19 Burst results for "Alex Cortez"

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

04:21 min | 3 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"I n d dot com. Now, Here's our own Alex Cortez With today's story page, General Sarno was born in Mexico City come from a big family, 10, civilians, 11 and the House was always busy. Everybody has a role, you know, Like like the funny one. You know that the smart one, you know, e guess my wealth like the serious one Korea's, you know, like building things and Around my 16 15 year old. My mom got here. So if we need to move out of the city, and they picked our little town like three hours away from Mexico City And my dad always had this dream off, become a farmer. But he approached was more like doing the always, you know, like No wanna use attractive from us doing like data before we horses, man. Because he believed that was better The plants to know that cross we grow better. It was a better job. I think people live there. Working hard was better way and I always was trying to find a way to do it more like in a smart way, you know, like like not to toward the heart against No. I saw my mom that he was trying to raise chickens in. I was trying to build the incubator for her. My resources were limited. No Internet or books and, you know So I had to come with the idea, And my idea was a box and It was no power of the farm, so I had to come with the heat source and I came to using candles or something like that for the incubator. You know, I was testing one eye and catching fire. So my dad got really upset because I almost burned the farm them And now my blind with Carl, you know everything was perfect. Could be growing, but Yeah. He was mad at me because he gets to tell me. Could you stop that? You know, Could you stop that team that you have, but just use accept that things the way they are. They're already working. But I just I just couldn't I just have it in me. You know, Like, how can I make a better, I guess. You know the same with a The corn show. You know that my mom had to use my hand a contraption she used to shell corn. I was like, maybe I can put a motor on it. So she doesn't have toward the heart because she was like, Oh, no like that. You can't just put corn in and they worked very much myself, and I don't know how to convince her but With the print kind and everyone see the another cramp. Coming out. And finally something works. But it was But again a didn't understand anything about revolutions per minute. You know, my mother was too fast for everything. It was metal with Matt also start getting hot and finally and burn it. My father and my brothers always make out on me. You know, Now you run something that what's working fine. Now we've had to write down all the one and it just kept happening. But I guess when my dad was asking me to stop that curious to meet him in it, and I go the way you know, we love like he was trying to prevent me and not to get hurt or someone Oh, even, you know, get embarrassed outside, You know this outside and in the workplace. His cars and all the people can be harsh and you get embarrassed. That's something I guess that's what he means. You know, like you might not feed up there. So you have to stay here with the family. You know, you'll be fine here. We love you. We understand you. Father. He's way and my way, but there were always, you know. Bumping into focus. Kristi don't line my approach and he can trying to convince me that the there was money on being shepherd. Which.

Alex Cortez Mexico City Matt 10 Kristi 11 16 Carl today three hours Sarno Korea 15 year old one eye corn General
"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

01:52 min | 3 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"Our own. Alex Cortez will bring us the highlights of his conversation with folks at the parade and on the National mall that day. Alex, What do you have? First for us, Lee at the parade, I met Kevin one sing. He was a retired Navy captain and now lives in Alexandria, Virginia, and I asked him who he was honoring. I've got a several friends from mine who are heading out with me. Alan Rogers. And then I had a cousin of mine who was World War two B 24 pilot Russell Anderson, who who did like 2020 missions and over World War two and B. 24, then crash died in the wars. Actually, his son was a air force pilot into died or the cold War and I playing crash And he was his son was a little baby when he when Dad died, where were to never saw his little baby? His son died is present Air Force pilot during the Cold War acts midair of accident and died in the line of duty, So his name was Russell Anderson as well. So those were three people that you know directly. My family who I knew, you know, died during the war or friends about a lot of other friends who died in the line of duty, You know, are badly wounded injured on de. So today's the day for all Americans to remember all those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. I'm just looking at the National Archives that statue over there says eternal vigilance. Is the price of liberty. That says it all. It's got a kind of exactly right. Exactly. I every time I every time I drive by here I look at this is like a temple. Right? The Temple of Freedom right across the temple of Freedom here where the Constitution Declaration of events, all the things that inspire our country and Actually billions around the world. Amen. Kevin and I then spoke about one more thing. What would you want Americans to know that they might not know about betters. Well, veterans do it for the.

Alex Cortez Alan Rogers Kevin Alex Russell Anderson Cold War three people Alexandria, Virginia First cold War billions World War two Lee Temple of Freedom temple of Freedom B. 24 24 2020 Navy today
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Our own. Alex Cortez will bring us the highlights of his conversation with folks at the parade and on the National mall that day. Alex, What do you have? First for us, Lee at the parade, I met Kevin one sing. He was a retired Navy captain and now lives in Alexandria, Virginia. And I asked him who he was honoring. I'm gonna several friends from mine who are competitive with me, Alan Rogers. And then I had a cousin of mine who is World War two. 24 pilot Russell Anderson, who who did like 2020 missions and ovary World War two and B. 24, then crashed, died in the wars. Actually, his son was a air force pilot into died or the cold War and I playing crash and he was his son was a little baby when he My dad died. World War two never saw his little baby. A son died is present Air Force pilot during the Cold War and act midair of accident and died in the line of duty, So his name was Russell Anderson as well. So those were three people that you know directly. My family. Who I I you know, died during the war or friends about a lot of other friends who died in the line of duty, You know, are badly wounded injured on de. So today's a day for all Americans to remember all those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. I'm just looking at the National Archives that statue over there says eternal vigilance. Is the price of liberty that says it all. It's got a kind of exactly right. Exactly. I every time I every time I drive by here, I I look at this was like a like a temple. Right? The temple of Freedom right across the temple of reading here where the Constitution thank you examined events, all the things that inspire our country and Really billions around the world. Amen. Kevin and I then spoke about one more thing. What would you want Americans to know that you might not know about betters? Well, that veterans do it for the love of the country..

Alex Cortez Alan Rogers Alex Kevin Russell Anderson Cold War Alexandria, Virginia cold War First three people Lee World War two World War two. 24 billions B. 24 today National Archives Navy of Freedom 2020
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:42 min | 4 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Right things. Yuri's about ethical dilemmas that sponsored by the great folks at the Daniel's phone, and by the way, if you have stories about ethical dilemmas in your life, for better or for worse, making the right decision making the wrong decision. But something big and something tough and complicated. Send them to our American stories. Calm. He's a some of our favorite stories. We get to learn from all of us together. Today. Alex Cortez brings us the story about the man who inspired this Syriza's the biggest thing that's lacking and one of the biggest things in the real world of business. Today is the Ethical standards on integrity of some business people or listening to Bill Daniels, the late Denver businessman who's best known as the father of cable TV. But in 1975 before he fully earned that title, he was the owner of the American Basketball Association's Utah Stars, which wasn't a profitable team and he was financially struggling. Here's former stars coach top Masaki Way started started the season, but I could tell, you know there was financial problems. He wasn't the same. Ambulance guy that he normally was a positive. Uh, really. We really had some problems. Guys not getting paid, so he ended up bankrupt in the team, which absolutely crushed him. Remember, he came to a practice and said, This is What I'm gonna have to do. I had to take bankruptcy for the basketball team that I owned in the state of Utah was the Utah stores where the league Champions Times were tough on my bank shuttle with credit. So I had to get all my players together. Almost happened, said We gotta shut her down and I was miserable. Let me take it. E was crying. And I was on the 10th floor of the traveling and Salt Lake City, Utah on my lawyer is a guy named Bob Nagel represented me for years with my house counsel. And I said, Bob, I'm so heartbroken. I'm gonna jump out the window. Hey, said Bill, the luckier having you're gonna live. Now. The reason I tell you, the story is I had temporarily strips citizens. It's all Lake City for $750,000 per season tickets. It's been paid for and no more ballgames, and we old creditors and that bothers the hell out of a It's almost 2.4 million in today's dollars, and Bill couldn't stop thinking about it, even though the debt had been legally wipes clean in the bankruptcy. Here's his business partner, John Semen on Bill special motivation when they created and later sold their second company. 15 cable systems. All along in the creation of the second company, and with the incident of filing bankruptcy with Utah Stars had this pressing obligation mentally morally. To satisfy all of his creditors. So he directed our accounting department to collect everything that was available at the time of the bankruptcy in the way of payables. And keep track of them because someday he had to make that right. He often said, is two objectives in life when he wanted to go to heaven, and he wanted to go without on anybody. Any money. You're mad at him. So one of his compelling reasons to sell was to satisfy those obligations in the grand scheme of things. It wasn't a lot of money at the time. It was a lot of money, but now that he's got 20, or 25 million It's not a big amount of money anymore, but almost before we even closed It was preparing to go back to Salt Lake to pay off those creditors. He's got a list of every one of them how much money he had defaulted with them on And what the interest rate would be to bring it up to current if he wrote a check. What would he owe him? Including interest on that was I think one of the most joyful times in builds life more joyful than having made the money from having build up the company and sold. It was the satisfaction he got of honoring his liabilities and protecting and preserving his name. And boarded. I feel good about that. I really felt good. And so did those on the receiving end and mostly not for financial reasons. Here season ticket holder Jerry Howls. I Remember getting a letter Then I've tried to find it tried and tried and tried to find that have not been able to find it. And I get this check for It was it had to be a couple. $1000 was astounded. Then I bring you found out what what Bill Daniels was all about in terms of His tremendous integrity. It's almost synonymous with Bill Here again is Thomas sake, who had this point was the coach of what would be the second professional team in the state of Utah. I'm back. Coaching the Utah Jazz, and he called. He calls me from a little American. He said. Can you come down to have lunch with me? And I said, Can I bring the sheriff? I thought when I arrest you, it was gonna be in the little facetious needs throughout. Things were gonna turn out okay? And I came down. He had some guy with him. I don't know the guy's name to this day, but he had a ledger with him. And Bill started going over their names, he said. You know this guy and this was like guys that were old $10 much less Season ticket holders, but he had like everything. I don't know where he got all the names. But E. I mean, there are guys that were all would like and I mean very, very little money, much less a season ticket holder or whatever on then, he said. Are you getting fidgety about what I might owe you And I said not anymore. And, uh hey, gave me a check which is worth I mean, would be nice to have today. But then with at that time, a young wife and two young kids it was astronomical. And some of those less astronomical checks that Tom mentioned might have resulted from the unusual newspaper ads that Bill Place that asked for anybody that he owed money to it to reach out to him. Here's former stars coach Ladell Anderson in 2013, Honey, you know you could do Not done that, but he did it. That's just the kind of guy you watch. You know how? How many? How many people would do that? You know, but he didn't. He made a promise to person he carried it out. You could take it to the bank. I love. I love Bill Daniels. I'll never forget him, Of course. But my days for number on 82 years old and I'll be wrong much, but he should never be forgotten. And this helps a little bit like good and all this love for Belle unexpectedly helped all of his future business ventures. Here's former stars general manager Vince Barilla, my personal feelings through that, you know, he couldn't if I've got it told him to do it very pre. Probably did. He couldn't have done anything better because the money is that That he took and paid back. Whatever the amount was. I always said to myself, I said those were the cheapest dollars he's every spent for PR. In my life. They're very didn't he didn't do it for that purpose he was competing in and the cable world within a multi cable people. What if Bill met any of those people head on in any city that they were competing for a guarantee of Bill got it because they knew of the caliber of person. That they were dealing with and to conclude Here's the late Bill Daniel speaking to students in the nineties. Now the moral of that story is today. Some 18 years later, I meet people in all over the country that say, Aren't you the guy that paid off the season ticket holders? It's all Lake City. I say yes, that's May. Now what I've seen you as I did not think that was such a big deal of the time. I just didn't want to have to live live with myself. That's a case of examples of ethics and integrity that come back to you that you never dream would come back to the O dancer and the reason I went over there. I went over there because I had to look in the mirror in the morning. When I say And.

Bob Nagel John Semen Alex Cortez Bob 20 Jerry Howls Vince Barilla 2013 1975 $10 Bill Daniel $750,000 Salt Lake Bill Daniels Ladell Anderson $1000 25 million Tom Bill Lake City
"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

06:51 min | 6 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"Worked hard every day to help small business owners become bigger business owners and live their American dream. Alex Cortez. Now brings us the story of someone you likely don't know, but we'll be glad to have met. Here's our Joel Manby was born into a poor family. My mother told me when I was after my father passed away that my father was making about $50 a week. For 3 to 5 years when his business was going under. So that's you know, Call it $2500 a year $3000 a year. And That had a huge impact on me because I felt it in our home. Every fight we had every disagreement was always about money. It was about the lack of it wide my mom by this Why did we do that? And It impact man. Matter fact I'll tell one little story. When I was in Little League, I was pretty good player and I hit a home run to win the this big city tournament. And it was the first time my dad had ever come to a game because he always works second shift in a factory job that he had later in life. And the whole team went out to and W to celebrate and my dad took me directly home. And the car was really quiet. I thought he was mad at me for some reason, and we didn't go celebrate. And at night time when I went to bed, I was crying. And I asked my mother Why doesn't Dad love me? Everybody else went out and she said your dad loves you. But they have payroll to make tomorrow and he doesn't have any cash and he can't afford to take you guys to end of you. That had a huge impact on me. Because it made me not ever wanna be in a situation when my kids were I didn't have resource is to take care of them. It drove me so much that sometimes I think I have done things in life. For the money, you know, and when it wasn't necessarily what I really love to do. And for anybody listening to this story, I would implore them not to do that. Because I think money does not make you happy. And you got to do things you love. And if money comes as result, great But it really dominated my life for way too long. That fear that fear of not having enough Did Dr me sometimes to really bad behavior because of that fear they took all the psychiatry tests of what I should do. I have a huge heart and a lot of them said you should be a minister or a coach. And you don't think of people like that being in business and being extremely successful in business. But that's exactly what soul did, which GM making him CEO of Saab North America when he was only 35 years old. And they later gave him Asia and Latin America, too. And so that was really my big business break that I was able to run a large division of General Motors at a very, very young age, and that was a big break. We had a great season. They're a great turn around for a lot of different reasons. At the same time. That was a period of my life where I think my work ethic in this fear of failure and just doing whatever I had to do not to fail. And really hurting my relationships with my my, especially with my wife. I was traveling 70 to 80% of the time and I could feel the tension growing. My wife at the time started putting up the white flag of Hey, this is not what I what I signed up for, and I really wanted to try to honor that. So I went to my Boss who was the CEO of all aside worldwide in Sweden and said, Look, I cannot handle physically. Doing Asia and South America. I want to just have United states in the United States was their biggest market. It was a big job, and that's how I started with them and then added these other regions. I said, I just can't do this. And he said No, I'm not going to take you out of those countries. You're doing a good job. We need you here. You know, Here's a 5% raise you stick with the job. Never forget that he refused that. And in hindsight, I do wish I had gone back and said, Hey, look, I'm gonna leave if you don't make this change, and at the same time I was getting some Huge pushback from my boss on our track record, Even though it was really, really good. They always wanted more, and they want it faster. I'll tell one story about What happened with him and some of the treatment that taught me a lot. A lot of what not to do. He calls me on Easter Sunday morning and just starts. Truman. This is remember. This is he's two o'clock and Sweden so it's like, eight a.m. or so in the United States. He wakes me up, basically out of bed and just starts chewing me out over the numbers for For one month, we had a three year track record. That was really good, but because one month was way off He starts to and me out, And he orders me to get out and our airplane and fly to Sweden that afternoon so that I could be in a meeting Monday morning. So literally, I miss Easter Church. I Get on that four PM flight out of Detroit, fly over to Sweden and literally just get chewed out for about an hour and a half in front of my peers. And some of them some of the reasons we're off. We're just manufacturing issues in Sweden, but be that as it may I can't remember. What was said exactly. But I never have ever forgotten how that made me feel. It just made me feel disrespected, Unimportant unneeded and I mentally checked out. At that moment and On the way back. I just started thinking. What am I doing? What? Why am I I'm giving. I've stress at home. I'm traveling all the time. What am I? What am I afraid of? If he's not going to treat me properly, it's time to be open to other things. So that was just a real indicator to me. That people have to be treated better in business. And you're listening to Joel Manby story and my goodness, his reaction to the lack of money in his home. Searing memory of that night literally. Where he will. He couldn't celebrate with all of his friends and a and W his dad took him home. And the way he dealt with all this the way he processed, this was to overreact. Year drove him and drove him is, he said to bay badly, forcing his wife.

Alex Cortez Joel Manby 70 Monday morning Detroit General Motors Sweden United States eight a.m. South America 3 $2500 two o'clock one month United states Truman 5% Saab North America Latin America 80%
"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

04:35 min | 6 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"To continue to Nurture them spiritually. So they won't want to do that, and they won't want to go there. And in the name of connective itty. We have become very disconnected. People are looking at their cell phones and getting text messages. And they're not looking in the eyes and hearing the voice directly of people. Unprocessed. If you go down south and someone says, you'll come back, you hear they all say that when you leave because it's just polite. If you don't say that, you're not polite. But some people mean it because you're like a brother or sister to them, and they'll miss you, and they look forward to being with you again. In other People can't wait for you to get out of there. And they just assumed every year. You see you get the words are the same if you're texting it, But when you hear the voice You know the difference. You know the difference right away. And people need to know that they need to know that someone really does care about them. And they need to hear that in the voice of human voice. And so we weigh wanted. Keep working on what Mother Trees has said the greatest poverty is spiritually poverty. We can't let that happen in our world. If we want our world to truly be better for our great grandchildren, we can't rely on it being better by science alone. Because science can be used both ways, good or bad. And so you have to bring up. You have to bring up the other side. And great job is always to Alex Cortez. And thanks to Robbie for the production, and thanks to Bill Austin, for all he does, proving that men of science well, they have spirit. My goodness. His faith walk is a remarkable one Bill Austin's. Moreover, that business and men of business can change the world and all of the great innovation and health. Well, it's all because of what private entrepreneurs do with their lives to make people's lives better in the end, and Bill Austin is the founder of Starkey hearing technologies, and you could learn more about their work and hearing AIDS. At Starkey dot com. And that figure he throughout was stark and remarkable. $3 trillion a year are spent. Well, All of it spent trying to make our lives better. And with this one device He's of the deep belief and he comprise it that people can well take fewer drugs. They can visit hospitals less frequently and need less doctor visits as well. And this is just a matter of living better and making better choices and having the data to do it and the devices to do it and again, we spent a lot of time with the steps and family office on Better health at lower costs and my goodness, this is practically a feature or that Syria's Bill Austin story, the founder of Starkey, hearing technologies here. On our American story. Hi. Hello. Hi, where the producers were the producers at our American stories on our American network, And we would like to hear your story if you or someone you know, has an interesting story that you would like to share with America. Simply email us a pitcher and a paragraph picture and a paragraph to your story at our American network dot or just a picture in a paragraph. Yep. That's all you need. The jurors someone you know, serving the military. Tell us about it. Send a picture and a paragraph to your story at our American network. That work did you or some You know that something dramatic happened. We want to know about it in a picture of yourself in a paragraph describing something that happened in your life you would like to share with America and the rest of the world as someone ever done something for you that changed your life. Share it with us. Share it with us. Share it with us. We're just having a bad day. We want to hear about it. We want to hear about it. Share your story with us on our American stories. Your story is important to us and our listeners to share.

Alex Cortez Bill Austin Starkey Robbie Syria Starkey dot com $3 trillion a year both ways one America American
"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

05:20 min | 6 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"American stories and with the story of an American classic Stephen Ross is the largest real estate developer in America, the owner of the Miami Dolphins. And he shared his life story with our own Alex Cortez. Stephen Ross is a Detroiter born and bred until his parents dragged him against his will. Midway through his freshman year of high school from Miami Beach, Florida hated it down there, actually. And I kind of rebelled against my parents and E got toe little trouble. I mean, I mean, I suppose is studying, you know, go out. Quick. Give me a little bit, You know, I mean, I had a you know everything but study even though my parents really Try to be strict. You know, my father lectured all the time. As opposed because he was working and then he'd lecture me. I guess it didn't do any good, You know, but its ultimate I guess it's something e. I don't know. E wanted to get out of there. I went toe. My parents said. Well, if you're gonna leave, you don't want to go to school here. You have to go to military school. It's fed about four days of military schools that I go back to school, you know? And e talk to most of my friends. I mean, probably my background was probably different than most, because I've never excelled early in life, and I was We got into college because they had to accept me because I had a standardized test that I Scored well enough that the school had to take you and they flunked out two thirds of the freshman class. They tell you looking at left and looking. You're right. The person sitting next you won't be here next year and So you know, kind of a wake up call. But I also knew if I wanted something we didn't I wasn't doing anything for my parents. I wasn't left anything and they had nothing to give me. You know, so I knew Where was you know is either sink or swim? And then when I got to college, that's when I really kind of started to be able to do well to receive Florida then so I could transfer to Michigan and then law school and then I got my masters in tax law. Which I excelled in, and it's probably the best year of school I ever had. That really had found something enjoyed. It always get good marks. If I liked it, you know, I didn't like the subject. I didn't do very well. Confidence. I mean, you know, you have to first find your confidence. That you can succeed and do something well, Excel. Continue on me, as they say Success breeds success. Mean, teachers told my parents. They were wasting time sending me to college, which is really kind of funny, right when I look back at it now, So I mean, I look at myself I was the way it started. Life because it Probably spread about the least likely to succeed in my ass school class, you know? So you tell me how much teachers don't wouldn't so the environment of which were brought up on me Even when your parents As much as my parents emphasized that and I could see things Was really later that I really saw things a lot more clearly, you know, after getting his master's degree it and why you Stephen went back to his hometown to work in an accounting firm as a tax attorney. I was doing very well practicing law on it. You know, certain places really kind of funny. It's kind of impulsive. I'm in my office one day was, in fact, I remember I could still picture Was June's thing was true. Seven through 2/9 in 1968. The night before Bobby Kennedy was assassinated, and I'd watch it that night. And that next day you're wondering the life that you never know when it's over and thinking about that, you know, he was a relatively young guy and partner walks in my office and asked me If I want to go Toe seven are in New York said You know what? Haven ever thought about it, is it? I want to go. I think I want to go to New York for good. It's a matter of fact, I'm quitting a moving to New York. Never entered my mind. It never would. From my mind too. You know, I'm gonna think about leaving and I even thought about leaving. It just came up. I mean, like this so impulsive. Sometimes we don't even know ourselves. No, What's really what's going out? So you've been brought in the senior partner and may you know Steve's quit. He's leaving New York. You know, guys What I mean, Steve, you're doing great. Here. You're gonna be a partner here and blah, blah, blah. But I got bored and I could see how I was tailing off in my bite. That was just ready for something and that Z parked it. About me even thinking about it. You know, it's a lot of things you know, like we think we're in control of We're not necessarily in control of what we really don't know. It takes something takes a spark. For something to happen. I've told my mother, you don't know anybody in New York. I said, Hey, you know, I went there. I loved it. And, you know stories. If you could make it there, you can make it anywhere. Blah, blah, blah and off. I went and

Alex Cortez Stephen Ross America Miami Dolphins Miami Beach, Florida American E Detroiter
Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross shares his life story

Our American Stories

05:20 min | 6 months ago

Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross shares his life story

"American stories and with the story of an American classic Stephen Ross is the largest real estate developer in America, the owner of the Miami Dolphins. And he shared his life story with our own Alex Cortez. Stephen Ross is a Detroiter born and bred until his parents dragged him against his will. Midway through his freshman year of high school from Miami Beach, Florida hated it down there, actually. And I kind of rebelled against my parents and E got toe little trouble. I mean, I mean, I suppose is studying, you know, go out. Quick. Give me a little bit, You know, I mean, I had a you know everything but study even though my parents really Try to be strict. You know, my father lectured all the time. As opposed because he was working and then he'd lecture me. I guess it didn't do any good, You know, but its ultimate I guess it's something e. I don't know. E wanted to get out of there. I went toe. My parents said. Well, if you're gonna leave, you don't want to go to school here. You have to go to military school. It's fed about four days of military schools that I go back to school, you know? And e talk to most of my friends. I mean, probably my background was probably different than most, because I've never excelled early in life, and I was We got into college because they had to accept me because I had a standardized test that I Scored well enough that the school had to take you and they flunked out two thirds of the freshman class. They tell you looking at left and looking. You're right. The person sitting next you won't be here next year and So you know, kind of a wake up call. But I also knew if I wanted something we didn't I wasn't doing anything for my parents. I wasn't left anything and they had nothing to give me. You know, so I knew Where was you know is either sink or swim? And then when I got to college, that's when I really kind of started to be able to do well to receive Florida then so I could transfer to Michigan and then law school and then I got my masters in tax law. Which I excelled in, and it's probably the best year of school I ever had. That really had found something enjoyed. It always get good marks. If I liked it, you know, I didn't like the subject. I didn't do very well. Confidence. I mean, you know, you have to first find your confidence. That you can succeed and do something well, Excel. Continue on me, as they say Success breeds success. Mean, teachers told my parents. They were wasting time sending me to college, which is really kind of funny, right when I look back at it now, So I mean, I look at myself I was the way it started. Life because it Probably spread about the least likely to succeed in my ass school class, you know? So you tell me how much teachers don't wouldn't so the environment of which were brought up on me Even when your parents As much as my parents emphasized that and I could see things Was really later that I really saw things a lot more clearly, you know, after getting his master's degree it and why you Stephen went back to his hometown to work in an accounting firm as a tax attorney. I was doing very well practicing law on it. You know, certain places really kind of funny. It's kind of impulsive. I'm in my office one day was, in fact, I remember I could still picture Was June's thing was true. Seven through 2/9 in 1968. The night before Bobby Kennedy was assassinated, and I'd watch it that night. And that next day you're wondering the life that you never know when it's over and thinking about that, you know, he was a relatively young guy and partner walks in my office and asked me If I want to go Toe seven are in New York said You know what? Haven ever thought about it, is it? I want to go. I think I want to go to New York for good. It's a matter of fact, I'm quitting a moving to New York. Never entered my mind. It never would. From my mind too. You know, I'm gonna think about leaving and I even thought about leaving. It just came up. I mean, like this so impulsive. Sometimes we don't even know ourselves. No, What's really what's going out? So you've been brought in the senior partner and may you know Steve's quit. He's leaving New York. You know, guys What I mean, Steve, you're doing great. Here. You're gonna be a partner here and blah, blah, blah. But I got bored and I could see how I was tailing off in my bite. That was just ready for something and that Z parked it. About me even thinking about it. You know, it's a lot of things you know, like we think we're in control of We're not necessarily in control of what we really don't know. It takes something takes a spark. For something to happen. I've told my mother, you don't know anybody in New York. I said, Hey, you know, I went there. I loved it. And, you know stories. If you could make it there, you can make it anywhere. Blah, blah, blah and off. I went and

Stephen Ross Alex Cortez Miami Dolphins Florida Miami Beach America New York Michigan Bobby Kennedy Stephen Haven Steve
"alex cortez" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:13 min | 8 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Know the difference between a man and a pig because you do and you can't help. But no, That's one reason why the Nazis Would love people on cattle cars and shipped him off to factories for their slaughter, just like slaughter houses, But they didn't really like to talk about that very much. They were always trying to cover it up. Right? And when they were later after the war, when they were arrested in, stand up and say, I did that, and that was really great. That's not the way they talk. Why? Because they know And if you know that, then you know that a fellow 6000 miles away in London, born of a great family doesn't get to rule you. Is if you were a hog to take your property and lead you around and do whatever you want. That's what the decorator independence means. And by the way, the point about this is that these arguments from nature inequality They are self evident. What self evident means is saying all men are created equal. You can actually turn that word men in that proposition into the word X. You can put the word cup there. You can put the word dog there. You can put the word pig there. You can put the word angel there because each being of a kind is equal in respect to the thing that gives it its nature and human beings are the rational creatures and unlike hogs, Responsible for their actions and cannot therefore be governed without their consent. Their consent, Theo even come together as a community. And decide to be ruled by a set of minimal common laws that are there's laws that they made an art some morning whims of some king. As mankind was ruled before then, and then off course, there's the dramatic conclusion to the declaration. Of independence. The end of it is a legal pronouncement that now we're going to be an independent country. Pronouncement, mind you sealed. By the people in the room there in Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Mutually pledging to each other, their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. It's a war time battlefield Proclamation. Thomas Jefferson is promising. John Adams. John Adams is promising. Thomas Jefferson back. Everything we've got is a stake in this. We're not going to quit on this thing. We're signing an act of trees. How many of them would lose their lives? Would any lose their fortunes and most importantly, would any Lose their sacred honor that story next In the rule of law for our American stories arm, Alex Cortez..

Thomas Jefferson John Adams Independence Hall Alex Cortez Theo London Philadelphia
"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Too. Didn't pay me And so I can't. I gotta do business a different way, and I'm not going to be able to Buy corn and harvest. And so you know, I'm just gonna have to all try to figure out another way to make it work and that I just don't have the capital and I don't have the bank line to go buy it from the farmers and willing Cooper's Tell me this story 40 years later, and he said that 23 days later gets a check in the mail for a million box. It was from my grandfather who prepaid feet so we would go to the growers by the corn, Put the corn and then sell it to him. Got him going again. When we opened the Grand Island plant, Willard Cooper came to see me. It never met. My grandfather said he wanted to be there. The guy with the first capital into the into the plant on told me this story. I've told that story a lot. It's It's hard to believe in the world like we have today that anybody ever do that. And you've just been listening to Dick Monfort, and he's just about choking up over the stories of his grandfather. On the end as fathers and grand parents we can either be told stories about us like that or not, it all has to do with how he lived. And great job is always to Joey into Alex Cortez for bringing us that piece and a special thanks to the Daniels fund and all of their help, sponsoring and supporting his show their ethics initiative. Well, they talk about things like this regularly and the principles that undergird their ethics initiative, integrity, trust, accountability, transparency, fairness, respect by ability. And rule of law. And all of these things are important. You heard about fairness again and again in this story, and you heard about respect. I mean, what a thing to do for a person front them the capital. First of all you trust right? There's a lot of trust going on there to be able to front two person a million dollars ahead of time and then my goodness, this the respect of that guy situation. And doing something about it. The story of Dick Monfort and in the story of his family here on our American story. Hi. I'm.

Dick Monfort Willard Cooper Grand Island Daniels fund Alex Cortez Joey
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:25 min | 8 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And so I can't. I gotta do business a different way. And I'm not gonna be able to buy corn and harvest and So you know, I'm just gonna have to. I'll try to figure out another way to make it work and that I just don't have the capital and I don't have the bank line to go buy it from the farmers. And Willard Cooper's told me this story 40 years later, and he said that to three days later Gets a check in the mail for a million box. And it was from my grandfather who prepaid feet, So we'll go to the growers by the corn, Put the corn and then sell it to him. Got him going again. When we opened the Grand Island plant, Willard Cooper came to see me had never met. My grandfather said he wanted to be the The guy with the first capital into the into the plant on told me this story. I've told that story a lot. It's It's hard to believe in a world like we have today that anybody ever do that on you've just been listening to Dick Monfort, and he's just about choking up over the stories of his grandfather. On the end as fathers and grandparents we could either be told stories about us like that or not, it all has to do with how we live. And great job is always to Joey into Alex Cortez for bringing us that piece and a special thanks to the Daniels fund and all of their help, sponsoring and supporting his show their ethics initiative. Well, they talk about things like this regularly and the principles that undergird their ethics initiative, integrity, trust, accountability, transparency, fairness, respect by ability and rule of law. And all of these things were important. You heard about fairness again and again in this story, and you heard about respect. I mean, what a thing to do for a person front them the capital. First of all you trust right? There's a lot of trust going on there to be able to run two person a million dollars ahead of time. And then my goodness, this the respect of that guy situation and doing something about it. The story of Dick Monfort and the story of his family here on our American story. Hi. I'm.

Dick Monfort Willard Cooper Daniels fund Grand Island Alex Cortez Joey
"alex cortez" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KTRH

"Their business is bigger. And have their families prosper and their communities and our own. Alex Cortez went to a fascinating event called Open Call will warm our opens their doors to over 500 entrepreneurs to pitch their American made products, all in hope of getting into the retailers over 11,000 stores. It's a great democratization of the buying process for folks who may not know anyone at Wal Mart. And it's a part of Walmarts commitment to buy an additional $250 billion of American made products in a 10 year period. And Alex now brings us the story of a prey. Lean proprietor. He met there named Suzanne Hart. I'm Suzanne. This is my mom. Okay? And so its name, Katie. Sweet or all scared of her. I'm just gonna say that she's an accountant by trade. The numbers match. It's we're all responsible. So just as an example how expensive was their hotel bill Last night was quite high. We're gonna hear about that. Yeah, Yeah, You should have brought the car instead in the car way had crackers way started with her grandmother's recipe. See, my dad started a company and 72 basically because my grand parents were ill and they stayed home to take care of him. My dad was a gourmet food salesman. He had to work out the garage at that point, so they could be there for them. We all lived with them. And then they just We ship about £300,000 of candy a year. We have 60 employees now, So we have 30 for this company. We have 30 for another company and some people in their 30 years, So we're the second generation coming into.

Alex Cortez accountant salesman Wal Mart Suzanne Hart
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:49 min | 9 months ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Alex Cortez brings us a voice from Colorado Springs. Colorado. I think growing up you always want to look up to somebody. That's very easy to look up to your own dad. And I think with my dad being a building contractor, it was very Easy for me to see what he did for a living way could drive by a building and, you know, very proudly would say, You know, my dad built that we're listening to Jim Johnson, who in college was 1/5 year senior and didn't always Look up to his dad. In between my 1st and 2nd senior year in college, he said, Hey, let's go to breakfast tomorrow. Which is that a real Standard in our house, who usually means there's an issue that we got a result. So we met downstairs. We're walking out the door and he said, Well, I've decided I'm not gonna hire you. You know when you get out of college, and I said that's fine because I don't want to work for you when I get out of college way, actually never made it to breakfast after succeeding and another construction company, Jim did make it back to their family business, G E. Johnson, and he would eventually lead it and leave the cultivation of their culture that's focused on values and ethics and through ethical dilemmas. Like this way had an example. Denver Tech Center. I honestly believe it was an honest mistake. Way poured a garage for a parking structure. Whole parking structure a foot. Too high way discovered it early on and Yeah, he was gonna be a Seven digit fix. If we admitted our own Miss steak, tore out all that concrete, redid the excavation and got it set right and that's when we did. We didn't debate it way didn't try to find you could have found logic on why you did it foot height. There's enough conflicting drawings and all the stuff we do. Thrust me way could have come up with some Goofy repair, You know, alternative solution by Ramping up part of the parking on or or or we could have just said Hey, for X number of dollars, You know, forgive our mistake. Way met with that job team. They owned up to it. They explained why And way went to the owner and said, Here's our mistake and here's what we're doing. I honestly believe we Next time that kind of built him? No, absolutely hire us because we did way held ourselves accountable. And it cost our company financially to do it right. And we don't hide behind those way didn't terminate anybody because they made this mistake. I mean, we did our due diligence found out It was just truly an honest there and there was multiple places in there. We should have caught it so Guys, you gotta That's why we have processes. Let's make sure we're following these on and I think stories like that. Or people roll their eyes and go. You guys were absolutely stupid. I would have had it any other way. But actually, the decision didn't even make come to me to make the decision. They'd already made the decision. So they're empowered to enforce. You know what we believe is Our integrity. They told me what they wanted to do, right? They told me what what They believe the right thing to do was and I said Yes, I would agree with that. I probably would have a harder time. Telling him no. I think that would have surprised them more and I don't think they have a very good plan. If I would have said no. The reward is doing the right thing. And I believe long term that's gonna open up. More opportunities and given the growth during Jim's.

G E. Johnson Jim Colorado Colorado Springs Alex Cortez Denver Tech Center Miss steak
"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Our American network dot org's That's our American networked out, or there's some of our favorites. In our own. Alex Cortez went on a road trip to an event called Open Call, where Walmart opens their doors to over 500 entrepreneurs to come to their headquarters. What they call the home office in Bentonville, Arkansas, and pitch their American made products to get into their over 11,000 stores. It's a great democratization of the buying process for folks who may not know anyone at Wal Mart. And it's a part of Walmarts commitment to buy an additional $250 billion worth of American made products in a 10 year period. And now Alex brings us this open call story. It was 10:30 a.m. And it suddenly got a louder as the entrepreneurs came out of the rooms where they had their half hour pitch meetings in a Houstonian named Mike Watts came out and showed me the sheet that he just kissed. Oh, yeah, we've got are here. We got our sheet here and says yes. Thank you for a great meaning. We look forward to continue this journey and they want it. They want our product. We're gonna be able to add jobs immediately in our local hometown. Today we have 32 full time employees. Based on this meeting, we're gonna be able to add Mohr immediately expected maybe 50 employees by Christmas, So I just I'm so excited that that's 50 families right that are now going to have a job. I can't even express how excited we are. That dream come true, really isn't mites Company Love Handle has a phone grip that you slip your fingers through. It is better than anything else on the market and will now be in the market. Called WalMart. I think he's gonna go.

Walmart Alex Cortez Mohr Mike Watts Wal Mart Bentonville Arkansas
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"This is our American stories and now we continue with our rule of law series where we bring you stories about what happens when the rule of law is present or absent in our lives today Alex Cortez brings us a fascinating voice and a great perspective we always think that the president is the most dangerous and violent era and that's because well there's always a war going on then that will top the news cycle for listening to Johanna Norberg all three of the book progress ten reasons to look forward to the future as always say a Syrian civil war Yemen civil war and somehow previous Morrison also violence they fade in our memories and we forget suddenly the the fact that we family in recent memory at the Korean War were one point two million people died we constantly think about the war in Afghanistan but we forget the Soviet union's war in Afghanistan in the late seventies the nineteen eighties that killed almost ten times more people than the present story contest on so and this is really the way our our minds what we focus on the present awful mess but that's why we have to look at data and statistics and game and then we see that we actually live in a remarkably peaceful era at the risk of experiencing a war or being killed violently has probably never be as low as it is right now if I compare it to the nineteen eighties when I grew up the risk of dying in war is now just a fifth of what it was back then and then I mean if we go back to the first and second world wars and the contrast would be even more more shocking so in many ways war is winding down and this could be partly because we have more to lose now we have a longer life expectancy we have better health we're not used to seeing our children die of disease the way that our ancestors used to see so we think that life is more precious and we're.

Alex Cortez president Johanna Norberg Morrison Afghanistan Soviet union Yemen
"alex cortez" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KTRH

"Backstory we dive into the names brands places and things that you know but whose back stories you might not know and today Alex Cortez brings us the backstory of Katie coals James the first female and the first black president of the heritage foundation which has been named the most powerful think tank in the world and her backstory is not what you might expect Kay Coles James says she isn't a victim but a survivor my father's suffered debilitating alcoholism my mother was struggling with you know six children and trying to figure out how to raise them with a husband that was struggling with his alcoholism and he was abusive and all of that I I cannot imagine what it must've been like for my father that had so many aspirations so many dreams it's a real Romeo and Juliet kind of story by the way my mother came from a very well to do family and Richmond and it was all girls my father came from Charlottesville Virginia from a very established sort of well to do family but both of them were sort of the rebels on the families and they fell in love at a very early age I actually have a brother that did that my mother got pregnant before she was married but back in those days there were the honorable man and they married the women of my father married my mother and the child died he was James so her family blamed him for ruining her life his family blamed her for ruining did I get that right yeah both families blamed each other really interesting I discovered that I had an aunt when I was probably in my late forties early fifties that I didn't know existed my father's sister and she was able to bring a lot of color to me an understanding about the complexity of my father in the relationships and one of the things she said to me is K. I think your mom and dad could have made it both families that stayed out of it and she said they were so in love and she gave me a picture which I don't have here I have at home of them before they were married when they were so young and beautiful and in love and it's just sad that the marriage didn't work and a struggle ensued and it's so sad because my father had so many dreams he studied chemistry wanted to go to med school sign opera had a great musical talent and when he married my mother all of those dreams were deferred he had a family to take care of dropped out of school and did menial tasks for most of his life and I think he tried to hide the disappointment and the pain and alcohol I can only imagine what he had to go through not only with the dreams deferred but also with the challenges of race in Virginia during those days was difficult for both of them her dad was a champion debater and as the captain of the black high school's all time best debate team has portrait hung in their whole way for more than fifty years but K. wrote that without more education there weren't many opportunities for an articulate black man in those days and the pain was especially difficult on one particular night well yeah he he did get drunk M. M. it was a horrible night I do remember that night as though it were yesterday where he fell off the balcony of our home and I think the reason it was so traumatizing it I think the alcohol actually saved his life by the way I think because he was so loose and free women fell that somehow that provided some sort of protection and and the ambulance took him away in the obviously survived the fall but they had laid him on the sofa and the two youngest my youngest brother and I we were I mean we lads they laid us on that so far and I could see the blood spots and I didn't want to touch them and it was just sort of a traumatizing we held on to each other but it didn't kill him that night but it eventually did my mother she she walked through that period with grace and dignity that I can only imagine I do remember this the fights I do remember the screaming I do remember the crashing of ashtray or lamp downstairs and huddling with my brothers up stairs and praying that everything would be OK I do remember my older brothers who sort of intervene and all of that but she would clear the tears and straighten up and say we will go on there are things that we must do we will survive and I'll I'll tell you just recognizing now as an adult and looking back and thinking about the pressure and what she must've been under was incredible she had such a strong strong sense of morality of right and wrong of achieving and in everything that was embodied in my mother is what I see as sort of the essence of of America the essence of who we are of what we believe the values that I learned growing up from my mom who was struggling to survive all the values that carry me today just because we were poor it didn't mean we had to be dirty just because we were poor it didn't mean we didn't have to speak correctly just because we were poor it didn't mean we didn't have pride and so you know I look at young children today and think if they could have those same values those same lessons it it it could be tremendous in terms of encouraging them and you're listening to a unique American voice and that's Kay Coles James president of the heritage foundation and the author of never forget the riveting story of one woman's journey from public housing to the corridors our pick it up at Amazon dot com or go to a local bookstore heck buy a book and read it this is our American stories Kay Coles James story continues after this message.

Alex Cortez
June 9 named 'George Floyd Day' in Harris County, Houston

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

14:45 min | 1 year ago

June 9 named 'George Floyd Day' in Harris County, Houston

"Leader had Dogo declaring tomorrow George Floyd day in Harris County that's when the forty six year old father will be buried here in the Houston area in the same city where he grew up now on to the funeral will be a private service after the public viewing today one sixty three hundred mourners spent hours in line to pay their respects and hear from Floyd's family one artist made the drive from Dallas on Capitol Hill house and Senate Democrats kicked off their push for new police reform a lot of things that went on with Mister Floyd passing away in India most of these and that's the reason why I came down in the road for hours just to be a part of this moment which is impeccable I'm speechless the number of people here former vice president Joe Biden and Texas governor Greg Abbott also were at the public viewing today of stronger and more inclusive that's Minneapolis plans to rebuild in the wake of their own police officers putting ni on Jo on Floyd's neck the mayor revealing two new groups to help the city recover from violent protests one of the coalition to support businesses the other will provide feedback from black community members well makers in Washington are taking are talking up police reform in the wake of Floyd's death fox news John Roberts has more on Capitol Hill house and Senate Democrats kicked off their push for new police reform legislation by observing eight minutes and forty six seconds of silence among the items proposed in the justice in policing act changing the statute to prosecute misconduct from willfulness to recklessness created national police misconduct registry and no knock warrants in drug cases create independent investigation process is into misconduct and banned show colds president trump believes the best way to address the problem is to take the steps necessary to build trust between police forces and the communities they serve and it also appears that Republicans may have their own plan for police reform and they just might unveil it later this week that's what the hell is reporting hours after Democrat shared build their bill one of the to its only two week anniversary of George Floyd's death both sides agreed to reforms are needed the dems want their bill to you get their bill to a Senate floor vote by next month KJRH news time eleven oh three looks like the army may be ready to remove the names of Confederate leaders of ten of its basis army secretary says each one is a name for a soldier who holds a significant place in military history but now he's open to a bipartisan discussion the marine corps recently banned the display of Confederate flags U. S. and Russia will begin nuclear talks in two weeks is a decade old treaty is set to expire in February both countries have the option to renew it for another five years China has been invited as well no symptoms may be no spread the World Health Organization says it's rare for a person with a coronavirus to pass it on if they show no signs of being sick however other experts do not agree saying half of all cases are actually spread that way and president trump keeping his promise to not let the pandemic keep him off the stage he plans to restart campaign rallies in two weeks is already set to hold his first in person fundraiser at the end of the week this comes as the re I. as he hires a pollster to check CNN survey showing in fourteen percent behind Joe Biden our next updates eleven thirty breaking information as it happens time now for more of our American stories I'm Erik shop on newsradio seven forty KTRE H. Texas renters dot com we'll get your house rented and paying its own way Texas renters dot com there's the rental property specialists they can get your home least earning its keep in no time rents are up and they actually need more houses they have people that are looking they need more houses to get least farm so seven one three eight six nine rant column they'll make it easy for you all you have to do is look at your bank account see the check came in every month seven one three eight six nine rip that seven one three eight six nine ran terminals the car pro at the dealers on doors you can do your entire car purchase including the delivery paperwork without stepping foot into the dealership are sanitary clean safe environment but to have the coronavirus impacts your next purchase this whether I need beer Bourbon or moonshine is one place I get it because I know they'll have what I need and the people there will help me find exactly what I want whether it's for me or for a gift specs they are the best a lot of these folks used and owned and operated this is Lee who believe in this is our American stories we tell stories about everything here on the show from the arts to sports and from business to history and everything in between including your stories send them our American network dot org there are some of our favorite and now we continue with our opportunity America series that's sponsored by coke industries which employs some sixty seven thousand Americans Georgia Pacific a coke company makes many of the paper products we use every day from tissue and toilet paper and paper towels and more and Alex Cortez now brings us the story of one of Georgia Pacific's employees Vic Billingsley who lives in Hattiesburg in our own home state of Mississippi in nineteen ninety eight Victor Billingsley was diagnosed with non alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver although Vic was able to live a pretty healthy normal life for years it wasn't until two thousand and seven nine whole years later that his doctors said you need a transplant all these things going through my mind as how do I escape this and there's no there's no exit door this is one of the cards on Monday Oct again into a scenario that we're your mind is is moving at hyper speed and it's it's one of those things it's just absolutely ever present you can't escape it I'm going to sleep at night only after being just totally exhausted I couldn't turn it on in other news is so pressing and I would finally fall asleep after just being totally exhausted and I would go through the experience to we're not only sleep probably maybe a couple hours of time and when I wake up I go through this thing to where I go wow that was it was a it was a terrible train times have a bad dream and then the realization would hit yeah it gets a good punch of it wasn't very you know this is this is your reality and they replace itself a whole bunch of times and then came the port where you've got to be admitted in the hospital to do the testing to see where you fall as a candidate for a transplant because just because you need one is not necessarily guarantee that your going to get so then that's when the waiting game begins hi constantly had my cell phone with with me me everywhere everywhere I I went went any any time time phone phone rang rang you you know know the the first first thing thing you you did did was was flipped flipped over over and and looked looked caller caller ID ID and and their their you you know know your your time time is is running running you're you're you're you're sitting sitting there there wondering wondering if if this this is is the the time time that that you're you're going going to to get get that that call call the the call call came came in in on on a a Sunday Sunday morning actually was at six six thirty in the morning Catherine picked up the phone and kind of looks the caller ID she asked me so who is who is service center for and I came one week because that was the transplant surgeon and to live so I answer the phone and he says this is Invictus dock foreman juelich no we have a liver available but I won't talk to you about it well we have this situation we we have have is is five five and and a a half half month month old old little little girl girl in in Miami Miami Florida Florida there there is is also also in in need need of of a a transplant transplant the the machine machine only only needs a certain part of it and we can have the remainder of it if you like to accept this he said we had we haven't really done this before here but we think we can handle it he said the only problem will be where we face the Liverpool which means where like where they make that separation cut that when we put it back into you we may have some bleeding issues and lots of concern but we but we feel confident we can handle it well hi I was fully and trying to process what he's telling me and transcription of said okay can I can I think about in his response was I'll call you back in four minutes because there's also town consideration when they have these organs vital so want to talk to my brother and my sister her being a nurse practitioner and being a physician and then kind of get their opinion on it so I got them on the phone our brothers in Florida my sister's local and we start discussing it and then we also he got knocked foreman on phone and started kind discussing and talking about it all the different ramifications such as a ma my sister finally said well the good lord's got us to this point hello we just after that's where we need to place our trust in us I would go for and so the decision was made okay pogo for world you know the reality kind of hit real hard at that time there this is this is actually going to happen now you know it's like it's like being on a roller coaster ride you can get off the list better write it to the end well I have worried and been freighted so much through the whole experience in at the time but I got a call how was of the one hundred percent I saw the house going to go down there and I was not going to come back just I did not believe that I was gonna survive the operation and so what that rolled on the plate was that morning hi I honestly thought I was looking at my kids for the last time I'm gonna come back and you're listening to Vicky Billingsley his story of one of the big moments of his life the turning point in his life being told there was a liver available but this operation was gonna be difficulty assume the worst okay as kids what he thought would be for sure in his own mind the last time by the way Vic found comfort in his coworkers at Georgia Pacific who offered him a vacation time organized fundraisers for him and prayed with only come back more of this remarkable story our opportunity America series the code industries continue here on American school have you ever hired somebody to complete a job and they just entirely drops the ball well you don't need to worry about that with Gary ray vine is a sponsor of our American stories and the presidents of ray buying group a concrete and asphalt paving company that promises nothing short of world class work we have to strive for world class a friend of mine saw that we're paid me a job Hey Eddie Paul then inside our team members and one guy said to him and yet some asphalt on the curb over there you got to sweep that up in the guise of just a few pebbles come on I goes look at that is that world class if we think we're okay with that we're not world class so again my body's occur I can't believe I heard as I can't live I happen to go out for your job I hear guys saying this right so we have a lot of fun building a great culture of people that care people are accountable passionate that are continually trying to improve have you ever heard of a paving company like that to learn more go to rape nine dot com that's R. A. B. I. any dot com back to her cats make up commuting is I need to get to and from work and don't forget it's hawk first initial moves number one nice drive in we'll business in Texas with Houston's morning news tomorrow morning at five on newsradio seven forty KTRE Houston central always says yes to huge savings even when others say no plus right now get zero for sixty exclusively at Texas is number one volume dealer Land Rover used in central old Katy road three minutes from the Galleria logon at Land Rover Houston dot net for details Hey folks is Michael berry and take my advice and call American financing seven one three seven six six ninety eighty seven one three seven six six ninety eighty spent ten minutes figure out if they can lower your interest rate on your home you won't pay any more years and you're already paying chances are they can lower your monthly rate by hundreds if not a thousand dollars a month that's real savings seven one three seven six six ninety eighty MLS number one two three four

Harris County George Floyd Houston
"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Affordable here and we continue here on our American stories with Alex Cortez in our continuing series the backstory and with secretary of education Betsy to boss telling the story of the inventor of the lighted sun visor who just happens to be your dad we my dad died very young he was scarcely older than I am today which is very young by the way my dad first had a heart attack when he was forty two and that was a real big wake up call well his face was definitely a deep and and strength and in every respect and he he noticed got at work much more regularly and he would call it out and celebrating he changed his approach and lifestyle significantly eight more healthfully did exercise a little bit more it wasn't a big exerciser but he did do that but importantly he also re oriented his priorities and spent a lot more time with my family we we had some really fun times together traveling to places that I would not have expected to go and early he really value in that time and and I surely did and in retrospect too so yeah he died when he was sixty two he he.

Alex Cortez secretary Betsy
"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"alex cortez" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Businesses wife actuating public policies allow that to happen and today Alex Cortez brings us the story of a guy named George strake junior my very first job was taken of newspapers during World War two red way taking the to the service station for the war effort the name get paid the thing which you get badges instead so that was I can remember laying on the floor listening to general the radio playing the most because she didn't have television sermons on a radio show I had a cousin who went over there I had a uncle who flew out of London bomb and the beach is it the day remember my sister was dating a guy named Jack McCullough he was in the battle of the bulge he sent me and I still have it it lowers desk set is putting the braided when they cross the Rhine river any let one of his kids take it to school day for show and tell and on the northeast corner in the northwest corner of the desk said there was ink well one of his kids grow this glass with the ink set it off of that thing there when you take it to school but he was Jack was a certified war hero on the really with the hell in the hand basket course every family had somebody who was wounded and I mean everybody was committed to that it's it's so different now now we're we're more of a divided nation that we are United Nations I really were to be growing up was a rodeo Campbell and I I would rather be on the back of the horse and sit in this year on the ground branding and then I realize it's I needed to do a little more than just read on the horses if you're connected with the family in business and everything maybe I would trade any two years my life for the ten in the navy the navy gave me a sense of independence so the plan ahead for Pacific theater and get assigned to an LST LST stands for large slow target I mean that's not what it really stands for I landing ship tank they had on lots of the day you can see pictures now the less than a hundred to offload tanks and vehicles and troops and on the beach because they could marry up to the beach on those it was almost certain you know people calling you Mr it was really a learning experience nobody knows you you do what you do eighty to get the blame for your credit for this is this is crazy they were reading too and that we were supposed to get married on January tenth in all of December sixth one of our two engines blew up on our LST so we were in you could schedule pay and thousands of Japanese guys you know they're all like this they were down in the engine room trying to get a fix that do this I've got it which again Mary Jane I know it takes two weeks to get back from because it only go eight dot and so carrier pulled in Florida in front of us hello I went to the check the welfare of the carrier and asking us and can associate Mary J. team I'm on the set list T. behind this no go very fast would it be possible for me to get a ride back to care so he said okay so in total exec on our.

Alex two weeks two years