28 Burst results for "Alex Stamos"

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

Daily Tech News Show

33:27 min | 9 months ago

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

"You're unique and so are your taxes. Turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who listen to you. Learn about your unique tax situations and answer your questions and on top of all that they can do your taxes from start to finish. Maybe you started investing and want some reassurance from an expert that you're doing things right maybe you're now self employed and needs some expert advice on what qualifies as a home office deduction or maybe it rather have an expert file your taxes for you so you can focus on what matters most no matter what. Your situation is turbo. tax live tax. Experts can answer your questions. Give tax advice review your return before you file or even do it all for you. Turbo tax live. Gives you confidence that you're uniquely you. Taxes are done right into a turbo tax. Live file with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you coming up on how to clone someone security key roku by some qube and we'll make the apple cars. This is the daily tech news for friday january. Eighth twenty twenty. One in los angeles on tom. Merit and from studio redwood on sarah lane from studio colorado. I'm shannon morris drawn the top tech stories in cleveland. I'm lynn per nine. The show's producer. Roger j we were just talking about a cas product that makes you ice cream and ninety seconds whenever you wanted and why roger never cries wider conversation join our expanded show. Good day internet at patriotair dot com slash dpd s. Let's start with a few things you should know. Amazon has discontinued its prime pantry. Grocery and household item service products previously available in pantry will now be available like any other products on amazon. So it's not going away to gather but the service itself prime pantry launched in twenty fourteen offering reduced shipping on up to forty five pounds of household goods for a monthly fee. Amazon node vied prime pant pantry subscribers about the closure in december and then issued refunds the. Uk's competition and markets authority launched an investigation into google's privacy sandbox. That would block third party. Cookies in chrome regulator received complaints from the marketers for an open web coalition saying the plan would abuse google's dominant position in online advertising. So the investigations going to evaluate. If the privacy sandbox changes would concentrate advertising spending market share with google samsung launched the galaxy chromebook to a cheaper version of the galaxy chromebook at launched last year so instead of four k it has a ten eighty p lcd screen with less storage fewer cameras less ram. It's also heavier and thicker overall but it also now starts at five hundred forty nine dollars instead of one thousand dollars. That has a thirteen point. Three inch nineteen twenty by ten eight hundred sixteen nine. Lcd touchscreen with the dual core intel seller on five twenty five you upgradable to an intel core. I three ten ten eleven ten one. one zero. You eight gigs. Ram and one hundred twenty five gigs of storage for six hundred ninety nine dollars a shortage of semiconductors affecting automakers. Volkswagen said last month that they needed to adjust first-quarter manufacturing plans around the globe because of the shortage. Now honda says it will cut domestic output by about four thousand cars this month at one of its factories in japan nissan is adjusting production numbers for its note hatchback model and ford has moved up previously planned downtime at a kentucky plant for its sport utility vehicle factory to the jin chips all right. Well we're talking about cars. Let's talk about the the apple car. Yeah a lot of rumors as of late will really over the last few years. But but but the rumors had resurfaced recently and hyundais. Now talking to apple about kerr's so says the company hyundai representative told cnbc quotes. We understand that apple isn't discussion with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided. Korean economic daily said that apple suggested the arrangements and hundred was reviewing the terms that involved e production and also battery development hyundai has had his own battery platform called e. g. m. p. going into production later this year. So might be saying what you're doing. Reuters sources say that apple would like to produce a passenger vehicle by twenty twenty four however might not be that date bloomberg's mark gurman reports in thomas e. v. from apple is five to seven years away and michio recently said he wouldn't be surprised if it takes until twenty twenty eight. Yes what's probably going on. Here is apple and i think this significant part has decided to start investigating how they would build. Whatever it is. They're going to build whether it's a whole car or an integrated platform and they're going to different manufacturers and parts suppliers and folks like magna including hyundai. And saying what are you got. How can you help us with this. And is a great company for this because they make parts they make systems. They make full cars. There's all kinds of services in the conday company that could play a part with apple so it may not be. That apple knows what they want from hyundai. It may just be that they're going and saying hey let's talk. You do a lot of the kinds of things that we think we're going to need. I'm pretty excited about this. I just got my first hyundai ever this year and my perception of this story was weight but hyundai currently uses android auto and a lot of their their cars. So i would love to see. How apple would integrate Hyundai's current technologies into something that is very useful for that apple ecosystem not just looking at e itself but also the The the systems inside of it the controls in how they would manage that four a driver and a passenger in the car. Yeah i mean. I think that's one of the big questions that i have is okay. Let's say let's say it's hyundai that that applet ended up working with with clearly not set in stone at least from what we know at this point. But let's say it's the companies for kicks. Let's imagine that that's what it is. Yeah it is. It is an apple car that hyundai produces a lot of parts for the way that works with lots of other companies to produce other hardware for apple. I mean that that's the loftiest kind of goal that we're looking at and maybe that would take till twenty twenty eight at you know if if apple was lucky. I think it probably has more to do with like you said shannon not that you know android auto wouldn't still be prevalent in a lot of passenger vehicles but maybe at some sort of it's a special relationship. It's it's a special kind of os inside a car that is supposed to you. Know i don't know move some merch because What apple is providing on the software side is is. Is that much more interesting. I really don't know if you look at that. Bloomberg article mark gurman sources are saying that Tesla people that apple has hired are working on things like interior exterior. Drive train stereo. Desist the kinds of things. You need when you're building a car not carting a software platform so then the question becomes is it the apple car period. Maybe hendaye makes it. Maybe somebody else makes it. And you know they'll figure out how to distribute it or is it the apple car by sunday and you go to hyundai dealership to buy it the way you went to an. At and t. store to an apple iphone but it's really apples car in cooperation with sunday. Are there multiple partners. I mean that's all the kind of stuff we're waiting to see but it really does feel like we have gotten to the point where this is no longer just yeah. They're working on project titan. They don't know what they're gonna do to. They have an idea. It's more than just software and they're working out the details. Maybe they don't even know that yet. Well i'm interested to see what happens but we also have some other news. Security among the systems impacted by the solar winds attack is the electron filing system. Used by the us federal courts at investigation is underway to determine if confidentiality of documents filed with the courts was breached and as a result starting wednesday confidential documents filed with the courts will be stored on standalone systems. Not uploaded big difference so these are documents sealed from public access because they contain sensitive information like investigative techniques identities of informants and a lot more other. Us federal agencies affected included the justice department the state treasury and energy departments as well solar winds has engaged. The krebs stay most security consulting group to help deal with this attack. That firm was formed by alex. Stamos the former chief security officer at yahoo and facebook and chris krebs the former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or sisa. So krebs was fired last month. By the president after finding no evidence of with voting systems in the twenty twenty election. Yeah stamos first of all brilliant for those two to team up and smart for solar winds to engage them for what they say is Helping with transparency with companies that are affected But this we we are not done finding out how bad this is. There are reports that there may have been other ways that this whoever is behind this intruded beyond just solar winds. They're finding evidence of that. They have not been able to root out the people that got into this vulnerability from all systems yet. They're still in there in a lot of cases. And you know this. This kind of confidential information is exactly the kind of thing you fear that someone would get intruding into a government system informants investigative techniques that you can now learn from to evade being prosecuted or caught yourself. That's that's crown jewel type stuff it's it's very interesting. In fact krebs spoke on record saying that it could potentially take years to figure out how deep the solar winds attack actually went and how many different kinds of infrastructure. You know brands and everything that it might have affected so this is not something. That's going to die anytime soon. I'm glad that they are reaching out. Craig's and stay most though because that i agree with you tom. It's excellent. excellent team roku made a few interesting announcements roku says. Npd data shows that the roku s was the top selling smarter operating system in the us and canada in two thousand twenty thirty one percent market share in canada. Thirty eight percent in the united states That's pushed the samsung's tizen number two. At least we don't actually know samsung's ties and was number. One in two thousand nineteen also announced a wireless soundbar reference design that uses wifi for its roku. Tv ready program remember. Last year roku announced the program which had a designed for wired. Sound bars. The program includes tcl. Pokemon on an element has just announced. They'll join as well with two point. Two point one ready sound bars roku tv ready to expand internationally later this year as well. But here's the big roku news roku has agreed to acquire exclusive global distribution rights to more than seventy five Shows documentaries some of which had not been released before qube shutdown. So there'll be some new stuff that nobody's ever seen after their exclusivity deal expires. That'll happen in a bit more than a year. Depending on the show roku will still have the rights to show the content just not exclusively until thousand twenty seven the content will have to be presented in original increments of ten minutes or less. The deal doesn't let them stitch it altogether. The content will be added to the more than forty thousand movies and tv shows already available. In the roku channel shows include from Be anyway punked. Murder house. Flip and dummy which stars anna kendrick. I never watched the new punk. I heard had its moments. The whole qube thing. It's really interesting to me because it was sort of like. It crashed and burned so quickly. And there's a lotta shot and friday around folks in the industry about it. And i think that's not because qube was doing things wrong. It was because the company had raised so much money time. Because you know. They had meg whitman. Jeffrey katzenberg who are you know. Heavy hitters and there was a little bit of like you are being to embassies and therefore you shall fail. The company did fail and the idea that some creators will have a new life on another platform shows. That just don't even saw but people still worked on. And maybe you're really good. I think this this makes a lotta sense and good for roku to get exclusivity for at least a few years so does roku have to wait at all in order to start showing this content or can happen immediately. I don't know when the start date. Whenever the deal is you know goes into effect. Then they'll immediately be able to to show it so you know within a month or so it would be my guess anyway but no they. They don't have once. The deal is actually in effect. They don't have to wait. What's going on here. is that the baby. Production companies own the rights to their own stuff but they have a two year exclusive for each one of their shows with qube and those two year exclusives are now being transferred to roku so roka will be able to have the exclusive for the remainder of whatever. The period was with quick. That's why it's more a year. Exclusively goes away then they still have the right to show it until twenty twenty seven but the production companies that made it can now start shopping at around to other places as well so the production companies do hold the content and remember this is just the content. Qube is still in a over. Its turnstile technology which is holding it up from selling its technology and i would expect once it resolves that lawsuit should resolve it in a way that they still hold their technology. They'll sell that to so this isn't the last you're going to hear could be selling off a part of it. I would imagine. Gotcha yeah that whole. The whole technology part of qube was again was an ambitious thing that was released at a very inopportune time in twenty twenty when everyone was like. We're just sitting at home like we don't need this like mobile phone technology. It's like cool that you can shifted around but you can't even cast thing. I mean the company did fix that pretty soon after allow about she was just. I mean it's just did. The timing couldn't be worse but that technology when you think of it in a variety of other form factors such as monitors that swivel talked about some of those yesterday. I don't know that qube or tiktok or snapchat or all of the stuff where we're like. Oh yeah that's the. That's the portrait view. Rather than landscape view. That works for certain apps is is is all that this is four. I think there's more to it So we'll see what happens and there's patents and things that are always valuable because you can use those to extract some concessions and money and stuff. So yeah expect that all to come join the conversation in our discord which you can join by linking to a patriotic. Can't get in there and talk about your favourite qube shows with all the other discord folks. Just lincoln to your patriotic out at patriotair dot com slash. Dpd s all right shannon. How do you clone a security key. Well i i will say please do not stop using your security keys because of this story i will explain it. Researchers from ninja lab published a paper on thursday showing how you could clone a google tightened security gate this is a two factor authentication key which is very similar to a you. Be key that you have to plug in or tap in order to access an account after putting in your username or your password credentials. Were both so in order to pull off the clone. You would need physical access to the key for about ten hours. Sometimes a minimum of ten hours just kind of depends on how good you are at this. About twelve thousand dollars worth of equipment physical equipment and custom software and some advanced skills in electrical engineering and cryptography as well. So you have to remove the chip and then take measurements of it at a being registered on each account that you went to attack the measurements observe electro magnetic radiation as the chip generates digital signatures that let the attacker slowly deduced the private key so measurements take about six hours per account. That's not including taking apart. The original tighten security key putting it back together. Then you need to seal the chip back into its case. You also need the targets password in order for this to work. So the reason it works is because of vulnerability in the security hardware chip residing within the google titan key and that is called an eighty seven hundred x by this company called. Xp if it's exploited in attacker could grab the elliptic curve cryptographic private key for the account and the same chip is actually found in other two factor. Authentication physical tokens as well like There's a ubiquity that it's found in but chances of attack or very very minimal given the scope of the attack so if you do all of this without the target ever noticing then they would never duplicated key but again given the scope given how much it costs and everything behind the scenes probably when it happened to normal user. The point of these security keys being the best way to use For two factor. Is that you can't even get at your private key right you. Nobody has to be able to get in there like the chip. Just doesn't make it available so the fact that they were able to get in there and get it is huge. You know the fact that they were able to do this is significant. But i mean if you're not a target of an advanced persistent threat. You don't need to worry about this. No one's going to go to the trouble to do this. And even if you're a target. I would guess shannon that most of them probably would be able to notice if someone took their key for ten hours or more you. You likely likely would especially since a lot of people with hardware tokens like google titan will stick them on a on their keychain for example like with their house keys or whatever wherever they keep all those personal physical devices that they don't want lost or stolen they keep them all on engaging so if somebody was to take one of these out of your purse out of your gym locker wherever it might be and remove it for like ten hour street minimum. You would likely know that this would have happened. the neat thing about these chips inside of these. Google tightened security keys. And any other cryptographic hardware tokens like these is that. Even the manufacturer doesn't know the private key so the fact that they were able to find vulnerability on these specific chipsets is really interesting. And i think that's the important bit of that. Is is even though the google titan like the end all be all of really excellent. Two factor authentication. There's always. The potential that vulnerabilities can be found. So i'm happy that this research came out. It's so fascinating and it's so interesting in this means that an x. p. and other security chipset manufacturers that sell these teeny tiny chips to google or whoever the company might be They can build on this. They can research and figure out what the next version of their chipset needs to entail in order to not be vulnerable to this again in the future. Yeah i mean this is really a good security story right. We finally figured out because there's always a way right. We finally figured out the way you get the private key out of a security key and guess what it's really hard takes a long time and now that we know it we can make it even harder and hopefully you know push that barrier out even further and even if somebody did have time to do this and you didn't notice i was reading the paper because i'm a huge nerd and they go as far as using fuming fuming nitric acid in order to get like melt the epoxy off of the original google titan. How are you going to put that back together. In order for somebody to not notice like there's a lot of intricacies with this attack in order for it to actually be pulled off so chances are very very slim that somebody would be able to pull off so again as i said at the very beginning. Don't stop using your google tightened security key if you have one keep using it because chances are you would never be attacked with this. Just just know if you haven't seen it in ten hours look together strange. This is going to be in a movie though. I'm calling that shot right now. We're gonna we're gonna see this movie. Where like i hope so. Somebody goes into surgery and they take his key and they go out and do all this and they slip it back in because ten hours later. He wakes up from anesthesia on something like that. I just hope they talked to the researchers so they actually show it off right. Yeah Sony tv and audio announcements Starting with details for its own tv lineup. Sticking with lead ravi x four k and k. Tv's will support four k at one hundred twenty hertz variable refresh rate vr as well as a l l m low latency mode and e arc. These are all things that are important. If you've got a ps five now you've got sony. Tv they can go. That sony also has an improved a chip that is going to improve the picture and sound positioning. So it aligns with what you see on the screen. Sony's master series. Tv's will come with a sensor that adjusts white balanced immense. Your ambiente color temp. You don't have to do anything they'll just do it. Also an aluminum heat shield. That will make for brighter. All the sets will support. Hdmi two point one. Another big one for ps five dolby vision hdr angle tv. Sony also announced. It's three hundred sixty reality audio platform if you're not familiar with three hundred sixty degree audio places instruments and vocals in a virtual sound field around your head but using just the one speaker so you can do this in an amazon echo or google. Home sony will start streaming video with three sixty audio later this year. Starting with concert from zara larsson on january eleventh. And somebody's gonna make speakers that support this. It'll be may supported by other speakers as well. But sony is going to put out the are five thousand and three thousand They've got that dark cloth. Surface that all these speakers seem to have these days with either bronze or silver accents. Work with google and amazon assistance and can connect to select sony abroad via. Tv's as well as supporting wi fi bluetooth. Spotify connect in google cast. The speakers do automated calibration to the room. They're in donut. The press a button for that. Either and we'll simulate three hundred sixty degree audio for stereo tracks as well. The five thousand cost five hundred pounds or five hundred ninety nine euros no. Us price yet on the three thousand two hundred eighty pounds. Three hundred fifty nine euros. This seems this. Seems like it's shaping up to be one of the trends. Is this the sort of three hundred sixty degree audio while you're listening to your black bank and it's just one speaker or potentially a couple of speakers ativan. Maybe yeah yeah already supported. Yeah there's less of kind of like What do i have to do. Five point one surround or at least get a couple of speakers and make them a stereo pair type thing. I really haven't heard this in. I don't know. I used to hang out at magnolia at best. Buy all the time. And just like geek out on stuff like this. of course. this technology wasn't around at the time. But it's really come on. Let's turn on some stuff and see the speakers. Do it works well. Then that's awesome my first reaction because i got rid of my kind of pants speakers some years ago because friend of mine needed them more than i did and i didn't have room in my apartment but i miss that i'm also an a. A permanent now that's smaller and kind of has a lot of weird angles and i find audio bounces off walls in wiz. That wouldn't if it was more of a square box broom So i'm not sure that i'm the perfect target market for this. You're the you're the one puts this through its paces and sees if it really works. Yeah if i could actually work as advertised again with some funny angles in a big old frame. Then i'm i'm really into this and i've always been. I don't have a sony. Tv currently sorry zony. But i was abroad. Bravi a person for years. Nears i think what the new bravi line is coming out with. Looks really nice. And i mean not totally in the market for a new tv. But i like the fact that i might get a new sony again paired up with a sony speaker. You got three six. Yeah already got all this stuff. It's going to be a messed anyway. You slice it. But i like. I like this to be sixty reality audio platform. What would you have set up in your house. I was straight up going to mention sonos because if if it doesn't have the connectability to be able to work with all of my other platforms that currently have invested in. Then chances are i wouldn't buy it. So i do have sono says in my house and i do have some issues connecting those with other speakers in the household to like like my google hub for example so the fact that this works with google and amazon assistant the speaker specifically The audio speakers. I think that's pretty cool. I like that. They are bringing that in and i am interested because i do live in a household. That has very high ceilings. How this would work in that kind of environment. So yeah. I'm very interested in the audio aspect. Well you might also be interested in what colour has come out. Oh yes the folks who make things like toilets and and sinks and lots of appliances however. Been a real. Cas mainstay for the last few years for some cool innovations and this year is no different. Even though we're not in vegas koehler has a new smart bathtub called the stillness bath. That lets you use an app or use your voice using google or amazon's assistance to fill up the water or perhaps set the mood by changing the color of the lights around the tab or even add some fog. You know you wanna kind of pretend like you're in the then present routines also turn on features in a certain orders if you wanna get kind of creative. that's cool. Yeah the certain amount of limitations with the base model and the base model is not cheap so temperature and depth control models alone will cost around eight thousand six hundred ninety eight dollars. That's right it's almost nine thousand dollar bathtub. If you want the experience tower that lets you activate fog and aromatherapy. That will run you just over ten thousand dollars. Both models are available in july. There are real things and if you want the version with lights and floor grades for overflow fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety eight dollars available. This october signed me off. I won't be buying those. Nope not even a little bit but we could have taken a bath at s in the new in the pre show roger was like. Why would you want fog. It's like this. Why does anyone want to be on. Yeah racist luxury suites in hotels for sure as well as apple's houses sure yeah something well. Yeah it's it's that like hey look at what my bath can do people go. Wow very fancy and then you know ten years from now will be like remember when we thought it was fancied to talk to your bathtub so that it would start filling up without touching it but Yeah it's it's somewhat silly because of the price. But i'm not really much of a bath person but they do look very nice all right. Let's check out the mail bag but ads do it. Nick wrote in with a pronunciation. Ramps own neck. You are not alone he says. Ac's rog is an initial list. Because it's our og like fbi or cia. People say ron yet. They're lower end gaming brand tough not initially them. It's an acronym like scuba or produce you f but pronounced off. It's like ace's can't make up their name minds. Then there's strict which is our subbrand strikes as a word it's a completely nonsensical made up word. But it's a word and you pronounce it as such nick as honestly as somebody. That buys a lot of hardware. Because i've rarely had a bad experience with them over the past twenty years. I am baffled by some branding decisions. The one the bugs me. The most is the strict subbrand. Sometimes acis makes the tricks products. The high end product in the product stock yet other times. It's a mid range product. Would it be too much to ask for consistency and product. Branding twenty twenty one. Yes apparently apparently we feel your pain. Nick i love the dichter's just like i just need to vent you guys. Let me let me let me get this up. Just we appreciate that. Yeah i mean i. i'm with you nick. Everyday is a fresh new hell when it comes to reading out some model numbers but what is not is shouting out our patrons at our master and grandmaster levels. Today they include christmas merton james and digression daniels and of course landon peralta back and illustrating the show. What have you drawn for us today. Len well you know. I'm really excited. Say that we've have the first image of the ample car the car. Which i'm that's what i'm calling it. I'm sure they're gonna take my advice. Coming around twenty twenty seven ish or so maybe You know you may. If you're a fan of richard scary busy world a you may be very familiar with the look of of the apple. Ii car I think it'll be a big hit with with fans of people who have kids So check it out. this is called meet. I car And this is available right now. My patriot on which by the way has to new levels. If lets me be your Let me be your teacher. Your mentor with your artwork. I can give you some help that way. And patriots dot com forward slash. Len plus i also just launched a new product called flip face max which is over at lend store dot com. And i i want to show you what that looks like. I did something special. for For our friend shannon for snubs. This is a this is what the flipping flipped. Face masks. looks like This is It's a little bit higher Higher end than the normal flip sister used to But those are on the front page story on pro dot com. But this is for you shannon. If people wanna see that because most people are just listening to this what should they do. Go to well right now. It's going to be on twitter instagram later. But just go to lend dot com. You'll see all the ones i've done over the past couple of weeks and including including shannon's so it's really lovely. Let it's yeah. That's adorable shannon morris First show of twenty twenty one certainly not the last. I know you're a busy lady at. Where can people keep up with your work. Oh my gosh. I have been busy. Youtube dot com slash shannon morse. Just like name. I just did at tech predictions video and it was so cool. I got like eighteen up and coming tech youtubers to their twenty twenty one tech predictions for the year. And there's some names in there that you that you definitely know. Aunt pruitt Miriam take rene ritchie. So i had a whole bunch of people joining and kinda give me their thoughts and It was very very optimistic. And i was really happy to see that. So if you want to see that video and the rest of mine check out my youtube channel. Hey folks if you need. Just the headlines. It's okay to skip eighteen s. Know you get busy. Check out our related show daily tech headlines all the essential tech news in about five minutes daily tech headlines dot com. We're live on this show. Monday through friday at four thirty. Pm eastern twenty one. Thirty e. c. And you can find out more at daily tech news show dot com slash lives. We back monday with chris. Ashley have a gray weekend. All this show is part of the broadband network. Get more at frog pants. Dot com club who've enjoyed this broader.

Tech Technology Apple Hyundai Hyundai Motor Mark Gurman Nissan Honda Cnbc Kerr Kentucky Ford Japan Michio Reuters Bloomberg Thomas Magna Google Roku Krebs Shannon Morris Sarah Lane Roger J Competition And Markets Author Samsung Shannon Sony Chris Krebs
What can the US do to prevent cyberattacks?

Cyber Security Headlines

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

What can the US do to prevent cyberattacks?

"What can the. Us do to prevent further cyber attacks. Light of the high profile cyberattacks performed by the russian foreign intelligence service and other state backed actors alex stamos published an op. Ed in the washington. Post on how the us should defend against them going forward. He called on the us to create a cyber security equivalent of the national transportation. Safety board to track investigate and issue recommendations on cyber-attacks and further calls on a federal data-breach law that would require disclosure of breaches side of state based laws. He further calls on putting defensive cybersecurity on the same level of intelligence gathering and offensive operations with the creation of being a good start but noting that it lacks the size and technical competence of offensive operations. The third measure would be to appoint individuals with practical defensive cybersecurity experience too key roles in the biden administration.

Russian Foreign Intelligence S Alex Stamos Safety Board ED United States Washington Biden Administration
Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

Pivot

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Nvidia to buy UK's Arm, sparking fears of chip dominance

"Talk shortly about invidia buying chip company armed from. Softbank. The deal is worth forty billion and video said it will make it the quote Premier Computing Company for the age of Ai Invidia is best known for supplying ships at rendered images, video games, but it's so much more than Invidia has become sort of the power player in in this. Area and I know you're not a chip expert but this is the this is a critical company for a this this sermon, I wanna get into the idea of what it means for certain companies sort of owning a space and you just recently testified about single companies or or a small group of companies owning spaces, and how dangerous that is why it's It like this was a bit of an a for sale because bank has pledged to raising forty or fifty billion dollars in my understanding is they're they're not gonNA make a ton of money I think about bought this company that bought on for about thirty. Thirty or thirty, two billion just about three years ago, and they're getting a mix of stock and cash. What we interesting is it now I I've invidia. The, most impressive company I just don't know about its now got a larger market capitalization than Intel when I was in business school was considered kind of the most innovative giant company in the world. They've been blown by, and then what happens does apple still WANNA do business within video when they buy a competitor to their? To. Their chip designs so the chip bores looks like it's about to get more interesting and just. Greed. Company gets sold for forty. Billion although. That's a bit of a headline number. It was it includes performance in all sorts of other stuff that does about one point going timeout thirty times revenues, and then Invidia with A. It's got a three hundred billion on market cap with twelve billion in revenues I mean this stuff is just it as obviously very strategic that that literally exhaust might total knowledge of the chip-making space. Do you have any thoughts on this deal? Well, I think I think people don't realize Jensen Wong who's the CEO? Has had it sort of as quiet? Person WHO's super I tried to get him to come to co last year and removes like Oh chips the but I think it's really important to understand how powerful this company has become an how innovative it's bad. You know arm holdings was a designer of chips for mobile phones Softbank had struggled in this area Softbank was sort of into everything but bought it for thirty one, billion dollars a couple of years ago. So you know it needed money because of all the other problems it's having, and this is an opportunity for invidia but it's gone. It's gone well beyond mobile for. and it's it's in graphics. It's a it's been moving into self driving vehicles as an area that it's that it's moved into and so it's just it. Just it just says that you know it's going to buy up everything and like you were talking about all these opportunities that were that are a lot of the focus here is going to be on Softbank because it's been involved in so many deals that have sort of blown up whether it be. You. Know this this the overvaluation, we worker or other issues. It's been the the collapse of the Vision Fund and things like that. So a lot of people like to focus on Softbank because it's an interesting sort of ongoing traffic accident but really invidia is has quietly been. You know becoming the go-to Chip Company not just with graphics in games and things like that but artificial. self-driving another area it's moving into I. Think it's it's going to grow Internet of things and stuff like that and Softbank was just not able to do anything about it, and so I think you have to focus on invidia being on this sort of tear beyond where they started and I think people don't realize. It's one of these companies that you don't pay attention to very much like I'm blanking the other. There's another trip company that just is doing incredibly well, it's run by Lisa. Su That it's just there's there's all these companies that are holding incredibly powerful positions amd also on a tear that are very important to the future and so that you're right there's going to be a real focus on where the chip business is going.

Ai Invidia Premier Computing Company Chip Company Softbank Intel Apple Jensen Wong AMD Arm Holdings Lisa Vision Fund CEO
New Zealand Stock Market Halts Trading Amid Cyber Attack

Risky Business

02:43 min | 1 year ago

New Zealand Stock Market Halts Trading Amid Cyber Attack

"Trading on the New Zealand Stock Exchange has. been halted for like a week because, of Adidas, attack and this was this attack was already happening before adamant I recorded last week shy but we didn't talk about it at the time because we weren't sure what the motivation was. The Cross Church massacre terrorist was sentenced last week. So we thought they could have been a political nexus to the attack, but now it looks like fairly standard. Diaz ransom stuff. Standard. Blackmail. But at a pretty big scale, two, hundred gigabits per second is what is saying that they're tapping? At End. Up Pretty significant target the New Zealand Stock Exchange. This is a little bit risky just like the ransomware people who are going after critical national assets things like hospitals where people are GonNa die I think these guys are playing with fire New Zealand's got a pretty serious Intel capability vice country and I wouldn't be shocked if doing things like going after the Stock Exchange ends up with these guys in the real crosshairs. Yes. are able to take down the part of the ends at X. Website that dealt with company announcements and because they couldn't provide. Appropriate access to company information they had to suspend trading, and it's been up and down all week. So it is actually a pretty it is actually a pretty big deal. This one it looks like this is the same crew may be that was pretending to be Russians like a couple of years while pretending to be like fancy bed, we offensive s and is your bitcoins and that was making some people on the receiving end of those emails feel very important for for a time. Ego boost that you give to your victims but yeah, I, don't think this is how the G. R. U. is monetize their activity. No, and it looks like one of the issues here was that ends at was hosting its DNS servers and its content service on the same network, which is usually a good thing to do. We keep on saying this is a very important pieces of infrastructure where people have not thought through and threat model that. Looks like and and I do think you know any organization of reasonable size needs to have security assessments that don't just try to break in into look at traditional intrusion but to think through if dos attack happens, what is the the thin part of your infrastructure? That's GonNa feel I. This is really interesting because you know obviously most of the exchanges probably disconnect from the Internet on private networks on leased. Lines in such But like you said, if they can take down a web service and a website that is critical to the legal operation of the site, then does it matter if the backend servers still operating they have to stop operation overall? Yeah. This attack campaign is also targeting money Graham braintree and other finance services companies, and we have linked through to a write up on zd by Cowan Kim

New Zealand Adidas Diaz Graham Braintree Intel Cowan Kim ZD R. U.
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The same thing could basically be carried out again, one of the things that I found really interesting about the impeachment and the sort of Joe, Biden misinformation campaign that the trump team was trying to peddle was that you could sort of see the press like trying to figure out how to cover the story without giving credence to these false rumors about Biden and not always succeeding is so do you see any change in how the press deals with these kinds of things from twenty sixteen or is it really just the same thing all over again? I mean, they're certainly changes I think there are a lot of thoughtful reporters. I mean, this is this is again, we have to be careful saying the media because we also have to separate out. Fox News from everybody else right. Because that's the other issue we've got as we have this conservative media that is willing to amplify or to help entertain these these radical positions or to write things that that create a lot of noise to keep people from questioning whether or not. What they're being told his true and so. That is one of the issues that we have to continue to deal with is at Fox News, such a huge influence on our political life and I think that's the the rest of the mainstream media likes to downplay that movie they don't like to but downplayed that because dealing with the Fox, problem is clear that is very difficult to do that without coming up with rules impact themselves, right. So it's much easier to talk about facebook and twitter because it doesn't impact the new. York Times. It's a lot harder talk about the Fox. Problem. Because they are well within kind of the the mainstream of what is considered, the freedoms that are afforded. The Political Press works much easier to kind of right in editorial that section two, thirty correct into say that there's too much freedom online Then to say that there's television station or large media corporations that are really ruining our politics but you know I think there are individual reporters who are doing a much better job. There's individual person to fantastic work conditioned formation I expect if we had to hack and leak. There was some New York Times article about the Desta emails. I believe where the mentioned that this might have been Russian operation was like paragraph eight or nine. So that would definitely be paragraph now. I may be experienced the media a little bit differently during the impeachment hearings were it seemed to me there's a lot of credence given to these claims and a lot of amplification of claims, and it actually looked a lot the same me and I think that was even the case when it was being pushed in a way that was obviously explicitly partisan. One of my concerns is that there's a lot of capability for you know really good information actors like the GRU to hide their fingerprints, and so it's quite possible that the next time this happens that even in an even better job of keeping partisan fingerprints off of pushing some kind of theme and can be very difficult to deal with true documents that have been leaked in a adversarial manner of I. Still Have Not seen some good discussion of how that should be handled. Okay. So if that's the differences with the media from now, twenty sixteen, th one of the other key differences coalitions like yours with the IP. Let's take a look at industry. They also seem to be collaborating more or talking about collaborating more at least last week a bunch of companies including facebook. Google Twitter Reddit, and Microsoft. They released a statement reassuring us that they working closely together and with the US government to counter information operations. You've said that you think this is really this is good but that there are important platforms missing. So why does this kind of collaboration Mata- and what should they be doing? As. We talked about these campaigns always multiple platforms right and I think that's one of the things that the companies are trying to come together to deal with is the fact that if they find something that might be the tip of the iceberg, the iceberg actually exists on one or a collection of other platforms. What they're actually doing those meetings is hard to tell this is a continuation of meetings that started when I was at facebook that I chaired a in the run up to the midterm elections but that they has been expanded significantly and the team specifically, facebook has done a bunch of work around coronation I. Think they should be thanks for doing that kind of work. It's unlikely that it's going to solve the problem for the smaller companies but. I think one of the things are trying to do is reduce the chance that if something gets caught by one of the big companies, Google twitter facebook being specifically the big ones that the ability for those same actors to continue to operate with impunity on the next tier, which would be the pinterest in the red it's the snaps in the like is reduced. Now there's a whole tier after that like I said with secondary infection, there's three hundred different platforms. And so the the long tail here is much longer than existence that I think that like that last press release came from Ted companies into there's two hundred, ninety more that might be relevant and so that that's an interesting question of how as a society we WANNA handle that won't tail because generally governmental responsibility. But in this case we're talking about political speech it gets really really sketchy but I I am glad that they're working together how effective that's going to be something. That we're going to see and I think that what will we will hopefully see is there will be take downs at are coordinated much more quickly than they were of the past which has definitely happened again between like the facebook and the twitter and the Youtube well I'd love to see is that the same time stuff comes off them. It comes off of these snaps in the it's at, you know within hours or minutes not within weeks, which is what.

facebook twitter Fox News Fox Google Biden Political Press New York Times US Joe Ted companies York Times Microsoft Mata Youtube pinterest
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Real news and real information, but you're only seeing. A piece of it, it's like the old analogy with the elephant by men and the elephant you're only touching one. When peace is hard from that determine what's true that's right. Es I think this is all a much more complicated kind of philosophical discussion than people have generally given credit for, which is the vast majority of Russian activity in two thousand sixteen was not what you can reasonably call Fake News, right? So there's really two big chunks to their information operation. One is the pure online operation by the Internet Research Agency and other related organizations. which was mostly not about the election was mostly about political topics and the vast majority of their output. Is Not falsifiable claims effect right? Like they're doing things like creating fake accounts. Of Part of anti immigration. Group in they're saying making extreme political statements about immigration. That for the most part or not things that are falsifiable, right and so. It is disinformation in that these people are working in a coordinated fashion to hide their. Than to amplify their message, well beyond what would normally be seen by people, but it is not fake news and it is not like a lie and then the other part of the big information operation was the gre racial hacking leak right and again, the core facts that they were able to put out were true right like they had really mail from jumping ESTA. They had real emails from Debbie Wasserman Schultz. It is that the one the selective leaking of themes to tell a story was part of the this information they weren't faking these documents they were able to kind of framing up and they're also able to drive a level of coverage of those topics. Well beyond what they should have now but this is why I also talked about like this is an off site. Then because the real target of the year you can leak was the mass media. Social just like, North Korea with Sony, right? Yes, exactly. Exactly and so in both cases, you can call it this information because of the authenticity of the identities of WHO's pushing it and their ability to get the coverage. But in both cases, it was based upon actual true fact and this is why I think people over discuss things like deep fakes and stuff about the creation of truly false pieces of evidence because. Most of the most useful are the most effective information operations that we have examples of are based upon us kernel of truth that is then spun amplified in twisted in a way that is difficult to call fake. You've said before the one of the fundamental issue that facebook faces is that there is no law to tell them or any other social media platform what is or is not allowed that there's no fundamental. Privacy Law in the United States. Would that extend to these content issues as well, and is it better if the government is setting rules in this area that the treads on freedom of speech or should it be up to private social media platforms? Slow I mean that's a complicated question I think just realistically the United States and the vast majority of content that people don't like on social media is First Amendment protected right? So we're never realistically going to end up with. Direct government regulation in this space, I, think. The place where I think government regulation would be good to encourage the companies to be more thoughtful about the impact of certain abuses that are not about political speech. The misinformation distillation is the hardest place because you have this spectrum, the spectrum of disinformation too political speech within the overton window is incredibly blurry and it is very dangerous for a government in a democratic society to say, this is where the line is. Well, let me push just for a SEC You've said, Mark Zuckerberg is mistaken in his view that interfering with posts by politicians amounts to. Censorship what do you think of twitter? Policy, which has gone in a different direction to say there are facts and we're gonNA use the fact checking label uncertain tweets. Yeah. And I actually think twitter's policy here has been much smarter. I think is afterwards going into a defensive crouch and that he's been really way too stubborn about the core decision around labeling politician tweets from my perspective one I do think we have to be careful about half trillion, two, trillion dollar corporations taking down speech by candidates in elections democratically elected leaders that that that's like a very dangerous place to go. But that doesn't mean that the companies don't have. Their own First Amendment right to label speech as they see fit and I think that the twitter at least they're announced model I don't think they're enforcement is incredibly good. But at least they're announced model of we will allow a piece of speech generally to exist as long as it's not causing direct harm this different if somebody's like calling for a person to be harmed or something. But if it's a political statement, that is a misstatement of fact that it can exist but we're going to reduce the product of ordinances that allowed to be amplified, turn off you re tweets and stuff like that. And we're GONNA, use our First Amendment right to label it. As we believe, this is not true. You can separate out silencing the voice of people in an ad in your own voice to it because you think it's wrong and I think the companies need to think a lot more about that second option what about you reference the size of the companies just switching topics entirely because I think it is driving some of the movement may is facebook a monopoly is too big. Should it be broken up? Yeah..

twitter facebook United States Debbie Wasserman Schultz Internet Research Agency North Korea Mark Zuckerberg Sony
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Place you want to be the senior director of security role where you can run a large team. You can have huge impact but you're not seeing as having that responsibility because Venus. So in two thousand twenty is imagine if you're a CFO and Sarbanes Oxley as past but you haven't invented double entry accounting yet and everybody's allowed to spend whatever money they want, and you can just advise like that's not how companies work right like the. CFO moves all the money and he public corporation like you are not allowed to ten cents without some kind of infrastructure they have put in place approving that but the so sits over in the corner in his almost all reactive and it's very difficult to know even know the decisions that are being made at any moment that are gonNA crew, a huge amount of security risk, and that's the kind of thing that we have to address Bijou. Right like. Every big company as the secret meetings secret but has like this this small meeting usually Monday mornings at the beginning of the week usually in the conference room of the CEO, and those are the people who actually run the company. They're not necessarily all the direct reports to the CEO right but it's like the inner circle, the cabinet of people who are making the decision, and it is extremely rare to hear about a CEO or really any executive who handles downside risk being in that meeting and if You're not in that meeting that in the end, you're just there for the cleanup, you're not able to actually bend the curve. Let's Let. Let's move actually to facebook and I WANNA I want to do the same divide. We did a little bit when talking about Zoom, which is you have a series of issues and we talked about them with with Yahu that really have to do with the security of a product, and then you have abuse of a product or being used in ways you didn't anticipate. At facebook you had. More Authority on paper, you're the chief chief security officer in while you're there you end up encountering as as we talked about a little bit Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election and seeing a type of meddling that I think we've seen on smaller scales really never on a scale like this before in part because there was never a platform that that had the impact like like facebook did. So tell me little bit it. You what your proposed approach would be the deal with Russian interference and how that differed from the approach of other executives and also just going to our compensation were you. In the right meetings or at the table. So they had a chance to hear from you so. I. The vast majority of my job at facebook was the traditional information security job right and and that was actually in some ways much easier than it was at Yahoo because facebook had money. You know a lot of the core problems at Yahoo is the fact that Yahoo was effectively a dying company by the time I joined in by Time Marissa, took over a CEO. There's an argument made that nobody could have turned yahoo around but. True or not by that point, like the investment in technology had really stalled out for about a decade and that was intruded facebook facebook was at the height of yelling continuing to grow had all new technology had built all this stuff internally did not have. You know when I got to you there is a server that had been rebooted for ten years which people like really proud of what that meant about the the. Quality of the data center in the fact that hadn't lost power in ten years intramuros like well just means you're not enforcing any kind of patch policy if like this is. You're not patching. For ten years. And that was facebook great like there's much more of a culture of kind of core security. So that was most of my job, but the where I got pulled into the Russia stuff was because. One of the things that I inherited and then really grew as we had a threat intelligence team whose entire job it was to look for. Advanced attackers, I attacking the company just looking for exactly the kind of attack that the Chinese did against Google but then also abusing the platform to cause harm and coming out of two thousand sixteen like one in my core beliefs is as a society we have really. Messed up by not having the equivalent of a nine eleven commission. Look at what happened in two thousand sixteen because there's actually this fascinating kind of Muller Report Right I've heard of it. I'm in a couple of the footnotes I think I'm not even in the footnote. It's amazing. The things that we do like that we think are not going to be that important and then are going to be enshrined in history forever. I'm sure you're in the same place. Do we need another report or do we need to mandate that people read the Muller? Reporter. Do you think there's more information be discovered? Well I I think it's too late now I think. As you and I know Robert. Muller's goal was to understand what happened to look for criminal behavior. The Muller team did not do a top to bottom analysis of what are the root causes that allow this to happen right and that was what the nine eleven commission did after September eleventh. In fact, that's one of those as a result actually wasn't that commission was the different commission that WMD Commission that division I let it the Justice Department. Security. Division was created as one of those. Really. Recommend recommendations so I take your point. Yeah that it's a top to bottom and think about how both government structure now a private sector structured and we still haven't done that and we haven't, and there's this interesting parallel between two, thousand, sixteen and nine eleven, which is you're the nine eleven reports. Got This a lot of it is about the failures of government to communicate internally? Right. And there's a whole section on the lack of institutionalized imagination that there weren't people who were thinking ahead of what all the bad things that can happen in. How should we preemptively think about the ways are our adversaries might act and we have the exact same thing happened in two, thousand sixteen except in nine eleven the responsibility there is almost completely in the public sector right protecting. Our country from terrorists protect keeping people from getting on planes with weapons that was clearly government responsibility whereas in two thousand sixteen. Now, you have this much more distributed responsibility between folks in the government, but also the private tech platforms, but also that the media and the campaigns. Themselves who perhaps should report if somebody reaches out to them from the Russian embassy and there was this failure of institutionalize imagination and part of it was that the kind of the belief of what was what was government going to do in attacking technology was based upon what we had seen in the past, which was taking over accounts sending malware, spearfishing, getting into private groups of dissidents right that kind of secret police slash y'all Aurora..

facebook Muller CEO Yahoo CFO Sarbanes Oxley senior director Russia WMD Commission Russian embassy Google officer Yahu Reporter Robert Marissa Justice Department
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Group of pretty good hackers who are able to break in, but there's a lot of reasons why they were first able to break into Yahoo, and there's another set of complex reasons of why they're able to stay. It took US weeks and weeks get rid of them. A lot of those reasons go back basically the age of the company in a investment insecurity over a decade but. This breach comes out. There is a set of lawsuits against Yahoo as normal and I ended up as you can imagine, getting subpoenaed for a bunch of these, and so I end up going and having these very long discussions with tons of lawyers in the room which people haven't been deposed I can't recommend it right. But. You know you're you're sitting there and the videos looking at you and everybody's everybody's parsing every single word you said, and then there's twelve people in the room and every other person the rooms getting paid to be there except you. and. You're sitting there. They're asking me all these super detailed questions they got thousands and thousands of emails and documents, and they're putting these emails in front of me in these documents and army, and through this process of doing this with me and dozens of other people who are involved in these breaches, you can start to build out this idea of okay. What were the root causes that caused the ability for these people to be able to break in Yahu and then the difficulty in chicken them out. Okay. That's fantastic. I'm that is that is really useful knowledge, right? Because these FSP hackers a couple of them were arrested, but the the main guys actually still at large predictable Russian affected by exactly. Yeah we can talk about our joint friend Alexey so it would be super useful for everybody else to understand what happens. What happened to all of those transcripts documents everything? Well, they do a deal where the class action lawyers get like forty, five, million dollars year fees a bunch of Yahoo users end up getting like free credit monitoring, which makes absolute sense for preach plus like a gift card. I think and then all of that stuff gets sealed up by the court right so that as a society, if you have something a failure like that to make that just an part of what is effectively like a legal game just to. Move money around with some class action attorneys in Florida, and then all of the fact-finding is then sealed up and made useless wants the money is moved around. That is just the silliest way to try to address incredibly complex issue like imagine the seven, thirty, seven Max crashes, and that's how we handled it and we have no idea of what actually failed on the seven three seven. There's no NTSB report everything because when we ended up paying off some lawyers in Florida, we would find that ridiculous in airlines would be. Much, less secure and so I think that's like one of the core regulatory things we gotta do is we've got to make the discussion of what went wrong public and we also have to create a model where people are encouraged to come out when they have a close call or when they have a breach that doesn't touch Pi but maybe be touched some kind of intellectual property. We we we need to have both a carrot of certain protections. Maybe you're better position to have an opinion on this, but maybe you. have kind of statutory penalties for certain kinds of breaches and such. So it's not like a four year, a class action lawsuit, but we need to have an encouragement of of a carrot, and then you have to have a stick if people keep it secret and then we really what I love to see is there really should be a four hundred page report of what happened to who because then everybody else can read that and be like Oh man now I see the things I have to do to prevent. Famously with Yahoo as well, and we see this is according to reporting this gap between what you're finding a recommending his chief information security officer and what the CEO who's facing a lot of pressures about a business that losing customers. A did in terms of security I. Think you said earlier that you and your career, you've not worked for CEO's for whom security was the top. The top priority right and that's that's kind of also people have talked about and how exactly you calibrate this I think a little but I think it's a good direction effectively a starbucks for security where you make the board and you make the CEO liable in a personal way for security that they aren't right now you're talking about the Sarbanes Oxley Law that essentially said that you have to personally sign as an officer of the of the company that you're meeting certain financial controls essentially, and you're saying we need some type of law like that. That makes CEO's boards personally accountable for secure. That's right. Yeah I think so because What keeps on happening is. The compensation structure for CEO's is built only around financial metrics and so Y-. This is just a truism for any industry, right but you you get what you measure. To the detriment of everything you don't measure you don't bonus right and so if you're only bonuses based upon the the short-term financial metrics and not upon the longer term risks, then you're going to end up. Management is going to go all one way and there are companies where security is integral. It's just it's. It's extremely rare honestly like the vast majority companies, there is a the existence of a CEO. is in some ways negative because you've created this executive fruit whom you kind of place all of this risk, but they don't have the ability to make the decisions actually bend the risk right and so it you'll from my perspective see. So shouldn't be the person who's the risk manager the the risk manager is really the CEO and the owners of the different product lines and a big enough company. It's not the CEO it's the people who own the business, right who make the real business decisions. So former St so says cease so shouldn't get fired after security incidents. Wants I mean. Like we're in this weird place where you have this executive whose only job is to think about the downside but they never have the ability to make kind of the big picture decisions of balancing kind of growth against risk though I think that's that's a really important point in in all seriousness, it's part of. Big Change. We've seen in our lifetimes just over the last ten fifteen years I really wasn't a chief information security officer, and then the C. C. So was supposed to indicate that they were in the C. Suite and most companies they're not really in. In the C. Suite and then even in the C. Suite, what you're saying is they need to be empowered in that may require. Creating by law if you're right regulatory or other risk that caught forces a company when doing a rational calculus to prioritize security and give them the authority, they need to reach the right risk decisions not just for the company but for society, Yeah No, you put that much better than me. You know when a young person asked me, how do I know Alex? Do I become cease one day? My answers don't. Like? The..

CEO Yahoo chief information security off Florida US executive C. Suite NTSB Yahu Alexey risk manager starbucks Alex Sarbanes Oxley Law officer
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Few people had Internet access I mean securities dawn from being a fun game like basic life safety issue right like in two thousand one. I don't know what the number is, but somebody can can probably look it up while we sit up here. But one in two, thousand one, you couldn't automatically solve bar bets like that. Just by looking at your phone, you had you look it up later but but also like a billion people had Internet access or seven million people or something like that I think it mentioned ninety nine at some point ninety nine. One hundred million people had Internet access, right. And for those people didn't it was a fun thing where they can do some research reading and now the Internet is a critical part of the lives of close to three billion people, right. And and so it's securities gone from something where like you know when the Morris weren't happened in the entire Internet shutdown nobody died right that would not be true today if the Internet just stopped working. Or. If we had a worm that infected ninety percent of Internet connected devices, people would die or people would lose their jobs or there'd be there'd be mass chaos securities gone from something. That's just kind of like fun something. That's responsibility that doesn't mean it can't be fun when you do it but you have to sometimes step back it'd be like Oh man. Actually. You are having a real impact right and then you referred to for for prosecutors in law enforcement a case that's always discussed the Morris worm, which is really the first time tempted to apply. Criminal Law to in intrusion this was a self propagating code. In nineteen, Eighty, eight, the shut down. The Internet any you said that when the Morris worm happened the entire Internet shutdown in nobody died that would not be true today. The Internet just stopped working or if we had a worm that infected ninety percent of Internet connections, people would die or people lose their jobs or there would be mass chaos. Tell tell me little explain that quote where you think we are now compared to where we were when it comes to Internet related threats. Yeah. So when I in that speech is kind of talking about the progression of our profession of people who work in computer security cybersecurity as you guys say DC. Or Information Securities we say on the West Coast as I a hobby then A. Job Just like any other job. Right that is like important to support things that people are doing but not too critical to effectively becoming a priesthood. Right that security has become. This they met underlies a huge chunk of our lives and Because of the success of the insertion of Technology D- every aspect of people's lives top to bottom that the same people might be doing. You might be doing the same things but the importance of what we do around us has completely changed and yes, I was using the Morris worm is a great example because that was a a worm as you. Pointed out that was amazingly advanced for the time. It had multiple payloads can infect multiple different incompatible computer architectures, and it infected a a big chunk of of the then nascent Internet and it was like a story among it people in universities. But nobody died there is no actual impact in because of the way we have inserted technology and everybody's lives That is not true anymore in kind of a from my perspective, but you know the tech industry overall were really really good at making technology useful for people to the point where they start to rely upon it. But then we're not very good at making that technology trustworthy for them right and there's multiple levels of that there's the traditional security issue. There's kind of the privacy issues which are about how you decide to gather updated, use it, and then there's also the what you might call the trust and safety issues which is know we build these technologies were bad things can happen and we often do so I and important I in that we figure out how can people abuse them later? And I think. There are fundamental problem in the structure of how we build technology in Silicon Valley is at all of the thinking about the downsides happens way too late in the process and it makes it very difficult to fix it up after working at Yahoo, and then we've had one of the biggest thefts ever maybe the biggest theft ever of a email related information by Russian criminals linked to in taking tasks from the Russian state. You then move to. Facebook and are there as you're confronting. Unprecedented attempt to manipulate. The way individuals are thinking using media and now you're at Stanford and tell me a little bit about what what you're doing at Stanford and how you're working to tackle some of the problems that you've you've observed and confronted firsthand your different industry jobs trying to do a couple of things. It's Hefford one is our team is doing research in the misuse of the Internet that trying to hit the sweet spot between it being. Done in a timely manner and being quantitative and qualitative Lee supportable enough to really inject a better level of accuracy into the discussion of these abuses right and so like specifically in the disinformation world unfortunately since two thousand, sixteen there's been a belief among people that by people. I mean really just kind of mostly the US media that any kind of disinformation activity is immediately impactful can can have all of these. Downstream impacts may maybe measurable and therefore that you should do almost anything to stop it right in that. That's not how we can handle any kind of abuse right? Like we have to really understand how do these abuses work? What kind of impact does it have? So then we can calibrate our responses to it are there's a lot of good academic groups doing this kind of work. The problem is the majority of them are on. Publisher perish kind of models where they have to be in peer reviewed journals and the like, and so you're talking about maybe something coming out a year or two afterwards, and so we've built this team to be able to do in the short term what is much more journalistic work of here's US exploring and uncovering a Russian disinformation campaign in Africa and getting taken down. So we have impact immediately that then can turn into A. Political Science Journal paper a year or two later by the PhD's who were on that team, and that's one of our goals is to try just kind of inject realism into the discussion of these abuses The second is to expand the discussion of what should be considered the responsibility of companies beyond the traditional information security into all of these other areas, and there's a parallel here with as. They talked about of where we were like in the late nineties. Early, two thousand security, which is security was super specialized field that was often the corner that was something. You did last that was not deeply integrated into the products life cycle, and that didn't have an academic component in wasn't training undergrad right and that's where I feel like we are on the broader trust and safety you. Trust and safety we're talking about abuses of technology. which is generally technically correct use of technology to cause harm without any hacking or violation of the rules of the system.

US Stanford Morris theft Information Securities Facebook A. Political Science Journal Africa Publisher West Coast Silicon Valley Hefford Lee Yahoo
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"A bulletin board systems you dial in with your with your modem, and often people would be interacting a synchronous league because a lot of BBS's only had one or two phone lines. So you could go right messages while you're dial, they'd go off come back twenty four hours later see what people have done but also what was big for kids those days was trading video games and tips on how to crack them in such, and that's actually how I I I learned how to do some reverse engineering was breaking the copy protection on my commodore, sixty four games and learning all that from BBS's was their particular game you remember cracking yes. Actually there's really fun game called Red Storm Rising interest a submarine simulator based upon the Tom Clancy book the Best Commodore Sixty, four game and also very expensive. Got Got myself a copy of that but at the time. It again, it was just kind of innocent time when doing this kind of stuff was not incredibly impactful people's lives. And Technology, it was just this kind of site thing right? Like you know my most of my life did not revolve around tech even for a super nerd and just kind of amazing to think what has happened since then that now technology plays such a more central part of everybody's life Especially somebody WHO's interested in like I was wargames. Any this is a nineteen eighty-four think around movies starring Matthew Broderick about a kid hacks into. The Department of Defense and nearly start a nuclear war spoiler alert but it did. Impacted have I did yeah I mean the two biggest most backflow movies for me in the computer space was wargames, which is exactly the kind of stuff that me and the kids who go to this twenty, six hundred. So there's a a magazine called the Hacker quarterly. Six hundred I'm sure you've seen it. Do you know where the twenty six hundred comes from? This is actually a quiz I give my students I do not. There's a man named captain crunch actually who I believe also went to Berkeley but back in the sixties who figured out that the whistle in the captain crunch cereal box made it perfect twenty, six, hundred, Hertz tone. which turns out to be the tone by which the local at and T. office would signal the long distance switch and so if you use that whistle, you could then steel long distance calls. So anyway, this kind of stuff that we talk about in wargames here's what's now called Ward Eileen which is he just goes through dials a bunch of phone numbers until he finds computers and that's the kind of thing that a bunch of kids would do in those days again with no like militias purpose just see what was out there and what was hanging out and It was pretty good time the movie that really impact on me sneakers right which Robert Redford. Movie in which he and a bunch of his friends have a company that are professional hackers and they paid to fix stuff, which effectively became a goal of mine that I was able to fulfill a little bit later. So those you know it's pandemic time at home looking for something to watch it time to to react both those movies in sneakers has an incredible credible cast just read right? Right it's Dan Ackroyd. David stay and. James Earl Jones makes a cameo as you pretty much right as a high guy, the national security establishment, pre pre national security division, but I'll, but I'll take it even though I'm not sure it's The best. Messing for. The war games always find it in. Talked about this before because in addition to in influencing a young Alex, most it also. For President Reagan. Caused him to ask the question could this happen to us apparently was really the beginnings of the first government programs when the answer was yes it could happen to us and we're not really prepared for it. Yeah. It's interesting that whole time is like looking back kind of the relationship between teenage hackers and the government was very complicated in weird right some guys I ended up working with later were part of a group called Maud Masters Destruction, which was a pro hacking group in new. York that the secret service I think called the greatest cyberterrorists in the world or something, and they turn out to be all these kids that go to the same school in the upper east. which off, we'll get to it later but the recent twitter hack at. Thank. You still you still have that phenomenon. Right well but I mean this is the difference now, right? Like if you're seventeen and you have these skills. And you don't very carefully stay on the beaten path you will end up in a very dark place right I. think that's actually no it is. There's so many more options people. Now there's good options right? You can participate in online hacking clubs like just yesterday I did a webcast with hat club, which is like this international group of teenagers that are interesting. Computer Security and they all participate in capture the flag competitions they participate in official bug bounties explained stick to step back yeah. Claim would capture the flag yet TITIAN is capture the flag REC-. t.f is a competition where you have kind of an artificial network set up and you compete to break into computers into get the flag, which is usually a file on the computer And so that's that's kind of an artificial game and it's something that I actually used to participate made a lot too old. Now my skills are you have to be in the seniors division of Hacky if I did that they should make that Make it should be. Swimming they call it masters right? Like that just means old you're young person you hack you can be part of a competition. There's. Schools can have teams now, right? Like at some high schools, it is a varsity sport to do hacking which I think is incredible. Awesome in a great opportunity. And then if you WANNA go up against real systems, not kind of these artificial plans you can go up against companies that have announced you're allowed to hack us we will pay you and so there's all these great opportunities for students but there's also a huge downside which if you fall into effectively the wrong crowd you will get pulled into criminal underground that didn't really exist when when when I was coming up, we've talked a little bit about the fork of the road for current kids where you can go down. The path of being paid by companies to find vulnerabilities so that they can fix them essentially getting paid for gaming, which is capture the flag or bug bounty programs, and then on the other hand that there's this dark criminal. Underworld, where you can also end up getting paid and. Kids end up faced faced with the choice or exploring one path or the other. What what would you say helps which experience helped shape your thinking about technology and policy and and put you I think on the path of law-abiding law-abiding citizen of mostly La by. Yeah I I mean I. I had a very, I was very fortunate my childhood, right so very supportive parents grew up in a very stable household in suburban Sacramento went to a good public high school was able to get good grades and go to Berkeley, and so there was none of those things that may be your other kids, push them off the path right plus I were immigrant families, stomach topless and. Grandfather, Andrew Raucous Andreas Ruckus from Cyprus who had really kind of nailed into me like the importance of education. That was his big thing. He he had left Cyprus at a fifth grade education because he was the oldest boy in the family and had been pulled out of school to to work on the family farm and so when you're the grandson of a little goat herder. kind of there's kind of immigrant expectations on your shoulder. and. That helped in I. had that Opportunity Right? Like I could go to cal and I could take classes. Now there wasn't a lot you could study security there's only one security class in the late nineties they are. This is actually an interesting kind of mirror image of what's going on right now around trust and safety, which is the same problem at the time you couldn't go to university and. Learn a lot about security. So I took a graduate class David Wagner really famous..

David Wagner Cyprus Berkeley Tom Clancy Matthew Broderick Dan Ackroyd James Earl Jones captain crunch President Reagan Hacker quarterly Department of Defense Robert Redford twitter Ward Eileen York La Alex cal official
"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Hey folks preet here. I. Hope You enjoyed this episode of cyberspace with Giancarlo in conversation with Alex, Stamos as always write to us with your thoughts and questions at letters at Cafe Dot Com from Cafe Welcome to cyberspace who. I'm your host John Carlin. Today marks the official launch of this podcast. Every other Friday we'll be exploring the key issues at the intersection tech. Law and policy. I'll be joined by a range of guests who made an impact in the world of cybersecurity. My guest. This week is Alex Stamos. He served as the chief security officer at facebook where he led an investigation into Russia's interference in the two thousand, sixteen election. He was previously the chief information security officer at Yahoo where he dealt with a number of major cyber-attacks from nation state actress. Today, he teaches at Stanford and leads the university's Internet Observatory. He also recently took on a role with zoom helping the company with security challenges brought on by its exponential growth during the pandemic, there's much to discuss and I'm thrilled to have Alex stamos program. Welcome Alex great to be talking to you again and. I want to start really with with your background a little bit. You've had a long career in tech including time as a successful entrepreneur and executive at Yahoo and facebook although as we'll get into a little bit more sometimes I wonder if if hiring you means instant crisis but let me just take you back a little bit is, is this the path you envisioned when you majored in Electrical Engineering and computer science at UC Berkeley? Not. Exactly, I was always interested in computer security but like other security people of my generation, most of the training that we got was very unofficial I. Think you would say there's really no good way if you're going to the eighties and early nineties to learn about security in a way that's completely legal in allowed So you did some things on a commerce sixty four than a PC starting with three hundred Baud Modem. And hanging out with friends in the like and back then. Securities was just kinda fun right going and breaking into BBS's, and you know. So BBS's your pre Internet. With your friends online you dial into, it's called.

Zoom won’t encrypt free calls, so it can help the FBI catch intruders

Daily Tech News Show

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Zoom won’t encrypt free calls, so it can help the FBI catch intruders

"Zooms earnings, calls, CEO Eric Yuan said true, and and encryption will only roll out for paid users of Zoom Zoom previously described it services having end to end encryption, though it actually provided transport encryption which protects the calls, but leaves the possibility. That zoom could see the data if it wanted to. That kind of lesser encryption will remain for free accounts. Yawn said the stronger end to end encryption would not be provided to free users because the company wants quote to work together with FBI with local law enforcement. In case, some people use zoom for a bad purpose zoom advisor Alex Stamos clarified that organizations on a free business plan like schools will also get end to end encryption.

Ceo Eric Yuan Alex Stamos FBI Advisor Yawn
Zoom's end-to-end call encryption service is only for paid users

Daily Tech News Show

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Zoom's end-to-end call encryption service is only for paid users

"Zooms earnings, calls, CEO Eric Yuan said true, and and encryption will only roll out for paid users of Zoom Zoom previously described it services having end to end encryption, though it actually provided transport encryption which protects the calls, but leaves the possibility. That zoom could see the data if it wanted to. That kind of lesser encryption will remain for free accounts. Yawn said the stronger end to end encryption would not be provided to free users because the company wants quote to work together with FBI with local law enforcement. In case, some people use zoom for a bad purpose zoom advisor Alex Stamos clarified that organizations on a free business plan like schools will also get end to end encryption.

Ceo Eric Yuan Alex Stamos FBI Advisor Yawn
"alex stamos" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:45 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on Amanpour

"Look at and certainly from overhead. You can see the scale of the digging and what they had to do to to try to bury the bodies and we have also now received a tweeted message from not us on twitter from the mayor of Murnau's who's begging for outside help including he's appealed to the young environmentalist activist. Greta Greta Tandberg and this is what he said. It was going to play a little bit of it. I am a Demille of miles. The main seat of Amazon states the biggest in the whole Brazilian. As I'm telling you that we are in needing help. We have to save the lives of the protectors of from the are offer. Disaster something like barbarism and I know all your influence so that's an appeal to the influential Greta. Tonsberg are the influential Sebastian. Salgado and all the others who've signed on with you. They are very very very scared there. And we know that a fifteen year old boy in one of the remote tribes died of. Cova did earlier in the last month in April and about three or four native of of the native population of died. So I WANNA ask you because if this is all going on and with your experience. Is it too late to protect those vulnerable people? I don't believe that's too late. If the action taken off we take these invaders outside of Indian territorq possible to protected then but we master have I quickly for me. We very important to be here with you tonight because I want pop lie all the organizations all the governments around the world to what pressuring Brazil. You remember that last year during the fires was the outside the pressure that made it the governmental direct in. We must do discretion. Ask the mayor of Manila. Said we masked care influence side because the government they are having won various Trojan behavioral to the Koran. Vibes is necessary counter. Track the together to fight the disease. There is a completely pleat offer behavior. In Brazil. The Myers off the Big Cedar. The governors of the states are taking the correct position isolate into people in the government off Brazil. The president also nerve is exactly fighting. The other direction in is becoming very difficult. Speak on very dispiriting breath to produce cone of more than two hundred million people in the when you see that is one of the most important points of the disease today when you see the number of the the data people is very small but the scientific groups are women that minimum than times more. That would have a seger that's presented in well Sebastien. It's already much more than than China and it is a very high number already in a continent which actually doesn't see very much at because many of the other Latin American countries have imposed very serious restrictions. But again I wanted to ask you because the government says that you're behind the Times they've done all this protection. They've taken the measures that you're asking them. But recently President Bolsonaro. He has compared these indigenous peoples quote. I'm sorry to say this but to animals living in a zoo honesty cannot believe my eyes or my ears when I'm even repeating this and when I read this So it it really does seem that. There's just no care from the presidential palace to this vital area. Everybody knows that the Amazon are the lungs of the world are the Center for biodiversity where we can find all sorts of elements implants for medicines. And the kind of stuff we need right now. You will also asking for a petition to be signed. There's some two hundred thousand signatures so far. I think unless you have an update again. What do you hope the outside world can do in this particular case for these particular people in that region? Do Brasil is a big exporter of a whole. Montijo is big goal. The big export of agriculture products in the world. It's not difficult to pressuring Brazil. I believe that ever in these massive Buddhist pressure because if you lose the Indian population we be as usual loss for the immunity probably speaks to concentration of cute during the war. We'll have a ball to two hundred different languages that we speak inside the Mazzoni forest. We have on in Amazon in Brazil. About one hundred and two group of injured that never had contact with outside. They are completely isolated. Groups is the history of humanity that leaves inside of the forest. We must protect then. It cannot Lusa the engine of Massoni. Of course that resume. Not the only country in a Mazzoni is nine. Mazzoni and countries but Brazil. Hold about sixty five percent of the zone. Thirty todd off the Zona Bio ecosystem in the is very important to protect the groups and we must acting out. That is the moment and to do and I invite everyone in this planet to sign a petition that we sent it to come. We fast together in this pressure either direction to save this population and I just wanted to end as I thank you by quoting what you've said. They are the beginning of Humanity. The prehistory of our humane existence. These people inside the Amazonian forest. We must protect them. If the corona virus comes we can lose a huge reference point for humanity of us. You saw God. Oh you a great eyewitness to just about everything in your time. Thank you so much for being with us. And now with Corona virus comes another epidemic as well and that is disinformation and a huge row is brewing. As the trump administration blames China for unleashing the virus on the world. Just this weekend secretary state. Mike Pompeo said there's enormous evidence that corona virus came from a Chinese lab which is not the conclusion of US intelligence agencies and in March a Chinese government official also used social media to accuse the US military a starting the outbreak. A huge amount of disinformation everywhere and our next guest was the former chief of security facebook. Alex Thomas is now director of the Stanford Internet victory and he's also a security consultant presume. He joined hurry screen of us and talk about these disinformation campaigns Alex. What's your most recent research showing about the state of misinformation? The time of Kobe says really interesting thing happening here which is for the first time in history for very very long time. All of the countries in the world have the same number one concern and so we really when we see misinformation from a China from an Iran Russia. They all have very different areas of focus but today every single country in the world whether Democratic or autocratic is very concerned with defending their performance during covert and in some cases of using Kobe as a tool against her they're kind of long standing adversaries. And so what we've seen is a massive shift. I countries towards As the topic of the day now in some cases that's because they actually have a message. They WANNA push about Kobe. So such as the Chinese example there are a lot of messages about the competence of the Chinese Communist Party that they want to push in the case of actors the Russians. It seems like it's much more opportunistic. Their goal is to use Kovin as a hook to pull people in these online communities that they then used for different political purposes later. So let's talk examples here. Giving some examples of how the Chinese or the Russians are using social media now to try to get their point across the Chinese examples really interesting because the Chinese narrative has continued to shift since the emergence of Kovic in December of two thousand nineteen. So at first the goal of Chinese messaging was to downplay the severity of the crisis. Then there is a significant shift around the time when the PR see shutdown Wuhan and other major cities in which the messaging shifted to. This is a major crisis. But the Communist Party's in charge in the PR. Pr is reacting with incredible efficiency. One thing that a lot of Americans saw during that time was social media messaging about the capabilities of the PR governments. And so I think a lot of people remember the videos of hospitals being built in seven days. A videos of drones going around and police in the streets. There's a kind of a viral video about a drone yelling at a grandmother and to go back home. These were videos meant to show that the Chinese Communist Party has organized China in a way that gives him great capabilities but also to kind of subtly reinforced. The idea that the authoritarian control of China is perhaps in the best interest of the rest of the world because they allowed the Chinese contain it since Chinese pivoted now to be very anti-american and you see in official line about America handling the Cova crisis very poorly. Unfortunately the things are saying generally true right. So it's hard to call it this information they're just highlighting actual failures of American policy. But the other more covert messaging is around the idea that the virus did not actually arise naturally in a but is a American weapon. And so that's been a much more kind of insidious and quiet message that they have been trying to inject is to raise doubts about the idea that this is a virus of Chinese origin. In trying to start to come up with alternative theories of that. They are planting in alternative media in certain kind of conspiratorial groups. On Line two can out to convince a number of people that perhaps it's not as simple as this coming out of out a. Wuhan wet market which I believe is still what scientists have believe that the most likely explanation viruses come from. So how are they taking that message? Is that something that the Chinese government is sending to? Its own citizens saying. Hey this could be America's fault or are they trying to send that to American citizens and everyone else in the world. It's both in the the Chinese propaganda capabilities are quite different. Domestically versus foreign domestically. The Chinese have what they call the fifty cent army which referred to informally.

Brazil Chinese Communist Party China Amazon Chinese government Greta Greta Tandberg Kobe twitter Greta Salgado Mazzoni forest Sebastian Manila Cova Murnau official Mazzoni US Big Cedar
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Enough of is there's no kind of theory of if you're going to protect me from this thing that I don't like how is that slippery Slope GonNa stop and that's one of the things like on that scale of things that we have total agreement over you've got him on the total end where everybody agrees it's bad it's so it's really down to a privacy discussion right up for me the other one. I think really interesting antibiotics so I hate. I have three kids who go to area schools up. The idea of my kids coming home with disease from Little House on the prairie drives me insane in the twenty first century in. It's a possibility where running through but those people like honestly believe those things. They're not part of some kind of coordinated there's probably foreign interference involved. But the majority of xers are posting under their real identities. I mean the most important ones are k. Junior right and we have to be really careful of saying I want to wipe out impacts of deciding. What is the theory under what you're going to do that? That does not get applied to every other area political or scientific disagreement. Yeah so just really quickly on. That gave the example. The other day on twitter about Antibiotics versus astrology. And how you could have. They are both things that people very strongly believe in one is empirically false yet you cannot solve it with looking at the impure ix because you have to look at it by looking as we look back to everything we've talked about. You have to talk about it by the harms that it creates and that drives where how you're going to change make policy for something right where I would see the X. going like let's say as a society we decide to silence xers. The next global warming deniers right. There's probably as much scientific evidence for anthropomorphic. Global warming is there is supporting the safety of scenes so to somebody who say that global warming is not manmade is it the responsibility of these trillion dollar companies to silence them. I just find that very very scary like I agree with the position. I disagree with that power being used. And that's actually to go back to our media criticism. You very rarely see people in the media utilizing calling for people on their side to be censored right. It's always people. They disagree with which is kind of the constants in this tech criticism. Is I want the tech companies to squash my enemies and so I think we have to start to make that kind of discussion not considered acceptable. That if you have a theory of speech control the spirit theory control should be fairly applied to your size as well. I couldn't agree more. Okay so I'm going to try and land this plane. Now that has flown us. Everywhere from the origin of the printing. Press to astrology. Alex you wrote an op-ed from the future low-fare in September last year. That was a a puck. Elliptic horrifying vision of the worst case scenario for twenty twenty and disinformation and platforms responses. To that. This information I wonder if you could just give a brief picture of what that looks like but also tell us now being nearly five six months since then have we made any progress. Or are you still? Just as worried about that apocalyptic scenario playing out in the next few months. Yes I didn't mean for it to be the odds of that exact scenario. Plano are low but any specific thing. I talk about in. It is totally realistic yet. The top was set in January of twenty twenty one and what is normally the really boring acceptance of the Electoral College. Vote by the Senate which is I got to read. I'm not a lawyer. GotTa read title three of the US Code. Which has all this parts obviously has never been actually tried out right of how elections work. So there's all this kind of boring stuff. Everybody ignores that in a case where we really hadn't hack against the election might turn into be real interesting political theater. And so kind of the point of the OP. Ed is that we shouldn't look at these problems separately. Everybody talks about election security. The security of local computer systems that belonged to localities. Disinformation on facebook vs disinformation in the major media as different things and our adversaries. Don't think that way that is not how the Russians are looking at this and the other thing I tried to talk about. It's it's not how other adversaries look the idea that Russia is. The only country has this capability is just factually false again. The Iranians the Chinese probably a number of US allies have this capability and if they see that Russia is interfering in our elections and nothing happens to them and it. It is to their detriment. Save for like for example. The Chinese than why would they stay out and so from their perspective. They're not just going to do one attack. They're gonNA tight altogether. It's an attack against the first against the registration systems. Combined with the creation of disinformation accounts. Where you're inserting yourselves into the support base of different candidates and then you attack the poll books on the day of to cause chaos in the voting and then you attack the the systems that are used to add up all of the results and to distribute the results. If you put this all together you probably can't throw the election to somebody else but what you can do is you can make the entire country. Feel like it was stolen from them right that they're all of a sudden. All Americans agree that this was stolen. They've just believe it was. The other side was the bad guys. I'm in our adversaries. Don't really have too much work. All they have to do is kind of open the door a little bit of creating uncertainty in the results of the election and the DNC and RNC will fly all their lawyers in on private jets. Who will take their crowbars and put it right into that crack door and we'll rip right open and so that's my big fear and I don't think things have gone that much better. There's some smart people at the Cyber Infrastructure Security Agency underage working on election security but they have no power and no capability. Fix the core problems at the state and local level and from a disciplinarian. Subjective companies have responded to with Russians into a sixteen. I don't think there's been a lot of thinking about what that might look like in twenty. I expect that in the Democratic primary right now a lot of the stuff. That's being young. There's this whole kind of problem of twitter. Creating all these divisions between people in the primary and you know the kind of never burning never worn never biden tags. Mayo Pete I would not be shocked if a bunch of that's being driven by people who are trying to to to support trump. Maybe a foreign adversary great. So do you have a sound effect? That's adequately sad. Enough to capture the apocalyptic scenario that you just outlined for us or are we out the other side and need a laugh track. Yeah I feel like I don't have anything sad enough so there's absolutely nothing wrong could happen the US election this year. And that's true so that we're not depressed for all the people listening to this in their car. Don't want them to be too depressed. Oh yes things are fine. Go outside. Plays their kids get some sunshine. Thanks so much. This is really great. Thank you for having me. You've been listening to arbiters of truth. The l'affaire podcasts miniseries. On disinformation. You can find past episodes in the law. Fair podcast feed and we'll be back with another episode next Thursday. The love her podcast is producing cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to Alex Thomas. Our music is performed by again. Our audio engineer was Jacob Schultz and our producer is Jen Pacha Halal please rate and review the law fair podcast on the Pike. Gusting up of your choice and as always thanks for listening..

US twitter Alex Thomas Russia Little House Brookings Institution Senate facebook twenty twenty Plano Cyber Infrastructure Security Ed Jen Pacha biden engineer Pete I Jacob Schultz DNC
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

11:31 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"They internal roles in the actual mechanisms and the reason for that I was always told by the company and at bay all companies. Who who who did this and had their content moderation policies was specifically to stop bad actors for manipulating the rules Once you have rules in place you can and you're transparent about them. You know how to break them. This is exactly kind of the trade off that Evelyn said But I kind of just wanted. You said you did this great moment of kind of this. The one area where there should be legal action and I wanted to take that to pivot to. What do you think is the best kind of disinformation misinformation options? That could come from government right now. Yeah so to be clear. There is no magic bullet here right. We're talking about child abuse material earlier and talking about Sam is clarifying because it is a type of abuse for which there's no disagreement as to the actual the fundamental content right even then. There were really difficult. Privacy trade-offs in this case we're talking about Yo literally. One person's misinformation is another person's political speech. And I don't have to tell the two of you actual legal scholars about the hundreds and hundreds of years of arguments over what is legitimate political speech right which the companies do not want to get into. So I just I. I don't think there's any good silver bullet here. Well do you think and something I tell? People does not focusing on the speech and the intended the speech but focusing on the behavior. Yeah and that's I think what you're saying and that's why I brought it up. Yeah it so from my perspective. When it comes to misinformation the benefit we have in fighting it is it is tied to amplification how effective it is right and so we should look at the different parts of these platforms and we should have different responses for the parts of the platforms that have lots of application. The top of that for me is advertising. Advertising allows you to trade money for amplification no other part of the platform. Shirley allowed that also allows you to put content in front of people who did not ask to see it. I think we talk a lot about people's free speech rights. We talk less about their kind of Free Association. Writes that when you talk about like Alex? Jones is kind of an extreme. There's the freedom of Alex Jones to have speech but there's also the question of people who intentionally go seek them out. Should they be able to get to his content right and when balancing that looking at advertising that allows you to put stuff in front of people who did not ask to see it and so I think you have absolutely the least free expression in Free Association rights when it comes to advertising? So that's where I'd start with. Legislation is around the again not the content of the ADS. But around what you're allowed to do with advertising and what I've been calling for since leaving. Facebook like right afterwards. I wrote something and gave some interviews is I think for a broad set of what we define as political speech including issue ads in the United States that we should have reasonable limitations on how targeted those advertisements can be and because I think one thing one of the differences between online ads and say a newspaper ad or a television ad is the ability to automatically generate hundreds of thousands of these ads and then to use programmatic tools to test them and that is not a good direction to go and also incentivizes political campaigns and pacs and such to violate our privacy by all this data to steal the state on us up. So that's where I would start is on the advertising. I WanNa because you're going in direction anyways and it was kind of really push you there. The political ads controversy. Yeah at the at the at the platforms. That kind of stirred up in October November. There is an interesting first amendment freedom of expression kind of element to to that in the sense that one of the least protected areas with speeches commercial speech but one of the most protected areas of speeches political speech. What were your takes about how the media understood the policy with the narrative got to be around and whether or not the company is created the right solution at the end of the day. I feel like they just waited at the media cycle. There's I think there's three different solutions. That have come out of it. So you're right. There's all started with trump video ad. That didn't only play online to be fair. Dealing buyers from NBC pointed out that this ad also played on Fox News of course but CNN MSNBC and a bunch of local affiliates. And I think one of the I didn't really understand this until this controversy. One of the interesting holdovers. A political speech law is that local. Tv affiliates had to carry troops ad. They had no choice but to carry it under the law. So like it. I I think it is not a simple issue people play it as simple moralistic issue and this is one thing that really drives me about the media treatment of Tech. Right now is they are directionally right and some of these areas but they make it like a simple. We're the good guys. You're the bad guys moral argument I could and the truth is it's it's not that simple and so there's this controversy of this ad that facebook carried and what's happened is the three big companies have ended up in three different places so twitter decided not to carry political ads at all. I think that's a huge mistake. 'cause I think that actually really benefits incumbents and rich interests because if you're not carrying issue ads then you see the field people who have money for television newspaper ads. Yes and not only that but you like but this is the thing that people don't realize that like you just have power and influence recreating itself from people that have tons of twitter followers. Because you can't buy you can't if you can't buy small ad you can't ever be can ever be the Dogcatcher candidate right. And a lot of tech critics in the media played this a simple trump versus democrats but like the truth was when twitter announced that a bunch of democratic groups. Very quietly got very angry because they were all of a sudden being cut off right like it is people who are challenging the current powers that be are going to wanNA raise funds online. They're gonNA WANNA reach their audiences online. Donald Trump can afford a super bowl ad. He's running the Super Bowl right up but a lots of other people don't have that reach and so they need much more economically efficient platforms. Yeah and that's something that I felt was so missing from the conversation was the there is like the facebook has a huge impact for being able to disseminate to large audiences for very little money. And so it's a really a tool for for the little guy and the other thing that was not particularly that I thought was interesting about. Dorsey is timing of. That was under reported in the media about the timing of Dorsey is announcement that they were like as a kind of like. Oh facebook's not gonNA take down political ads. We're going to take down. Political ads was that it came twelve hours before the facebook earnings call. Yeah and so. That was like it was so motivated by. It was very clear that there is a business interest there. I this is I think people outside Silicon Valley don't understand how many of these decisions are being driven by the fact that a bunch of these billionaires actually hate each other right like there's there's a bunch of stuff that happens in Silicon Valley. That seems that it's hard to understand. Then once you realized that there's to a certain extent these are still boys with toys. It's almost all men and it's a bunch of kind of posturing and that is actually behind a lot of the decisions that can make it such. It's it's so weirdly true and I'm just never of this world until I spent the last nine months embedded at facebook and I'm not even in the sweet. I'm on the factory floor and I can. You can still just being in this environment for a couple of months. You just start to see that starts to become evident and it's bizarre famously. Evan Spiegel DC. N- facebook say that like he's not worth comparing facebook snapchat as yahoo was to Google led to mark Zuckerberg turning the entire Canon of INSTAGRAM's product management against snapchat which did not work out. Well for them so that sounds horrifying. Let let's have these boys with toys. Have so much pal. One response to that one answer to that is let's re decentralize the net we have centralized the net away from the original. Utopian vision of the Internet where everyone had a voice and a platform and instead. Now we've got these mega platforms that control so much of the world speech. What do you think about the idea that that's gaining traction? In the last few months about the idea of decentralization. As a solution to this problem. So if you don't mind me going back real fast. I I want to answer your question which you asked which is about the political ad controversy so I was just like. I don't think twitter made the right move. Banning POLITICAL I think. Facebook decided to have no restrictions on political ads Except like the researchers are existed that you have to be a citizen you have to prove who you are which I also think is not the right position right like my kind of medium position would be I think there should be limits on targeting and then you can have a a disinformation sander but you can apply it only to claims about opponents. I think that's what people are really worried about is lies about your opponent. So if trump says Mexico's GONNA PAY FOR THE WALL. That is part of democracy for us to decide whether that's true or not if he says. Joe Biden about to be arrested. That's something he has to actually back up to run a facebook at. I think that'd be reasonable. What's happened is this has been turned into a partisan issue when it really shouldn't be because the truth is we don't know that trump is actually going to be the best on facebook ads this cycle. He wasn't twenty sixteen but Mike Bloomberg seems to be building the most impressive on advertising capability in the history of Man Right. And so you know. A ton of my old facebook friends have quietly changed their linked that they've left facebook and not put their new employer in But I have heard through the grapevine that like buying up a huge amount of talent from Silicon Valley and has obviously effectively unlimited money to spend an online ads. And so I think it actually should be a partisan issue. We should treat this as your a nonpartisan one. So to your second question on decentralisation I think decentralisation is like encryption. It is orthogonal to some of these arguments. It makes some things harder. So you're right if decentralize these networks than it takes away the decision making power of the central authorities and I think there are good reasons and arguments for that. But this is back to the equity discussion if you decentralize than you cannot have the control of speech that some people are calling for and so in a decentralized world just like with encryption. It becomes more chaotic. It becomes more free form. You'll end up with very uneven enforcement and I twitter's announcement that they're looking decentralized models to be Dorsey is reaction to to Zuckerberg encrypting is at. Both of those guys are looking for an out right. Mark Z out as privacy because facebook gets hit on privacy all the time and so he's going to use privacy's the reason they're encrypting which also then lets him out of the responsibility to do content automation. Dorsey would love twitter. To be distributed platform. Twitter live longer decides. What is Nazi? Yeah I think that this is. I wanted to hit the mystery. Button like the like the alien like that's really conspiracy conspiracy theory X. Files but but I think that that's right. The one thing I will say that fact checking boards do not seem to be the solution to any of this going at the epistemological question of this is just all types of wrong and I think that that's I'm really really hoping that that's a phase that goes away so like that's an what you said about part of democracy is sussing out truth for yourself. I just think really where the conversation I start going to people who call it is right to criticise the tech for for certain things. When you say I want the tech companies to do x you should also say that the limit should be why right. And that's what you're not hearing enough of is there's no kind of theory of if you're going to protect me from this thing that I don't like how is that slippery Slope GonNa stop and that's one of the things like.

Facebook twitter Donald Trump Dorsey Free Association Silicon Valley mark Zuckerberg Alex Jones Evelyn Sam United States NBC Shirley Joe Biden Mike Bloomberg Evan Spiegel DC Mark Z Fox News
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"What's going on not only do people not understand and have a good sense of the technology but they've built their lives on right they take the technology and and have no idea how what's making it work or making it go And so they don't know how to properly regulate it but they're slowly slowly becoming a conversation around this and it's starting in academia. Even five years ago content moderation was not a thing that people understood what that was. I had to always give a talk of being like hey. I'm working on this crazy thing in which facebook takes down things that you post on it. People had no idea that was happening so I think that this is it. Is these workshops. These conversations are getting there. Don't you love it when you're on some kind of topic and it turns out to be one of the most important topics and Yeah it's actually. Yeah Yeah I think Evelyn is heard some of my crazy origin stories of being doing maybe hd and Yale and telling people that this is what I wanted to do and people being like. That's not a thing you can't do that. And this is what it feels like in the security community overall. Is that people in Information Security of screaming about insecurity? Privacy ISSUES ENCRYPTION. And we're just seeing these little nerves got together in the desert and they'd right lifestyle pieces and now all the people are paying attention and we don't know what to do with. Yeah it's like burning man. The clash at least is a full employment program for all of us so are no longer in the desert rapidly. Computer typing away. There is a fascinating thing though. So you Evelyn. You just pulled back on your leg we're talking about encryption but let's talk about the platforms but when it comes to sink. Disinformation election security. All of this type of stuff encryption is where the conversation is right and then when you talk about miss and Disinformation. Amplification is where the conversation is and they are interrelated because there's different types of things happening and they have these different. They have different harms and they have different solutions. And there is at least in my estimation right now just really very blunt tools for trying to a dress what is like which which are. I think of just these incredibly fine greened problems that you're trying to thread these this needle for just to mix all my metaphors together like trying to thread this needle of of Managing Civil Rights and privacy and speech and technology. And then the feasibility of all these things in bad actors blowing it all up right the adversarial part I think is one of the differences you have versus other areas of public policy right. We see this in traditional formation security where there have been rounds and rounds of politicians. Who will say things like well? Why don't we just have a building code you know? We buildings used to fall down all the time. And they don't do it anymore at least in rich countries because we have building codes that you have to live up to But the difference is is when you're building a bridge building skyscraper. Your enemies are generally natural causes. Its gravity it's fire. It's things that you understand when you're talking about adversarial action. You can't use a building code because really what you're doing is you're playing chess and you can't become the world's best chess player just by reading books you have to actually do it And I think that's one of the differences in this conversation is at your content moderation to a neutral. This is how people speak is hard enough in a world. Where every single decision you make? We'll have an instant reaction by people who are sometimes professionally paid to beat your system. It is much much harder and I think that's one of the other things it's not very well understood here and the other really big difference with building codes is where okay with the government saying oh most of us are okay with the government. Saying here's exactly I mean. I know nothing about building codes. But here's exactly the kind of cement that you need to have. And here's the foundations that you need to have when not necessarily okay with the government. Really explicitly specifying. This is the kind of speech that is acceptable. This is the kind of coordination that is acceptable on a public platform. And and this is the kind. That's not something that I was interested to ask you about A lot of these conversations around what facebook calls coordinated inauthentic behaviour? I don't know that's one of one of your phrases or where that comes from great euphemism. It is so I mean I was part of naming that it used to be coordinated enough in the activity. But that's yeah so we thought we wouldn't play too much into the For that yes. I was part of putting that policy. Well thank you for giving us this phrase that now you know. I get to work with everyday. So That's interesting because so much of the conversation around. Cip focuses on the behavior pot. You know these platforms talk a lot. About the fact that we are regulating behavior. We had taken down behavior not content. Where taking it down because of the way that these pages work together rather than what it is that what they say and I'm really interested in to the extent to which that's actually possible or true and maybe you can sort of unpack for me. How do you differentiate between the two when you're in conducting an investigation question? So that the reason we had to create that policy in two thousand seventeen was to address one of the fundamental policy failings of facebook going into sixteen elections. So some of the things I mean. Facebook made lots of mistakes one. We didn't have like a disinformation focused from a threatened till perspective right so our threat. Intelligence team was super focused on malware account takeovers normal fishing normal cyber activity. We were not looking for disinformation. Second problem was we're not properly enforcing identity so. Facebook had run into a number of controversies around what people called. The real name policy was called. The authentic identity pulses facebook causing trouble for folks especially a Yo people kind of already treated as on the fringes of society and are treated that well. We're we're not having good interactions with facebook policies The outcome of that controversy was facebook effectively stopped enforcing authenticity policies and so it was very very easy to create fake accounts in two thousand sixteen as long as you weren't pretending to be a specific celebrity or something like that and then one of the third kind of big picture problem was that the all of the content policies on facebook at the time were about the individual pieces of content themselves right and so the the kind of standard way of thinking of anything was. You've you've got this post this video. This image. That item goes into a cue. A computer looks to see how likely it is violating and then a human being starts to take them off the top of the QA decides. Is this a violating piece of content or not right in fact the key tool users called the single review tool it was a tool. That only let you see that once piece of a piece of content without any context. That's fine for peace of hate speech for bullying harassment for nudity for copyright violation because those are all things that are inherent in the continent self. The problem posed by organizers information that the individual pieces of content often not violating the policy. Right so it is okay to be a guy in Wyoming. Who Post say. I don't like Hillary because of her immigration policy post right. What's not okay is if that guy in Wyoming is actually one of one hundred fake accounts had been created by Svetlana Bob. It's actually spent Lana in Saint Petersburg working for the Internet research agency and it's part of a coordinated campaign so the that policy was created to catch the fact that we effectively are Rico statute internally of the idea that you could tell that Rico. Actually I got another another excellent acronym right effectively. I mean we. We saw this as a rule that even if one piece of content wasn't bad you could say all of your activities bad so you can get al. Capone's restaurant that he's using to launder his money. Even if the restaurant itself is legal right that that was kind of the idea and so that focused on behavior really came out of the Russia experience in two thousand sixteen where the they knew what our content policies are so they were creating content. That would not violate the policies. They went right up to the edge but they generally will not go over the edge and they also understood that nobody was looking to see whether they are all working together and so that specifically for that I think the problem with that policies just like all of these policies. It was directly written for one specific thread actor in one specific election. That is not necessarily the way that political disinformation is going to be pushed on the platform. Now so while it needs to continue existed is no longer sufficient to exist by itself. It's always amazes me. How how quickly the bad actors morph and how hard it is to chase them. Yeah well for example. Our Africa a report on disinflation Africa will not sure if this group is the Internet research agency but we can tie it to have any promotion. Who is the owner of the IRA? So they are certainly part of the same family. The people who are acting in Africa and instead of having several hundred people in Saint Petersburg do it. What they're doing is they're hiring stringers in country or in neighboring countries which is going to be much more difficult to detect from a technical perspective when they have people in Egypt in Sudan in Madagascar who are reporting back to Russia in some cases still making dumb mistake so one of the people in one of these networks posted photos on his instagram his visit to Moscow. And so there's there's still some object mistakes being made But they are getting much better in in creating patterns of it'll be more difficult to detect so we've run head on into another trade off then because in this area there's constant cries for more transparency around what platforms are doing to take down these political speech. But what you're saying is if you give too much transparency that just teaches the bad actors what to do and how to get around these policies. Where exactly the line is that. They can walk right up to it. I'm probably more in the first camp to me. It concerns me. How little transparency. There is around what what's happening in this space. But you've been on the other side of it and you're the one that's working on these policies in detecting these threats. So do you think that there is possibility for more transparency? Or would that just create the make? The problem was I mean I think there is a trade off but I am in the more transparency bucket to I feel like these companies are acting in a pseudo governmental manner. The only way we can have any confidence in their decisions is if we understand a how those decisions are made be what the decisions are and see if they create president that has to be enforced in the future right like I think that is an unfortunate thing inside the company is is that I think this is less prominent facebook. I saw a lot of this youtube where they keep on doing these things where they will decide not to take a youtube video down then they get a lot of criticism they take it down then put it back up then they put it back up de monetize it like all they're doing is telling everybody like you should scream at us and we will do. What is what is advantageous to your political group. If you can screen the most right like that is that is a trap that you do not want to walk into and I think the only way out of that trap is transparency. Also as an academic who has a team who's trying to study this stuff we need a lot more transparency with the companies if not totally public transparency mechanisms by legitimate researchers under reasonable privacy? Controls can get access to data and that's actually been something that's going directly the runway because one of the equities here is between data protection and understanding the bad things that are happening and the the legal needle is all the way on the data protection. Side so GDP are does not create explicit calls out for academic research. I am holding in my hand. A thirty page report called a preliminary opinion on data protection in scientific research by the European data protection supervisor and while this group in Brussels believes that you can do the kind of research we want to do under GDP. Are they basically say well? It's still up to every state data protection officer which is a model. That is not going to work. You know American company is going to let economic research happened. If one WHO's running for higher office is going to utilize it as a way to to slam that that big bad American company and so this is one of the areas where I think we actually need. Legal action to both create safe harbors within existing data protection laws and also to encourage the companies to work with responsible researchers because otherwise. The next time. This happens were not going to know anything that that's going on so this is something to piggyback on this question. Excellent question from Evelyn. Which is that for a long time. The content moderation policies. Facebook were mostly secret..

facebook Evelyn Saint Petersburg Russia Africa Yale Wyoming youtube harassment Cip officer supervisor Hillary Capone IRA Lana Brussels Moscow
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"They also discussed his work on cybersecurity. Disinformation an end to end encryption. Also for the first time an arbiter of truth history. There are sound effects. It's the law fair podcast episode. Five hundred seven. Alex Stamos on the hard tradeoffs of the Internet. Alex wanting to train on the podcast for a while. And we would love to know a little bit about your background and how you started the Internet observatory at Stanford you know. Thanks for having me. I think you guys are doing a great job with this podcast. And I'm glad I was able to to join it so the Stanford Internet Observatory is a research program here at the freemen spoke l'Institut so this is effectively. The closest effort has to a public policy school and our goal is to understand misuse of the Internet to come up with policy and technical mitigations to harm and to try to bend the curve in the future by educating the next generation especially of technologist to make sure. They don't make the same mistakes. So Alex one of the ways in which I first encountered your work is really relevant to what we've been focusing on in Al podcast series so far. This was back when you were still at facebook. And you were the co-authored On a two thousand seventeen. Facebook report about information operations which was really one of the first big and meaningful pieces of transparency and engagement around this issue from the platforms. And I'm just wondering what was your thinking behind writing that report. And how do you view it now from this perspective Three years down the track. Have we made much progress in moving the ball forward? Or what do you think of it now? As a as an academic looking at that report from the outside yeah it's funny because that report is probably going to be the most cited thing that I've ever written in my life. That was not the plan. But now it's like cited ever at the Milan planets cited multiple times in the report. So it is a little funny that facebook. Newsroom is looking back if I knew that that was the most important thing that I would ever right. I would definitely have done. Some things have used the Oxford Comma. Not Not my biggest concern so I think the report is an interesting artifact as academic if I went take a step back. There is a really big picture question that we're dealing with right now. Like a lot of these little fights that are happening around online ads around. Disinformation around. Encryption are really part of one big which is what is the relationship between government individuals and the tech platforms that carry so much of our speech now and the traditional position of tech companies when it comes to geopolitics of actual conflict between states has been that there is a handful of really of the large companies that have had dedicated threat intelligence teams. That's generally what we call them often. Those are people who come from Western governments intelligence communities so my team had folks from an essay. Cia G. C. H. Q. And the like the head of Google's team I believe his ex Australian signals directorate. So we'll five is shout out for you there Evelyn. And and so we have. We have these intelligence teams and this has been for a while seems of existed. A lot of this came out of the two thousand nine attacks by the Chinese People Liberation Army against Google in thirty five other companies. That's when Silicon Valley started really paying attention to government activity but these teams until recently their goal was to study the misuse of their platforms by governments. Look for bad behavior and then report it to governments generally western governments with whom they had good relationships and then let those governments handle the outcomes and the closest they would get to talk about this publicly would be notification of individuals and so for example if you get malware from the Russians as part of a campaign Google notify you at facebook before the twenty sixteen election. Actually in twenty fifteen. This actually happened a lot but one of the cases I can talk about because somebody leaked to Nicole. Roth is that we. Facebook detected a big campaign by the the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps of Iran against the US State Department and they were doing this on multiple platforms but we detect on facebook. We let the State Department No. We'd notified the individuals who are being targeted and the FBI and the State Department took care of it and so that was kind of like the normal thing going into the twenty sixteen election of how we we acted and we had on our facebook team. We have people who are dedicated to looking at Russian actors specifically twenty eight and twenty nine twenty. It's the one that's related to. Gru and we saw activity by accounts that we had tied to the GRU earlier via their activity against the world that Doping Agency and some stuff in the Ukraine and we then saw that activity it was related to attacking the D Triple C and d individuals in the DNC and we notified the FBI and that was kind of the end of it. The goal was you know we've done our job we've shut down the bad activity we've told the FBI now we know retroactively to the FBI did not come out and publicly talk about that before the election or if they did it was kind of buried in some of these deny reports that were really really broad and they didn't do proper notification of the people who are being targeted now the actual hacking against the DNC did not happen on facebook. Most of it happened on Google or against their direct servers at the DNC. So that activity happens and then after the election spent a team both to investigate more of what we had reported the FBI and what we could figure out relate to that as well as what was the source of the fake news crisis on facebook during the election And so that report in April was was supposed to be kind of our best understanding of what was going on at that at that time because it became clear that especially now that the trump administration was in power telling the FBI telling the Department of Justice was not going to be like an acceptable thing for us to do but then there is real fight inside the company because young people in the company especially in the office. It's their job to keep the company on the good graces of the incredibly powerful executive branch of the states and so they did not want to be seen as getting involved and so the report that came out is the outcome of the fight of how detail can be much attribution. Can we provide without being seen to insert ourselves into what at the time was a very partisan it's still very partisan but a poorly understood area of like what the Russians had done between sixteen something that that highlights that I've found really fascinating in this area? Is this kind of bifurcation of the conversation where you have. The conversation about Clinton moderation generally which is very like free speech focused human rights focused. And then you have this conversation around disinformation operations which is at its core political speech but that discourse is very militarized intelligence abrasions. Not kind of thing and I guess what you're saying is that's actually really reflected in structural separation within the companies as well as that. Would you say that's accurate? Oh that's absolutely accurate. Yeah so I. I had a threat until team. A counter-terrorism investigations team. A child safety team at fraud team. These teams are focused on organized. Adversarial action right in some cases in many cases breaking the law but in the case of some of the three until stuff perhaps pushing along the law and in in or not illegal in the United States but it was all adversarial whereas the general content discussions that is handled by a content policy team. That's run by Monica Bicker. Both at that time and still now and those are generally. My folks were technologists ex. Fbi agents say analysts. She has a lot of lawyers and First Amendment experts and people who understand speech rights around the world and so it's a very different. They come at it of from a normal. You know what are norms? Where the laws? What is appropriate for people? We come at it. From a organizational that the other differences we were looking for small groups of people who have an outsized influence whereas most the content policy. Decisions are not made with that in mind. They're made in. Like what decision can we make? That can actually be applied across millions or perhaps billions of people yet. So this is great. I kinda wanted to talk about this because one of the ways that I've thought the this comes from Jack Balkin idea. I think you've probably even heard me say this before. But the the free speech triangle but it can also be the free speech and the Privacy Triangle. And it's the idea of the world used to be a story of a diabetic story. A story of governments and citizens and the tension there was between governments censoring citizens or infringing on Citizens Privacy that was the primary concern and citizens push back with voice loyalty democracy and in there somewhere is the journalism playing an intermediary role and civil society. And then the online platforms Tech Company is really exploded. This idea and made it so that now you have a third a third node and citizens can a route around the problem of censorship. They can take their privacy back via the platforms the other side of that. That's like the Great Wild Wild West Story of the Internet so I kind of wanted to talk about that. Where do you see that conversation moving? You've been hosting all of these end to end. Encryption conference workshops. You've done to. I've been both of them. They've been amazing conversations. Can we just kind of have a talk about maybe how platforms and descend misinformation are moving away from like what we typically have been thinking about on the platforms of these open platforms to things like end to end encryption a messaging and how how those proliferate misinformation disinformation at totally new way? Yeah absolutely so as you alluded to. One of the areas of research for our observatory has been the impact of an encryption on a bunch of these debates and especially a focus on. What kinds of things can we do? To mitigate some of the harms that for which we have some solution right now and those solutions are no longer relevant an encrypted world and. I think you're totally right in that. A lot of these arguments are based upon kind of a total reshuffling of power. Right the fact that now there is a mechanism they allow people to get around the gatekeepers And I'm not the first person to point out that perhaps some of the media anger on some of these things is related to the loss of power that they no longer control. What is the national conversation that they no longer determine? What is the OVERTON window? A POLITICAL DISCUSSION. That perhaps it has something to do with the fact that New York Times it is more notable when they get cd to thirty correct then when they get it wrong unfortunately I think we can where the want button there already being the Communications Decency Act provision that protects a lot of these platforms from liability for arranger. Right right yes. In the fact that it is the law that is critical for these companies. Do exist that gets blamed by the media. When with the media's really arguing with is the First Amendment of the United States Constitution right and so I think that is is a big part of the discussion. The way encryption changes this is it. It rolls things back a little bit. It's like one of the ways I think that these companies have been disruptive is they have put in the place of individuals a power that really only started existing in the twentieth century and then was only in the hands of governments and corporations right absolutely like for most of human history. You can only talk to the people who can hear your voice right for. Y'All hundreds of thousands of years and we have the the written word but it's written manually and so you end up with at least in the West. Most knowledge under the control of the Christian Church and then after the great schism the Catholic and Orthodox churches deciding. What is what is knowledge what is allowed to be kept..

facebook FBI Alex Stamos Google United States Stanford Internet Observatory US State Department Internet observatory New York Times Chinese People Liberation Army DNC Milan Jack Balkin State Department No executive Roth fraud Stanford Nicole
Jack Dorsey Wants to Decentralize Social Media

Techmeme Ride Home

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Jack Dorsey Wants to Decentralize Social Media

"So I guess my running joke about who put the be in Jack. Dorsey Bonnet is kind of running stale at this point this this morning Jack released a pretty ambitious twitter thread outlining how twitter intends to fund the development of project known as Blue Sky an independent in an effort to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. Let me just quote. Twitter is funding a small independent team of up to five open source source architects engineers and designers to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. The goal is for twitter to ultimately be a client of the standard. Twitter was so open early on that many saw its potential to be a decentralized internet standard like SMTP the email protocol for a variety variety of reasons all reasonable at the time we took a different path and increasingly centralized twitter but a lot has changed over the years I were facing entirely new challenges centralized centralized solutions are struggling to meet for instance centralized enforcement of global policy to address abuse and misleading. Information is unlikely to scale over the long term without placing far far too much burden on people second. The value of social media is shifting away from content hosting and removal and towards recommendation Algorithms. Directing one's attention unfortunately these algorithms are typically proprietary and one can't choose or build alternatives yet third existing listing social media incentives frequently lead to attention being focused on content and conversation that sparks controversy and outrage rather than conversation which informs and promotes health. Finally new technologies. These have emerged to make a decentralized approach more viable blockchain points to a series of decentralized solutions for open endurable hosting governance and even monetization and much work to be done but the fundamentals are there and quote skipping down a bit quote. Why is this good for twitter? It it will allow us to access and contribute to a much larger corpus of public conversation. Focus our efforts on building open recommendation Algorithms which promote healthy conversation and and will force us to be far more innovative than in the past. There are many challenges to make this work that twitter would feel right becoming a client of the standard which is why the work must be done transparently in the open not owned by any single private corporation furthering the open and decentralized principles of the Internet. We'd expect this team not only to develop develop a decentralized standard for social media but to also build open community around it inclusive of companies and organizations researchers civil society leaders. All who. You're thinking deeply about the consequences positive and negative. This isn't going to happen overnight. It will take many years to develop a sound scalable and usable decentralized standard for social media that paves paves the path to solving the challenges listed above our commitment is to fund this work to that point and beyond and quote Jack went onto name Parag Agarwal as the lead of the project so a few ways to look at this number one. I've I've said for years that twitter is really just a protocol disguised as a company and frankly smarter minds than me have said for years that social media hadn't been invented a decade earlier would have been a protocol. Things would be a lot more efficient at this point if it had been and of course you can still built massively successful businesses off of protocols I mean just look at Amazon and Google and second you could look at this as twitter's version of Libra Gra but in a way a more ambitious and radical project. Also you could see this as Jack's version of Zack's vaunted pivot to privacy as Alex. Alex stamos pointed out on twitter. Both companies want to be out of the controlling what people say business. Lots of folks including the official mastodon twitter account pointed out that projects like this already exist but it is super interesting that it's one of the existing platform plays that is inspired to blow up the status quo of massive platforms parenthetically strangling the open Internet. Sort of reminds one of this scene from. HBO Silicon Valley. Kahad there's billions of phones all around the world but the same computing power

Twitter Jack Dorsey Bonnet Blue Sky Alex Stamos HBO Parag Agarwal Official Silicon Valley Amazon Google Zack
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

"They also wrote a story about how creepy it is. That facebook will call law enforcement when somebody's about suicide and facebook live right like if you're either one of those positions is okay. It's okay to say facebook needs to police this product. It is okay to say this is not good and then in that story about policing suicides <hes> they explicitly kind of infer an implied that the only reason that any of this happens is because <hes> facebook wants to look good in the media or look politicians which i know the people who work on that team. There's a number people who work on that team who have had family members who've committed suicide. I was disgusted to see the the new york times imply that these people who've worked very very hard on a very difficult safety prob or only doing it for the bottom line the company right and so that's one thing like if you're reading the media <hes> and they're implying that because somebody works at tech company that they're just kind of innately an evil person. That's something you could disregard right and look to see whether or not that same organization mutation has had any opinions on that exact topic now. I talked to somebody at the time about that and the beasley pointed out the times has over a thousand reporters. It's quite possible that the person who wrote that story had never read the other times story on facebook live right so you're right. That's a problem of an organization that that's large have all these different opinions but i would like to see the larger media organizations start understand that they should have a vision of the world they want to move to and they should incentivize people to move that way instead of just complain about whatever decision people make that moment right like that is not helpful in. It's just getting kind of old like it's. It's easy to write a story seeing the world's shitty place right now especially. It's tremendously tr tremendous easier right that story. It's incredibly easy. It's much harder to make a proposal of an idea of how to address it that doesn't have massive side effects or a accumulate a a lot of power in people's hands where you don't want to be right like that's a lot tougher and so i'd like to see folks who right the the world's a shady place and that's reflect on the internet also take a position about what should happen so here's my last question. What are the if you had to say. Here are the three big trade offs and you mentioned some but i i want to criticism for the listener. What are the three big trade trade-offs for the platforms. I think about security dynamism making money. What are the three trade offs. People should be looking at whenever they see decisions or their three other five. What what are the big ones yeah and there's there's a bunch. Obviously i mean i think clearly you know in a targeted advertising world knowing information about about people is a direct directly beneficial to the bottom line and the ability to turn in advertising and so there is a legitimate privacy revenue trade off that i i think the companies have over over optimize on the revenue side and are starting to give some of that up. I think they're also finding is that they thought they needed all this data and they don't actually right and so my my hope is that we'll get a little bit of a free trade here in that as pressure is put on the companies to gather data. They'll find that the lazy assumptions. They made turns out not to be true anymore anymore. I think one of the bigger ones that we've talked about is the the privacy safety trade off right so you know a great example of this is that google had a flaw in google google plus that allowed people to gather up a bunch of data..

facebook the new york times google beasley
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

"With the help of the kind of content moderators raiders that that <hes> the virgin a lot about so this is my last question asking other companies are doing and then i want. I i have a real spicy one for a great from casey. He gave it to me because he said to ask it by. He's not gonna show up. Late doesn't get to send a question. I will say the note on this question is i quote. He will go off so i gotta do it is true. What is our facebook doing. How prepare for for the election so i think facebook pretty well prepared for what happened. In two thousand sixteen right it has the broadest set of advertising transportation unlike google facebook considers issue ads to be political ads. I think that's a really important step because under our assessment facebook during investigations something like eighty percent of the russian ads that they ran were not illegal under u._s. law because they're not electioneering right so facebook actually takes a much broader definition russian of what is it <hes> an address allowable political ad than google. Does i think facebook has the largest team. I think the the hardest thing for facebook is going to be trying to predict tau. The non facebook products are gonna be used right so instagram has some of the same problems twitter has and that you can have a pseudo anonymous identity on instagram. The fact that instagram is mostly images midges. Give some benefit but not a ton as you know. The russians did lots of the russian troll. Factories have professional meam farms like they have graphic designers. <hes> using illustrator all day to create memes so is instagram. Ready is actually a big question. I'm guessing this instagram as well behind was happened on facebook dot com and then the use of what's happening. Yeah what's up number. One source of information in southeast asia will what's up with its end to end encryption be used in the same way in the united states. It seems unlikely twenty twenty but after twenty twenty s people moved to those platforms. I think they'll they'll become an issue. Do you see that problem on like i message what isn't used as the united states apple does have an end to and very popular messaging service message. Do they have a disinformation provin. I messages even possible to know. It's impossible to know i it's pretty well known that message has a child safety fifty problem right <hes> which is something that does not require kind of the international reach that what's it passed to have that problem <hes> i see no evidence of of a disinformation problem online message all right. Here's my last question. I'm actually very excited to ask you this question. I'm very excited for myself ready. What are we getting getting wrong. What is the media getting wrong in this conversation. Oh that's that's how i know see. That's you get that reaction. You know it's beginning like what are we getting. What are we consistently wrong. There's a couple of different issues going on here. I there are three groups who really screwed up in two thousand sixteen right. There's mark zuckerberg and a hoodie is standing next to james comey in a suit standing next to a new york times editor in a press at and mark zuckerberg sane man we really screwed up between sixteen and the government guy in the media guide are saying yeah..

facebook instagram casey united states mark zuckerberg google southeast asia james comey twitter new york times editor apple eighty percent
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And open spend about what's going on they will quietly cleanup problems without coming out and publicly discussing them and that has generally worked right like the amount of criticism they've gone on these issues is much less than facebook but i think what that has created as a back swell of criticism and they the deluge will come because they have not been honest about all the things they've been doing. They haven't suppressive it. It seems like the deluge is starting to build already right. I mean it doesn't seem that was an excellent. Ask about so twitter seems like they're they're. They're doing what they can. They're doing well specifically. How do you think they're doing for twenty twenty. I think they're doing okay. I mean again. The actions of these companies only affects one one of those four different kinds of russian interference so even if you completely eliminated all online trolling activity we should not consider twenty twenty a done deal so i just i just wanna say that i think twitter's doing okay like they've cleaned up a lot. They've got a lot of fake accounts but they have a fundamental product weakness that will always leave them open that doesn't exist at facebook book right and and that is a problem and they just have staffing issues as well but i have to give them credit for being the most open company on data. I think they've done the right thing. They're they've made it easier for people to find an spot bad stuff on twitter and so that helps offset the fact that they have the least resources so let's go to google google constantly in the news president is is a checking google for basically bad study yeah right and they had they have the two different services. They have obviously the search results page and they have youtube. Let's specifics talk about youtube. How is youtube doing it is very unclear. What youtube is doing around disinformation right. They are acting the way facebook active a couple years ago all right so when i was a facebook one of the things that really frustrated me is the company would make content moderation decisions completely knee-jerk based upon the immediate press feedback doc and that reduces the pain in the short term and greatly increases the pain in the long term because they are doing what facebook used to do. Which a signal that if you yell let us enough we will make decisions in your favor right and facebook is trying to grow outside of that through like more documentation of these policies of why these decisions are being in made of creating kind of an external process for adjudication of the really hard decisions were youtube. If you look back just a couple of months ago took down. A video wpro untucked down it. <hes> you know d. Monetize guy all of this within forty eight hours without any actual intellectual scaffolding it was clear like just based upon how much feedback back they're getting internally and externally they made snap decisions and so i think youtube is probably the worst placed because they they have done the intellectual work in what it is that they want to do and what what kind of information environment they want to provide the other challenge youtube has is unlike facebook twitter that the number one determinate while both of those companies have albert admit ranking of news feeds. It's the number one determinate of what shows up in your news feed of twitter and facebook is who your friends are right that number one determinate of what you see on youtube is the algorithm itself itself right like youtube while social network is not really powered by who you're following. Your friends are right. It's based upon the recommendation engine and so that makes them uniquely more responsible responsible for what people are doing. I think more than than a twitter facebook or any other social network that is powered by who your social graph is and they have not responded that great to that s us as we've all seen right like it is still possible to start with jordan peterson videos and then end up with semi white supremacist videos that send you to gab where you can get more highly radicalized article is that it's still a progression that you can do on youtube. One thing i think is important as close as you describe video that was like up and down and do monetize all around a guy who works at vox media carla spots. I it's important for me to disclose that was company..

youtube facebook twitter google vox media jordan peterson president albert forty eight hours
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Vergecast

"In to help all of the folks outside of computer science to deal with the impact of the internet on their fields <hes> so for example of your political scientists these days and you want to understand and how twitter facebook or some other kind of technology is impacting your field. The activation energy for the amount of work you gotta do is really high right. You gotta get a grad student. Have them write some python breath on get access to the twitter a._p._i. We're trying to build all of these tools and techniques one time and then to offer them to a variety of different people from across social political scientists to understand what's going on so we see ourselves as a group that will do its own research but also really a support an engineering team to try to help academia deal with the incredible impacts internet's have on society is a theme. I think we're gonna come back to a number of times. There's there's an element of the internet right now. We're just to look at it correctly and deal with what it's become you. You have to either reinvent the wheel at a very high scale over and over again or you have to find a service writer can do it for you. It sounds like you're kind of like we're going to help you look at the internet and measure it correctly so you not to do it yourself. Yes exactly determine. Observatories actually not an accident right like astronomers to figure this out. If you're you're an astronomer raise five billion dollars and build your own hubble space telescope right you have a theory of what you want to study you rent time on the hubble or the cbo or the you know very large array or something so we do the same thing like build a set of capabilities that are going to get used in ways that we have no idea how will be used so i mean it's it's a theory right. Our thesis is if we build it. They will come <hes> but so far. We've we've had a lot of interest from a variety different academic groups who have deep expertise in different areas of society or we're area studies for example but don't have the technical wherewithal or the access to data to really do this kind of work so that's now before that before this you were the chief security officer facebook for that. You're the chief security officer at yahoo boring jobs. I like to go from not boring moments for either company. Obviously i wanna talk to you about facebook a little bit but we just had michael bennet <hes> senator for colorado in the show and he wrote a book about elections security <hes>. That's obviously when you think about facebook it was the was the center of election interference basically like posting memes from russians on facebook. I'm curious d- think you think we're we're ready for twenty one eight twenty right now because bennett really did not think that we already yeah so i've met with senator bennett and we've talked a lot about this kind of stuff so we just put out a report from our group at stanford <hes> <hes> you can go to election report dot stanford e._d._u. If you want to see it but we have around forty recommendations for how congress how a tech companies how individuals tools can prepare for twenty twenty if we look at twenty sixteen there's actually three or four different kinds.

facebook twitter senator bennett officer michael bennet cbo senator colorado writer stanford congress twenty twenty yahoo five billion dollars
"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"alex stamos" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"We talked about what happened in two thousand sixteen and about the enormously complex landscape of defending not just election infrastructure. But also preserving the integrity of the information ecosystems in which Americans make their decisions about how to vote including the possible consequences of regulating foreign media. It's the law, fair podcast episode four hundred twenty five Naper silly Alex stamos unsecure in American elections. So thank you both for. Joining me today, you guys have just released Eurosport securing American elections to really interesting and comprehensive sort of approach of the multitude of problems were up against the fair way to put it before we dig into the report Alex, you were at Facebook for this period of time. There's been a lot of focus on social media companies role in combating election interference in amplifying harms from election interference, I'm sort of curious, what was your experience and perspective about what happened at Facebook during the twentieth sixteen election, and how does that sort of influence what came out in this report versus thanks for having us here to talk about this? The twenty sixteen interference really breaks down into a couple of different categories. The big ones being the Jere you hacky Lee campaign, that's the activity by the main intelligence directorate of the Russian military to break into a bunch of. Different systems into us. The leaked information to influence the election. There's the social media trolling campaign, which is was mostly on Facebook and Twitter. And then there's a variety of kind of white propaganda campaigns as wells attacks recollection structure in the report, we try to address all of issues. So for what we saw at Facebook on the Jerry can we campaign, we had a little bit of warning that something odd was happening in the spring of twenty sixteen. When we saw some accounts that we attributed to Russian Intel being used to do reconnaissance against potential targets. We did what we normally didn't know situations, which is we inform the FBI this is one of the things I think that's changing the norms around this that up to this point. If you're a tech company working in this area, working through US, L E, and I see was kind of the traditional way that you would do victim notification and try to deal with these issues. I tweeted that notification. But we did not. What we're not looking for kind of the pure troll campaign. And that's actually one of the you'll hear specially for Mike McFaul, who edited this volume talks a lot about how we're missing nine eleven report for what happened in two thousand sixteen and I think one thing that's missing is the analysis of how both in the private industry, and in government, we were focused on the traditional cyber security threat actors, but weren't looking out for that kind of pure trolling operation like we found later into the experiences mostly about the work we did to protect direct attacks against individuals after the election. We put together big team to look into Canada. The fake news phenomena, overall and then diving into that we found a variety of different information, quality issues financially motivate spammers, but then, eventually a big cluster of Russian activity that than we disclosed in twenty seventeen. So when you look at the big pieces of information that have come out, so I the intelligence community assessment that comes out and January twentieth seventeen. I believe. And now the special counsel's report are there pieces of information and not that you look at and think if only I'd known this at the time, everything would have been different or if only the US government had told me this piece at the time everything would have been different you. It's hard to know what in the Mola report, especially was known to the government in two thousand sixteen in real time that is, again, one of the things that's missing from our investigation. Twenty six team is kind of a thorough time line of who knew what when and what kind of information flow breakdowns might have contributed to the problem. Overall, the truth is, we got no help from the US government in twenty sixteen. And for most of twenty seventeen on these issues effectively. Everything you read in the Mola report about activity on Facebook, our team found in turnover voluntarily the government, it was not found by the government was not using government information that has changed..

Facebook US Alex stamos Mike McFaul Naper FBI Eurosport Lee Canada special counsel Twitter
Amazon touches $1 trillion, on pace to overtake Apple

Ethan Bearman

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

Amazon touches $1 trillion, on pace to overtake Apple

"The world has its second trillion dollar company. And it's another American business. Correspondent Steve castenbaum says Amazon joined a very exclusive club on Wall Street today, twelve zeros that's how many digits follow the one in Amazon's market value after joining apple in the Chilean dollar club. Amazon stock price rose again after the opening bell rang Amazon and apple now make up more than eight percent of the total value of the S and P five hundred ninety percent of shopping is still done in brick and mortar stores, but this arbitrary. Milestone shows how confident investors are that Amazon will have a much larger slice of the retail pies.

Palo Alto Palo Alto Fire Department Palo Alto Airport Amazon Alex Stamos Ethan Bearman United States Jeff Sessions Senator Dick Durbin Brett Burkhart Brad Kavanagh President Trump Fire Department Bay Lund Apple Steve Kastenbaum Steve Castenbaum
Microsoft Surface Go Review Roundup: A Mixed Bag

Techmeme Ride Home

04:21 min | 3 years ago

Microsoft Surface Go Review Roundup: A Mixed Bag

"In addition to its an. Uber and Detroit hubs. It has offices in Austin, Texas, San Mateo, California, and London, and quote, as Twitter user startup m. n. Jackson who claims. Interestingly, to be the artist formerly known as start up l. Jackson tweeted, quote, Jackson's law, you can absolutely build a multibillion dollar start up in the upper mid west. It just can't be sexy like at all. Since he's been in the headlines so much recently. One more quick update on Facebook's departing chief security officer, Alex stamos stay. Most is officially now leaving Facebook on August seventeenth, and his new gig will be to become an adjunct professor at Stanford where he will also be part of a faculty working group called information warfare. The remote of which is to examine the role of security and technology and society. Interestingly, Facebook, apparently does not plan to name a successor to the chief security officer position on Twitter stamos wrote, quote, Silicon Valley faces, many challenges than I am encouraged that there are so many dedicated thoughtful and skilled people continuing to tackle these challenges at Facebook. I will miss everyone, but I look forward to collaborating with them in the future. Preliminary reviews of the surface go are in and they're a bit of a mixed bag over at and gadget defender. Hardware says that the surface go is the ideal cheap windows tablet. Almost. It's not quite an ipad killer, but it's still useful. Quote, I'll admit the surface go is full of compromises. It slow and it's limited by windows tens, slim tablet apps election, but it also has a keyboard that blows away any other tablet, and it can run normal windows software if necessary. It's not meant for everyone. But if you're in the niche, it's targeted at it could be the windows tablet. You've been waiting for and quote at the verge dealer bone says, it's better than he expected, but it does have its flaws quote after using the surface go for the past couple of days I realized I've been over thinking it the surface go is simply a very small surface with everything that entails. It's a little less. Powerful and probably not the right thing to be your only computer, but as a secondary machine for windows users, it could have a real place and quote at mash -able Raymond Wong is way more critical, giving it a three point, two, five stars out of five. He said the service go is painfully slow to us barely better than a net book quote. I've been struggling to figure out who Microsoft surface go is actually good for if you already own surface pro or any laptop y, would you buy a smaller tablet with huge Basil's that often chokes windows ten up due to its underpowered Intel Pentium processor? Why would you wanna type on a cramped a little keyboard, but then it hit me the answer's right in the name the surface go is good for when you're on the move. And that's really it. And quote, contrast that with Alex Krantz at Gizmodo who calls the surface, go practically perfect quote, if you have the money and you want a solid windows machine. That's primarily for browsing emailing and word processing the surface go, is it the device you need to by looking for a second computer? It's a no brainer. Splurge on this one. There might be faster budget, laptops, and there might be cheaper ones. But the surface go feels like a perfect representation of wet laptops at this price should be and quote. So I don't know. I have links to all the reviews and the show notes, I guess it's up to you to figure out who to believe. Tech main right home is sponsored by medal lab that alab is one of the few design agencies in the world that can take a product idea from end to end from napkin sketch to real shipped product. Let's look at medal apps work for Google. You've heard of amp, right? That framework that allows web content to load. Lightning-fast. Google came no medal app to create demos that showcased amps capabilities and showed developers what was possible with the technology. So meta lab created example sites, including four art.

Facebook Jackson Twitter Alex Stamos Raymond Wong Detroit Google Austin San Mateo Texas California Adjunct Professor Officer Stanford Alex Krantz London Basil Microsoft
The Surface Go reviews are in, and... they’re a bit all over the place

Techmeme Ride Home

04:21 min | 3 years ago

The Surface Go reviews are in, and... they’re a bit all over the place

"In addition to its an. Uber and Detroit hubs. It has offices in Austin, Texas, San Mateo, California, and London, and quote, as Twitter user startup m. n. Jackson who claims. Interestingly, to be the artist formerly known as start up l. Jackson tweeted, quote, Jackson's law, you can absolutely build a multibillion dollar start up in the upper mid west. It just can't be sexy like at all. Since he's been in the headlines so much recently. One more quick update on Facebook's departing chief security officer, Alex stamos stay. Most is officially now leaving Facebook on August seventeenth, and his new gig will be to become an adjunct professor at Stanford where he will also be part of a faculty working group called information warfare. The remote of which is to examine the role of security and technology and society. Interestingly, Facebook, apparently does not plan to name a successor to the chief security officer position on Twitter stamos wrote, quote, Silicon Valley faces, many challenges than I am encouraged that there are so many dedicated thoughtful and skilled people continuing to tackle these challenges at Facebook. I will miss everyone, but I look forward to collaborating with them in the future. Preliminary reviews of the surface go are in and they're a bit of a mixed bag over at and gadget defender. Hardware says that the surface go is the ideal cheap windows tablet. Almost. It's not quite an ipad killer, but it's still useful. Quote, I'll admit the surface go is full of compromises. It slow and it's limited by windows tens, slim tablet apps election, but it also has a keyboard that blows away any other tablet, and it can run normal windows software if necessary. It's not meant for everyone. But if you're in the niche, it's targeted at it could be the windows tablet. You've been waiting for and quote at the verge dealer bone says, it's better than he expected, but it does have its flaws quote after using the surface go for the past couple of days I realized I've been over thinking it the surface go is simply a very small surface with everything that entails. It's a little less. Powerful and probably not the right thing to be your only computer, but as a secondary machine for windows users, it could have a real place and quote at mash -able Raymond Wong is way more critical, giving it a three point, two, five stars out of five. He said the service go is painfully slow to us barely better than a net book quote. I've been struggling to figure out who Microsoft surface go is actually good for if you already own surface pro or any laptop y, would you buy a smaller tablet with huge Basil's that often chokes windows ten up due to its underpowered Intel Pentium processor? Why would you wanna type on a cramped a little keyboard, but then it hit me the answer's right in the name the surface go is good for when you're on the move. And that's really it. And quote, contrast that with Alex Krantz at Gizmodo who calls the surface, go practically perfect quote, if you have the money and you want a solid windows machine. That's primarily for browsing emailing and word processing the surface go, is it the device you need to by looking for a second computer? It's a no brainer. Splurge on this one. There might be faster budget, laptops, and there might be cheaper ones. But the surface go feels like a perfect representation of wet laptops at this price should be and quote. So I don't know. I have links to all the reviews and the show notes, I guess it's up to you to figure out who to believe. Tech main right home is sponsored by medal lab that alab is one of the few design agencies in the world that can take a product idea from end to end from napkin sketch to real shipped product. Let's look at medal apps work for Google. You've heard of amp, right? That framework that allows web content to load. Lightning-fast. Google came no medal app to create demos that showcased amps capabilities and showed developers what was possible with the technology. So meta lab created example sites, including four art.

Facebook Jackson Twitter Alex Stamos Raymond Wong Detroit Google Austin San Mateo Texas California Adjunct Professor Officer Stanford Alex Krantz London Basil Microsoft
Facebook’s security chief to depart role over company’s handling of misinformation

01:52 min | 3 years ago

Facebook’s security chief to depart role over company’s handling of misinformation

"That while the president continues a direct attack on mr muller global news twenty four hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in san francisco i'm ed baxter this is bloomberg brian all right thanks very much and it's time for the media review so we do a lot of this facebook stuff here the new york times saying that the security chief add to facebook the chief information security officer alex stamos would leave the company that's after internal disagreements over how facebook should deal with its role in spreading in disinformation and then the new york post came out with the story saying well no he isn't actually stepping down that he's just working in a different capacity there's role has changed and that he himself says he's working on risks and election security and we also had that line from facebook saying that the independent auditors ron site at cambridge analytic is london office but then we got word that they stood down at the request of the uk information commissioner's office they wanted to conduct their own onsite investigation and if you go back to the channel four piece from the uk that expose on cambridge analytic showing the ceo boasting they could use prostitutes spies and even students to entrap politicians this is the data firm accused of harvesting phaser user profiles and the ceo alexander nick said they could send some girls around the candidates house adding ukrainian girls are very beautiful i find that works very well and a quick final note the wall street journal says that the new central bank chief egon in china after running start he's promising a series of reform and openingup measures wouldn't say what the are but you'll know soon enough and that's the media david right.

Ceo Alexander Nick David CEO London New York Chief Information Security Off Bloomberg China Egon Wall Street Journal President Trump Cambridge UK Commissioner Cambridge Analytic Facebook Alex Stamos New York Times Ed Baxter