12 Burst results for "Alex Laskey"

"alex laskey" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

Factually! with Adam Conover

03:32 min | Last week

"alex laskey" Discussed on Factually! with Adam Conover

"I have now. And the wrong strains have really showed valles and We've put on the end of every every sentence in every name so yeah. Well i guess adams high but you'd probably be at amount of solo and year daiva near roscoe and the yeah anyway my friends here for my people. I don't know australia like so. Where are you from. And i can imagine what an insult it is to return to your land. People ask you where you're from that so they think i sound american You think striking. I mean that reminds me of the first time i grew up in new york. I live in california now. And i flew back to new york city and check in at the hotel and the guy behind the hotel de said you just get here from from los angeles and i was like how good what is it about. No i'm from here. Tell like i can just tell by looking at you you you. You came from california. Like no oracle. But that's what it is. That's what it is to live. You know it wasn't until you said new york. Charlie pick up on it. He does sound like eastern europe. Until is i also assumed you're one of those hopelessly liberal tree hugging californians hopelessly subway hugging new yorker. We'll look let's talk a little bit about. How do we make that mobilization a reality. I delay in the power of narrative. A lot And i think we can start to tell the stories that get us there. And i have spent the you know. I started an organization with a wonderful franco. Alex laskey cold rewiring america last year. And where we will making it out goal to figure out what we have to do to politically to make what i just said. Come how do we. How do we get how do we get a nifty op president. Who's gonna play the role of henry hudson and getting american industry to work. Who's gonna do the workforce training center and really that's an exercise in narrative in becoming the most convincing. And telling your story we were pretty successful even got some policy prescriptions written into the baden's climate plans that tiny bits. And i i'd give full credit for any of these things. You can have a tiny bit influence and we sort of we now believe had timing influence so i think it's all about storytelling. He's i'm going to this experiment with you on a new idea Please the strongest force in american politics today isn't the nra because they're bankrupt giggle giggle but the vip merge association retired people membership in our must be. Think about it as a discount coupons to hop what that aarp does very successfully is. Make sure that a whole bunch of a Volunteering some some lobbyists guard to the utility regulatory hearings in some given state to represent the interests of thai people and they they make sure that their interest retired able represented in the conversation healthcare's Shuji influential within the jerk in washington is the ip has their own zip code in washington. It's that logical.

california new york los angeles Charlie australia washington Alex laskey last year new yorker eastern europe henry hudson america today first time year daiva californians roscoe Shuji one american
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"So. . Let's turn to our topics this week, , and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've . been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five , percent. . It's simple. . It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. . The authors are Saul Griffith. . Sam College Alex Laskey <hes> you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. . His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. . So they're part of a team called rewiring America, , which is putting out a series of technical reports, , mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, , and putting a lot of people to work in the process. . So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, , and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. . So Melissa, , let's look at the origins <hes>. . It doesn't start with emissions instead, , it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. . Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. . like modeling thing saying what happens with that? ? From a modeling approach. . I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? ? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, , targets, , economic development targets, etc, , , and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. . So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. . We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, , they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. . What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? ? So they said, , okay, , what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. . Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. . So it was this bottom up, , call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. . But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? ? So, , in this modeling, , they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On . the electrification side, , they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. . Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, , okay, , every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, , hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. . As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. . Anything, , but it would help if you did. . I like. . I think this is fantastic. . Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. . I think that part of this that. . Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me <hes> is what are the forces around here that will make it happen <hes> i. . You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, , we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. . The when we think about for instance <hes>. . The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. . In the local level, , you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. . So whenever someone's gas boiler? ? <hes> goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. . So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. . But I. . Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The . math actually works. . Now, where's , the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, , a commodity report that I think <hes> many of us who've been steeped in this? ? No but for think the first time <hes> watcher is shocking. . Right <hes>. . So the energy information, , administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to <hes> primary energy. . Right. . So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. . You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. . Then people say look how small it is. . But in fact, , when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, , Levin's would say. . It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. . How to put it into a refinery, , converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. . Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Dr Melissa Lot Alex Laskey America engineer Hurricane Saul Griffith New York Al Morning CO founder Austin Texas United States Jigger Bethesda Maryland Ingrid Catherine Hamilton senior research scholar
The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

The Energy Gang

06:17 min | 7 months ago

The Economic Case for Electrifying Everything

"So. Let's turn to our topics this week, and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five percent. It's simple. It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. The authors are Saul Griffith. Sam College Alex Laskey you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. So they're part of a team called rewiring America, which is putting out a series of technical reports, mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, and putting a lot of people to work in the process. So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. So Melissa, let's look at the origins It doesn't start with emissions instead, it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. like modeling thing saying what happens with that? From a modeling approach. I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, targets, economic development targets, etc, and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? So they said, okay, what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. So it was this bottom up, call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? So, in this modeling, they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On the electrification side, they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, okay, every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. Anything, but it would help if you did. I like. I think this is fantastic. Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. I think that part of this that. Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me is what are the forces around here that will make it happen i. You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. The when we think about for instance The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. In the local level, you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. So whenever someone's gas boiler? goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. But I. Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The math actually works. Now, where's the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, a commodity report that I think many of us who've been steeped in this? No but for think the first time watcher is shocking. Right So the energy information, administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to primary energy. Right. So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. Then people say look how small it is. But in fact, when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, Levin's would say. It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. How to put it into a refinery, converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and diesel. Then actually burning that fuel and you know and creating the electricity that then actually keeps your beer cold all the losses in there are eliminated when you go directly to electricity but in but we are constantly comparing ourselves to primary energy and so part of what this report shows is a week actually eliminate fifty percent of our entire primary energy usage just by electrifying everything right because you lose all those losses

Alex Laskey Engineer America Saul Griffith Co Founder United States Dan Yates Melissa Emery Cap Bax Levin
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"It's the fastest way to decarbonised and create tens of millions of jobs and it can be done using off the shelf technology. A team of respected experts drops the first in a series of technical manuals for the clean energy economy. What are they calling for? Then BP gets real the oil giant says it will slash oil and gas production by forty percent in a decade ramping low-carbon tech by ten axe what are the forces pushing BP shift and lastly the New York Area Utility pse G was supposed to have learned a massive lesson after. Hurricane. Sandy. So why did thousands of people just spend nearly a week with air conditioning and with rotted food in the refrigerators we'll look at pse. Failed Response Plus. It's major cold divestment and we're going to be doing that with my two CO hosts. One is our guest co host who is back looks like she might have enjoyed last week conversation. It is Dr Melissa Lot. She is a senior research scholar at the center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. Hello Melissa. Hey. Al Morning. How are you there in Austin Texas to engage the sun is out and that's a good day as far as I'm concerned is your Roomba safe. My Room by is officially in the garage it will not disturb us as we have a good chat morning. The last week we got all the tape back and Ingrid was assembling episode and she says was leaning. What is going on and we figured out that it was actually Melissa's room. Other regular co host. He's there in Bethesda Maryland and he's the president to generate capital. Hello Jigger. Hey, it's been raining today straight here. So I don't have this son that Melissa talked about but you know I feel like you know I should be thankful for rain. So just a reminder that we have a live show coming up on. August twenty fifth. So the day after Catherine Hamilton comes back from vacation we are going to throw a lot of show notes at her and make her have a discussion in front of a live audience online. So we'll. We'll make sure to turn her relaxation around real quick but we're going to have a live show that you can sign up for today, and we'll have that link in the show notes. So that is on August twenty fifth. So. Let's turn to our topics this week, and we'll start out with another report that has come out but this one is very different from some of the climate reports. We've been discussing a plan to create millions and millions of jobs by electrifying the economy and slashing emissions eighty, five percent. It's simple. It's elegant and the authors say it is totally doable. The authors are Saul Griffith. Sam College Alex Laskey you might know Saul Griffith we profiled him on a recent what it takes episode and he talked a little bit about how this the the origins of this plan came together and Alex Laskey is the CO founder of power and we profile. His Co founder Dan Yates on a recent what it takes as well. So they're part of a team called rewiring America, which is putting out a series of technical reports, mobilization plans for rapidly electrifying in decarbonising America, and putting a lot of people to work in the process. So there are two parts to this conversation was the actual modelling that goes into the plan, and the other is the economic benefit and jobs claims. So Melissa, let's look at the origins It doesn't start with emissions instead, it looks at decarbonisation the way an engineer might an engineer like yourself walk us through the basis of how they're modeling the decarbonised economy in this report. Is this interesting at you know I've been a model for fifteen plus years i. like modeling thing saying what happens with that? From a modeling approach. I mean frequently when we look at climate mitigation so how do we reduce emissions? We start with an emissions target or frequently in combination of emissions, targets, economic development targets, etc, and then we kind of back our we into what the mix of things could look like to meet that. So it's this top down approach or this perfect foresight. We know what's happening in the future and we back out from there in this report, they really looked at what machines and equipment are out there. What could we get out there and how quickly could we do it and they went from there? So they said, okay, what can we get online if we really double down on this and they broke it into a couple of stages stage one being ramp up production of technologies and Stage two being okay. Let's deploy these things as quickly as possible. So it was this bottom up, call it an engineer's dream because it gives me a lot of tech to play with and look at. But it really gives you the nitty gritty on how do we get this done? So, in this modeling, they mostly focus on electrification unpack how they do that yes. On the electrification side, they look at how do we beef up the supply side of things ahead we get all the power generation we need in line and I've got a lot of thoughts especially around their cost assumptions and what they think we can actually accomplish. Jigger I'm curious what you think about it as well but then on the demand side I mean they also say, okay, every car that gets sold when your targets taking off the road isn't electric one every bit of equipment in your house would replace there's no more combustion it's going to be electric I'm so it's it's essentially a near one, hundred percent replacement rate zero carbon technologies. As soon as you would naturally retire those things they do have a caveat in the report which is interesting of saying they're not forcing you to early retire. Anything, but it would help if you did. I like. I think this is fantastic. Right that it's exactly what we've been saying on the energy gang for seven years right which is that we have the technologies necessary to decarbonised and we have to deploy faster. I think that part of this that. Is still sort of not fitting exactly together for me is what are the forces around here that will make it happen i. You know I think that part of the reason I'm hopeful I had a long conversation with Alex about this, we had a good reconnection in these inspired me to figure out how to get involved with rewiring America but like is it. The when we think about for instance The planned obsolescence of natural gas utilities natural gas utility spent about seventeen billion dollars a year on distribution grids and other sort of Cap Bax. In the local level, you could imagine that they could spend that seventeen billion dollars making all these things come true. So whenever someone's gas boiler? goes out they could replace it with electrify everything solutions and they could actually just charge people thirty bucks a month or whatever for the next twenty years to recoup their their costs right. So there are ways to actually figure out how to do this. But I. Think it's critical for an a report like this to come out I and to say it's actually possible. The math actually works. Now, where's the political willpower to actually make this happen and there's some really interesting insights, a commodity report that I think many of us who've been steeped in this? No but for think the first time watcher is shocking. Right So the energy information, administration and many other sources really always compare solar and wind to primary energy. Right. So the way that the world works is you basically pull oil out of the ground ten percent of all of our energy in the United States and pretty much globally is used to bring this kind of stuff out of the ground and then. You say you know this is how many quads of energy we use as a society right and so of solar and wind come in at two percent of that energy. Then people say look how small it is. But in fact, when that energy actually goes to keep your beer cold as emery, Levin's would say. It loses about seventy percent of its energy through the process right in transporting the oil than like. How to put it into a refinery, converting it into useful fuels like gasoline and.

Dr Melissa Lot Alex Laskey America engineer Hurricane Saul Griffith New York Al Morning CO founder Austin Texas United States Jigger Bethesda Maryland Ingrid Catherine Hamilton senior research scholar
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

07:29 min | 7 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Appliances, you will, you won't care about your neighbor comparison. But if you feel like there's similar than you, that's very, very powerful information because we don't have time to actually do ground level bottom up analysis of everything stance. Make Sense. I know you signed powers first contract with mud, which is Sacramento's utilize in two thousand and seven. The same year that you started. But when you sign that contract, you literally did not have a single line of code written and I think a lot of people listening know how hard it is to land utility customer. Let alone if you don't have any code. So how did you do that and what was the early Oh power product like once he actually did write some code. Well. The. The single biggest piece of magic we had was my co founder, Alex, who is. Truly. than his ability to. To move move something like a power forward in terms of finding the right people to talk to and and. Getting their attention getting you know getting us in. That was the that was the magic and then the. Other. Essential piece is that we had we. We did all the work to really put together a product that had. Very, crisp product market fit within the utility sector, and the utility sector is very weird. So they don't just buy things too. It's not like you think you go to business, they're gonNA buy something because it's going to improve their bottom line like that. It's totally different physics in the utility industry. So. Largely to cut it short. There's a huge multibillion dollar segment of the utility industry that pays for energy efficiency programs in the math, the physics there is. I will buy things if they can help consumers save energy cost effectively, and so if you can deliver a program that that works that reduces energy use and its demonstrable measurable and it's cheap, they'll buy it, and so we did all the work to package this up and the critical piece. Was that we pitch the program to be implemented a clinical trial. So he would do a randomized testing control in the utility could directly measure the impact of our communications on reducing usage. And then when you had that fit into their model and then Alex it all of his magic and found us the right people and then. We got our sale. And then we wrote the code. Really. Fast. How quickly? I mean, we had like five months to launch, and we started like a week after we saw. How big? How big was that I conquer? So utility numbers are crazy that contract was almost four, hundred, thousand dollars. And that was your very first contract and that was one year. Yeah. Wow. Now, we signed smaller contracts but then later in powers. Powered today under Oracle has hundred plus million dollar contracts. Wow. So it becomes a different beast in that industry. So I, know you personally put in the first fifty thousand dollars to start. Oh, power before closing your first round of one point five, million in August of two, thousand, seven. And that round that one point, five, million dollar round included a check from an early investor in your last company Eddie soft, and so I'm curious at the time. Were you an Alex and whoever else was on the team at the time? Were you able to pay yourselves where you just living off savings and then what did your work environment look like you know? We all have our stories of where our company started and what they look like. But what did that look like for you? Yeah. So we were like on, I was paying my own way until we raise the. We. We always sort of kept on. Slave. Wages as long as we could Alex and my salary wasn't normal until we went public really and we were always. There was no separation and identity between us and the company at the equity felt like our bones are blood. You know it was like we we held onto it over everything. So I mean we were we were generous with our employees, but it was like was. We've we really managed. We tried to do everything. We can to preserve it, and we paying ourselves was not the priority at the very beginning I had the luxury of having made money made some money at edgy soft. So I, was able to just I didn't take any salary. We Alex took like a subsistence salary and then that got paid back out of the out of the way we were offices were on On. Utah Street in Protrero Hill and we weren't. It wasn't really an office. It was the building that had it had various times, Edgy soft wedding channel Flick stor event. Bright was originally there. The Guy who founded Zinger, the previous company mobs squad I, think our mob snob shop. It's a prolific buildings prolific and spitting out startups. Anyway. The top floor was like a free for all, and we basically paid ran for a couch and a and a, and a standing desk. And we tried to get away without paying rent for for a and then the landlord new came in. It was like, Dan, what are you doing? Gary Go. Man. was like. Four, fifty, a month or something negligible. Tell me. If these numbers are correct, you raised a sixteen million series. B Is Outright Sixteen. One six and then. That was in December of two thousand. We raise the A annot seven, and then we raised the be in a Gotcha and then twelve months. After that, you raised a thirty two million series. See it was two years later, two years. Twenty, ten Gotcha Gotcha. What did fundraising look like for you? And then what advice? What advice do you have for entrepreneurs who are fundraising now? We had great success with fundraising. We had competitive bids and you know multiple term sheets in both of those big rounds as well as A. Guess I'd say my advice don't have much else to say about that. Directly, I'd say my advice and fundraising broadly. I. Often give a couple of tips. One is the one thing you can control is your timeline, so I worked very hard to. Align my conversations with multiple interested investors that they would be coincident. So we got a term sheet or more than one term. She would get them in parallel and we could create some competitive bidding environment. We could become a price maker instead of a price taker and then. The. Second thing I always say is. You have to when you're pitching in a sales setting, it doesn't matter if you say something wrong, you're just trying to say something right and then the buyer will say, oh, that's interesting. I want that and in an in an investor setting. That's just not the case If you say something wrong a May reveal something bad about your company. because. They aren't everything has to add up and be it may reveal or at least revealed, create the perception in the investor that you don't fully understand the company, and so you're an invest in an investor setting. It's as much. The you're trying to create. Confidence in yourself. You know giving build building when the investor, the sense that you really understand your business. So those are the two things. I. I typically advise people on and then you mentioned you met. Powers Co founder and former president. Alex laskey during your freshman year at. Harvard. And then later you reconnected with him in San Francisco, what was your relationship like in college, and then what is your relationship look like auto power?.

Alex laskey Sacramento co founder Gary Go Powers Co Oracle Eddie Zinger Protrero Hill Harvard San Francisco Bright Dan founder president
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"I had this nine more naive sense that there were wild lands ahead of us, and after you drive through the Americas, you realized that actually the most of the you've got well, what is decreasingly while Amazon and otherwise the biggest stretches of wild lands are largely in North America. And everything's obviously mapped out, and we listened in parallel to this. As we drove, we listened to jared books collapse on first generation ipod with the hard drive. This is jared diamond's book. Yeah, and that the book talks about ecological collapse in history of it, happening across a whole host of civilizations and it was just. It was the perfect book to to open our eyes I. I describe on this trip. It felt like the third party on the on the journey was the land because we're looking out the window and and just taking in. So that's what that's what. Is there any image that stands out in your mind of just something that you saw that you will always stay with you? Yeah. There was actually in a really stark. We were driving across the center of Guatemala. And it was huge prairie or plains. Cows grazing moist like wet, but the grass, and then there was this. promontory with kind of like A. Hundred foot. Tall. As. Almost like a humongous three. Acre rock had just been placed in the middle of this plane with sheer cliffs and on top of it was flat and on top, it was just covered in the most dense rainforest picture and it suddenly occurred to both of those that this entire field from horizon had been rainforest. And Guatemala is ninety, seven percent forested and that is. That is the fact that the. Statistic. But then we seeing there really I don was unforgettable and now there was those moments and reading like Oh. This is. The we've got to change what we're doing. From June to October of two, thousand, seven, you had four major life events. You move from. San Francisco to DC, you turn thirty, you've got married, any founded Oh power. The origin of power involves a behavioral scientists, Your College Classmate Alex Alex, laskey and PG's antiquated billing system. How did all four of these things come together to lead to the founding of Oh power and what was it like having all of these things happening at the same time? So it was very hectic. I don't recommend trying to tie them many things together all at once. It wasn't a plan, but it happened. But the way the founding story of power was I came back toby and I my wife and I came back from this trip that move back to San Francisco, and both are looking into what to do next and she had just finished her PhD in international history and it was looking to get into the development or international aid world ended. Surprisingly, I was living in San Francisco for. Years at the time. I knew a lot of people and we tried to. Find opportunities there and they're really actually isn't much in San Francisco on in that domain. So DC was was pulling I. We had I was looking to support her moment to make change for her career. But so Alex and I got working on this sort of looking at a bunch of different cleantech ideas and he and I started to partner together. He had just come off running political campaign and we started looking into this idea. A number of ideas, and I had really out of the blue. Jeanie Bill in the PGA now is good and in no small part I, think power plays a role in that because it's a big customer of overpowers. But OPEC need self spend a lot to improve their bill. But at the time it was atrocious. Almost, you couldn't even tell him what you owed. I, won't go. I. Could regale you with the details, but suffice to say moping this thing is it's like garbage and I'm thinking. There's a billion utility bills that go out a year. One hundred million homes, twelve times a year. Isn't this the biggest marketing opportunity to communicate to people but energy savings, and I don't even know how much I owe let alone if I'm using a lottery little and I had this idea, I'd love to see how my energy use compares to my neighbors, not an individual neighbor, but just give me an aggregate sense using above average below average. Then I could get a benchmark if I should have an opportunity to save. And so I had I was talking about this idea with a bunch of an amongst a bunch of others and I, happen to have a breakfast with Ria Su who was Later under run entity see and being the Obama Administration very successful, and she was running Hewlett Foundation an environmental practice for forgiving, and she had just funded this guy. I tell her about this idea in her eyes go wide and she's just funded this. Guy. Robert Shell Dini famous behavioral psychologists and he's just conducted a study. That demonstrably dent proves if you compare people to their neighbors, they changed their energy behavior. So that's what got US started Alex, came back to ask like this is stupid idea have is actually a real idea, and then we have to look into it, and then you know it's continues from there. Are you a competitive person? Sure. That instinct I want know how my neighbors are doing better I, mean it works. It's funny. It's it's. Was, I wasn't sure why you were asking. Yes. So. Professor Chao Dini has talked a lot about this in depth and with more subtlety than than I will. But. It's not competent. So there's like people often sort of the nastier versions of the instinct is competition or guilt. You know we're going to shame you into changing. And really those are both kind of manifestations of an underlying instinct which is were very deeply program to pursue to seek social proof which is just were heard animal. You know we were were a social animal. We're not actually a hurt animal but so. We, we really take strong cues from norms. and. So when you get a norm that tells you, you're using thirty percent more than average, and if you feel the critical thing is you have to feel. An affinity towards your norm group. So you have to believe you are like your neighbors. If you moved into a neighborhood surrounded by monks living with a single lightbulb and you know appliances, you will, you won't care about your neighbor comparison. But if you feel like there's similar than you, that's very, very powerful information because we don't have time to actually.

Alex Alex San Francisco jared diamond Professor Chao Dini North America Guatemala Amazon Americas center of Guatemala OPEC Jeanie Bill DC Hewlett Foundation toby Ria Su partner PGA
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

02:01 min | 7 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Gates, the CO founder and former CEO of power. Power was founded in two thousand, seven by Dan and Alex Laskey. Two friends from Harvard, Dan new software. Alex knew how to sell and both of them wanted to build a company for environmental. Good. Oh, power was based on a simple premise, send paper mailers to utility customers, comparing their electricity use to their neighbors, and if people saw they were doing poorly, they'd make changes. Changes, it actually worked and overtime Oh Power Inc. deals with the world's biggest power companies and started processing vast amounts of smart meter data making it arguably the biggest energy efficiency success story in business. The company went public in two thousand fourteen and was sold to Oracle in two, twenty sixteen, and in this episode, Emily talks with Dan about the science behind the idea how. How power evolved and expanded and why the company was eventually sold to. Oracle. Normally, we record these conversations at powerhouse headquarters in Oakland. For obvious reasons, we can't do that anymore feels like a lifetime ago. So you're be listening to a live interview recorded over zoom in front of a bunch of people listening in from their houses. We can't give any applause here but without. Without further ADO, here's Emily Kirsch with Oh power co founder, Dan Yates I'm thrilled to be here today with Dan Yates Co founder and former CEO of the energy data company power, who's joining us from Washington DC, hello, Dan, and welcome to the show by emily. Great to be here. Thanks for having me. Of course, I. Know We asked you to turn off your AC. Then, we were afraid. It was going to get really hot. So you were GONNA pre. Cool. Your House I'm curious. Are you freezing? Are you sweating? What's what's your state right now? So it's cold. It's late enough. That, it's cool enough. So all all of the complexity has been avoided. Good good. So. Dan, you founded were in two thousand seven. You led the company through a billion, dollar IPO in two, thousand, fourteen and five, hundred, thirty, two, million dollars sale to Oracle in two, thousand, sixteen under your tenure power saved customers more than thirteen terawatt hours of energy..

"alex laskey" Discussed on Climate 2020

Climate 2020

05:53 min | 9 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on Climate 2020

"Before you start slicing up the victory cake and the fight over the victory cake. While you haven't won on the field is a complete time-waster and the Republicans know this. Because they feed it. Remember Mitch McConnell calling up the green new deal on the Senate floor just to create mischief just because he he perceived division so do no harm the second is go after the bad guys and I think we have to really strong strategies one. We've got out the fossil fuel industry. We've had the house long enough that there should have been subpoenas into some really really creepy dark money episodes that we've seen in the climate right. Was that heartland institute that set out. Two hundred thousand fake schoolbooks schoolteachers around the country. I think it's fair question. Who the hell paid for that. Why is there not a subpoena to heartland saying tell us about who funded your fake textbooks? Go on offense against their crooked machinery root out the dark money. Expose it when you put light into dark money. It's like cockroaches. They run for the shadows. You will clear things out very quickly. The other is corporate America offense but in terms of going into Congress and taking interest in climate change. Are you saying by the way that that the that? The term green new deal is a liability for for climate activism at the moment not per se but fighting with other people in the movement over it is a liability carbon pricing people in green new deal people quarreling with each other. If you've got people you know saying that they're going to sit the election out because you know nobody's supporting the entire renew deal the way they want it. That's just shoot damage shooting yourself in the foot it when I wanted to follow real quickly David so that because there's some interesting new proposals that are coming forward. I mean like rewiring America from saw Griffin and Alex laskey which is really interesting new proposal. You've got the the the the evergreen action that Jane's staffers are putting up and standing up. You've got some other things and They have similar elements to the green new deal. Very ambitious use of government use of government funds creating millions and maybe even tens inmates a new jobs But as soon as it comes to Congress your Republican colleagues Mitch McConnell Ted Cruz Joni Ernst. They immediately call it the green to deal and just start making fun of it. So how do you? How do you deal with that? How do you deal with that? Well what I would. Love is the day that the. Us Chamber of Commerce the National Association of manufacturers the big lobby groups the what Big Wall Street lobbyists a big banks.

Mitch McConnell America Congress heartland institute Senate Us Chamber of Commerce Ted Cruz Joni Ernst Jane David National Association of manufa Alex laskey Griffin
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

10:44 min | 10 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"That airplane a shed one tear and it was beaten out of me and I'm criteria okay. So we're moving on from US learned. I'm how has your leadership style changed over the course of your career If it has I'm much more hands off. I don't think I'm I think I'm a good leader and a manager so I've stopped trying to manage and so that means hire people who don't need a lot of management or as teams get big enough to really actually that only works until maybe six to ten people then hired management. So I think I learned that lesson and it just don't if I'm running the calendar where stirred in trouble so I don't I just don't do the things on now now. I'm not good at which is a long list so don't do much. I would argue otherwise for this work in DC. How big of a shift is this in your life? I know in part you wanted to have this conversation to talk more about what you're doing in. Dc is this you is this you leaving other lab you said you're moving to DC but for a short period of time like how significant is this in the life and career of Software v? I I literally still the teenager was like it's one way to go to Alaska. What could go wrong? I've got eight hundred dollars. My mother thought it was a terrible idea. But you know I worked on a fishing trawler and I helped a guy bill. The marijuana greenhouse and stuff be enough money to survive but like the adventures of of. This is good. I'm interested in learning. How the political process works? I feel it is genuinely important like we. I guess in my few trips to DC talk about people who are Writing Energy. Oh climate policy or thinking about it or advising on it. I'm underwhelmed with the they. They not coming from the front lines of the solutions. Like people in this room so I was like holy cow. The people in this room need to go to. Dc hate guys. We can do this. We need to be the industrial coalition. That's like we can get this job. We can get it done in ten years. But that's not going to happen unless you go to. Dc woke up and down the hill. And you're like America's musings opportunity. He's what it looks like. Let me paint you the picture of how this isn't going to be deprivation and cold rooms and small cars right. Because that's what has the fear like. He's the unbelievable opportunity. You're you may not know it. But solar and wind is now has arrived. He's the legislation that's in the way from the rollout happening foster so I'm actually working with Alex. Laskey who was a founder of power. You should have him here one day. He's great he's very politically connected. So I'm sort of bringing the the data he's bringing you know deep knowledge of working with every utility in the country and we're trying to it's not an exclusive club if anyone would like to come and volunteer their time walking up and down both sides of the aisle for the next three months like this is the moment in history to do it. It's not going to happen if we don't go. And if we don't do it as rub you know. I've hired and half a dozen in the audience really great people who don't need to manage them and we'll probably be stoked when I'm not in the Office. Walking with the crazy idea trying to disrupt them and they're gonNA continue working on on the great technologies that they work so. I don't think you know other lab ten years old. It's sort of manage itself. We're going to start another Dublin this year and then we'll do because the EU and now one hundred billion dollars of work to on on their version of the new deal. So you know. We're going to be there to help them with that problem. One hundred billion dollars from and if we can stand up an office in Dublin without me obviously the San Francisco office can survive for three months and I think the you know the work is is was trying as to autism. Think it's a one in a million shot but as I like to think of it at the moment like on coming under two degrees is one in a million. We really need to have either a miracle technology image. That's not on the cards. All we need this wartime if it but everything that seems impossible seems impossible until you make it inevitable so we just got to collectively make it inevitable. So now's the moment you're calling it rewiring America Ryan America Dot Org. Don't even know how to take a donation from you yet. We have a website. Rewiring American auto practice. Peadbody judge said Boutique Dot Com three or four times last night so America Org anyway. Roughly that is providing technical and data and optimism and messaging support for the politicians of both sides. The WanNa do it and it's about figuring out how to build this industrial coalition and it's about providing support quite. Frankly I think the you know. I've been an activist in my life. I've chain myself to my sheriff fences of never never been charged. Never never never briefed in never never inhaled never charged us but the youth climate strike movement is so exciting to me in the way. They're doing it and I think extinction billion has some some but like is also kind of amazing in its history. And I think the organ the Granville. They need good stories and good ideas because I think it always fails it will. What do you so you said we need a solution? What's your solution? I think it's the job of the seventeen year old. Greta. I think she's amazing but I don't think he's going to be like his all of this deep physics on what we need to do. So that's our job so like you know I feel like we're kind of also signing up to to join the grounds to be to help the army on on the ground swell. Where will we rewired in America and other Latvian? Five years five years we will have eighty percent decarbonised America. I'm going to give you some optimism that that is not actually completely insane so the solar industry globally grew twenty five percent last year electric vehicle industry grew twenty two percent next year last year and the wind industry grew attend and a ten and change so if we continued those growth rates for those industries. This is a poll from the existing install base. What year do you think we are producing enough electricity to completely power the world? Anyone WanNa guess just chat a number 2035 super classes bat twenty thirty seven so literally if we just keep our feet on the gas for wind and solar at the growth rates that they're on but not the gas not on we don Kuwait gas anymore. It's me burning anything natural in your home. You're killing your children by burning methane and creating. Yeah well I mean I would like to demonize the natural gas industry but then I'm GonNa make a plea that we all go to actually figure out how to. I think we're more likely to win. If we flip those industries to be outside and I'm I'm worried that the democratic messaging is so doc but on the on the positive side you know we would we on the trajectory. You're on novel. Yesterday is a difficult growth to sustain but by twenty thirty seven we would produce ten terawatts of clean electricity. And that's enough to dig to completely power. All the activities in the world and on the growth rate of electric vehicles is about twenty thirty. Four way you'd be making eighty billion eighty eighty million vehicles a year global vehicle so if we doubled the right right and that's how we did it World War Two okay. How fast we making bullets today? And this was like in nineteen forty and someone We're making Tanna Day. We're like well we need you know. Five hundred thousand a day by the states who like. Let's try double tomorrow in this double again. The cool thing is you only have to double the rate at which we doing wind and solar navies and you can get it done by twenty thirty so it's not insanely crazy. So my optimism is like we need one one doubling of the right and a lot of commitment and and it's and it's conceivable so I and I just haven't heard enough people say it's it's it's doable. But it is doable. We just need to make it known that still we'll make it knowing that is going to be the cheapest solution we're GONNA lower every I don't know why the Democrats went out there. Pitching HOW EXPENSIVE THEY AGREE. New Deals where it's going to save every young if you could take the cost of rooftop solar. Australia the cost of heat pump heating in Japan Germany and the cost structure of electric vehicles in California. There was a magic country. Which was those three things you would save in a stray? You'd say the average family two thousand dollars a year in America probably thousand bucks a year. So you know it's the the future is just distributed or something but like wherein range we just gotta get rid of the things that are in the way something. I appreciate about your answers that I asked you about rewire in America and other lab in you answered representing the entire industry and the vision and future of the industry which I think is testing credit to who you are and what you're known for. It's not about you or this thing you created. It's about what you're ultimately trying to do with that. No need to respond with. She just had stopped monologue gonNA close with our high-voltage around quick questions very quick answers quick meaning like ten seconds. If you're an animal what animal would you be and why Albatross? Absolutely my gods. They fly incredibly although they land terribly like super high aspect ratio and I was lucky enough to sit on a hill in the Galapagos Albatross. Like dozens of them flying and my wife and I still do trust mating thing. She's doing now. What inspires you Albatross. People.

America Dc DC US Alaska marijuana Dublin Laskey Galapagos Albatross WanNa Alex Ryan America EU founder Tanna Day Granville
"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

The Energy Gang

10:24 min | 10 months ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on The Energy Gang

"Okay. So we're moving on from US learned. I'm how has your leadership style changed over the course of your career If it has I'm much more hands off. I don't think I'm I think I'm a good leader and a manager so I've stopped trying to manage and so that means hire people who don't need a lot of management or as teams get big enough to really actually that only works until maybe six to ten people then hired management. So I think I learned that lesson and it just don't if I'm running the calendar where stirred in trouble so I don't I just don't do the things on now now. I'm not good at which is a long list so don't do much. I would argue otherwise for this work in DC. How big of a shift is this in your life? I know in part you wanted to have this conversation to talk more about what you're doing in. Dc is this you is this you leaving other lab you said you're moving to DC but for a short period of time like how significant is this in the life and career of Software v? I I literally still the teenager was like it's one way to go to Alaska. What could go wrong? I've got eight hundred dollars. My mother thought it was a terrible idea. But you know I worked on a fishing trawler and I helped a guy bill. The marijuana greenhouse and stuff be enough money to survive but like the adventures of of. This is good. I'm interested in learning. How the political process works? I feel it is genuinely important like we. I guess in my few trips to DC talk about people who are Writing Energy. Oh climate policy or thinking about it or advising on it. I'm underwhelmed with the they. They not coming from the front lines of the solutions. Like people in this room so I was like holy cow. The people in this room need to go to. Dc hate guys. We can do this. We need to be the industrial coalition. That's like we can get this job. We can get it done in ten years. But that's not going to happen unless you go to. Dc woke up and down the hill. And you're like America's musings opportunity. He's what it looks like. Let me paint you the picture of how this isn't going to be deprivation and cold rooms and small cars right. Because that's what has the fear like. He's the unbelievable opportunity. You're you may not know it. But solar and wind is now has arrived. He's the legislation that's in the way from the rollout happening foster so I'm actually working with Alex. Laskey who was a founder of power. You should have him here one day. He's great he's very politically connected. So I'm sort of bringing the the data he's bringing you know deep knowledge of working with every utility in the country and we're trying to it's not an exclusive club if anyone would like to come and volunteer their time walking up and down both sides of the aisle for the next three months like this is the moment in history to do it. It's not going to happen if we don't go. And if we don't do it as rub you know. I've hired and half a dozen in the audience really great people who don't need to manage them and we'll probably be stoked when I'm not in the Office. Walking with the crazy idea trying to disrupt them and they're gonNA continue working on on the great technologies that they work so. I don't think you know other lab ten years old. It's sort of manage itself. We're going to start another Dublin this year and then we'll do because the EU and now one hundred billion dollars of work to on on their version of the new deal. So you know. We're going to be there to help them with that problem. One hundred billion dollars from and if we can stand up an office in Dublin without me obviously the San Francisco office can survive for three months and I think the you know the work is is was trying as to autism. Think it's a one in a million shot but as I like to think of it at the moment like on coming under two degrees is one in a million. We really need to have either a miracle technology image. That's not on the cards. All we need this wartime if it but everything that seems impossible seems impossible until you make it inevitable so we just got to collectively make it inevitable. So now's the moment you're calling it rewiring America Ryan America Dot Org. Don't even know how to take a donation from you yet. We have a website. Rewiring American auto practice. Peadbody judge said Boutique Dot Com three or four times last night so America Org anyway. Roughly that is providing technical and data and optimism and messaging support for the politicians of both sides. The WanNa do it and it's about figuring out how to build this industrial coalition and it's about providing support quite. Frankly I think the you know. I've been an activist in my life. I've chain myself to my sheriff fences of never never been charged. Never never never briefed in never never inhaled never charged us but the youth climate strike movement is so exciting to me in the way. They're doing it and I think extinction billion has some some but like is also kind of amazing in its history. And I think the organ the Granville. They need good stories and good ideas because I think it always fails it will. What do you so you said we need a solution? What's your solution? I think it's the job of the seventeen year old. Greta. I think she's amazing but I don't think he's going to be like his all of this deep physics on what we need to do. So that's our job so like you know I feel like we're kind of also signing up to to join the grounds to be to help the army on on the ground swell. Where will we rewired in America and other Latvian? Five years five years we will have eighty percent decarbonised America. I'm going to give you some optimism that that is not actually completely insane so the solar industry globally grew twenty five percent last year electric vehicle industry grew twenty two percent next year last year and the wind industry grew attend and a ten and change so if we continued those growth rates for those industries. This is a poll from the existing install base. What year do you think we are producing enough electricity to completely power the world? Anyone WanNa guess just chat a number 2035 super classes bat twenty thirty seven so literally if we just keep our feet on the gas for wind and solar at the growth rates that they're on but not the gas not on we don Kuwait gas anymore. It's me burning anything natural in your home. You're killing your children by burning methane and creating. Yeah well I mean I would like to demonize the natural gas industry but then I'm GonNa make a plea that we all go to actually figure out how to. I think we're more likely to win. If we flip those industries to be outside and I'm I'm worried that the democratic messaging is so doc but on the on the positive side you know we would we on the trajectory. You're on novel. Yesterday is a difficult growth to sustain but by twenty thirty seven we would produce ten terawatts of clean electricity. And that's enough to dig to completely power. All the activities in the world and on the growth rate of electric vehicles is about twenty thirty. Four way you'd be making eighty billion eighty eighty million vehicles a year global vehicle so if we doubled the right right and that's how we did it World War Two okay. How fast we making bullets today? And this was like in nineteen forty and someone We're making Tanna Day. We're like well we need you know. Five hundred thousand a day by the states who like. Let's try double tomorrow in this double again. The cool thing is you only have to double the rate at which we doing wind and solar navies and you can get it done by twenty thirty so it's not insanely crazy. So my optimism is like we need one one doubling of the right and a lot of commitment and and it's and it's conceivable so I and I just haven't heard enough people say it's it's it's doable. But it is doable. We just need to make it known that still we'll make it knowing that is going to be the cheapest solution we're GONNA lower every I don't know why the Democrats went out there. Pitching HOW EXPENSIVE THEY AGREE. New Deals where it's going to save every young if you could take the cost of rooftop solar. Australia the cost of heat pump heating in Japan Germany and the cost structure of electric vehicles in California. There was a magic country. Which was those three things you would save in a stray? You'd say the average family two thousand dollars a year in America probably thousand bucks a year. So you know it's the the future is just distributed or something but like wherein range we just gotta get rid of the things that are in the way something. I appreciate about your answers that I asked you about rewire in America and other lab in you answered representing the entire industry and the vision and future of the industry which I think is testing credit to who you are and what you're known for. It's not about you or this thing you created. It's about what you're ultimately trying to do with that. No need to respond with. She just had stopped monologue gonNA close with our high-voltage around quick questions very quick answers quick meaning like ten seconds. If you're an animal what animal would you be and why Albatross? Absolutely my gods. They fly incredibly although they land terribly like super high aspect ratio and I was lucky enough to sit on a hill in the Galapagos Albatross. Like dozens of them flying and my wife and I still do trust mating thing..

America Dc DC US Alaska marijuana Dublin Laskey WanNa Ryan America Alex EU founder Galapagos Albatross Tanna Day Granville
"alex laskey" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

Motorsport Radio

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on Motorsport Radio

"Once again and the British GT championship joining them on the Bill or rather the other way round. But that's where we'll be talking about a bit later on isn't that right? Connor indeed esta killed so stay tuned for that. And get all the latest updates on my bane. Probably the biggest and best single make saloon car championship in the country. I've got that. Right. Yes. Lester an exciting weekend coming up on Olten park this weekend for the first purchase GT round. And it's obviously associated support as mentioned. Yeah. We're big in this weekend. We should do that. And yeah, we'll be talking about formula e as well funding. What happened with that? And find out who has made the biggest gaffe ever in leaving team. Just before they came good. Nope. Not Honda by dumping dumping the team and then going on to win the championship. We'll we'll boop. We will be talking about a bit later as well in the greatest ever sport comebacks because we put article about I can vote and stuff when that's also what will be packed show, basically. So let's not waste it by off Donna caveats, alrea downtick, Tim. Thank you very much. But we are talking and continuing with some f one chance for the time being and yes, so Ferrari, then someone suggested that I have a fundamental problem with the car isn't just slow all is it is it, I don't even know. Connor. Well, the Ferrari has been underperforming cry thing. This is the best way to before. That's that's also a way to put it as well, Lester they've been very dominant in preseason testing. And we all thought this would be finally the year finally Ferrari would get goods, and we could have a real race on our hands and then Melbourne came. And then Bahrain happened and we've had China, and it's been a interesting last couple rounds. If even if we look at the drivers championship the stop in his ahead of both for our drivers. Now, and considering what we all expected from them coming into the year. It's a real underperformance. And I'm sure that they're preparing let's say for a championship voice at some point butts to go three races and not show any promise attache, minimal drive only two podiums into three races for both drivers. It's it's not what you want to be performing. And it's certainly something that's going to this going to hinder them for the rest of the season. Even if. Do get their act together right now deaf. Oh, so yeah. You know, what you thought you basically just skirted round my question with is the fundamental problem with the Ferrari? Yes, eloquently pot. And I definitely wouldn't have put it in such nice words. So I think we still go for rehabbing stunk attempts, Alex Laskey Ferrari, then now will you one of the people who were? Cheering them on after their fluttering preseason tests. And are you disappointed and also what's wrong with that car? Can you fix it? Please. It's just too slow. Why basically it's it's got a lot of power this top speed surprisingly enough is she has great imagine. It has like very peaky top speeds. So it delivers power occasionally like the maximum power casually. It's still like a average average top speed is average Powell on the street still better than most post things. But it doesn't quite deliver all power all the time. So they're not able to maximize that because of liability issues bugs of things, obviously still clo on Bahrain last time, I think he broke most people's hearts in the paddock and the F one world's and just in the corners as the gentleman points. Dow who was with the quotas headline the f ones like for always fundamental air issue. Now, I know expert, I don't know exactly what that is. When I hear that. I wonder if it's upside down and this is pitching the car into the air. And I hope not because it'd be terrifying. It'd be about wherever it's down. We we don't want that. But honestly, I it's it's a one and after last season when they had the best call for the majority of the year, and they made a few themselves actually when the car, and it's bashing veteran made quite a lot of Ariza himself..

Ferrari Alex Laskey Ferrari Connor Lester Olten park Bahrain Powell Ariza Honda Dow Donna Melbourne China alrea downtick Tim
"alex laskey" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"alex laskey" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"He just wanted to have some yuck slaves. His motives are unclear right now, but it does seem as though maybe he was dealing with something depression or some issues. This guy did crashed the plane and die, but whether he did that intentionally is still a bit of an unknown. It's kind of a conjecture I would. I would say that it is not one hundred percent clear that he was suicidal, but the things he said certainly would lead you to believe that he was. Yeah, he'd, he did say in this conversation with air traffic control that he knew how to put the landing gear down, but he wasn't really planning on doing it on land again and the he referred to himself as a broken guy with the with some screws loose, I think. Yeah, but yeah, pretty pretty bold way to go. Yeah. And there's no real stuff. I don't want you to know here outside the fact that this maintenance worker was able to successfully steal hijacked steel. A plane and not to mention like how in the same way with the credit card scam right earlier, how is this going to affect the kind of access that employees get? You know, security gets tighter and tighter. Every interaction that we have in society is starting to get more and more monitored, and we're just looking for new potential threats always. And now it's like we're looking at them from the inside. So I wonder if there's going to require different clearances or what, what what it's going to mean for for people, you know, at airports, I, I don't know. There's a lot of potential for change there, and I would just say, I don't know enough about how you get a plane to start a like a giant turboprop engine plane to start. Are there keys involves is their code involved software? I don't know, but I'm gonna look it up and learn more. So I guess. Yeah, here here's to use sky king. Our final post for this episode comes from Alex Laskey and he posted a guardian story and it's the title is men find for pretending to be a ghost in Portsmouth cemetery. Yeah. And the reason this is great is because the the commentary is is interviewer. Where do you see yourself in five years me? And then this postman find for pretending to be a ghost material and I couldn't help, but let this, oh yeah. And then the the below the below. The headline police spokesman say witnesses complained about Anthony, Stoller, throwing his arms in the air and saying. She and it could. I couldn't help reminded of our ghosts oversight episode. Yeah, where there was some question as to whether these two women who claim to have seen the.

Alex Laskey Stoller Portsmouth cemetery Anthony one hundred percent five years