17 Burst results for "Alex Rosenberg"

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Your twenty four hour broadcast news to New Jersey one one point five on this Thursday morning and we have temperatures that are in the thirties has you step outside and it is damage to some rain around will dry out around lunch time or so and then very cold air will settle on the garden state later today how long will it last Dan has the forecast in minutes China's UN ambassador says the government is confident it is capable of winning the fight against coronavirus saying efforts are achieving positive results the ambassador told E. U. N. meeting in New York China's confidence has been boosted by the decline of new cases in regions beyond the epicenter in who by province for eight consecutive days at a significant rise in curing the cases the more than five thousand the just released report finds the distribution of white supremacist propaganda in the garden status spike dramatically over the last twelve months Alex Rosenberg of the anti defamation league says there were a hundred forty one incidents of white supremacist propaganda in two thousand nineteen and Jersey compared to forty one the previous year he points out white supremacists are actively working to spread a message of hate and intolerance about many different groups all minorities that are not Caucasian war of European white heritage white supremacist pose a real risk says Rosenberg if their ideology is left unchecked it can and does lead to attacks on houses of worship and schools David Matthau New Jersey one of one point five news Tirmidhi jerseys first news five fifty for a solid start to the year for new Jersey's casinos as part of a beast of a January for gaming revenue in the garden state the industry made over three hundred million dollars last month up nearly thirty one percent from January twenty nineteen part of that was a massive spike for sports betting in Jersey gross revenue was almost fifty four million for January up one hundred eighty five percent from the year before Meadowlands racetrack where the FanDuel sports book operates brought in half of that amount counting all gaming revenues six of the nine casinos reported January increases over last year hard rock led the pack up forty one percent to twenty four million for the month Erin vote in Jersey when a one point five team this time IT jerseys first news five fifty five the hundred and county safe communities coalition is one of eighteen coalitions chosen across the nation to take part in a project that will help bring awareness of non opioid options that are available for pain treatments Leslie gable co CEO of prevention resources which manages the coalition.

New Jersey Dan China coronavirus New York China UN E. U. N. Alex Rosenberg Erin Leslie gable CEO
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"That tell you something else that tell you it's Chinese hoax or that tell you, you know, there's some evil cabal of globalists' who want to do x y and z and they're using this scam to, you know, I I don't, you know, keep up with all what all that stuff is. But you know, where you can go to find it right YouTube. Predominantly, you know, part of it. But a lot of this is Alex Rosenberg describes a lot of it comes down to the fact that we're we're using old tricks. These are basically sort of shortcuts in our perception of reality. And that all of the reality that we have is not like pure objective reality, like, of course, not, you know, one of the like fun little I'll go and even call it a mind blower that he drops in that I deals with Paul Kennedy at the said was that you know, that that we live in a world that doesn't actually have odors or colors, right? That's just our sense world. That's our way. That's the way that our our bodies in our minds interpret the stimuli. Yeah. There is actually light. And there are actually volatile molecules. But the idea of color is something that happens only in the brain. Right. We constantly air in this perception of the world because it's a da- positive, certainly not malady. After but you can see how it stands in the way of a proper understanding of of reality. If it mattered like if I don't know if some fantastic scenario presented itself say there's an alien invasion Jimi Goodwin to go for the key to defeating the aliens was a perception of reality. That did not the did not rely an understanding of reality in, which odors, and colors exist. You know, we're doomed. Yeah. We would we would be doomed because we have this this built in handicap that has never been maladaptive up until now. And so one of the things he's arguing is that is that storytelling was dappled early on. But then is perhaps increasingly mal adaptive as we as as civilization becomes more complicated. Oh, yeah. I mean, this is one of the clear things that we've discovered through, you know, the the recent decades of psychology, neuroscience, focusing on bias and misperception, you know, that's been a been a key. She to to what we've learned about the brain in the past few decades is that we have just all kinds of ways of getting reality wrong. Right. And a lot of this is based on heuristic, you know, simple. Quick fast dirty rules that the mind uses to try to come up with an answer without doing too much work. And in fact, you.

Alex Rosenberg Jimi Goodwin Paul Kennedy YouTube
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"We're back. So as I mentioned at the top, I was inspired to talk about this today. When I saw an interview published at the verge with a Duke University, professor and philosopher of science who's written a book about the use of narratives in understanding history in this philosophers named Alex Rosenberg I wouldn't familiar with him otherwise in this book is called how history gets things wrong. The neuroscience of our addiction stories now understand I wasn't actually able to listen to that ideas episode, but Rosenbergs on that episode. Oh, yes. Yeah. He's one of three individuals that they chat with and he's extremely well. Spoken on all of this in in very humorous too. Yeah. Because one of the things like we don't want to make it sound as if he is like railing against narrative like he himself. He's a novelist as well. Oh, yeah. He's written multiple historical novels, and he makes the point that, you know, he thinks stories are wonderful like there's no denying that. They bring us joy. They enrich our lives. And there's also little doubt that they're one of the most if not the single most powerful ways of changing people's minds about things motivating action, though, of course, maybe this isn't always for good, right? And one of the things that he talks about at length, especially on. The ideas episode is is the idea of self narrative, the idea of a viewing our life as a story and ourselves as a character in that story and indeed turning to exterior Nurit narratives Beit, a novel movie myth, and then using that is sort of a. A guide by which we might interpret our own life and our own identity. But before we get to get to that really like there's like the idea of where narrative comes from. Yeah. And and Rosenberg says that he sees self narrative is one of the oldest among various human adaptations that enabled us to survive the prehistoric world to deal with predatory threats. And then work our way up the food chain. Yeah. I mean, I think you can clearly see self narrative as some variation on the same kind of adaptive value is imagination. Yeah. What is imagination? Good for. You can like simulate something that might be dangerous before you actually, try it grind turn it over in your brain. And see if you can sort of practice without actually putting yourself at risk..

Alex Rosenberg Duke University Rosenbergs professor Beit
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on This Week In Google

"I have the water lilies in my office. So far Erling who is a scientist at Google research side has says differential privacy with mathematical certainty makes it impossible to trace the data back to its origin. You have an outcome that is mathematical certainty. It's proven to work you have an outcome. That's independent of any one person's data, but it's still a good outcome. However by masking, outliers, it could sometimes remove relevant or interesting data, especially very data sets. So there's the problem homogenize someone so David Weinberger Burr. Author of the manifesto. Here's the Duke book got the jellies coming up. We'll talk about more when it comes out. But it's brilliant. And and as his David always and is called everyday chaos. Pre-order it now. We'll have Carson making no because I'd love to get him on triangulation. But he talks about how what's really happening here is that in a world of she learning AB, tesla stuff to correlations that come along. Have no explanation fit. No law. Make those sense. The data just tells you this is how this disorganized crazy world of ours operates that way, we didn't know before that frustrates the hell out it was human beings because we thought that we could reduce these two laws. I mean laws of nature laws, and we. Narrative, right. Breeding another book. Oh, this is really. See I just happen to have called. I can call. How history gets things wrong. Duro science of our diction two story. Yes. I love that idea. It is because it says that. We have a theory of line because we want to figure out what the other person on the of the savannah is going to get that half. An ETA lope was eaten by the lion before the line gets back. We're figuring out what other people are going to do is epithet way. That is hard wired into us ways that he argues the philosopher science, the author is one Alex Rosenberg. You mean, George Washington didn't chop down the cherry tree. The problem is we we so what Eric so what stories he says bonuses narrative history is always always wrong. It's not just incomplete or an accurate, but deeply wrong. Yeah. Fast halfway through. So I can't legitimately summarize yet. But it's absolutely fascinating. So yes, say si narrative is the root storytelling is the root of our problems. Well, no. Disconnect. It's it's the root of our disconnect with machine learning or quote, data driven everything I think we're just telling ourselves big lie. It's hard for us to admit this though because what is our job. Stacey Jeff Leo to explain everything storytelling. We we we diminished we reduce all of the complexity surrounding us into understandable intelligible stories media. This is not a popular stance of mine. School. This is why an M this is why I don't say I'm a writer because I think my job is to explain the way things work in a lot of times. I have really hard time. Finding the compelling story. I call it the dead baby the dead baby leads and gets the story wide adoption in the audience. And I it makes me sad. So I am I totally believe this. But, But. but but wait a minute addressing the fundamental issue. Which is that in inevitably the story misrepresents the facts because they can't be reduced. I write about like engineering and tech. And I always talk to people, and I'm like explaining the trade off between this that in those are conversation. Those are things people don't wanna read basically, this is why like nobody reads my stuff. Or you need to make you stories. Compelling. Compelling walk. Three of story. Stereotyping LA graffiti today at the used bookstore near Boston and. You get into you get into a narrative of how could this happen? Ooh. That's what we do. Remember that wonderful TV. Remember that wonderful TV show connections. Who is the? Austin conductor manufacturing? Well, it was painting on rocks and then pressing the rock on paper..

David Weinberger Burr Carson Stacey Jeff Leo Erling Google Alex Rosenberg Eric scientist LA Boston tesla George Washington Austin writer
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Ideas

"Fiction drama biography. Bring it all these stories are a source of joy a chance to escape whether we are the self narrative sort or not, but what if the need for narrative is actually something that does more than good, Alex Rosenberg is professor of philosophy. I think that the self narrative is one of the oldest among the uniquely human adaptations that we started telling narratives about ourselves and analyzing other people's behavior in terms of narratives about them on the in the Pleistocene when we found ourselves driven out of the rainforest onto the African savannah at the bottom of the food chain and needed to solve that tremendously pressing problem of how to survive let alone move up to the top of the food chain by learning how to cooperate and collaborate, and that's where narrative comes from. And so when you talk about narrative in that context, you're talking about it as sort of evolutionary necessity, but you don't sound like you think we need that anymore. Well, it wasn't ever Lucien. I in assessing or any rate a quick and dirty solution to the problem of how. To organize the behavior of other people along with us to to survive to protect ourselves and eventually to start hunting, the mega-fauna we needed the the beliefs and desires theory of mind that we use to narrate our own lives in order to predict an explain the behavior of a small number of people in our media vicinity over the very near future. Because that was what was needed survive. Unfortunately that narrative now is used by us and by everybody else to explain the behavior vast numbers of people in distant past and long futures far away from us in ways that make us think we understand, but we don't and in fact has been very harmful in organizing, the vast institutions of our culture and civilization over the last thousand years at least, and so that's other people. But what about the way that we think about our own beliefs and desires, in a way, you're asking a question about an altar. Unitive that's not possible for us. We really can't think about our our own trajectories our own actions, our own responses, except through the vehicle of this theory of mind. So it's not only indispensable even though it's harmful. But it drives so many of the values that we find and that make our lives meaningful that we just couldn't give it up. It's something we were brought up to do. It was indispensable to learning language and to learning the customs, and mores and institutions have our society, but the neural circuitry that delivered this particular theory just operate that way. And when we try to read back from the theory into how the neural circuitry at every level of organization in our brain, actually works. We find that it's wrong. Now does that mean we can give it up? No. No doesn't mean we can make allowances and correct for it and improve on our understanding of human behavior by giving it up. Yes. Giving it up in science if not in everyday life and neurosciences shown house so many aspects of our conscious and in particular are introspectively available beliefs about the world on the basis of consciousness mistaken. A huge amount of conscious. Experience has been shown by philosophy years of neuroscience to be fundamentally misleading about the nature of our minds, our brains and about the reality that surrounds us. And we mistakenly assume that all there is to the guiding and the driving of our behavior is what is introspectively available when that's wrong. And so this idea then that we are in a way a reality apprehending machine, that's constantly

Alex Rosenberg professor of philosophy thousand years Lucien
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Lou welcome to the show where we start with the thing. You know an end up in a strange place. I'm Alex Rosenberg joined as always by my partner in crime. Just seen Underhill. How're you allow? Hello, I'm very good. You went. You know how they do in the beginning of pockets. Sometimes they talk about, you went, you went, may you went on a corn maze. This weekend had a little fun adventure. Well, that banter didn't work. Okay. Basically we'll we're going to talk about is how I forgot what you had done. And so I wanted to bring that up, but I couldn't remember. I went foraging. Oh, rain. Okay. So we both had outside of the city adventures, tunnel? I, yes. So, yeah, basically, I'm gonna show you how the midterm elections could make it easier to buy to buy stolen stuff and by accident by accident, it's actually closer connection than you might. They might think. So. Obviously, the midterms are ahead in the United States in the control of the house and the Senate, both both at stake. The Republican democrat look likely to take the house from the Republicans. There's an off chance they, they take the Senate, and this is sort of the normal flow of things. People are disappointed with whatever the government's doing. And so like to vote a new party into power each each time around? Yeah. I mean, it's a, it's a bit unusual because economy is so strong. That normally you stick with what's working when he comedy strong. But then again, you could have said the same thing for the two thousand sixteen election, right? The con- moose relatively strong and we'll switch to switch the party leadership says, you know, it's probably a lot more going on than. Yeah. Well, I mean, and it also depends on who you're talking to because I'm sure that people in rural America weren't saying, oh, the economy's really strong. So while the overall numbers to look really good. But I mean, you know, all the all the coal miners that are losing their job. No, but like seventeen coalmine. AK when it comes down to it, it's all the, the workers, the manufacturers that are getting their job shifted into something that's more service oriented. And so guess what service jobs pay a lot less than manufacturing jobs. And so that's just sort of the trend receiving as automation comes into play and robots, take over the world. Anyways, so so so some of the things at stake, it's if you had to name like the biggest issue in the midterm election, this financial regulations would be so far down the list, but it it's one of the things that that that's at play. I mean, Republicans and Democrats their views on how to deal with finances in the wake of the financial crisis have been very, very different. Very divergent. Yeah. It's funny because I always feel like the answer is somewhere in between the extremes. You know, on the one hand, you have someone saying lots of regulation. We need regulation for everything. On the other hand, you have people mostly Republicans saying, well, this is hampering small banks and big banks. Thanks. Yeah, but it's also mostly the big. Yes. So so the main important regulation we've seen recently or or set of regulations is dodd-frank of course ten a lot of things, but one of the things that did is set up the consumer financial protection bureau and give that bureau the ability to regulate small Dr or or in any more specifically payday loans which fall into the small loans category, but are typically have very high interest rates typically are paid off by your your next up paycheck. Okay. What does it take to get paid in loan? Not much, not much you can sort of Walton often. It doesn't hit your your credit report and it. It's pretty easy, get alone and then is often easy to even roll that over. So you take out a hundred dollars and then you have to pay, let's say. One hundred thirty back in thirty days. Obviously interest rates incredibly high. Like in the like what range you often see interest rates in two hundred to four hundred percent range, which PR sounds extreme, but I do think it's worth mentioning that..

Senate United States Alex Rosenberg Underhill Lou partner Walton four hundred percent hundred dollars thirty days one hand
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"This is the knock on affect start with within, you know, and and up in a strange place. I'm jesting Underhill and joining us is Alex Rosenberg Lou. And today we are going to start in the world of workplace surveillance. It feels like we're in an FBI is physical in Lincoln. FBI van like spying on someone right now. You've got those headphones and got these weird microphones this. It's very type space as well. We're kind of in a like a little cubby area. Yeah. Yeah. So it feels like we're surveilling. Yes, instead we're being surveilled. Yes, you are listening to us instead now it kind of makes of other people that we were listening to that. No, no, it is. In fact, you are listening to us. Now it's interesting because I mean, it kind of makes sense what's going on with workplace surveillance. It's becoming more prevalent and that's because technology is advancing. That's just sort of what happens is it becomes easier to survey people. It happens. We don't do a lot of mean. Men joked about, but we don't do a lot of surveillance here real. Like when I was at sea hopes, not so far as I know when I was a CNBC we used to be in about, you know, there are a lot of companies. Were there watching what you're what you're doing on your computer. I always wonder about that. I always wonder there are times you know, it's like if you're on your work computer and you think, oh, I need to buy that on Amazon and then you buy on Emma's on, does your employer? No. And if I'm an employer a kind of understand that desire to know what employers are doing. Well, there's a scene in billions were were, were the the new fund managers like our le- let me see everything that he was searching for today, like defined as per full EEO idea that always freaks me out. I will say, if you're an employer and you're considering doing workplace surveillance, I think it would lead to employee ease that are a little bit less happy or content leg. If I knew that I was being surveilled, I think it would be a little bit less happy. You'll be not supposed to know ratings. So well, okay. So I have some examples of workplace surveillance. So one of them is, I mean, I don't know if this was much of a surprise, but Amazon actually developed wrist bands to track warehouse workers and all their hand movements as Fillon ship orders and make sure that they don't steal anything. But that's that does seem a little excessive. If they, yeah, I, it's just tracking. I'm not sure how much the work they're doing now that sue, okay, they steal something. It doesn't look like similar to other. Yeah, lifting package up and putting it out. Well, then there are other companies that have implemented a software. There's a software called works smart, and it takes frequent screen shots of employees, computer screens, and gives employers a focus score, an intensity score of their employees. I'd also like will pop up something on the screen enough them to solve..

FBI Amazon Alex Rosenberg Lou Underhill Lincoln CNBC van
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Welcome to the knock on affect. This is where we start with the thing, you know, and end up in a strange place and this week, of course, we're going to start in China with all the things that are going on there with their image issues joining us today we have Alex Rosenberg, welcome to the knock on effect just to reiterate that you are welcome. Welcome to this. Knock on affects anyway. So what we have going on, basically, China has image issues to say the least one study showed that China's air pollution is so extreme than in two thousand fifteen. It contributed to one point six million deaths per year, and that's the Berkeley earth. Our research group is, is that now what like what are the causes of death or I don't wanna get well, there's I mean pollution. So this is air pollution, whether it's factories or autos or all sorts of other and any sort of burning of of chemicals creates air pollution. And that's been. Actually, there's another study that came out today that it has significant impacts on cognition. So it actually can contribute to a year less of education if you're exposed to a lot of air pollution. Well, it's a quality life issue, too. I mean, I was I was in Beijing in pre two thousand six, and it was just shocking how how full the sky was of of smog. Yeah. And so that's certainly that affects you know, quality of life and then you know, China hasn't just been having issues with its own pollution. It's actually been importing the world's pollution in some sense. So the way to look at this is that they've been a huge importer of wastes of basically recycling and other garbage for the entire world. And a lot of people don't realize that there is actually this huge trash trade going on where a lot of western countries have been shipping their trash to China just because it's been. The most cost effective way to do it. Then in China, right now, they've accepted nearly three hundred million metric tons of America's scrap alone over the past twenty five years. And so, but it's not just the US scrapbook the politically correct term? Yes, graphs. And then that's actually a key point to bring up is that there's actually a lot of controversy over what words you use for wastes. I was using the word waste, and when I use the word waste, I mean both trash and recycling. I talked to people in the industry and they said that you should use the word scrap, but the fact that the word waste has been used over and over and over again means that it's sort of a a hard battle to fight. It's like one of those things there. There's no good term for because it's not a good thing it would. It comes down to is, are you reusing it? So that's where scrap has a connotation that you are reusing it in his going to get turned into something else. And so that's where the money is. That's where the money's to be made is if you can actually repurpose it putting something in a landfill burning it, that's not very profitable. Right? I'm saying if someone's trashy, it's worse than if they're, they're scrappy scrap easy. Good. Yeah, exactly. Trashy, that's a good point. But that's thing is that we've been the US has been sending a lot of its trash as well as recycling to to China. But oftentimes it's in the form of were sending it to them in the form of recycling, but there's also some trash mixed in that probably shouldn't be there. And just another interesting tidbit, at least the woman that I spoke with at the institute of scrap recycling industries. She said that in China, they don't have a word for scrap, and that's think that have like fifty words for like the word for snow considering all the all the import well in this actually becomes a bigger point later on which will get to..

China US Alex Rosenberg Beijing Berkeley America three hundred million metric t twenty five years
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Should we get the almonds? I have. Okay. Okay. Trouble in Turkey will put with Sabi powder on your hazelnuts. I am. Alex Rosenberg, I'm just seeing Underhill and this is the knock on affect the show that starts with the thing, you know and ends up in a strange place. So we're we're, I don't know. I think we're cheating because we're starting with the if you count the summer interview series as an episode for starting with the same thing to episodes in a row, but it it counts because we're, this is a little different because we are going to a much stranger place than we did last week. Yes, because because wral is thinking about the global economy and ultimately what will it'll mean for 401K holders and for potential retirees. And I'm thinking about what I'm going to eat on my nuts. So you know Sabi both those high minded both both to agree minds, religious with. Different viewpoints. Sure. So, yeah, just to review mean we are recording this on Friday. So the situation in Turkey could change, but the the basics are the United States. Government has begun to impose tariffs on Turkey, a Turkish metals enter tallying for the imprisonment of a pastor. And you know, in general, Turkey has had thera- -tarian government for longtime. I shouldn't. I shouldn't take third, Jerry number. And I say, I should say that the president wants making. A third -tarian moves in and has has consolidated his power substantially and he's been installing family members in charge of treasury and finances and really high cabinet positions. Yeah. And he's also exert a lot of control over monetary policy in the country. And, and so you know, the Turkey is built up a lot of international debts and it has a lot of of. What days was called hot money where you know money from international vessels would rush into a country and and then it can rush out. And that's what we've seen. We've seen the Turkish lira fall massively against the US dollar at as international capital bounces, and this is happening for quite a long time. I mean, so it's not like suddenly we've been reading about this for the past few weeks, but really this, this was sort of building up all your long. We saw the decline in the Turkish lira happening, you know, well before, right? But, but there was a sharp and very sudden move as the international community to have reacted these to his tariffs and perhaps thought, you know, we've been a bit maybe profitable Gaetan if I knew what that word meant to say in in lending to Turkey. So you know it, it sort of a sort of a bit of a herd behavior, so sure. And, and of course you know, it's itself accentuating, right? Because is money leaves Turkey, more money must Turkey, and and that has as long as. It's not going to that as impacts and all sorts of other emerging markets and frontier markets and China and South Africa and all these other currencies. So Turkey imports, a lot of the a lot of their food, a lot of their, you know, Sopa trample on a lot of the basic goods which is only natural, but as the lira loses value costs more to to buy those goods, you know. So the Washington Post, for instance, talk to one person who's a Syrian refugee in Turkey and he sending money home, and now you can no longer afford to send my home. So it's it's not a, it's not a fun or or or funny situation in Turkey by any means, and I don't want to make light of it, but on the positive side for Turkey, this does help experts. So anytime currency, your currency declines in value people from elsewhere, probably wanna purchase more of your products because they're cheaper. And so that's an important dynamic that happens anytime you're currency fall. So it might be tough, but there's also a win on the other side. Yeah. And, and you know that's been the charging trying to for so long that the devalued different. You know it's right with the center which that's true, but you know, whatever. That's the charge that people make China's weakening. Their currency doesn't thinking ship things better..

Turkey United States China Alex Rosenberg wral Washington Post president Underhill Jerry South Africa 401K
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Rising trade tensions means that your diamonds are going to become a little bit more clear. Let's find out why. Welcome to the knock on a fact. This is where we start with the thing, you know, and up in a weird place. I'm just in Underhill, Alex Rosenberg. And today we're going to take you through trade tensions and Chinese tariffs all the way to diamonds and their clarity. And of course we usually have Alex guessing. But for the podcast version, we will not guess we will just take you on this journey. So the first part starts with the White House last week up the ante and the trade wars with China basically threatening to impose an additional two hundred billion dollars in tariffs on things like catfish and golf bags, and puffiness, and piston engines, and all the weird things that you can imagine, how am I gonna clean my feet after having a delicious fried fried poboy kep. Okay. Oh, okay. Yes. Yeah, Wednesday night plans, earth destroyed really bad for those of you who views. And you know, you can't go golfing afterwards because you're golf bags will be more expensive while I carry my clubs over my head. Oh, okay. Okay. Those the paints a pretty good picture. Well, anyway, so China's threatened to retaliate dollar for dollar basically becoming a trade tit for tat, but what I want to focus on, here's at China has. Other ways to retaliate. So they can say, oh, we, we're gonna impose all these tariffs on your products, but they're more creative strategies here. And so other creative ways to do it would be to weaken the Yuan so that they wanted to weaken their currency and change the price of their exports. If they wanted to, they could sell off US treasuries. They hold a lot of US debt. That's certainly something that they could use as leverage. They could also just refuse contracts with American companies or not by products from American companies like Boeing that could really hurt industry or they could intensify regulation. But my favorite one is that they could start to mess around with the supply chain. There's so much that's concentrated in China in terms of the US relying on China for certain products that that's that's a huge aspect of it. And so this is actually researched to get into the the first knock on affect. So China is the major supplier of many obscure yet vital. Devices and materials for the high tech sector. And that's rare earth metals? Yeah, it sorta velvet underground of elements. Yeah, the obscure band yet yet vital. Yes, actually, this is a very good analogy give. So China produce more than eighty percents of the world's rare earth metals and compounds last year, and they supplied seventy eight percent of US imports. So seventy eight percent of what the US imports for rare earth metals comes from China, and actually, I do think it is worth we can back up a little bit and explain what we were. Yeah, because you know something that I know is important, but like what is rare earth? Well, you can find them on the periodic table of elements. There are seventeen of them and this funny that they're called rare earth because they're not actually that rare all over the world. You can find them pretty much everywhere, but actually extracting materials is very, very costly. And so that's where a lot of the issue comes from, but it is. It is hard to go for a long time. Without using rare earths you'll have them in your hairdryers or your electronics. So we have a few things here. If you props. We have, it's in your iphone. So your iphone is polished with these elements. They extend the phone's battery life there in the phone circuitry. So apple would certainly be affected at dis. So a company like cre- would be affected here too because all LED's contained. So especially the blue green and red that shines through the LCD screen is only made possible with rare earth. And then of course, we have magnets. We actually had some, they're really on the set for the for the.

China US Alex Rosenberg cre Boeing White House apple seventy eight percent two hundred billion dollars
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"Welcome to this week's knock on affect i'm just underhill joining us is alex rosenberg lou and we are going to take a journey today from the dollar and the rising dollar and go all the way to ice cream and the point is your icecream we'll get a little bit more creative the yes share the flavors will be more more unusual around expected great and so we're going to start out with the dollar and this is i should mention a more indepth version of the video program that we produce which is on real vision dot com but this is we're going to dive a little bit deeper into some of the topics we discussed there so wanna start out with the dollar and we've been seeing something interesting happened over the past five months or so since january the end of january the dollars in creeping up it's risen about three percent and that's been actually fairly significant because it was in a downtrend for the past over the past year in other words this gaming value against other currencies i mean basically dollar still worth about dollar yeah you know hundred cents is at the dollar and so basically just means that there's more demand for dollars than other currencies and so this is where we get to the first knock on a fact which is that a stronger dollar has a significant effect on other countries finances so this gets into emerging markets that's what we often talk about but really it's everything so it's developing countries frontier markets leastdeveloped nations it's everything and so basically what we've seen this that a lot of these countries are taking on dollar denominated debt so as they take on that debt and the dollar rises suddenly they have to pay back that debt and guess what they're in a little bit more trouble because rates are rising all sorts of other problems and using their local currency they have to use more of their local currency the payback the dollar on it yeah and just to zoom out a bit it's easier for a country to take our debt in its own currency in other words they you know let you use and to do bucks you want to take out deadens anju bucks pay back into do bucks that way you're not worried about what currency markets do but for a lot of debt investors in you know a lot of them are in the us and europe or even other emerging or developing markets they'd rather just pay back and us dollars because then they're worried that you know as the government is anna do as you get the trouble you might you know badly inflate your on currency just pay back in these kind of worthless antidote bucks rather than paying back in these sterling us dollars or stirrup or pound sterling itself i guess it's sister dollars but have used xanadu buck xanadu buck yes it's it's my favorite way for paying back for newspaper tycoons oh yeah citizen kane oh no i thought you're going to say pillows of your for your pillow is a service business remember citizen kane he bills xanadu from self rosa wow this is a reference i did see citizen king that completely went over my head anyway moving on so as a dollar strengthens we are saying it becomes more and more difficult to pay back that that using the local currency and this has been happening all over the world k any country that has a significant borrowing in us dollar and since we are doing the knock on affect going to go to an unusual place into usual country and that country is a very far away island the fourth largest island the world and there is a cartoon movie named after franchise a franchise and it is the home of lemur so if you haven't guessed it by now choice story no matta gas car so not augusta is one of those countries that's heavily early reliant on dollar denominated debt so two thirds of their debt is of the total debt is external and most of that is us dollars and so according to a recent imf report currency fluctuations are major vulnerability for the country so the last time that we saw the dollar surged twenty fourteen twenty fifteen time period that was the main reason why their debt to gdp ratio spike ten percent so that was it had huge implications for them so that in government financing has actually been a particularly key issue from outta gas car because they've been hit really hard by several cyclones twenty seventeen in both twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen so with in the.

alex rosenberg lou underhill three percent five months ten percent
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"To season 3 really swimming different on the night it is something you fun to look forward c whatever you're in this in the box with me all the illusions that will follow us on twitter ahead of it this will with jeff block you'd have just been shattered now also joining us this week but not here in the studio with this in the freezing cold new york is one yuko host alex rosenberg alex are you there i grant area well i'm extremely well it's on i'm so pleased that you've joining us was season 3 it's nice to be able to share the load um and and not have to completely allowing changed everything because as you found out in the last few weeks that doesn't always go to claim that alex just a for this this out they give them a little bit of your backgrounds they know who the hell you off yeah so i joint revision helped months ago on cove headed content here i spent five and a half years at cnbc but tried to hold that against making two on irregular like by the milk unlike right now i know i'll alvin them over door or a nonchalant me over very get and i should mention the cfa charter holders so take that for for what it's worth two well alex welcome it's great to have you with us um you off gonna fill some launch shoes lift by our friend mr chen but i think no shoes that you will filled with ease and for me you one of the particular benefits of having a years it means we get to bring back the long short segment which is a was one of my favorites on the show so i am going to throw you in the deepened and give you that he wants to go first so uh i know you know the drill here and i know you've research alone sure this so picky poison and let's go through my long i am long scottish economists okay on a few those myself and find gentleman to a man now what particular reason rda for belong scottish economist this week.

twitter jeff block new york cnbc mr chen alex rosenberg milk
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KELO

"In america and this includes places like seattle ryan people understand that it's appropriate to love this country to feel grateful to be here there was so many many times between innings before the game after the game where people who serve in defense of our country our military our police officers law enforcement the were cheered and honored and saluted the there was a very moving sequence where they had a bunch of mariners fans who are serving our country overseas a wearing the uniform who came on screen and basically were saying go mariners that that kind of its was great it's baseball and yes it is a moving tradition sorry colin kaepernick and it's a long tradition going back for more than a century frankly where people sing the national anthem before the game and then people also saying god bless america and also saying america the beautiful on this particular four thirty two ally and then later in the evening we went to fireworks display in bellevue washington and there would have to be ten thousand people the tons of people he could barely get a spot to sit and to watch the fireworks and is wholesome and they had a youth symphony orchestra the plate the stars and stripes forever yes they also played some movie music i don't know why they played fanned the oppor that's not the american musical but okay they play than they played some music from star wars and they play music from jurassic park but it was all wonderful and people are having a great time and and people can celebrate our our country and so how does the new york times celebrate our country they have a column by one of these over educated i i don't wanna use too harsh a term that fools house at i was going to use more harsh term but he's a professor of course he is endowed professor of philosophy at duke university and who is the author of the book called autumn an oxford and author of another book called the atheist guide to reality hm a better to do the atheist guide to un reality because there's so much a reality that you have to deny you're going to maintain your atheist faith sir in any that we've invited alex rosenberg to come on the show he's in switzerland right now how appropriate no no better place for in america hater to spend the fourth of july than in.

law enforcement colin kaepernick washington new york times professor duke university alex rosenberg switzerland america seattle bellevue professor of philosophy
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on WGTK

"The atheist guide to reality hm a better to do the atheist guide to un reality because there's so much a reality that you have to deny if you're going to maintain your atheist faith sir in any that we've invited alex rosenberg to come on the show he's in switzerland right now how appropriate uh no better place for in america hater to spend the fourth of july than in switzerland he writes this piece where he talks about a small boy preferably an immigrant he says a stateless refugee from a wartorn continent place the child in an environment that make obviously owes his family's prosperity freedom and even his very survival to the generosity of the american nation eager to assimilate completely the child will embrace the patriotic symbols the flag the present military the national pastime develop the child is sustained and sincere interest in the trample progress in the nation's history but then he goes on after he's instructing people to this too a talk about how what you have to do for the child is then tell him the horrible truth about all the terrible terrible things about america and the child will come out bitterly disillusioned hating the country very upset and enlightened person and this is the kind of thing that he writes about be clear that the constitution is soiled with the stain of slavery the threefifths clause requirement that fugitive slaves be returned the clause allowing the international slave trade to persist for a generation after its ratification now see if he were a history professor i don't know maybe if he's a history professor it's still be a crazy leftists but this particular philosophy professor when he talks about the threefifths clause what does he talking about he's talking about the fact that the southerners insisted that slaves who they owned who had at the time the legal status of domestic animals they did of of horses are dogs slaves were property that those slaves should be considered for the purposes of apportionment in other words that they should be quote represented by a congressman even though they weren't considered full people and people in the north objected to that.

alex rosenberg switzerland america professor congressman threefifths
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"It so wholesome and they had a youth symphony orca as dra that played the stars and stripes forever yes they also played some movie music i don't know why they played phantom of the opera that's not american musical but okay they play aides immunity from star wars and they played music from jurassic park but it was all wonderful and people are having a great time and and people can celebrate our country and so how does the new york times celebrate our country they have a column by one of these over educated i i don't wanna use too harsh a term that if fools house at i was going to use a more harsh term but he's a professor of course he is and endowed professor of philosophy at duke university and who is the author of the book called on autumn and oxford and author of another book called the atheist guide to reality hm a better to undo the atheist guy to un reality because there's so much a reality that you have to deny you're going to maintain your atheist faith sir in any that we've invited alex rosenberg to come on the show he's in switzerland right now how appropriate uh no better place for in america hater to spend the fourth of july than in switzerland he writes this piece where he talks about a small boy preferably an immigrant he says a stateless refugee from a wartorn continent place the child an environment that makes it obvious he owes his family's prosperity freedom and even his very survival to.

new york times professor duke university alex rosenberg switzerland professor of philosophy america
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"Enough supplies their these rolling blackouts across the city i know colleagues who actually have ended their operations with that slash like that comes in the cell phone this is that's a surgery oh yeah at least two quote the patience this is particular distress it because venezuela you still have plenty of money even a decade ago the oil flowed out and dollars floating to the country and venezuela could buy anything it wanted from the rest of the world and a hundred glasgow is a history professor it and why you and he says there was this attitude in venezuela why make anything yourself when you could just by the import with very cheap dollars yeah why makeup i don't parts when you can buy out of parts reprise why make sure oh shoes milk and if the sheets and anything i just by absolutely ready made not have to worry about having to go through all the procedure you know investment domestic would have to do they just five for upfront and said makes if usually dependent not import this isn't okay strategy as long as the money keeps rolling him but this will him in a critical mistake more than a decade ago he looked chavez was run in the country here's a socialist talked a lot about helping the por and at one point he starts to worry about the value of his own currency the ball the far and so chavez decides to fix the exchange rate between the boulevard and the dollar essentially travis as the value venice willis money is whatever i say it is so it makes financial sense it actually makes it dynamic sense as an emergency measure what happened is that this measure was kept and maintain throughout even to today it was an economic time bomb because wanna government fixes the exchange rate that also means that they have the only place you can exchange money for instance alex rosenberg was out clothing important crockett's if you wanted dollars to import something he had to go to the government and look at a list of a proved products where you would check whether or not a particular material or a particular article clothing had been central the authorized by the government wishes alphabetically you go down you find underwear you wouldn't you would find man's underwear made out of poly estar cotton and then you a check in the book if the government.

glasgow professor venezuela chavez venice alex rosenberg crockett travis
"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"alex rosenberg" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"Was kept and maintain throughout even to today it was an economic time bomb because when a government fixes the exchange trade that also means that they are the only place you can exchange money for instance alex rosenberg was clothing important crockett's if you wanted dollars to import something he had to go to the government and look at a list of approved products where you would check whether or not a particular material or a particular article of clothing had been central the authorize by the government with his alphabetically you go down you find underwear you'd you wouldn't you would fine man's underwear made out of all the estar cotton and then you a check in the book if the government team this important enough tobias option basically now imagine this for every product the venezuelan important rosenberg says businesses would spend their days getting approvals become the defense will a would eventually say yes but then in two thousand fourteen the oil prices cratered the value of oil got cut in half over six mots the last game of the end why you professor says all of a sudden there was no way venezuela could pay for everything this is the an of any kind of boom years but there's nothing that we can do now but isn't point to hurt a tremendous amount so what are they do when uses comment they did nothing and now all those business people lining up to import products were told no not enough dollars to go route and this brings us back to the hospital's rosenberg their clothing in puerto also brought in that blue fabric you know the stuff they used to drake the patient during surgery he remembers his last shipment he kept waiting for government approval we're still waiting to have those goods cleared and we still oh that money torso fires and an age and so like a lot of business owners in venezuela rosenberg stopped he stopped is business stopped important he had no choice and that is what you see happening across venezuela the stays if you can up to business there will be shortage is roberts met and p r news.

alex rosenberg crockett oil prices professor venezuela puerto roberts