is over and it should be full of rainwater, but it's really at like a severely low level. And if you look at Lake mead, it's at 30% of full capacity. This is the Lake that's held up by Hoover Dam and that Southern California relies on for a lot of its water. It's at its lowest level since it was filled in the 30s during The Great Depression. So stuff that I thought was apocalyptic and I.

Southern California Ron Lin Alex wigglesworth Rosanna Shaw Haley Smith Ron Miami Los Angeles Sally fields Cassandra Alex Hailey Haley earthquake California
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:01 min | Last month

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"For the lack of any big quake so far this year? Not you because the last time you mentioned a lack of big earthquakes we just had one like a month later. Uh oh, I changed the damn it. I always do that. On the wildfire wing is Alex wigglesworth, Alex since water is the opposite of fire. Can you make it rain? I wish we'll get there one day. And joining us in you is our Cassandra of the coast, Rosanna Shaw. So how was that conference of crustaceans you cleverly canvassed in Cabo? I think it would be shellfish of me to talk about that when we're supposed to be talking about earth day. Touche. Thank you all as always for joining us. And Rosanna, let's actually start with you. Reading silent spring, take us back to the 1960s. What kind of state of mind were we in leading up to the creation of earth day? Three things come to mind when I think of the sparks that ignited the modern environmental movement. One obviously was Rachel Carson's silent spring, which really helped the public think about how everything on this planet is connected. Before this book, it was the post World War II era, chemicals were the miracle of science. Frankly, our town has gained a lot by the coming of the nylon plant. In every way, air town is a bigger and better community. Industrialization was our economy booster and we were just starting to learn seemingly simple concepts like food chains and ecosystems. And these concepts I might add were being debated and questioned publicly by major corporations and industries, not unlike the way climate change science continues to be debated today. There was a motto at the time, dilution is the solution to pollution and silent spring really made us reconsider that frame of mind. The dilution just means the problem re accumulates elsewhere. There was also the Santa Barbara oil spill in 1969 in this stunning fire in Cleveland, where a river quite literally went up in flames because there was so much trash and chemicals in the water that the river caught fire. These events shocked us into seeing just how rampant our disregard for the environment was at the time. We take a lot of our environmental protection laws for granted today, but back then, we were just dumping chemical waste into rivers in the ocean. Pesticides like DDT got fogged all over beaches and farms in the smog, as anyone growing up in LA would remember was just awful. So all of this ended up leading to the creation of birthday then? Yeah. Later in 1969, senator Nelson, a Democrat from Wisconsin, was in Santa Barbara to follow up on the oil spill, and he came up with the idea of doing a national teaching on how human activities were damaging the natural world. This was in the era of the counterculture and the Vietnam protests. So teach ends were very much in Vogue at the time. And this idea led to earth day, which led to some pretty significant legislation that continues to guide the way we manage and protect our natural resources today. The clean air act, the clean water act, it also led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency, which has a complicated track record today depending on who you're talking to. But can you imagine the EPA not even existing before 1970? I should also note that these landmark regulations were passed under president Nixon, it may not feel like it today, but protecting the environment was a no brainer bipartisan issue back then. All this history, all these people pushing, but now when I think about earth day, I think about my mailbox, just filled with all these emails from companies saying, oh look, we're green, RICO friendly, we're carbon offsetting carbon neutral. You get sick of earth day, quick that way. Is that the same for you, Rosanna? Yeah, I mean, I would say earth day today has evolved into a number of things the cynic in me thinks of all the greenwashing email pitches that flood my inbox too. There are so many. But there is still a lot of meaningful education work that happens each year come April, community cleanups, special education events. I noticed that a lot of environmental campaigns and big policy decisions also often get pegged to earth day. So even though we should be thinking about these issues every day, not just once a year, it is important to acknowledge that earth day has become an important way to check in on these issues at least once a year for folks who aren't engaged all the time and it's not just about buying more stuff that is quote unquote sustainable. We'll be right back. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business, it takes a dedicated team working together, and the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough. At city national bank, we aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you. After all, it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them. See what personal can do for you at CNB dot com. City national bank member FDIC. Michael Lewis here host of against the rules. Each season I've been asking what's happened to figures in American life, who need us to trust them. Referees, coaches this season I'm taking a long look at experts. Why is a country that's like the best in the world at creating experts? So horrifically bad at figuring out who they are and taking their advice. We're going to find out together. Listen to against the rules wherever you get your podcasts. So Ron, we're talking about earth day and the campaign every April sort of reminds me of shakeout that they were supposed to pay attention here in California. To earthquake prevention and safety, but no one does what they is it supposed to be again, I forget. It's every third Thursday in October, which is usually around my birthday. So it's easy for me to remember it. I always actually thought that it happens to be around the anniversary of the Loma prieta earthquake, the World Series earthquake from 1989, but the real reason is actually quite boring. The first one happened only in 2008. And it was in mid November and the schools were like, mid October is actually a better time for them. So that's the reason why. But the anniversary is actually for me are helpful because I can almost peg any time of the year to an earthquake. It's a helpful reminder that any month could be a time for an earthquake. I mean, there is this kind of myth that there's an earthquake weather of it happening during hot weather, but that's not true we've had earthquakes in the winter time too. If you give me a month, I can give you the name of an earthquake that has happened before. Welcome to give a month and round Lin gives you an earthquake. First up, we have the times host and columnist Gustavo arellano. June. June June June, there was the landers earthquake of 1992, a magnitude 7.3 that shook up the Mojave desert. Next is Rosanna Shaw, coastal overlord, and pun master. September. September, the two, the two quakes in Mexico, the 1985 and the one from 2017. And that's it. For a given month and Ron land gives you an earthquake. Tune in next month, for ask Rosanna how she's doing and she'll ruin your day with a terrible joke. Wow, we're gonna take this show on the road one day, Ron. But Alex, so there's a shakeout day. There's an earth day. Is there a day where we just think about just wildfires? And doesn't the idea itself kind of sound silly? Sure, there are wildfire awareness days, although I'm not sure that any of them are widely observed, California actually has a wildfire preparedness week in early May. We said in the past and I'm going to bring it back today, we.

Rosanna Shaw Alex wigglesworth Rosanna senator Nelson Santa Barbara Rachel Carson Touche Environmental Protection Agenc Cassandra Cabo earthquake Alex president Nixon Cleveland city national bank Wisconsin Vietnam City national bank RICO LA
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:07 min | 4 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"In the wildfire chair is always as Alex wigglesworth. Alex, do you like your fireball neat or on ice? Definitely neither. Yeah, though you got the trick question. Covering earthquakes in COVID-19, of course, is Ron Lin, Ronda, snow freeze earthquakes. Only during heat waves. Oh, fascinating. And our overlord of the coast, Rosanna Shah, is a way at a super secret seal society seminar in sausalito. So in her places, our newly anointed water master, Ian James Ian, sparkling or still. Still, still, still still waters run deep. Definitely. Oh, that's very deep right there. Listen to the four top song, by the way. So welcome masters and Ian as our newest master. Your first. So with all the snow in the Sierra Nevada and more forecast for this winter, California, the drought, we're Gucci, right? Yeah, if only that were the case, it's still technically a state declared drought emergency. We did get a ton of snow, almost 18 feet in December at donner pass, and it was a record setting month for snow in parts of the Sierra Nevada. California's snowpack is officially well over a 100% of average for this time of year. But the snow season lasts all the way through March. So we still have a long way to go. And we'll have to see if this winners overall snowpack turns out to be a big one, a real boom, or not much. I mean, we're seeing all this snow, so that's good, isn't it? It's good that there's snow. Yeah, it is definitely good. It's been a lot, but there's also January, February, march. So getting to that April 1st finish line, we don't really know what's going to happen. And people who manage water look at April 1st, kind of like a finish line, and so so far what we've gotten represents a bit more than half of what we need to get to make it an average amount on April 1st. So the next few months will be really key. Yeah, here in California, the television stations always make this big show of people going to some part up in Northern California with a humongous ruler to try to get the snowpack measure. Why is that measurement so critical in the American West? So on average, California gets about a third of the water from snow. And so when it melts in the spring and summer, that water flows into reservoirs in the northern part of the state and you know if you've seen before when you're driving along I 5 in the central valley and you see the California aqueduct carrying water toward the south. A good chunk of that water came from snowmelt runoff. And so for now, even after The Rain and snow, the state's biggest reservoirs like Lake Shasta Lake oroville are still way below average levels. And the past two years have been some of the driest ever recorded. So to really get out of that deep water deficit, we'll need more storms to come our way. And it's really not clear if that's going to happen this winter if something like December will keep on coming. And another thing to keep in mind, climate change is cranking up the natural water cycle. So with higher temperatures, come more extreme extremes. The heat is making droughts like this more intense, and we can also expect more extreme floods. Extreme extreme, that sounds like a metal band. Ron, you've covered drought for years, of course, and my friend food legends have been climbing. She wondered on social media why we just let so much water just flow into the ocean and she said something to the effect of like, where's the city infrastructure to save a bunch of that rainwater? It's the hubris of our forefathers. Ozymandias. So the incredible thing about the way LA was created. LA people always thought we could grow our way to existence by taking water from somewhere else from Northern California or the Colorado River. And so a lifetime ago rain was actually always considered a nuisance because it caused so much disastrous flooding. I mean, there were these big floods in LA in the 1930s and so that's when everyone was like, you know what? We gotta do something about it and that's when they align the LA river with concrete so that you could rush all that water out to sea as quickly as possible..

Alex wigglesworth Ron Lin Rosanna Shah Ian James Ian California Sierra Nevada Ronda sausalito Lake Shasta Lake oroville Alex Gucci Ian Northern California central valley LA Ron Colorado River LA river
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"In the wildfire chair is always as LA times reporter Alex wigglesworth. Hey, Alex, if it's raining, that means no infernos, which means you get to have a break until summer, right? Don't jinx me. Occupying the coastal chair is Rosanna Shaw. If it rains Rosanna, that means water level rises, so does that mean the coast is anti rain? Hey, Gustavo. I would say the coast is more anti Gustavo jokes. Ah, that's mean. Well, whatever coast I only like you and Laguna Beach anyway. Finally, our earthquake chairperson is Ron Lynn. Ron, can we just get rain to drown the monsters that live in fault lines? And then therefore, and earthquakes forever? Yes, yes, that's a big plan. You've got it. Awesome. I should win the Nobel Prize for that. Well, welcome all is always in. We'll start with Alex. And it sounds counterintuitive, but this year's fire season was poised to be pretty disastrous, given the drought levels, but then it rained, so yay? Right, those rainstorm said started last month where kind of a mixed bag for Northern California. On one hand, people were relieved because rain like that can really help with fires that are burning. And once you start to get these rains, that pretty much means the end of the fire season or at least the season of these really large intense fires. At the same time, these storms dropped so much rain up there, and they happened right after, even while some of these fires were still burning, there was no time in between for the landscape to recover. So authorities were also worried about flooding and debris flows. Also, in Southern California, fire season is not over yet. We didn't get that much rain from these storms. It's too soon to say whether this specific string of storms is linked to climate change, but scientists say these rapid shows from intense fire seasons to record breaking storms will continue to become more common as a planet warmth. You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't when it comes to disasters in California like, okay, fires gone because The Rain, but because the fire just destroyed so much of the land, now it's all of a sudden, vulnerable to flooding and mudslides. Yeah, this risk is especially high if it rains soon after a fire, but it can last for up to 5 years until plants that were burned grow back. That's because a loss of vegetation exposes the soil to erosion and ash and other burn material can kind of clog the soil and prevent it from absorbing water. That can make The Rain run off the soil like its pavement. All that can turn into a debris flow, which is when the water carries the loose mud soil and rock down a slope. When that flow is sandier and more water saturated, it's called a mud flow, not a mud side because Rosetta will yell at me. Yeah, can I jump in? I'm sorry. I need to set the record straight for the gazillions time. I know people in California like to say mudslide and the quote unquote news media Gustavo is also very guilty of this. But there is no such thing as a mudslide. It's a mud flow or debris flow, or it's a landslide, which is a totally different phenomenon. Ron and Alex have heard me go off on this so many times. I'm mudslide is a melted chocolate dessert Gustavo, ask any signs. But mud slides doesn't it? You have mud when it rains, it turns into mud when it falls down like the hills, it slides, so mudslide, right? No, it's a B grade melted chocolate dessert okay, I'm just pulled up the U.S. geological surveys glossary. And here is their definition for mudslides. This is from the United States geological survey, and this is going to put you all to shame. Mudslide, it imprecise, but popular term coined in California, frequently used by Lehman and the news media to describe a wide scope of events ranging from debris laden floods to landslides, not technically correct, period. Please see mud flow previous glossy. Mud flow mud slides sounds like Texas Ron help me. You're your team mudslide, right? Well, I'm not going to get into it, but I can tell you if any California should know about two things. One is a debris flow, which is basically when a lot of water falls down a debris flow can happen within minutes and send torrents of mud and water, screaming down slopes. And you know, can be potentially deadly. The other thing that people wanna know about are something called deep seated. How you see? Look at this. Ron, Ron is from California, and he almost said mudslide. He gives me crap about this all the time. He is low key on team mudslides because he's like every single other California in this state. Good man. We were actually in the same meeting with some USGS person when we heard that like, oh, mudslides actually don't exist. And we both gasped and were like, we didn't both. And I said, that makes a 100% sense. And I will forever never use the word mud slide again. So deep seated glass. Again. Do you see the landslides are a thing people in Orange County? You'll remember this, the Bluebird canyon, a landslide that happened. I don't think it was even very rainy when it actually happened. But over the many months of water accumulation, a landslide can happen. And it can also be very deadly as well. So two things to keep in mind debris flow and deep seated landslides. Fine, Rosanna beets mudslides, landslides for.

Gustavo Alex wigglesworth Rosanna Shaw Ron Lynn Alex Ron California Rosanna LA times Laguna Beach Nobel Prize Northern California Southern California United States Lehman Texas Bluebird canyon Orange County Rosanna beets
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Frank Carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then, they charged him with murder. I'm Christopher gafford, writer and host of the LA times podcasts, Dirty John, and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast, the trials of Frank Carson. This 8 episode series is a story of power, politics, and the law in California's central valley. New episodes of the trials of Frank Carson are available to find them, search for the trials of Frank Carson, wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you. And finally, as is our tradition with masters of disasters after all the talk of gloom and doom, we have to win with joy. We'll start with Ron Ron. What's bringing you joy this month? So there's a little tradition that we do with our pet rabbit jewel every night, which is to feed her her daily treat. It's a banana. It's a little slice of banana. But it's the point where we'll do this thing where I'll tapper on her butt and she'll run around me 7 times. And she'll actually know when the semi tape is because then she'll be like, hey, stop it. We need the banana no more games. Oh, and seven's a mystical number. So I think Juul is actually the Salvation of mankind. So please keep doing that 7th tap run. Please. We'll do. Alex, what's your joy? My favorite thing about October is something called the highway 62 art tour. It's out in the desert, highway 62 is the main artery that runs through yucca valley, Joshua tree, and 29 palms. And all the artists around there, which there are hundreds. Open their studios up and you go get a map and then you can drive around all of them and buy their art. So I love doing that. I get people's Christmas presents from it all the time. It's really fun. Yeah, that's a cool drive and quirky communities up there. And of course, all the hipsters are ruining it and desert ruination. But that's a whole nother disaster. Tony, what's bringing you joy this month? Yeah, I have to say it's the pending arrival of Halloween. I it's one of my favorite holidays. I've got a giant inflatable Jack skellington decoration in my front yard and looking forward to watching a lot of scary movies. What are you going to dress up as? I have not decided yet, but I'll come up with it soon. Dress up as El Nino another disaster. Yeah, it's gotta be weather climate related. So I'll try for that. And Rosanna again is on break, but no, I'm here. I'm here, I'm here. I'm here. What? Oh my God, Rosanna coastal master coming in because she needs to bring the joy. And if I know her, she's gonna bring corny joy. I'm so sorry, I'm swooping in from so many breaking news stories. I've been running around a lot this week learning about science, but I promise you all a joke. So here I am, pulled over on the side of the road ready to go. So, Gustavo, I was going to do a jellyfish joke, but that would have been a no brainer. Oh my God. Okay, here's another one. Here's another one. Just in case you didn't laugh, I had a second one in my back pocket. What do you call a pony with a cough? Cough pony. A little horse. Waka waka waka Rosanna, you always bring the corn next time, bring some pop with it. But thank you so much for bringing jokes. Thank you, our masters, Tony Barboza, air quality, Rosanna Shah on the coast, Ron Lin on the earthquakes and Alex wigglesworth on the fires. Thank you all for this latest episode of masters of disasters. Thanks for having me. Thank you..

Frank Carson Christopher gafford Dirty John Juul Ron Ron LA times central valley yucca valley Rosanna coastal Jack skellington California Alex El Nino Rosanna Tony Gustavo Tony Barboza Rosanna Shah Ron Lin
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:26 min | 7 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"In the earthquake chair, as always, as LA times, earthquake reporter Ron Lin. Ron, can we push air pollution into fault lines to choke them to death and then they'll be never any earthquakes ever again? Yeah, maybe we can seal them up and bury them. Yay, you see, I know I have good ideas. Holding the wild file chair, as always as wildfire reporter Alex wigglesworth. Alex, what kind of air masks are best to bring out my eyes? One that works? That's a great touche. Coastal everything master Rosanna Shah is off because she's already working on next month's disaster, sadly. Water quality. I can't believe I'm actually going to say this, but stay strong, Huntington Beach. And this month, we welcome a new master. Our air quality Cicero, Tony Barboza, Tony, welcome to the wolf squad. Thank you. All right, Tony, you've covered air quality and Southern California for years now. How bad was it this year in the American West as a result of all the wildfires? So it's not your imagination, air quality has been getting worse pretty markedly the last few years, especially with these record setting wildfires we've been having. They've all been throwing up a lot more smoke into the air than we've seen really ever before. And in Southern California, the historical culprit for better has always been exhaust fumes from automobiles that eventually cause smog. And then in recent years, air quality got even worse because of all these huge warehouses and the trucks that do shipments to and from them. You did reporting earlier this year. What did you find on them? Right. The long-term story on air quality is actually really positive in that California used to have really terrible smog that spanned most of the LA basin and decades and decades of tough air pollution regulations have brought that under control. What we've seen in recent years is a big deterioration of that progress and reversing of that progress. And one of the things we've seen is that the air quality has gotten started to get worse again in some of these areas that are also magnets for diesel trucks. So we're talking about inland communities like riverside and San Bernardino where they've seen a big explosion in warehouses and these are places where, in addition to the smog, they also are just seeing a big influx of trucks. So you've got the local pollution in the regional pollution adding on top of each other. So anytime you pick next day delivery another kid gets asthma basically. Right. These neighborhoods that are near warehouses also have some of the highest asthma rates also, you know, it's all transportation general. You look at the neighborhoods near warehouses, rail yards, freeways and ports, and they have some of the highest rates of cancer risk and asthma. And that's due to their proximity to huge sources of diesel pollution. It seems like in California it's always one step forward to beat back air pollution then two step back. So there's always been activism on this going back for decades. But especially in recent years, you have these humongous warehouses and you have this well, they're giving us a lot of jobs, so maybe all of you who are breathing in this bad air sucks. Sorry. So what are activists doing now against that? Yeah, it's actually an issue that kind of has two angles to the problem where one issue is the increase in trucks it's bringing more pollution. And the other issue is kind of a lack of land use planning. So you have neighborhoods where, you know, people bought houses out in inland areas thinking they would have a nice calm area. And then lo and behold a few years later, a giant warehouse is their next door neighbor, and they're dealing with hundreds of trucks driving by their house every day. So you've kind of got two parts to that problem. And it started to deal with some of the air quality side, but the land use side is really not being addressed. Now that the Democrats have that super majority over California, they're really trying to be ahead of this. You also did a story that we're going to launch satellites to rat out greenhouse gas emitters. Right, the amount of monitoring that California does of air quality is really significant. It's changed a lot in the last few years, not only using satellites, but using these remote, low cost air quality sensors. So you can really get a sense really down to a fine grain of detail where the smoke or where the smog is worst. Any truth through the rumor that one of these satellites is going to be called captain planet? I.

Ron Lin Alex wigglesworth Rosanna Shah Tony Barboza Southern California LA basin Tony asthma LA times Cicero American West Huntington Beach earthquake Ron California Alex San Bernardino riverside cancer
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you as is our tradition after all the doom and gloom. And there's a lot of it and it seems every month we have more and more of it but we can still find joy in all of our masters of disasters. always have the most brilliant of joys. So we'll have to start with the joy of ron ron. What's your joy. So i followed it a little bit of alex advice from a previous podcast that we taped and what brings me. Joy is our national and state parks system. I did that road trip up to seattle up and back and man. I mean i am very grateful for the fact that we have a lot of redwood forests that have still been preserved i mean just seeing the old growth and the enormous trees just brings me a sense of calm even also saw. There's something called. The lava beds national monument. And you can actually go into these tubes underground that were formed by lava you know so long ago and just check out you know nature i mean it is destructive nature but right then and there so so that brought me a lot of joy in the last couple of weeks joy in lava only wrong could find joy and joy in past lava. no less rosanna. Please bring us more joy. Well since you loved my joke last month here is another silly choke to bring you more joy gustavo. What did the ocean say to the beach. What did the ocean say to the beach. Surf's up nothing. it just waved. That was a sweet one. It was good. I am not gonna tell anymore joke because i'm terrible at my jokes. Maybe i'll do a knock knock one next time but alex finally what brings you joy so. I actually had the pleasure of being caught in a rainstorm twice this summer. I never used to be one of those people who liked drain until i moved to california. Like dog steve is four and he's only seen rain a handful of times in his entire life. The first time was when i visited philly. That was a nice surprise. The second time was actually out in the desert not far from the arizona border during a camping trip that i clearly did not plan well at all. It was so freaking perilous. I started getting these emergency notifications. The i said life threatening thunderstorms than it was flash flooding turn around don't drown than it said dust storm pull aside stay alive like they all rhymed but when the storm actually rolled in it was beautiful there. Was this insane. Snake lightning the skies opened up. Everything smelled sweet like saffron. My ended up sleeping in a motel six instead of outside but it was worth it to see my first desert. Rain did the motel. Six malek safran unfortunately definitely did not did they do allow dogs though Well always dogs holiday and express his smell like pancakes. And that's a good smell to have and that's it for our masters of disasters are monthly series with ellie times environmental. Reporters thank you. Ron land covers earthquakes. Alex wigglesworth on the wildfires. Be and rosanna shaw. Always about the slowly eroding coast. Thank you masters for thank you thank you. And that's it for this episode of the times daily news from the la times tomorrow. A conversation with los angeles county. Sheriff alex via nueva like what. You're listening to the make sure to follow the times. Whatever platform you use please please. Please don't make us the puccio podcasts. Our show is produced by shannon lynn. Denise gada marina being an melissa kaplan our engineers. Mario deals auditors or shawny hilton lauren. Rabb our internet ashley brown and our theme music is by andrew eden. I'm gustavo deanna. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news and this mother gaseous..

frank carson christopher gothard Dirty john lava beds national monument ron ron alex california rosanna gustavo seattle malek safran Ron land Alex wigglesworth rosanna shaw steve arizona Sheriff alex ellie earthquakes shannon lynn
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:23 min | 9 months ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"As usual. We have our trio of hair and introducing first and foremost our earthquake. Wizard also dabbles in cove in nineteen reporting ron lynn. What's going on. Hey rosanna shies cassandra of the coast including earthquake caused landslides and tsunamis that i'm sure eventually earthquake caused wildfires. That caused climate the coast to go up. High rosanna salvo and alex wigglesworth covers wildfires. Which means she is now working all the time year round even more. So than ron kovic. Hey alex hi how you doing. Oh scared as usual so looking for comfort from all of you. So we'll start with you. Alex do we know how this. Dixie fire started. Not for sure. An investigation is in its early stages farces decided to blow up with the red flag warning event that we went into. We're in another red flag warning event. Starting today that was edwin zuniga and he's the public information officer for the california department of forestry and fire protection that said the fire started near where a tree had fallen into a power line maintained by pacific gas electric company the utility that supplies power to parts of northern and central california. Then nine days later another tree appears to have fallen into another. Pg and e. power line about thirty miles away and a separate fire started. That eventually merged with the dixie fire prosecutors in butte and plumas county's are investigating pg for potential criminal charges. They're looking at whether pg needed everything. It was supposed to do to mitigate the risk of a wildfire things like trimming the vegetation maintaining the equipment and then also other. pg need responded appropriately once it became aware of disturbances on the power lines pg and he has already said that in the case of the first fire it took about ten hours for a worker to reach the site and call it in these prosecutors say that pg and he should have known this power line was in a really high risk fire area the canyon where the first fire started is the same canyon where the campfire started in two thousand eighteen that destroyed the ton of paradise and killed eighty six people. Pg pleaded guilty to eighty four counts of manslaughter after its equipment was found to have started that fire. And in fact pg and he had flagged the power line that might have started the dixie fire to be buried underground as part of a safety campaign announced as a result of the campfire. The work on the project hadn't started yet still. Ps you need told me that it was up to date on trimming and poll inspections in the area and it is cooperating with the investigation while for the days where we had to worry about when a tree felling of forests. If it made a sound terrible. I have to move on with these jokes to keep levity. Studies have shown that humans ignite the majority of wildfires in the us. And as you pointed out alex it could mean mismanaged power lines. Muffler akins caused a fire sparked from a shovel and well even gender reveal celebrations because people are dumb but it's how we're interacting with a changing climate. That's making an already bad situation worse gel regardless of how fires are starting these conditions are helping them really take off. It's been hot. The vegetation is historically dry in some areas. There's a build up of this dry vegetation for a bunch of reasons from the elimination of indigenous burning practices two years of aggressive fire suppression. Here's dixie fire public information officer ryan bain talking to the. Ap the associated press earlier this month about the drought's impact on the fire or the water to do as far as mop up. So we're playing catch up with this fire It's very difficult to get out in front of it. Because of the intensity of the fire and the the dryness of of the fuels out there so california is going through a drought this year and of course there are also more people living near these wilderness areas than there were twenty years ago so when fires do burn out of control or is a bigger chance they could sweep through town. We actually saw a lot of these conditions align. When the dixie fire destroyed the town of greeneville of fired actually been burning for about three weeks. At that point then bad weather conditions set in and got windier and even drier the fire hit pockets of overgrown unburned fuel these patches of timber that were clogged with undergrowth. The undergrowth helps the fire. Get up into the crowns of the trees which actually allows the flames to run across the treetops. That through embers over the containment line though sparks landed and dry vegetation and started spot fires which caused the fire to grow over the line and race towards the town and by then the fire was also burning so intensely through all that fuel that it was creating its own weather patterns that were helping it to grow larger and making it more dangerous to fight on this fire. Behavior was zola. Radic that it was really a scramble to make sure that everyone even got out of greenville safely. And it's one thing when it's like saying southern california infamously. Mike davis author wrote an essay about twenty five years ago. Called the case for letting malibu burn and he was criticizing suburbia. But we're talking about small cities up into sierras. You know where. It's all green forest mountains. These towns are not supposed to be at risk of getting burned every year maybe once in a generation but not every year shorewood w seeing fire enter populated areas more frequently and in some areas where i mean. There are some areas where experts thought firewood really never enter. That are now at risk for burning. Ron your earthquake guy. But you've also covered wildfires in your career like a good master of disaster and while every california and grows up with earthquakes wing to fall in us like well an earthquake. The anxiety around fires is just right up there with them. I mean i've read accounts of the spaniards who came here in the seventeen seventy and they would write about these humongous fires going all along the coast to the point whereas all smokey yeah i mean that's right. I mean. fires have always been a part of the california landscape whether naturally or even indigenous tribes practicing intentional burns for thousands of years. But for modern day california apocalyptic fires were not an annual thing like growing up in the bay area. I have this indelible memory. When i was a kid of the oakland hills burning in nineteen ninety-one and that was at the time the second deadliest fire in california history. Unfortunately twenty five people died many trying to escape but now it's kind of like an annual currence in two thousand seventeen. There was the tubs fire. In napa sonoma counties that resulted in twenty two deaths. Alex just talked about the campfire. That flattened much of the town of paradise. And then just last year fifteen people died in the north complex fire north of sacramento and the scary thing is is that it used to be. The deadly fires usually happened in october and november when we saw the santa anna winds or the diablo winds up in the bay area but ninety more some of the deadliest fires have started as early as august this month as last year. North complex fire did and it's just nuts. I mean growing up in the bear. We never thought of santa cruz counties with its redwoods ever catching fire. But that's exactly what happened last year. Yeah it's like the fire. The century every month in california whether northern southern everywhere. Yeah it becomes to a point where we're always like you know i'm on tenterhooks. Last fall was the first season where i actually had to buy air filters and put them all around my place because the stench of the smoke was just so bad. We couldn't breathe. It used to be that. I would tell people moving into the area. You know what. Don't worry about the smoke this year. It's like it's a one in every ten year thing. I can't say that anymore because it's now the case where we do have to prepare for lots of smoke every late summer and every early fall bad air quality. That's going to be another topic and probably next month. The way california's going rosanna. You've also covered wildfires because again when you're a master of disaster you have to be limber with your doom and you recently looked up your old reporting from.

ron lynn rosanna salvo alex wigglesworth ron kovic earthquake edwin zuniga california department of fores pacific gas electric california Muffler akins ryan bain rosanna alex plumas county cassandra butte Radic Alex associated press
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"About panic port in the media but she shifted now to increase alarming to give birth in the number of coronavirus case when we started all this months ago that was the big beginning and then it turned into deaths which is a serious thing and it stayed deaths its case is again because we discovered that deaths have plummeted throughout the entire country California being no exception of course the York already has the worst behind them yeah and a dead deaths are down ninety percent between April twenty first and last Sunday Sunday was two hundred sixty seven April twenty first two thousand six hundred ninety three ninety percent drop in deaths that headline is nowhere let me know newscast on Sunday and in fact today in the state of California only thirteen deaths have been reported but the update to that is that the el Segundo times actually ran a story yesterday alarmed by spiked spiking coronavirus numbers here's why officials insist they aren't worried this is about as much as they'll give the assigned this story too what I favor a border names Alex Wigglesworth how much is your Wigglesworth anyway they talk about well the county LA county a hotbed of Kobe TV California has reported more than three thousand deaths and eighty thousand confirmed cases the rising case number so have sparked some worry about whether the economy is re opening too quickly in easing stay at home orders could cause new outbreaks but health officials discount the concerns in fact John I saw last week that the one reporter analyzed Gavin Newsom's cryptic data stuff and said he's willing to live with us sixty deaths a day in California and we have been below that mostly well for a while now because if if you look at this the way insurance companies look at the situation you have to look at the cost of putting millions of people out of work not only because the cost of their personal lives and their emotional health the the cost to the economy the cost of the tax revenues in Sacramento versus what is largely an elderly nursing home situation I need to do a cost benefit analysis on two key indicators the positivity rate than the average number of daily hospitalizations have continued to remain steady while average daily deaths have declined C. el Segundo times they quote telling officials admitting that but these numbers could go up because the re opening businesses in the protest over the police killing of George Floyd which by the way if that's starting to show up that's another indicator that the case numbers are not a good way to look at this because it probably is also younger people who will certainly I don't think there a lot of eighty year old downtown market around it was a guy in buffalo they got knocked down I was almost entirely a young person's event right and if they get the virus to me it's almost a good thing if you're done because now you have a unity for awhile you'll be sick for a couple of weeks but there's really no there's no way around this the virus is going to be here as long as there's not a vaccine so you know within you not to worry about it anymore yeah I was thinking about this today that this whole flatten the curve thing which was the mantra for weeks on end at the beginning of this I always said is gonna is gonna draw this out longer because if everybody hides in place no one is going to get us to herd immunity this is no one available for that now we may have a shot younger people and I'm not saying every young person who gets corona virus is not going to have a require hospitalization or not even die but it's going to be a very low rate but you do need at some point short of a vaccine which I give up following that story one day it's going to be here so next I had three years away and I never come thank I'm tired of following the satellites or that's the vaccine business wakes me up when there's a real answer yeah that's the way it goes good people with their damn predictions you can't predict these things that's not why they go through you know years worth of testing because all kinds of stuff can go wrong it's a lot of stuff that's even too boring to talk about you wouldn't be interested it doesn't sit wait so the average daily number of hospitalizations in LA county has been decreasing since late April well that's our friend Dr Ferrer said that although over the last three days the last three days this is a very slight increase yeah but she said it could be because hospitals are testing all patients now for covert nineteen well that's just those with symptoms that's another thing normal people started going back to the hospital for their normal problems right along the way they they get tested for the virus a virus right so now you're sitting in the hospital technically is a virus patients over you might be a symptomatic you're actually in there for something else Alps the positivity rate is continuing to remain pretty stable at eight percent think statewide even lower but the the positivity rate of people being tested is only about eight percent and the seven day average of daily deaths has been trending downward since April twelfth reached its highest peak this is LA county in early may forty five to forty six people dying every day in early June it had slowed to twenty or thirty deaths a day the seven day average stood at twenty eight on Friday so yeah foot off the gas pedal here media but I guess they don't label are still interested in my story so cases is the only thing we can present to alarm what else is going to get them the audience how else you gonna get the clicks yeah it it this is a mathematical game they know now with websites exactly how many hits each story gets in fact I remember seven years ago when this was new the phenomenon of of counting can't sit newspapers and that would determine news coverage there was a scoreboard in the newsroom I wanna sex that remember which paper is a big paper their scoreboard and all the writers and the editors management could see what stories are registering and that was supposed to send a message to the writers and editors well you know now what kind of stories you ought to be doing here right there's the scoreboard and same thing with television television gets minute by minute rating numbers the next morning eight no morning producer goes to his desk does this computer he can see minute by minute how every newscast did and then he could track the order of the stories that were broadcast he knows exactly what Paul then and he knows exactly what caused people to change the station now if that's your job and you're making six figures what are you going to do that night you're gonna keep giving him the crap that worked the night before right when we come back we easily Jose Huizar has finally been arrested in this corruption investigation dealing with real estate developers they finally took him into custody today all the details will come from Chris and Carla from can't find his next Johnny can't.

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

12:51 min | 2 years ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Okay ladies and gentlemen if you do wish to ask a question please press one then zero our first question will come from the line of Brian Carter with the LA Daily News please go ahead your line is open thank you very much a productive for air I wonder if you had a break down by percentage of the underlying conditions most to play on in the county hospitality the hospitalization kind of in the spirit of a national study it without the other day in the New England journal of medicine and do you have any concerns about how particularly younger adults with underlying conditions would sort of I guess for lack of better word we integrate into you know society want these measures are ended and any corresponding concerns about sort of false senses of security and forgive me for taking this one on but I did want to ask did you request the National Guard assistant at thirty homes and that's it thank you okay thanks let me start with the request for the National Guard we didn't request the National Guard but we requested help and the National Guard was great so we did ask the state you know to help us with staffing the easiest thing for them to do is to deploy the National Guard and we're extraordinarily grateful that they did and they continue to provide us with support at at the skilled nursing facilities through other other staff as well as I believe the National Guard is here for the entire week so I want to be very grateful for the support and the quick response we put in a request one day and the next day the National Guard were being deployed I don't have a break down of for the people who are hospitalized by their underlying health conditions are nor for the people who have unfortunately passed away in terms of what exactly was the underlying health condition but we do document a whole range of conditions that we consider a based on the science that may in fact I have a pretty significant impact on your ability to successfully fight this infection we are doing I'd more detailed record review just as part of our surveillance projects so we should be able to get more of that information out and we do pay attention to the many research studies that are also out there documenting which underlying health conditions seem to really because of the mold you know really because of alarm because they people with those underlying health conditions tend to be a higher risk for serious disease I do love your question about what should it what's what should we be doing and what kind of advice should we be giving a younger people who have underlying health conditions I'm sure you've noticed that almost every day for the last two weeks included in the number of people who have died that I've been reporting on are people who are between the ages of eighteen and forty and these are in fact almost always people not not every single case but almost always young people who do have underlying health conditions and I also want to know that there's been a lot of discussion in the literature around underline around out young people with no underlying health conditions who have in fact shown up with blood clots and maybe even strokes so I want to remind everyone this disease causes a lot of damage it's particularly harmful for those people who do have underlying health conditions at whatever age but it also still causes severe illness and deaths among people with no underlying health conditions and because it's so easily transmitted all when people are in close contact with each other I urge everybody who has a loved one or knows a friend or family who has an underlying health conditions to make sure we're doing everything we can to help people with underlying health conditions stay safe at home not have to go out for shopping not have to go out to get the essentials that they need to stay safe at home and then I urge every person if you are that person with an underlying health condition such as asthma such as any kind of pulmonary diseases you need to be mindful that even if you're feeling well and your disease is under control you are at high risk of should you be infected for having serious disease and we're going to ask you to take special care was stay home stay away from as many people as you can even in your household you should be isolating wherever possible from others by keeping your distance on because we don't want you to end up with serious illness and we'd like to do everything we can to support you so that you stay healthy I'll take the next question the question because slowing of Alex Wigglesworth with LA times please go ahead go ahead first of all you have your phone on mute about that we already talked about this a little bit but I was wondering if you were able to they how many nursing homes your plans in the state I'm interested in and where they're located and whether primarily at the Denver staffing needs or what that help with that testing or contact tracing of love yeah thank you that's a great question it we we requested assistance and the National Guard were deployed at four different skilled nursing facilities I don't know their names or their locations but it was in all four cases it was around staffing as we've identified a staff that are sick and or staff that are positive I would cope with nineteen are they need to stay out of the workplace for an extended period of time and in in places where there are outbreaks that can often be mean that there are dozens of employees that appropriately are not coming in to work so so we do have staffing issues all in all of the nursing homes where we've had significant outbreaks but thanks for your question we'll take the next question that comes from the line of Jackie partir KPCC please go ahead yet doctor Greer if you could please expound a little bit on on what aid them to matic testing will look like in in nursing homes I mean how that's actually going to be delineated sure thanks a lot and and I I I appreciate the question and I also appreciate the fact that we've really changed our guidance we used to just recommend even in places where we were noticing that there were outbreaks situation said it was symptomatic people are that needed to be tested and it was people with symptoms that we needed to make sure they weren't coming into the facilities with all of the recent both literature and even our experience here in LA county as we've expanded our capacity to test it's become really clear that a symptomatic people are in fact both infected with the virus and a capable of shedding the virus and that means they're capable of infecting others so in places where we have a lot of honorable people who reside and that's our nursing homes all all of our long term care facilities it's really important to acknowledge or this new reality and that means that we have to do testing at those sites of all of the people who are residing in those facilities and all of the people who are working in those facilities and to date what that's shown us is that there's a fair number of a symptomatic people at the facilities both among residents and among the employees who are testing positive for covert nineteen so where we have people that are now a symptomatic and positive for covert nineteen they still need to be isolated and all of the close contacts need to be quarantined and that's why in fact you've seen our numbers jump all in terms of the number of positive cases at the facilities because we are doing a lot more testing and and we will continue over the next couple weeks to make sure that we're testing at every single site and we're testing everybody who's there all of the employees and all of the residents we'll take the next question right the council individual Grover NBC please go ahead sh yes doctor could you just briefly address restaurant in LA county I believe you said on Tuesday the county would soon start disclosing the names of restaurants that have had corona virus outbreak when will you start disclosing those establishment I do believe there's any risk to the public eating takeout food possibly prepared by coming in second with the virus no it's both really good questions let me let me start with the posting of information about the restaurant so yes we're trying to work on a on a well informed way for us to actually post outbreaks and saw an outbreak is five or more employees at a restaurant that have tested positive for covert nineteen I want to note a couple of of cabbie odds here one is just because their employees a test positive in a workplace as I've said before doesn't mean that they in fact choir the infection at the workplace so one reason why we're going with the threshold of five or more which is our outbreak it's our outbreak definition in workplaces is because we wanted the knowledge that there's often times particularly now where that where this infection is so wide spread across all places in the county but it's not always clear that in fact the outbreak site the place where the transmission happened was at the restaurant there is not a lot of information that's known about the impact of being infected and preparing food but you will know in our guidance from the very beginning if you're known to be positive for covert nineteen well we are very clear that you should not be preparing or serving food and and and we want to continue with that message which is why it's so important now that we know that they're a symptomatic people who could be positive to make sure that again in places where there are central workers are we're big we're going to be able to those employers are going to be able to help those employees I get testing in a situation where you know you have positive cases are ready in in in your restaurant I in terms of you know how safe to I think take out as I said from the very beginning I think it's very safe I think the reason I say that is there's all you know they're still all of our guidelines are rounded out really guidelines or directives around safety and food preparation and those are still in effect just because it's take out doesn't mean that there's been any ability for any of the restaurants or food processing plants or food preparing a sites to not implement fully all of the infection control processes are in place so I do think it's safe I think people can continue to safely pick up and take out from your favorite restaurants we will be working again with all of the restaurants around making sure that they continue to implement all of the infection control process sees which when they're done well do protect all of us for what we call there like universal precautions and they protect all of us from the transmittal of other kinds of infections as well as code nineteen but we'll take the next question the commercial line of Annabelle moon yo's ABC seven please go ahead I'm repeating my question the first one is regarding the new help order that you mentioned Dr Ferrer does that also apply a shoe any sort of detention centers jail prison and then my second question is regarding a statement made by the president president about the possibility of injecting disinfectant as it relates to Kobe nineteen he felt that that that he was being sarcastic but it has prompted disinfectant manufactured to issue warnings against it so how the county received any increasing questions about that and what is your message to residents Jeff thank.

Brian Carter LA Daily News
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Implant center sometimes it's just nice to know there are other humans out there just trying to make sense of everything just like you we're all in this together KFI am six forty more stimulating talk sample camp by AM six forty lives everywhere the I heart radio after another round of those always entertaining voice line people coming up in about fifteen minutes from now just read a story that in you probably should watch yourself apparently some people are going a hundred miles an hour now on the screen the anti freeze I think so they are right now yeah I was driving I but you know C. H. people is a little less to do because it's less you know traffic and accidents so you know be careful I saw one today on the side of of of a freeway kind of just sit there waiting for somebody to a hundred all I seen was on I was only doing seventy five yeah it's nice seeing several of the cops yeah they really have nothing to do so there and they're tucked away where you won't see them you'll divide by it and I was doing that ninety two okay and water I could not keep on the floor well I mean it's six thirty I'm I mean on the forty five minute ride a morning no was that Friday afternoon last week oh sorry six thirty PM how could you not go ninety five miles an hour they finally free this never happen again I just I'll buy that super sports car and use it for a couple of weeks but I couldn't catch up to anybody by the way I was going ninety two and I couldn't I couldn't catch no I don't so well mayor Garcetti still droning on DEC one really is yes this press conference to go to the judge I can't fight Facebook page now one of the things that he did yesterday and we kind of did it again today as we we you know you read the numbers for this for the county by the way three the county numbers they don't break out the city separately it's part of LA county and talking about how bad it is and how we could become the next to York well the el Segundo times at least showed a little bit of level headedness and their most recent posting by great names reporters Alex Wigglesworth Wigglesworth and Soumya Carla Mangla anyway that's one person I assume I assume you guys the first name last name is Carla Mangla yes I thought Soumya was one woman and Carla Mangla was known Carla Meg was the last name once I I that Carl was the first name of the third woman okay so Eric I said he said a week or two from now we'll have images like we're seeing in the York here in Los Angeles the next sign for the el Segundo times is it will be bad but how much remains a question the mortality rate Nelly counties about one point eight seven percent that's higher than the rate New York City Dr Ferreira said and by the way she's very good but she said one big factor is that LA county's tested far fewer people but New York all lining it or not have a good sense of the number of people with the virus now almost eleven thousand people listen to this have been tested in LA county as of yesterday New York City already has twenty five thousand confirmed positive cases all right I remember think about how many people they tested because in general ninety percent test negative that's what's going on in LA county only ten percent of testing positive this is about that in York city they've twenty five thousand confirmed positive cases they have a hell of a lot more negative cases they have a hell of a lot more testing they're offering such bogus statistical analysis to scare people I mean outrageously bogus statistical analysis you heard those logical voice line people who talked about the density of New York and subway system in the mass transit system you we have nothing like that here which leads to the easy spread of the virus somewhere that's what I have New York here no he's doing this just to get people to behave extremely treating us all like little kids where you say something extreme to a little kid to scare them straight and keep them in line that's what I resent just be straight what's going on is bad enough you don't have to ignore widely exaggerated to scare us a little more to keep us in line now don't don't don't don't treat people like little kids what's going to happen it's going to throw some people off who don't actually look into the story a little more is that the number of cases in LA county is going to rise because I read that they're now testing five thousand people a day versus five hundred right not too long ago and that's going to lead to because if ten percent of a more positive as could lead to more positive answers most of them will be mild cases that people will recover from the vast majority eighty percent or more is going to be mild cases and the deaths will not keep pace with the number of new cases so therefore the death rate should come down from that one point eight percent it is going to come down and on top of that you have this huge pool of people who who who are probably positive we'll never know they have no symptoms and that has to be included in that death rate the death rate numbers right now all over the world a bogus because we don't know until they do an antibody test on on a large sample we don't know what percent of people have no symptoms but would test positive it's gonna be a lot I've seen estimates that could be twenty to thirty percent more fifty percent more I've seen an estimate in one country all right I mean that would drop the the the death rate by half if that was true and career said today the modeling is only as good as the data you have to enter into the model and we are really at a disadvantage here in LA county the rest of California because we just haven't done a lot of testing yet that was plain simple truth at least at the times put it in the story for once because that perspective is being lost on people who hear the number of cases in the number of deaths and destruction collisions from that without knowing that we probably have a lot more cases in the county we just don't have the testing yet by the way you know she's not a medical doctor she's not now she's a PhD well she's a doctor and I'm yes he said but not not a medical doctor is good though six master of public health and a master's in education we should stop a moment until the body what's happening Monday at this time yes Monday big big big moment for the Johnny can show Monday at five thirty five we're gonna have Dr Anthony Fauci on is that the star of all the trump coronavirus ray Lopez at to get press briefing Sir and what we've we've had a we've had a number of trump administration officials on okay everybody knows doctor falchion Dr fatties it is the one and he's the one everybody wants to hear from and we will have a five thirty for about fifteen minutes on Monday so you mark that somewhere so we can talk about stuff like this because you know he's also he's a New Yorker is very logical if you see him out there he's a data driven guy right and we want to get the perspective on this I also want to ask about how you know we will have to follow the trunkline about everybody's back to work by Easter but now to talk about what Cuomo's been talking about this call actually explains it better governor Cuomo New York that we need to separate out the groups of people and get some people back to work may already have had the virus and develop antibodies to the virus and they can return to work safely we can isolate the people that are older with medical conditions and stuff like that and the people in effecting what contacted what easily have grown about what is worked in in in South Korea for example is what they call test trace and isolate our testing program is way behind because the CDC and the FDA F. that up so we're weeks behind where we should be if we ever get there if we test people a test them even if they don't have symptoms testing if they do have symptoms then you trace their contacts and then you isolate people and then you can let those people who've already had the virus but didn't show symptoms you can you could let it go back to work if you can if you can isolate the people who are testing positive from the people who are not testing positive people can start going back to work and and the death rate I we talked about this in New York City that's right for people like under Rav what was it thank you like under a forty five was like zero point three percent and it was pretty low under sixty five one of these people could be could could be working right now if we can separate the high risk individuals from those who even if they get sick it's going to be mild all right that's gonna be the next step Dr Fauci on Monday five thirty five PM bush lied people to finish off coming up John and Ken show KFI and Deborah Marquez news.

KFI
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KCRW

"Thank you that's doctor sira Madonna she's a special pathogens expert who works in New York City here in California there are six confirmed cases of coronavirus and there is a full quarantine for people arriving in the United States from China now it was a lot of misinformation in the form of hoaxes and fake news spreading across the internet here to talk about all of this and how so in California is reacting as Alex Wigglesworth she's reporting on this for the LA times will come hi hater and great thanks okay so over the weekend the defense department says it could house a thousand people who may need to be quarantine when they arrive in the U. S. what does that mean with that look like I'm sure the defense department announced that it freed up a thousand bands ask for military bases two of the four are in California there Travis Air Force base in Solano county and the marine corps air station Miramar in San Diego county focus will say that the defense department will be responsible only for housing any possible exactly we've they're gonna be Americans who are returning from overseas travel in China and are subject to quarantine and helping her Human Services personnel be responsible for a sort of handling monitoring and any medical treatment that may be needed and we're asking the leaders actually announced on Sunday that for the first wave of people fleeing the outbreak in China will fly into the marine corps air station Miramar this week and are expected to be quarantined for fourteen days which is are believed to be the viruses and you patient experience and this is the first time there's been a quarantine at this level in like fifty years right at least yes so there is currently a hundred ninety five people who are now being quarantine that March air reserve base in riverside county and bills where people who were evacuated from the US embassy in Wuhan which is believed to be the epicenter of the outbreak they flew there last week then on Friday the centers for disease control and prevention order that they be quarantine for fourteen days when the plane left China and that was the CDC is first mandatory quarantine and more than fifty years and we don't know whether or not there's a hundred ninety five people have the virus you know there you know one of those a hundred ninety five people have been confirmed to be ill they're just being monitored and I kept on the base for the duration of the virus incubation period okay and so what about the six confirmed cases so far hearing in California what we know about those I'm sure it's all one of them is in LA county ones in Orange County and then up north to Lawrence and the needle county into in Santa Clara county and all of those people had recently traveled to China except for one of the patient and Gambino county her husband is believed to have translated crown of iris her after he returned from traveling in China and I'm not actually only the second case of human to human transmission recorded in the United States the all those patients are reported to be in good condition some of them are hospitalized some are just being monitored at home officials say that they are keeping a close eye on both them and anyone that they may have been in contact with well meanwhile as we discussed in the earlier segment there's a lot of panic out there lot of people are freaking out and you can see that on the web what have you seen I'm sure there's a specially locally you know there's been a lot of rumors in the really creating panic and many of them have evolved college campuses there's been rumors circulating that members of certain college community is whether it's students are staffers have contracted the virus happen at UC Irvine Irvine valley college U. S. C. T. none of that was true and in the case of you about the the school actually had to issue a campus wide emergency alert letting people know that there were no confirmed case in the crown of virus yeah I was last Monday the building manager of an off campus apartment complex and send out emails saying that tenet have contracted the virus and really some people into a panic they turned out not to be true then there been other instances that appears to be you know not just rumors but deliberate hoaxes at least two of the case of their work communications that were made to look like news articles stating that students at different high schools a contract and the corona virus one was in Orange County and one in Santa Ana and then there is also something that appeared to be a letter from the department of public health saying that there had been sort of a widespread outbreak in the city of Carson and in that case the LA county sheriff's department is actually actively investigating the whole as a criminal matter and at the I it also involves are possible federal implications and many of those false reports were spread through social media people sort of shared things of where they had confirmed it was true and experts say you know there's definitely an urgency when it comes to passing on information that's related to help maker of lend itself to the spread of the fed the rumor but officials say that's why it's so important to check with you know your local public health department and your own personal health care provider before you're passing on that kind of information to avoid contributing to the spread of fear and false report now come again information virus yes so I guess it's it could be criminal because it's like yelling fire in a crowded theater right it could cause panic and a lot of real harm although we know when you're making something look like an official communication you're signing government officials names on it there are also you know some sort of fraud and forgery implications right right and but then the you know in in the Chinese American community here in Los Angeles there it was a big weekend right there was a lunar new year and all these activities were planned summer postponed because of the fear right sure I'll number of posts postponed indefinitely it's lunar new year celebration which I haven't scheduled for this weekend I wasn't necessarily because of the risk of coronavirus officials really cited fears over the virus and he said they believe that it would just affect the turn out that the turn out to be too low but then in LA's Chinatown lunar new year festival in a blue dragon parade that's a place this weekend as scheduled and the turnout appears to be because the mayor was there and no problems were reported hi Alex thank you so much thanks so much that's Alex Wigglesworth reporter at the LA times coming up they fell in love as teenagers in Vietnam then he moved here to America to southern California she followed six years later they got off the plane and they did not you know run across the airport into each other's arms they kind of looked at each other like you I don't I don't know about that maybe decades later they fell in love.

New York City California United States sira Madonna
"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"alex wigglesworth" Discussed on KCRW

"Thank you that's doctor sira died she's a special pathogens expert who works in New York City well here in California there are six confirmed cases of corona virus to California military bases have been selected as possible corn tine sites Corentin sites for overseas travelers the centers for disease control and prevention order to quarantine for hundreds of people from Wuhan evacuated to a base in riverside county last week there's also a lot of misinformation as we discussed in the form of hoaxes and fake news spreading across the internet we're gonna talk about all this now with Alex wiggles where she covers the corona virus right now the outbreak in reaction for the LA times high hi hater and great thanks okay so over the weekend the defense department says it could house a thousand people who may need to be quarantine when they arrive in the U. S. what does that mean with that look like I'm sure the defense department announced that it freed up a thousand bands ask for military bases two of the four are in California under Travis Air Force base in Solano county and the marine corps air station Miramar in San Diego county focus will say that the defense department will be responsible only for housing any possible exactly we've they're gonna be Americans who are returning from overseas travel in China and are subject to quarantine and helping her Human Services personnel be responsible for a sort of handling monitoring and any medical treatment that may be needed and the rest of the leaders actually announced on Sunday that for the first wave of people fleeing the outbreak in China will fly into the marine corps air station Miramar this week and they're expected to be quarantine for fourteen days which is are believed to be the viruses and your patience and this is the first time there's been a quarantine at this level in like fifty years right at least yes so there is currently a hundred ninety five people who are now being quarantine that March air reserve base in riverside county and those where people who were evacuated from the US embassy in Wuhan which is believed to be the epicenter of the outbreak they flew there last week then on Friday the centers for disease control and prevention order that they be quarantine for fourteen days when the plane left China and not let the CDC is first mandatory quarantine and more than fifty years and we don't know whether or not those a hundred ninety five people have the virus you know there you know one of those a hundred ninety five people have been confirmed to be ill they're just being monitored and and kept on the base for the duration of the virus incubation period okay and so what about the six confirmed cases so far hearing in California what we know about those I'm sure it's all one of them is in LA county ones in Orange County and then up north to Lawrence and the needle county into in Santa Clara county and all of those people had recently traveled to China except for one of the patient exam Benito county her husband is believed to have transmitted coronavirus her after he returned from traveling in China and I'm not actually only the second case of human to human transmission recorded in the United States but all those patients are reported to be in good condition on some of them are hospitalized some are just being monitored at home officials say that they are keeping a close eye on both them and anyone that they may have been in contact with well meanwhile as we discussed in the earlier segment there's a lot of panic out there lot of people are freaking out and you can see that on the web what have you seen I'm sure there are a specially locally you know there's been a lot of rumors in the really creating panic and many of them have evolved college campuses there's been rumors circulating that members of certain college community is whether it's students are staffers have contracted the virus happen at UC Irvine Irvine valley college U. S. E. none of that was true and in the case of you about the the school actually had to issue a campus wide emergency alert letting people know that there were no confirmed cases of coronavirus knows last Monday the building manager of an off campus apartment complex and send out emails saying that tenet have contracted the virus and really some people into a panic they turned out not to be true then there been other instances that appears to be you know not just rumors but deliberate hoaxes at least two of the case of their work communications that were made to look like news articles stating that students at different high schools a contract and the corona virus one was in Orange County and one in Santa Ana and then there is also something that appeared to be a letter from the department of public health saying that there had been sort of a widespread outbreak in the city of Carson and in that case the LA county sheriff's department is actually actively investigating the whole as a criminal matter and at the I'll also involves are possible federal implications and many of those false reports rest bread through social media people sort of shared things of where they had confirmed it was true and experts say you know there's definitely an urgency when it comes to passing on information that's related to help me for of land itself to the spread the rumor but officials say that's why it's so important to check with you know your local public health department and your own personal health care provider before you're passing on that kind of information to avoid contributing to the spread of fear and false report now come again information virus I'm yes so I guess it's it could be criminal because it's like yelling fire in a crowded theater right it could cause panic and a lot of real harm although we know when you're making something look like an official communication you're finding government officials names on it there are also you know some sort of fraud and forgery implications right right and but then the you know in in the Chinese American community here in Los Angeles there it was a big weekend right there is a lunar new year and all these activities were planned summer postponed because of the fear right sure I'll number of posts postponed indefinitely it's lunar new year celebration which I have been canceled for this weekend I wasn't necessarily because of the risk of coronavirus officials really cited fears over the virus and that they believe that it would just affect the turn out that the turn out to be two wells but then in LA's Chinatown lunar new year festival in a blue dragon parade that's a place this weekend as scheduled and the turnout appears to be because the mayor with their and no problems will record as hi Alex thank you so much thanks so much that's Alex Wigglesworth reporter at the LA times coming up they fell in love as teenagers in Vietnam then he moved here to America to southern California she followed six years later they got off the plane and they did not you know run across the airport into each other's arms they kind of looked at each other in real life you know I don't I don't know about that maybe decades later they fell.

doctor sira New York City California