12 Burst results for "Alex Schroeder"

"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 6 months ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Greenwich Connecticut The hiring market is pretty crazy He's been involved in more than 750 new hires this year The salary negotiation seems to be coming much sooner If you don't make a decision on someone relatively quickly they'll be gone And the task of negotiating salary just changed significantly 7 states so far have passed a new kind of law aimed at pay equity including Connecticut just this year Employers must tell job candidates upfront if they ask the range of pay for the position That's to even the playing field especially for women and people of color but Kerrigan says it's left him scrambling to keep up So it comes in we really want them We'll give them the pay that they want And now we just change our range Again now we have to go back out to that job And just say the range is different His farm is now reviewing its entire compensation structure every month offering raises to existing staff so they stay in step with new hires David Lewis is seeing the same thing at many companies already stretched to the limit by the pandemic This is the biggest revolution I've lived through in my lifetime and probably will Lewis's firm operations Inc handles HR services for more than a thousand different companies Most companies can safely say that employee a doesn't know what employee B is making These laws change that A change that aims to give job seekers an advantage biota MacDonald lives in Connecticut but you just got a remote job in Chicago so she didn't benefit from the new law She says knowing the hiring company's pay range would have reassured her she wasn't underselling herself For me as a woman of color it was difficult to bring myself to negotiate but then being able to get the range up front I can see something like that making a huge difference To competitive market did give her a boost her salary and signing bonus offer put her at 70% more than the job she left but of course she doesn't know how that compares with her new colleagues In Hartford I'm Harriet Jones for marketplace Our producers are rose conlon Meredith garrison Stephen Ryan Alex Schroeder Daniel shin and Erica soderstrom In New York I'm cerebellar with the marketplace morning report.

Connecticut Greenwich Kerrigan biota MacDonald David Lewis Lewis Inc Chicago Harriet Jones rose conlon Meredith Stephen Ryan Alex Schroeder Hartford Daniel shin Erica soderstrom New York
"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 7 months ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Supply chains with strategy services and software including GEP smart and GEP next AI based digital procurement and supply chain platforms Earlier this year the IRS sent millions of U.S. taxpayers letters telling them they'd made a mistake in owed money usually the problem had to do with accounting for COVID relief payments Last month the IRS followed up with a second wave of letters that a lot of people thought were a scam But it turns out the letters were real marketplaces Nancy Marshall ganzer has more Michael white got one of the approximately 13 million letters the IRS sent out in the spring that Wisconsin swim coach says it informed him he was getting a smaller relief payment than he claimed Okay he thought so much for that Then he got the second letter last month which was rarely confusing and made the same claims as the first And I thought the first was saying it was over The IRS is sending out about 5 million of those confusing second letters Here's why In some of the first letters it neglected to tell taxpayers they have a right to appeal That's all the second letter says The IRS's national taxpayer advocate Erin Collins says you can call the number on the letter to appeal But it's right now the IRS is only answering less than 20% of those calls She recommends replying with your own letter certified of course so you've got documentation to make your case I'm Nancy Marshall gensert for marketplace Our producers are rose conlon Meredith garrison Stephen Ryan Alex Schroeder.

"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:19 min | 8 months ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"The next couple months president biden is set to fill some key positions at the powerful federal reserve. Will the current share. Jay powell. Stay in is also the fed's vice chair for supervision job created after the great financial crisis of two thousand eight behind that somewhat. Wonky title is a lot of power over. Big banks. Marketplace's nancy marshall genzer reports. The fed vice chair for supervision is supposed to limit risk to the financial system and is basically the fed's top banking cop enforcing dodd-frank mandates like requiring big banks to have a sort of rainy day fund and submit to regular stress test to prove they can withstand a crisis but karen dine in a former fed economist. Now teaching at harvard says the law is vague. And that's where there's leeway for the regulators as led by the vice chair for supervision the current vice chair for supervision is. randall quarrels. his term ends next month. Corals was nominated by former president trump and he decided to roll back. Some dodd frank. Regulations quarrel spearheaded new rules. That tell banks what they'll be tested on ahead of time. That did not make dennis kelleher. Happy he's head of better markets which advocates for stronger financial regulations. If you're provided the questions to attest before you take the test you're going to do a lot better on that test. Kelleher would like whoever replaces quarrels to reverse that. But that wouldn't be easy. Any changes the vice chair for supervision wants to make to bank regulation have to be approved by the fed. Board of governors says yale finance professor william english. He's a former fed economist and senior advisor. They can move the board in the direction that it choose but only only so far because in the end the boards can have a vote and if the votes aren't there the votes aren't there. English expects whoever president biden nominates for the vice chair for supervision job to try to move the board in the direction of new rules on how banks manage emerging threats like climate change. So you want to be sure that banks. They make loans are taking appropriate account of the risks than vase from more and larger hurricanes. A white house official wouldn't tell me when president biden will nominate a new vice chair for supervision. Only saying the president will appoint someone who quote will be the most effective in implementing monetary policy. I'm nancy marshall genzer for marketplace. Our producers are rose. Conlon meredith garretson stephen ryan alex schroeder danielson and erica soderstrom. It's the marketplace morning report from apm american public media. I am hollywood host of marketplace tech. A show that helps you understand the digital economy. How a more of the country get access to better internet. What new jobs will artificial intelligence create or destroy and what tools will help us. Survive are already changing climate. We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts..

president biden fed nancy marshall powerful federal reserve Jay powell karen dine dennis kelleher frank william english Corals randall Kelleher trump harvard Board of governors Conlon meredith garretson stephen ryan alex schroeder erica soderstrom apm american public media
"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Hollywood hosts marketplace tech a show that helps you understand the digital economy. How a more of the country get access to better internet. What new jobs will artificial intelligence create or destroy and what tools will help us. Survive are already changing climate. We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts theranos the silicon valley company that was supposed to disrupt the delivery of medicine. In america with a machine that could do blood tests with a pinprick. The company collapsed amid evidence of fraud. Today's the first full day of witnesses testifying in the fraud trial of the high profile former. Ceo of theranos elizabeth holmes who founded the company when she was nineteen. Let's turn now to adam lischinsky a longtime silicon valley reporter. Who's in san jose covering the trial for the publication. Business insider adam. Thanks for connecting. My pleasure david or gives a sense. What did we learn about each side's arguments in the opening days here well on the prosecution side. We really didn't learn anything. If you've been following this case even fleetingly you know that elizabeth homes has been accused of fraud. And that's the prosecution's case that she defrauded investors partners and patients of her Defunct blood testing company from the defense. We actually learned something which is that. They have a defense. That is not that. She's insane which is not that. She was coerced by her co founder and ex lover but rather than she wasn't as responsible for everything that went on at theranos as we thought and furthermore that she didn't personally profit from any of this because the company went bust and she never made a dime. Well i'm that last part at him. Some may here. This as similar logic to a robber allegedly stealing a car and totaling the cars so therefore it's okay because the robert and end up with a working car. I think that's a very good analogy. Her defense lawyer argued in his opening statement that she certainly could have sold stock on multiple occasions. And didn't she held on which is sort of a source of pride of silicon valley entrepreneurs. I'm not selling until where a success and she didn't and she ended up with nothing This will be one story that the defense goes with to try to. I guess it listed some compassion from the jury of this must be on your mind as the trial proceeds but you know a lot of companies in the silicon valley and a lot of companies elsewhere involved in innovation often bring imperfect products to market and then hope their research catches up before anybody notices. That's absolutely true. That's part of the glorious. Legend of silicon valley started by none. Other than steve jobs who operated this reality distortion field and convince people that he was capable of doing. Something he wasn't but then lo and behold later on he was and it was wonderful and everyone was delighted and he made lots of money but this is a medical products company. They were testing people's blood. They were giving patients results based on those tests that had bearing on whether or not they had diseases or other medical conditions. So this isn't a widget or or an app or a game that you play on your iphone but something that has to do with life or death and so the prosecution certainly will argue that this is nothing like the silicon valley companies that that we read about in gloried in. It's completely different all right so back to the trial you going back in today. adam. I'll be there all right adam. Lazinski who's covering the trial for business insider. He's also author of inside apple. How america's most admired in secretive company really works. Adam thank you. Thank you david. Our producers are rose. Conlon meredith garretson stephen ryan alex schroeder. Daniel shinhan erica soderstrom. I'm david brancaccio. This is the marketplace morning report from. Apm american public media..

theranos elizabeth holmes adam lischinsky silicon valley Hollywood adam san jose america elizabeth david robert steve jobs Lazinski Conlon meredith garretson stephen ryan alex schroeder Daniel shinhan erica soderstrom apple Adam
"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Listen. Wherever you get your podcasts canada's border is back. Open this week for vaccinated. Us tourists the move is not mutual. The us is still closed to canadians. On non-essential travel this has major economic implications for canada. Americans are big business before the pandemic more tourists from the us visited canada than any other country and that was true in the reverse to canadians. Were the us's top visitors so as that mean for our economies now. The canada is open to americans but the us is still closed to canadians. Marketplace's carolyn champion has more on that more than a quarter of tourists to the. Us used to come from canada. Roger dow would see them every winter in florida. I can tell in the canadian down because all the condo lights light up dow ceo of the us travel association and now the candidates border is open. He says the us should return the favor because if not dow says canadians may choose other destinations. Travel is like water. It will go to the place where it's easiest to go to and if there's a block it will go somewhere else besides snowbird locations. Us border towns depend on canadians from washington state to main university of central florida hospitality. Professor alan file says once the border opens canadians will come back is easy to get here. The gosar many family connections. It's such an ingrained relationship that it still gonna be there. Us border restrictions are set to expire later. This month file says canada's reopening does put pressure on the us not to extend those. I'm caroline champion for marketplace sticking with canada for a moment during the first growing season of the pandemic farmworkers in the province of ontario in canada tested positive for cove in nineteen at higher rates than even frontline health workers did and those striking numbers and outbreaks on farms and in some instances numbered hundreds of cases per farm brought new attention to poor living and working conditions for some temporary farm workers and raised some hopes of lasting changes. Emma jacobs has more leamington. Ontario is known as the tomato capital of canada. It's dotted with greenhouses. That actually grow everything from cucumbers to cannabis plants. Many of their workers are in canada on temporary visas like herbie. Originally from the caribbean island of saint lucia. He says when the pandemic began social distancing was next to impossible in the crowded bunk house he shared with other workers guy. He's frisky the week. Herbie asked us not to use his last name because he's looking for a new employer to sponsor his next visa when kobe reached his farm. Herbie says i one of his co workers got sick bread bread and spit on. I think only one looker union. Happy when we went the distance. He tested positive. He says his symptoms were mild but it was scary to be surrounded by so many people ill all at once by last summer. Canada's health minister patty. Hi do was testifying to a parliamentary committee about what she'd been learning of conditions on some farms. It is a national disgrace the way that Workers are treated the ontario greenhouse vegetable growers association. Which is headquartered in. Leamington declined an interview but has posted quote facts and myths about foreign worker programs on its website. It notes that every farm is heavily inspected including housing last summer minister. Hide you alluded to major changes to come for the farm worker visa programs so far. The government's mostly added money for inspections and started a process to set standards for housing. These are incremental steps says researcher janet mclachlan of the migrant worker health project. They're welcomed but if this is the this which then they certainly haven't gone for enough. Well the pandemic highlighted. How vulnerable workers are. She says attention in reforms need to at last it in montreal. I'ma jacobs for marketplace or producers arose colin meredith. Garretson stephen ryan danielson. Alex schroeder and erica soderstrom and. I'm sabrina short with the marketplace morning. Report from apm. American public media is molly would host of marketplace tech a show that helps you understand the digital economy. How a more of the country get access to better internet. What new jobs will artificial intelligence create or destroy and what tools will help us. Survive are already changing climate. We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts..

canada Us Roger dow us travel association alan file gosar dow Emma jacobs caribbean island of saint luci Herbie university of central florida carolyn ontario greenhouse vegetable g leamington caroline herbie florida ontario washington Travel
"alex schroeder" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Amazon customers never see. Thanks Each of you for joining us, It's great to be here. Thanks for having us Karen among warehouse workers at Amazon. That's not a typo there in the New York Times, Attrition for workers is how high Roughly 150% a year. It's actually so high that Amazon tracks it weekly. It's about 3% a week. It's the equivalent of having to replace the entire workforce every eight months. And so it creates these incredible pressures and demands to constantly be scooping up new people and putting them through the system. Now, Jodi. Why could this possibly be the case when every single other business I ever talked to is trying to lower overhead by retaining employees? Well, it turns out that some of it relates back to Jeff Bezos. His ideas. He was afraid of a stagnant workforce. What he would call a march to mediocrity he envisioned to Amazon. As like the Marine Corps. You would come for two years, It would be really hard. And then you would move on. So turnover is almost built into the system. If you look at the way they pay, they just don't expect to keep people for very long and also promotion is very limited. Yes, So, for example, they use a lot of technology to monitor worker performance and productivity, which means that one manager might oversee 100 Hourly associates. So there's just structurally not that much room for promotion or growth because technology is doing so much of the management. It's the same thing with the hiring. You know, we have this automated hiring process. It's called internally lights out hiring because it's not a human doing the interviews. And so there is this kind of lack of human connection that develops between the associates and management. And so you see this incredible constant turnover and there's kind of open question now because the turnover is so high and Amazon needs for growth and employment is so large Whether or not it's sustainable. What did Amazon tell you about this? I would say Blockbuster number 150% attrition rate nutrition rate You might be able to see even from space. They suggest what? That maybe you shouldn't get, too caught up in a number. Repeated a phrase that attrition is just one metric and without broader context doesn't have enough meeting. But they really didn't elaborate on that, And they definitely didn't say that number was unacceptable. We spoke with a VP for human resources in the warehouses who said Yes, we want to build careers for people, but we're also really happy to provide short term employment for people in the time of need. And so that is sort of this open question again of whether or not they can kind of bring that down or have the intent to bring that down. But, David, I think you're asking the right question. Which is is that 150% attrition number a giant red danger sign. Or is it the secret to Amazon? Stop the nation. Karen Wise is technology reporter for The New York Times, based in Seattle. Jodi Kantor's The New York Times Investigative reporter and co author of, she said on Breaking the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse story. Peace. The Amazon customers don't see was published in the New York Times this week. Thank you both. Thank you. Thank you. We also talked to that reporting duo about another challenge at Amazon. The companies often automated approach to HR, which makes some employees and their families feel like they're dealing with the black hole. Marketplace dot org. If you miss that part of our conversation on the air are executive producers Nicole Childers, Our digital producer is Alex Schroeder.

Alex Schroeder Nicole Childers Karen Wise Jeff Bezos David Amazon Jodi Kantor Seattle Karen two years Marine Corps Jodi 150% this week one metric both The New York Times Each Breaking the one manager
"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts. All the hiring done by amazon gets lots of attention. The is the second largest private employer in the us. Less attention has been paid to the number of people who leave especially jobs at amazon warehouses. According to reporting by the new york times attrition an amazon warehouses is higher than is typical in that part of the industry among the questions is all that leaving seen as a bug or feature pulitzer prize winning investigative reporter jodi kantor and times technology reporter karen wise worked together on a reporting project published this week in the times with the title. The amazon customers never see. Thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. thanks for having us. Karen among warehouse workers at amazon. That's not a typo there. The new york times attrition for workers is how high roughly one hundred and fifty percent a year. It's actually so high that amazon tracks weekly. it's about three percent a week. It's the equivalent of having to replace the entire workforce every eight months and so it creates these incredible pressures and demands to constantly be scooping up new people and putting them through the system. now. Jody why could this possibly be the case. When every single other business. I ever talked to is trying to lower overhead by retaining employees. Well it turns out that some of it relates back to jeff. Bezos says ideas. He was afraid of a stagnant. What he would call a marched mediocrity. He envisioned amazon the marine corps. You would come for two years. It would be really hard and then you would move on. So turnover is almost built into the system. If you look at the way they pay They just don't expect to keep people for very long and also promotion is very limited so for example the use a lot of technology to monitor worker performance and productivity which means that one manager might oversee one hundred hourly associates. So there's just structurally that much room for promotion or growth because technology is doing so much of the management. The same thing with the hiring we had this automated hiring process. It's called internally lights out hiring because it's not a human doing the interviews and so there is this kind of lack of human connection that develops between the associate's and management. And so you see this incredible constant turnover and there's kind of open question now because the turnover is so high at amazon's needs for growth and employment is so large. But there are not sustainable. What amazon tell you about this. I would say blockbuster. number one. Hundred and fifty percents attrition rate in attrition rate. You might be able to see even from space these suggest. What the maybe you shouldn't get too caught up. In a number they repeat a phrase that attrition is just one metric and without broader context. Doesn't have enough meaning but they really didn't elaborate on that and they definitely didn't say that that number was unacceptable we spoke with a vp for human resources in the warehouses. Who said yes. We want to build careers for people. But we're also really happy to provide term employment for people in time of need and so that is sort of this open question again of whether or not they can kind of bring that down. Or how the intent to bring that down but i. I think you're asking the right question. Which is hundred. And fifty percent attrition number a giant red danger sign or is it the secret to amazon's nomination karen wise is technology reporter for the new york times based in seattle jodi kantor's in new york times investigative reporter and co author of she said on breaking the harvey weinstein sexual abuse story. The piece the amazon customers don't see was published in the new york times this week. Thank you both. Thank you thank you. We also talked to that reporting duo about another challenge at amazon. The companies often automated approach to hr which makes some employees and their families feel like they're dealing with a black hole marketplace dot org. If you missed that part of our conversation on the air our executive producer is nicole. Childers our digital producer. Alex schroeder our technical director as jc bolt. I'm david brancaccio. You're.

Alex schroeder amazon Bezos david brancaccio Karen two years jodi kantor jc bolt fifty percent Hundred nicole jeff harvey weinstein hundred Childers this week both one metric karen wise seattle
"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the seven o'clock hour of all things considered in the eighties, false accusations of satanic ritual abuse spread across the country. Now Que non has revived those fears. We'll hear that and more at seven o'clock. This is marketplace. I'm Kai Risdon. Remember back in the before times are these things called happy hours. You go after work Bond with your colleagues, maybe blow off a little steam in the process to while bars and restaurants got your business. Those times are not quite these times just yet, because, well, lots of people still working from home and a lot of companies going full on remote or some kind of hybrid happy hours, as we knew him have changed both for workers and for the watering holes they used to frequent. Good places. Kristin Schwab as our story. I'm going to take you somewhere. No marketplace Listener has gone before our New York office. Happy hour. Hey, how's it going? What's up, homey, like I haven't seen your face. We've been doing these virtual toasts on it off during the pandemic, And in some ways they're better than the real thing. I get to see colleagues who work on ours or usually have to rush to pick up their kids from school. Admit parents and partners and puppies. And sometimes there's baby therapy. Yes, then months, my gosh, you there are also the drawbacks. You know them. Well, The awkward pauses the way everyone has to take turns talking and how sipping a beer at the desk or dining table you've been sitting out for eight hours doesn't always feel so happy. Here's marketplace digital producer Alex Schroeder. When I log back into zoom, just the confines still sort of feel all in the same way they do during work. Part of that is because for some people happy hour even in person can seem like an extension of the work day. Jeffrey Feffer is a professor of organizational behavior at Stanford. It feels contrived that it feels like it's something that you're doing. Strategically, social relationships matter To the extent people know you, They're more likely to give you a higher evaluation. A lot of what happens at the bar is genuine. Feffer says Socializing is a key part of job satisfaction. But the spontaneity this kind of kinship requires has been lost during the pandemic, and it's not just workers feeling the effects for many bars. Happy hour has become a dead zone and the deals the discounted APS and drinks. They're mostly gone to Michael Maxwell is with Blue orbit hospitality consulting company. I mean, if you look at what it's all about it a reduced price. That's the last thing we want to do during the pandemic is reduced prices. It's in crowded spaces and its gathering afterward. It's everything in the equation that didn't fit it all, he says. In normal times, a good happy hour in a 50 seat bar can boost daily sales by $1000 or more. But even as restrictions relax, he thinks bars will keep discounts out of the equation to take advantage of the boom the industry has already seeing in spending. It'll be a while before that happens in business District's Nile Moran at Rosie Dunn's an Irish bar in Midtown Manhattan, says the office crowd used to make up 70% of his sales. Basically, triangle people right now they were just, you know, the noise and the clattering of the glasses and the laughter and You know it just that you know that General Merriman's instead at five o'clock on a Wednesday just a few customers nurse drinks at the big wooden bar. Still, Moran, who's been in the industry for 30 years, isn't looking to put a happy hour sign outside his bar anytime soon. He's worried rising food costs and wages mean it'll be harder to make a profit. Instead, he's redoing the menu to get people to stay for dinner. You here. Oh, my God, no one's ever going back to work again. Um, I'm certainly betting on New York. I mean, I know it's coming back, you know, And maybe he's right. A few minutes later, a group comes in wearing blouses and suit jackets. Turns out they used to be regulars. Every day. I'm serious. I'm actually not kidding. Meghan McEnroe and her colleagues work in HR to financial services for a nearby right now coming into the office is optional, but shoddy. Betar makes the commute a couple times a week on remain specifically, I come in just to see and socialize my co workers to break up the week. You know, I could do my job. Home just as easily, but it's It's really for the socialization aspect. Even if the deal's don't return, some workers are committed to keeping five o'clock alive in New York. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace. A lot of people have taken the opportunity this pandemic has presented to make some changes, sometimes big ones too. Like.

Alex Schroeder Meghan McEnroe Kristin Schwab Jeffrey Feffer Kai Risdon 30 years Feffer New York seven o'clock Michael Maxwell Midtown Manhattan 50 seat $1000 eighties eight hours 70% Stanford both five o'clock Wednesday
"alex schroeder" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now the racial inequities both now and deep into the future, caused in part by unequal access to technology and training. A study by Deutsche Bank predicts that very high proportions of black and Hispanic people could find themselves shut out of 86% of all jobs by the year. 2045. That's a Quarter century from now, as part of marketplaces reimagining the economy. Siri's Let's welcome Object, Walia, managing director and global Head of technology investment strategy at Deutsche Bank. Great to be here. How do you define this divide? As you see it, you have many layers of us, so the digital divide has been going on for quite some time. It's well telegraphed the staggering divide. The numbers we found was when it came to race, especially urban areas with black Hispanic communities, 10 years behind. Why community for the last 20 years? And that's we try to highlight where there's access to connectivity was access to hardware and, of course, access to training, which saw interconnected, large water society in the country, especially people of color remain behind. Just we fully understand this if current trends continue. Black people and Hispanic people will attain the level of digital connectivity of white people in 10 more years. Yes, then you know every continue process from broadband access. The gap by this point in time is about 10. Yes, there's a lot of steak. I mean, what is the economy for? It's about people's livelihood is and And well being. And you forecast that in about 25 years. If these issues are not remedied in some way, you have a lot of people, especially black people on Hispanic people. Who are not prepared for the work that is on offer. Yes, the way digitization is going and we try to keep a conservative forecast. Some people say it might be faster as things start to get. There's nothing analytical. We believe in 25 years. One generation you have 8 to 9 jobs in the country, which will require medium to high level digital scales Current point of time. 60% of Hispanics, says Seven blacks site began to prepared with digital scales, and so there's not addressed. We're looking at large swaths of the population behind a shutout of being under prepared for the jobs was required these skills. So I mean, there's implicit and everything we've been talking about. But the idea is, as people think about ways of addressing persistent racial inequalities. The technology piece has to be addressed, you would say. On the day of digital civilization. It is one of the most important part of society and having his training in Tak has a clear correlation to jump in income on the highest shelf we found in our studies was among black and Hispanic communities once they have access to technology and training. Very striking data object. Willie is managing director and global head of technology investment strategy at Deutsche Bank. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Also covering the club of corporate CEOs. This week. It's the business Roundtable, embracing U N climate change goals and calling for something that many economists have long supported. Putting a price on a key contributor to climate change carbon dioxide emissions If you missed that on the air, it's in the marketplace. Morning report podcast feed now. Among my colleagues working diligently, each toiling in separate locations during the pandemic to get this program on the air, six times a day, executive producer Nicole Childers, digital producer Alex Schroeder engineers Brian Alison and Jason I'm David Brancaccio. This is the marketplace. Morning report from a P M. American Public Media. Another hour of morning edition coming up. First Joe's bringing us to Concord. By far the worst jam is to 42 South.

Deutsche Bank managing director Willie P M. American Public Media global Head of technology Siri executive producer Tak Nicole Childers David Brancaccio Joe key contributor producer Alex Schroeder Concord global head Brian Alison
"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"California, the orange groves and all that fun stuff. I grew up in the Santa Clara valley back in the sixties. So we've got a little bit of knowledge about the water situation out there in California. Well, Eric ask and Ye shall receive here is a scene from Chinatown, a lot of irate, citizens when they find out that they're paying for water that they're not going to get it's all taken care seems to get you've, you're breathing the water LA or bring hell eight of water. Are you going to do that by incorporating the valium to city simple as that John? Huston, Jack Nicholson in nineteen seventy four in Chinatown. Eric, thank you for your call. More hit some thoughts, do you have any thoughts about Chinatown? It's still a powerful metaphor that, you know, I it's, it's, it's one of our metaphors and the idea is that do you want water should the city be taking water from somewhere else, which is what we've done here. I have a whole chapter on on that. I mean, it was written beautifully by Marc reisner in Cadillac desert. And I've done did some new research borrow from reisner and, and so that you cannot write a book about water and the California dream without touching upon Chinatown. Well, you know, Mark, we only have about two minutes left here and. I wanted to just end by hearing from you about if there are some solutions here because we talk about the California dream, your book is called the dreamt land indicating that perhaps the dream has come to an end. You've even used the word delirium. So I mean, is there a way to, to cope with what the reality of California, and water is, what are the solutions? What we after one hundred sixty five years, we have now finally were were regulating groundwater. And that's because the land is sinking from all the pumping, and I think when this when this takes effect, and it's, it's a long kind of lead up to it. But it'll, it'll take effect in fifteen years, you're going to see the footprint of agriculture in the San Joaquin valley alone. Paul. Five to four point five, maybe all the way down to four million acres. So the farm belt will get smaller and smarter because we went from farming very good land to farming marginal and to now farming poor land, just because we kept having water that we were taking in it had to go onto land. So, so that's going to diminish. But the city's you have to do their part. I mean, can we keep sprawling out a growing suburbia evermore, you know, all the way up to places like paradise that, that where we're a town should have never gone. And this is what's going to have to happen, if we're going to figure out a way to to, you know, continue this, this, this, this, this, this myth and this experiment, that's California into the, the next fifty years. Well, Mark Eric's is author of the dreamt, land, chasing water and dust across California. We have an excerpt of the book at on point radio dot org. Mark, it's been a great pleasure to speak with you. Thank you so very much for joining us today. Love the way you framed the whole segment. Thank you for having me on point is produced by Anna. Bowman Brian Hartson ski Eileen. Amata Stefanos, Kosonen Hillary mcquilken, Alison, poli James Ross Alex Schroeder and grace Tatler with help from David Marino. Our executive producer is Karen Shiffman. I Magnin truck Roberti. This is on point.

California Mark Eric Chinatown Marc reisner Santa Clara valley Brian Hartson San Joaquin valley LA Amata Stefanos executive producer Karen Shiffman Jack Nicholson Cadillac desert John Huston Paul Kosonen Hillary mcquilken grace Tatler David Marino Alex Schroeder
"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Dad who raised me and who loved me into being and i come from ben walden and have certain traits and characteristics that that that come from him and an all of that has got guess it took a village you know all of that has gone into making me and also making this discovery i mean people will sometimes now say to me you know do you wish you hadn't known i can't wish that i hadn't known because it explains so much i mean my sense of otherness as a child that we were talking about i i understand it now it makes sense to me and so that is an enormously liberating thing to have all of the pieces of the puzzle we have about a minute here are so been in half left ago there were a lot of callers and i'm sorry callers that i didn't get to but this is something that's happening to a lot of people out there i i have a friend who recently went through this whose mother discovered that she had a sister she never knew about how would you what advice would you give to people who may be on the precipice of making enormous discovers about themselves and their families i think partly to know that you're not alone there are so many i mean last year twelve million people but these kits and two percent of them to make this discovery of you know the non-parental discovery or some version version of that so there hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people who are contending with this because i think in the moment of discovery it's a feeling of being very much alone of being sort of alien and other and somehow freakish that that you know that that that one was so wrong about something as a central as family and and there really is a world of people out there who are making these kinds of discoveries will danny shapiro author of many books including her latest which is called inheritance a memoir of genealogy paternity and love we have an excerpt of it at on point radio dot org janney it has been a great pleasure to speak with you thank you so much thank you magnetic so enjoyed it on point is produced by annabelle men brian hartson ski eileen amata stefan could sodas alison poli james ross and alex schroeder with help from matt heus seal kibi david marino and alex payne our executive producer is karen shiffman i'm magnitude bardy this is on point.

ben walden stefan james ross alex schroeder executive producer danny shapiro matt heus david marino alex payne karen shiffman two percent
"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"alex schroeder" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"When we continue to invest in education. Our children are the winters and our children are the one who prosper from all this that. That's why it's so important what they're doing in LA and we've done all across the country. I remember talking to you last year. And we we talked about how the average pay of a West Virginia teacher was around forty five thousand dollars which was thirteen to fifteen thousand dollars lower than the national average in one of the issues that you're facing in West Virginia is that teachers just needed to drive over state lines to other states, and they'd get paid considerably more. And so there was a shortage of certified teachers in West Virginia has has that situation gotten better where we still have a shortage. It's going to take more than just a one year employee of two thousand dollars to to help that but we are seeing more rare younger teachers very interested in staying in West Virginia now, and if we continue that investment this year that should be another five percent pay raise coming in front of him. We will have moved beginning teachers salaries from thirty three thousand two over thirty seven thousand in two years, and and that will help us be competitive with their contiguous states. We're more. Concerned with their contiguous states than we are the national average because we are such a we were bordered by five different states, and they can go across the border and make more money. This makes us competitive with them. But it sounds like overall that a year after the strike from last year, the situation is improving in West Virginia. So so daily let me ask you that was the catalyst really that's sort of unleashed. This big movement across America, we saw teacher strikes, and so many other places and now the giant district in Los Angeles. I mean looking across this past year. Did you think that this is what he'd spark from what your action in West Virginia you when you make that courageous step to step out of the classroom? You don't think about the what it's going to do nationally as we've had time to reflect we are very proud of the fact that we have led the movement from West Virginia. We're look at an different light as educators in West Virginia. Now, people look at us more with with respect and admiration for what we've done, and like I said at the end of the strike with the interview with you. I would hope that other states and governments learned from this. Apparently, they haven't that that we have to continue this. When are we going to make education a top priority win? Are we going to make educating all of our children, not just a select few? But all of our children are our number one goal in this country and fund education like it should be funded. Well, daily president of the West Virginia Education Association. He helped lead last year's teachers strike in West Virginia. Speaking to us once again from Charleston today daily, thanks so much for coming back and giving us this check in on how teachers and schools are doing in West Virginia. Thanks so much. And we wanted to teachers in LA now that West Virginia fully supports them and their endeavors. Well, thanks again. Mr Lee, you know, this issue of education and supporting teachers and the myriad numbers of ways. We can support American students is a huge one so go to on point radio dot org. And let us know what you think, and when you're at our website, you can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter right there on the homepage. Where you get behind the scenes looks at what goes into making this show. You'll also get some messages from me, and my colleague David Folkenflik. And by the way on point is produced by terrific team and abou- men Brian Hartson ski Eileen Amato's. Define a Sonus Alison poli James Ross n Alex Schroeder our executive producer is Karen Shiffman. I'm making a chocolate bar eat. This is on point.

West Virginia West Virginia Education Associ Los Angeles David Folkenflik Sonus Charleston Brian Hartson America Karen Shiffman Mr Lee Eileen Amato president executive producer James Ross Alex Schroeder forty five thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars two thousand dollars five percent two years