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"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

12:23 min | 11 months ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Mission Daily

"I i think it's actually interesting in retrospect right so in that context already because i'm seeing scenes from the movie right now in my head and like a while they made even more sense yeah yeah so exactly so that i mean the out of the many problems that the design <hes> effort behind the film had to solve was what is the future of computation spielberg himself said. Please don't tell me we're still going to have a keyboard mouse in in fifty years. I think <hes> journalists will still have a keyboard because that turns out to be a pretty good you i for for typing language but everything else needs is to evolve and it is interesting to note that there is very explicitly no a._i. In minority report in fact that had been that had literally been spielberg's previous film a._i. Where everything ed this is much more biologically inspired by pre exactly and and so what we were saying what the movie was saying and very much frankly what i was trying to say with those scenes of general computation with the tom cruise character in neal mcdonough and colin farrell wearing gloves and standing in the middle of a vast visual pixel landscape and n. volition really manipulating data unscented unsorted data manipulating data to kind of to bring it into the best posture to be understood by human minds <hes> like that's it was an attempt anyway at a very strong statement about how powerful u._i. Itself could be right so you i <music> as an extension of human cognition and human teamwork and the for whatever reason <hes> the those those scenes really kind of sparked a lot of interest they were <hes> you know they've they were written about still for whatever reason remembered and written about a lot minority report ended up being kind of kind of a bellwether for a a symbol for kind of future u._i. Trailed invoked today okay. Which is the wilder again gratifying but back in the day when we were getting oblong off the ground it was you know every time that we were able to invoke minority report has a kind of starting position saved us literally an hour you either try to sit there with <hes> an investor or a customer or prospective customer someone else and and tried to describe what the future of better improved you i might be or you could say hey. Did you see minority report. The other year never would say oh yeah yes yes they well that was uh that was prototyping. <hes> what this should look like and here now have a look at the actual real world version. Which i'm sure was incredibly really helpful. Are there any stories about the making of that that you can share any stories that stand out <hes> would be particularly interested to hear about how was philip. K dick's original work approached and are you interested in p._k. These work or anything like that only massively and obsessive vehicle his <hes> exoduses over there with john latham introduction. If i don't miss my mark yes indeed. I couldn't help noticing sitting here squinting favorites. It's it's wild to say the least it is and he was he was kind of busy cracking up a mentally at the time and yet still it's amazing. I think dick remains one of the most most important science fiction writers because from the beginning of is much more interested in the kind of larger sociological political cognitive consequences of technology than he was just as one example of what he was insured then he was in the technology itself. You know it's always about what can go wrong or what are the unexpected acted consequences or how do people reform at their lives around a new threat or a new core of technology technological imperative and so because he was always always asking that because he was always willing to take a kind of sidelong glance or a a raised eyebrow approach to how that stuff would play out and because like all too few writers and people did he understood that comedies often the best way to truth the stuff that he wrote is unbelievably prophetic pedic right even if you look today politically it you know it's unbelievably prophetic. The man who remember the future is example and who ends up in political office. I mean it's it's prefigured by fifty years in yeah in index were so but back to minority report. It's interesting because you look at the short story that it came from. There's not much there. Are you know it's one of those where he was clearly <hes> well. I don't know i mean it's it's not my place to say but he was certainly paid by the word through much of his career and i think he was probably on his third or fourth straight day of sleepless writing fueled by very exciting molecules and he just sort of hammered this thing out and the the characters are completely not even two-dimensional. They're all one dimensional and it doesn't matter because the the incredible core of the idea that you then put flesh back on the if the idea's are big enough it doesn't matter for characters decipher people will look completely passed that so yeah and in a way for exactly okay the reason that you say and because it was pretty minimal story. It was a pretty great colonel to build the there wasn't there wasn't much that you had to feel bad bad about transgressing or trump you strip away this lint and you've got this beautiful. Which i'm sure is great for the production team or at least a little but helpful. Maybe i completely they so and and it's one of the interesting stories about minority report that the production designer <hes> an amazing and pre legendary guy named named alex mcdowell was hired on the same day literally that the screenwriter <hes> an equally adept guy name scott frank was hired so there was no script on the day that we had to start building the world and that led very directly to a new methodology for designing films designing in general which alex calls world building and it came about because alex literally really didn't know which way spielberg would point his camera sherve right and so all of the sets that he built worth sort of three sixty. Normally you just build this piece of the set because you got storyboards listen. You know we're never going to look backwards. We didn't know which direction the camera would have to look also figuratively we didn't know would we go into a subway or a hospital spital would would there be as seen in courtroom. There was originally than there wasn't would there be a fashion show. At one point there was it turned into a car factory chase the imperative to build old the entire world came out of not knowing which piece we'd have to inspect and that process that that injunction itself was kind of transformative formative to the design process and it meant that we had to we could no longer just build the traditional flats right reserve fronts buildings also figuratively. We had to know how this entire future world was going to work <hes> and that led to i think an unusually cohesive vision of the future <hes> and i and back to that vision of the future i think it turned out accidentally to be unusually pressure because it was a surveillance world that we were depicting and we were saying it's not the orwellian version is not government. That's looking at you all the time in fact it's advertisers yeah. It's a commercially driven world. That's performing facial recognition ignition targeting ads. This is all before the browser became the place where it adds slough targeted you and so it turned out a maybe for i was going to say for better or worse. It'd probably for worse to to have been completely spot on in a lot of those ways yeah so during the process of doing the movie and after it was released. That'd be very curious to know. Would you think of the finished product and what did the team who made it or the sentiments there you know when you when you work on a film on anyone who's had any hand in in creating a film and as we know it takes a village <hes> knows perhaps with the exception one of the director but i don't even think that's true when you're working on it. You don't know how it's gonna come out. It can seem like the most brilliant thing day to day shot by shot as you're making it and can be a complete kind of misfire or doubt or tony incorrect <hes> and then the certainly plenty of counter examples where stuff that looks dull on the page <hes> or where the actors are weird or the direction seems odd turns out to be prophetic or kind of groundbreaking or trail-blazing in some hunting unexpected way and so i i think we were all gratified to sit there in the cast and crew screening. Watch this thing unspoken still shown on film rather than digitally and go wow this is you you know this not only does it hold together but it's asking really really interesting. Question does a very great film. It is has a lot to say and a lot to ask it asks more than answers answers and that's appropriate but about free will you know about the role of technology and politics and all the rest of it and predestination and knowledge and cognition. How is all this stuff inter operate with a society that wants to be vital and i think i think we're we're all very friendly. Good word choice there of thanks <hes> of of how that turned out yet from the momentum of the film that was kind of the origin of oblong or were you already thinking about the company pre minority report. I'd gone from building prototypes of things like what ended up in the film in fact. That's how i ended up. <hes> joining the film mm production alex mcdowell when he was on kind of research junket around the around the country looking into research labs in big companies and universities came across the kind of next next january stuff that was building and vitamin come aboard so i'd come from the practice of building things protecting by building right thinking by building <hes> and then we built all the stuff a second time which was fictionally in the film and i think it's not surprising to anyone cheating to say that we you know the stuff that you see on screen wasn't literally on a screen on the day it was it was composites later on what's different about the process that we used is that i designed and the gesture language all the commands though sequences of as if they would have to be built right so it wasn't one of these things in their other certainly only other films scifi films with gesture interfaces that didn't work this way where i mean i've actually been on the set for a few of them where the director says it's it's the gesture interface seen just have been affleck wave his arms around for awhile and we'll let the poor editor figure it out and you know what comes out of that can be visually exciting exciting but it's never going to be coherent. Instead you know spent weeks training the actors. The actors actually knew this gesture language they had actually absorbed and you know incorporated into their muscle memory so they they were performing in a very real sense. They were the first users of ob lungs mezzanine in in some pretty literal way. It's just that they couldn't do anything onscreen but they knew what they were gonna see. I think that type of attention to detail is recognized by the audience right because if <unk> as practiced something to the point where they have muscle memory. I think that actions where you have muscle memory associated with them are much more professional much more authentic than ones where you just doing something for the first time it's gonna be awkward and and we as social human beings have a lot of machinery that's designed to recognize that yes part of this this sort of social acceptability or you know mutual evaluation of fitness or whatever the heck it is but you know when someone's faking doesn't know the things the first or second time and i think that what what you're saying is a really important point because yeah it was a hugely technical scene or set of scenes in some sense like we didn't expect the audience to come away with <hes> having memorized the gesture language although some when people went back and kind of did so <hes> but we were operating with the knowledge that justice you say people would be able to tell if it were kinda faked yeah <hes> and that leads leads to you know kind of cognitive engagement with the audience that you can't get any other way and i think that that in fact led to the fact that the quickly after the film came out i i started getting phone calls from fortune fifty companies basically saying hey. That's that stuff in minority report. Is that real. Can we buy it can you we build if it wasn't real this ogle.

alex mcdowell spielberg dick director neal mcdonough philip colin farrell john latham scott frank affleck editor fifty years
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on No Story Is Sacred

No Story Is Sacred

10:01 min | 1 year ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on No Story Is Sacred

"Giver, I can raise you, and I can also when you okay, I got a simple one K not as not as dark as as Alex's in. This one Eugene is not horrible at everything. He actually drives the plot forward in his standard, boring, storytelling. He actually comes into tasted at the end. Yes. Sandy, just Errol Flynn's. It's flimsy. Yep. No fight ref Ryan pan. Even it's a sword. It's swinging from chandeliers, which is know fun. It's but not for this story. I did appreciate how Finn go the rescue reponsible like promptly fuck and fails. Got through the window at a mmediately stabbed. Yeah. Oh. Okay. Oh shit. I feel like we're not that. I think this covers it I think that a related point to that. And I'm not counting. This is my own I related to that is the is Flynn being the driving force entirely for repulsed rescue. Yeah. That's actually what I was. Yeah. Trying to get that. So yeah. Yeah. So it takes away all of all of repels agency. And makes it about a fuck and dude, and oh now I feel sick to my stomach about this one. I will. How can you be up dimissed about the? Pip? What do you get ready? Simple one. Okay. If the animals talked. Oh, that's unnecessary. Right. Break anybody's heart. Saying that'd be obnoxious. It would it would make it a demonstrably worse film, though. It would very simply. Yeah. Oh god. What if it was like a character actor or like a comic like a bunch of comics who's Dane cook? As a Maximus the horse Steve Harvey, the camelia, although that was back in two thousand ten so it'd be like something really bad. Now, only see k. Scale. Ed TJ biller together. So gross. I can't I can't. Oh. And then of course. They would be having their own weird rivarlry in the background drawn focus. Yep. Oh, jesus. That's terrible. Oh, it's no mother author redemption ark. But yeah, I mean from other definite is still I think the worst moment. Cat. Do you think you? I think that should be that match even got little beat. Shit. I'm trying to think here. Okay. I'm gonna do a weird one. So, you know, how remember Batman movies Batman movies for whether fucking reason have to villains? Oh, yeah. I'm gonna add an extra villain. Not just mother girth. Go Girdler fucker name is gospel Mumma, Jay. And I don't just mean in terms of like, the lesser Batty's of Flynn's, whatever because they were you know, they were entertaining chess pieces henchmen were hidden spear-carrier sick having but legitimate extra bad guy. So for instance, a real villain opposed against Flynn, not Maximus, but an actual a guy out to get him in a really negative and willing to do the wrong things to do it. So you have to add extra scenes of him threatening the guards. And if you don't find the Flynn rider, I'll have your heads. And then we see a head in a jar or some shit. And then eventually you'd have the two villains like striking up together, and maybe they're gonna betrayed others. So basically, it's this entire unnecessary plot. It's it's getting the sin of pulling focus, but a a different one. I know and when keeps betraying those two guys Flynn with working with amick onto the take for them to realize, it's them thing. Never. They don't hang out with the loveable rogues and that shop net Barnett by they clearly need friends. Maybe that's what happens to them. Now, they get to have a redemption are kit 'cause they're like siblings, aren't they? Yeah, brother. Yeah. And they did trust Flynn like Flint's one who fucked that up. Yeah. True name. We're all in an honest business arrangement, and he crime what you'll yes. But then he decided to double cross them. And frankly, I think that they have legitimate what they did not need like they had no idea that mother gafa was a fucking, you know, going to betray them. And they actually just keep trusting people's at actually thin. Maybe not wise in their line of work. But it's legitimately a problem. I think that they do need redemption. Our biggest weakness is that ship trust to trust to easily. And I've got this thing with my with my arm. But that's that's a different thing. That's a different thing. But yeah, I think the reason that the Hench guys aren't this extra thing is because yet they actually aside from being we don't know anything about them. They're just auxiliary minion type things, but even in their exhilarating nece within the realm of who they are as people they're acting reasonably it makes sense that they're fucking pissed off at Flynn. You know, I mean, they've spent five minutes is company. Yeah. Imagine if it was an an unreasonable actor if it was way over the top villainy the high chancellor yet, or if the captain of the guard had taken over Maximus took over most of the capture the guards actual search for Flynn. But imagine if the captain of the guard was actually like super evil. Oh, do you guys. Remember the zero movie within Donovan Deras, Joe. I was thinking about that yet. Remember, the blonde confederate captain or whatever the fuck. He was heads in jars. Yes, him imagine that opposite mother. It just would have taken away from the whole story draws focus. Just like just like the comedy thing. But in a different way. I would have ruined it. It's still not as good as. God damn. God, dammit. So. Yeah, tangled that was fun. Tangled? Disney movies. I'm a simple girl of simple pleasures. If think tangled kicked off kind of the latest run in good movies. They had right. All right after the time nine yet. I think that was one that I own. Oh, hey, the freidy animation movies that aren't Pixar can be good. Also, I think that also thing with the fact that the animals don't talk. And we see that again going into frozen. Does saving it from the snow talks, the Iraq's those are different doesn't spend doesn't. And that's what I'm hanging my hat on who even though reindeers are better than people. I feel like that's a song. It is his it's the only one that Tony award nominated Jonathan Groff sings in that is not moving. Lasts for a minute. Not. It's like a thirty second song. No any eventual closet is. Oh, that's right. Oh cross sauce. All right, guys. I think that we handled that one we ready to sign out. Yeah. I think so ready to leave this tower. That's when my life beacons while fight may. Okay. Well, I'll fight you with a frying pan. Yeah. Doing that audience. That's always if you have. Always fuck you pip as always if you have a story to submit head on over to know stories sacred dot com slash submission, follow us on Twitter at no story. A secret or send an Email through contact at no stories sacred dot com. Your hosts have been Alex McDowell Brendan Donald Pippen MacDonald, and Catherine Crichton editing for this episode done by Brendan transcript them by athletes STA art by j Wolfe show, notes and transcript are available at no stories sacred dot com. Thanks for listening everyone, and please rate review and subscribe to know story a sacred. Also, visit our patriot page to support the show and get meet rewards at patriot dot com slash no story is sacred. And by the way, I do actually intend maybe even this week. Maybe next week who knows put up an audio telling of what did I read the lady or the tiger for our patriots subscribers of for downloading you can. My melodious voice read it out loud. Naught boy. Next time next time biologists Royal next time when we talk about Terry practice guards guards, one of the discworld books until then we're no stories sacred, and any story can be changed. I'm cat. I'm Brendan I'm Pippen, and I'm outs. And we're doing the Royal. All of us are.

Errol Flynn Alex McDowell Brendan Donald Pippen MacDonal Ryan pan Eugene Finn Dane cook Steve Harvey Twitter Sandy Pip Girdler Iraq k. Scale Tony award Ed TJ Disney gafa Donovan Deras Barnett
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Triangulation

"And and you'll create an enormous number of jobs and the standard of living plummet because everybody's productivity goes down. So to vilify automation is paternal your back onto hundred and fifty years of of history. Now people will hear that. And they will say this time is different. This time is different. They'll either say it's happening much faster. Now, that's kind of one talk or they'll say it's going after the thinking jobs and not just the physical jobs and interestingly, the idea that this time is different also was common in the sixties and common in the thirties and comment at the beginning. But I think each of those two arguments that it's faster now. Or that it's going after kind of work. I think about spurious as well that being said, I get them a full airing. And I in the book, I mean, I want I want three hundred to take their answers to those three questions and kind of work through it. And if if in the end, you believe people are machines. Then maybe someday we'll build a mechanical person, and if we ever can build a mechanical person, then maybe that mechanical person will be we better than an organic person. But if you don't believe people are machines than that. There is something substantially different between a human being a machine than the machines. Never going to be able to do what we did. So you finish your PHD. And was that when you were approached to work on minority report? It was one of those one of those confluence is that's just so ridiculous. That it can only happen in the real world. I you know, I finished my dissertation some months before. And was kind of tidying up in publishing and doing the things you do while you figure out the next step and minority report at that point just got really and truly and finally and fully green lit. It had tried to get off the ground once or twice previously once even Spielberg, but this time it was going to happen for real and one of the one of the pre-production activities was that the film's production, desire and extraordinary designer and extraordinary guy named Alex. Mcdowell was flying around the country, basically visiting as many industrial labs and universities as he could looking for advanced technology sort of tech just on the cusp. That would be both recognizable today sort of and. Could clearly extrapolate into the future with which to populate this world. Because Spielberg's brief to him. Probably terrifyingly was I this has to be a completely real world. I don't want it to feel exi- file wanted to feel like this is just what you get. If you wait around fifty years and drive to Washington DC looks like this. So while what along Segue. interests? So there's Alex and the problem master Jerry moss stopping by the media lab. And I just sort of got into this hour's long discussion with him, and he looked at the luminous room stuff. And it's important. He said, yeah, I think I think this kind set of ideas, probably solves one of our hardest design problems on mine hardy report, which is Steven wants to know what computers are going to look like how do we operate them in fifty years? So twenty twenty five is that the year takes place twenty fifty four fifty as it hits the streets. But when we started it was set in twenty eighty and there was a moment when Stevens said it's just too far. We can't predict and he's right. You know, we can barely predict two years ahead at this point. And so he felt like eight years was too much. We pulled it back to twenty forty four. And then for some reason that I've never gotten a good answer to or never never been able to figure out right at the last minute. We went up by ten years to twenty fifty four if you look really carefully you can see a little bit of eighty ADR or looping putting putting different dates in. To actors mouths to to make the calendar. Math workout. So they they came to you. And they they they wanted to see what computers were looked at were you in charge of all of the technology like the big advertising screens. And what about the cars stuff? Ultimately, it was my job to make sure that all of the technology that would appear in the film knitted together. The that it seemed to be in fact from a single, you know, consistent, Karen futures that you would get to buy just waiting around for fifty years as I said and instead of being patched together..

Alex Spielberg Stevens Mcdowell Washington Jerry moss Steven fifty years eight years ten years two years
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Linguist at the university of British Columbia Okinawan, and she invented an entirely new language for the current release alpha alpha. It's about a young hunter who learns to tame a wolf. This is supposedly the first time man domesticates and gets friendly with a dog. It takes place twenty thousand years ago during the last ice age way before there were any written records a spoken languages, Christine schreier. Thanks for being here. This sounds like a really cool job. How did you get into writing fictional movie languages? Well, actually, you mentioned one of the languages that led me there. So when avatar came out, I was really curious because the media was saying people are learning that the and I was wondering how that was possible. And so I did an online survey with navy speakers in twenty eleven and had about three hundred people reply and you'd be great ended immediate release about that. And I ended up on the front page of a Canadian newspaper called the globe in mail and. Election designer for man of steel. That was my first one I worked on. His name is Alex McDowell. He was getting on a flight from Chicago going to Toronto, and then landing in Vancouver where they were filming man of steel, and he saw my article on the front page and called me when he landed in Vancouver. So I could come and work on manifield and develop crypto Nian, Superman's language. So help us understand how you create a language from scratch. So this case with alpha, it was supposed to be something that our ancestors had spoken twenty thousand years ago and researchers have done with they call proto languages. They're estimates events, Estra languages. And so I looked at three different proto languages proto no strategic, which was spoken in Europe proto Eurasia attic, which was Europe, Asia and proto Denny Caucasian, which was kind of the North American equivalent around that time period and use those as models for this new language I made for alpha. Does this language of yours have a name? Yes. In the language I call it, they, I'm a. Gotcha. So what was the hardest part of creating this bay? Emma, the hardest part was maybe developing the extent of vocabulary because the entire movie is in this language. And so it was a long script. So just the detail of every everything all the other ones I have done before. It's not that there's not many, but for Tony, and there was only about three hundred words I created, but this was the whole kit and caboodle. So the amount of work was probably the hardest part. So as you said, you also invented the language and man of steel, what did you have to do for the man of steel movie that you didn't do for this move? Vice versa. Well, you were you freer in man of steel because it was totally fictional? Actually, not because there isn't spoken crypto Nghien in manifield. You didn't miss it if you saw it ages ago. So I worked with the art department, so there's writing all over the sets on robots on weapons on costumes. And so it was never meant to be spoken, but there was a huge cannon. Superman has been. Round for seventy something years. And so I had to take into consideration the words that had already been created like a word for moon or crypt on or Cal or Joyal where with alpha there wasn't a set for Caballero list already. So I had more freedom there to some extent. How long did you spend a working on creating Bayona for l. fo. I started in October of two thousand fifteen, and then the majority of the work happened between that time in about March of two thousand sixteen. And then after that they were in post production and they wanted the people in the background. If you if you film a movie, there's often people in the background talking amongst themselves and in this movie they hadn't done that because the background people weren't speaking Bama and so they needed to have voice actors come in and add that extra layer of sound. And so into dozen seventeen. I redid the script for the background characters, so there were more lines. I mean, that's kind of extraordinarily you're basically living with this language..

Christine schreier Alex McDowell manifield university of British Columbia Europe Vancouver Superman Bama Emma Joyal Tony Chicago Bayona Caballero Toronto Asia twenty thousand years
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Triangulation

"Yeah okay so you finished your phd cranky weapon no you're actually one of the less cranky people so you finish your phd and was that when you were approached to work on minority report was one of those one of those confluence is that's just so ridiculous that it can only happen in the real world i you know i finish my dissertation some months before and was kind of tidying up in publishing and doing the things you do figure out the next step and minority report at that point just got really and truly and finally and fully green lit it had tried to get off the ground once or twice previously once even spielberg but this time it was going to happen for real and one of the one of the pre production activities was that the film's production desire and extraordinary designer extraordinary guy named alex mcdowell was flying around the country basically visiting as many industrial labs and universities as he could looking for advanced technology tech just on the cusp that would be both recognizable today sort of and could clearly extrapolate into the future with which to populate this world because spielberg's brief to him probably terrifyingly was i this has to be a completely real world i don't want it to feel exile wanted to feel like this is just what you get if you wait around fifty years and drive to washington dc looks like this so while what along so there's alex and the problem esther jerry moss stopping by the media lab and i just sort of got into this hour's long discussion with him and he looked at the luminous room stuff and it's important he said yeah i think i think this kind the set of ideas probably solves one of our hardest design problems on mine hardy report which steven wants to know what computers are going to look like how do we operate them in fifty years so it's twenty twenty five is that the year takes place twenty fifty four fifty as it hits the streets but when we started it was set in twenty eighty and there was a moment when stevens said it's just too far we can't predict he's right you know we could barely.

spielberg alex mcdowell esther jerry moss stevens washington fifty years
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on Filmspotting

"In the comic books that is brought up it's not lost on people that they look very similar in fact i don't think it's lost on the two superheroes that they look alike and peter parker and wade wilson have a little bit of a rivalry but they couldn't be more different as people under their suits and yet they share a look and they share that same kind of similar hyper talkative approach they rely heavily on humor the dead pool costume i believe was designed by angus strathdee and russ schinkel and it's cool josh that's all i can say about dead pools outfit it is cool i do like that one in it's almost yeah the spider in connection it it's like 'spiderman's costume grew up got a little curdled little bitter little cynical right and that's how the character is and that's what it looks like two so before we get to our number four picks we do have a guess voicemail here one of the people i thought of right away who needed to help us out with this list is chris clinic he's been a long time contributor to the show been a guest in a guest voice mail or over the years and he someone who i've pointed out multiple times looks like clark kent he has a little superman in him and while it's really not a surprise where he went for his number one low adam josh and sam at your body chris clinic checking in from washington dc you know the third act of zach snyder's man of steel is so awful that people forget about the twothirds of the movie that i think are really good in the plus column for that movie is alex mcdowell's production design and particularly james acres and michael wilkinson's costume design i think the way that they imagined the advance crypt tony in technology is sort of a geiger esque tech that's that's been grown somehow is a kind of ties into the donner 78 superman which showed a survey crystal basic acknowledgee but updates it in that is best expressed in superman's costume which is sort of a like a scaly sort of chainmail type advanced looking material it has the design elements of the classic superman costume but still looks like some alien technology influenced the design i particularly like the idea that.

voice mail clark kent zach snyder alex mcdowell michael wilkinson alien technology peter parker wade wilson angus strathdee russ schinkel adam josh sam washington james acres
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"I don't know that would be too i ask don't know but i will find out next time on the crack podcast previous dad's awesome yet a lot of these people get revived even years after death fortunately and also like people who do the art for movie posters you can find their galleries online and it's just it's such a great nostalgia hit people in the know in hollywood well now i should look at the person's gallery like somebody like alex mcdowell when we think of oh who did the iconic seen from the movie of a touchscreen well that's the brilliance of philip k dick or steven spielberg right that's those guys but the person on the list way down as alex mcdowell he did it well i am i moving us onto quickly because essay glaze really well underway in way way let's do it he is my favorite of all just hits myself spot he's our director on pewee house so he literally like cocreated with power rubens all those guy khanna characters and i mean just i love that because my brothers like this he just is the guy who goes to the dump finds interesting stuff and build stuff so he just made that cheiry made a box things like we should put it it's had in this that's the character he made all those puppet see love from view is play house just out of shoe boxes and cardboard and paper scraps and stuff and he's just an amazing personality you can find them on youtube like doing puppet shows with all as puppets documentary about him there is a thank yeah there is a great wayne way documentary called beauty is embarrassing.

hollywood alex mcdowell steven spielberg pewee house wayne
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"A room you walk into and ugo of things are bad of uncomfortable whoever lives fear is on drugs this is very gross like dingy so he is the art director said this on her for the crow lawnmower man fear and loathing in las vegas fight club minority report and the weird stand out i think got his andy pages and fantastic mr fox he built other miniature so housing which feels nothing like the others one god allah yeah like i encourage people to dig into the fight club story because he's basically an architect engineer as well because he scouted bunch locations wasn't happy with any of them for like the dilapidated mansion they live in so he just drew an architectural blueprint and built that house cheese and had it made as a functioning flop house like tenement and like there was some plumbing electricity in style more yeah amazing and fear and loathing like if you've ever been on a set it's so easy not easy it takes a lot of artistic vision like we were saying but that this guy every job he's on is carting in just tons of garbage and like placing meticulous like he's the guy you call in when you need someone space to be a horter house and i just can't imagine the level of detail work that has to go into making us hoarders room sat at insane to me like a i think people don't necessarily realize that release fully think about with correction designers is that a lot of their work they build every element of it with can adam like a lot of those bond movies were shot at pinewood studios in like north london and i've been there and it's just like it doesn't look like anything else over there just constructing every element of this guys like under see caribbean fortress and now same with alex mcdowell he's building like especially order house you're like great prop team i need a thousand of thing right minority reports amazing because they feel like that image of screens in house screens will be used and how you'll just wave your fingers adam.

director mr fox engineer pinewood studios london alex mcdowell adam las vegas andy caribbean
"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"alex mcdowell" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"And if you just google like ken adam torrential have room or whatever yeah it'll come up and it's very simple but it's like a a steel mesh framework coming out of a circle and it's socalled looking yeah doing allow with a little on problem solving that's my favorite and then the opposite thing happened at the end of his tenure like where they were just throwing money at walk into hasn't even the end of his his role there but when they did the volcano said that was the first million dollar set cheese any wow behind in moon reeker they go into this control shuttle control launched room and it was all based on mondrian painting so the monitors all can have the primary color strange alan geometric right yes odds and it's fascinating to me he was always thinking one step above the medical it's amazing and it is sort of a law start in the sense that i don't know why ever again we ever would make a million dollar volcano sat there such easier ways it last literally only at nearly as like a viral marketing attempt why euro have to you'd build a portion green screen some of it cg the risk your you had to go you build a small set probably custom owing dollars today but the true level acer right right i knew how his lost heart yeah well the the volcano now would be episode three of star where he's at has crossed thing and while we're on set designers one of my favorites is alex mcdowell desiring a bell were all right so we covered amman crack before once and what i love about him is he sort of is the master of.

ken adam acer alex mcdowell google viral marketing amman million dollar