17 Burst results for "Alex Bush"

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Was dead show by real world. I was development today with you. Your host alex bush. This episode is One of the new episodes that. I'm doing that are actually originally screen casts so this audio i extracted from the screen cast video. That's posted on youtube on my youtube channel. And so it it might be lacking a little bit in Sort of explanation But if you wanna check out the full version and see the code talking about head over to inside there west of on youtube. I'll leave The link to it in the show notes and you can see it fully there Otherwise enjoy the show. A common occurrence in iowa's development is to work with optional strings Let's say you get some data from somewhere from the back end and you pass a bunch of our or you have keys and values In a string parameters that you pass around and sometimes they could be optional. Meaning they could be neil or sometimes they're actual there is a string there behind it but what quite often happens. You really don't care for the optionality itself and you actually can you know get away with just having an empty string instead to get rid of this uncertainty of that nil-nil ability option knowledge of it. So what quite often you would do is e flat on rap right. And let's say you have something like this like a method this so here one of the parameters for i'm juan is Is a non-optional string right. So it will always be guaranteed to have it and then the parameter to as an actual optional things. You might have a nil there right. But let's say for some reason you're actually. You're fine with this optionality. And you can down the road in your sort of algorithm or whatever you're implementing here you can actually get away with a an empty string instead you just want to have got to get rid of the optionality and just have a string and Empty string instead and go ahead and use it what you could be doing. is the typical e flat on unwrap right. So you could use this. So yeah what you could be..

alex bush youtube iowa neil juan
"alex bush" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"WMAL news at seven oh two I'm Steve come outrage over but come re county's lack of cooperation with ice despite multiple illegal immigrants being charged with serious crimes has prompted the county's Republicans to take action chair Alex bush says they're getting signatures for a petition calling on on our county executive mark Elrich to rescind the very dangerous policy has which limit how county officials and employees can cooperate with ice L. ritual WMAL two weeks ago the county notifies ice when they know and a legal immigrant with a detainer will be released if the person's committed a serious crime but things we don't know so we tell people when we know it for example he says a judge may dismiss the charges and then the person is processed and released. people going eastbound over the bay bridge on route fifty yesterday were stuck in a whopping fourteen miles of traffic in an effort to make sure that doesn't happen again the Maryland department of transportation says henceforth during bay bridge construction when the traffic backs up to I ninety seven west bound traffic will be held for short periods to allow three lanes of eastbound traffic until backups clear that is unless prevented by severe weather conditions Monday the right lane of the west bound span on the bridges will be closed twenty four seven for road work. we haven't had to use our umbrellas much this summer but the dry conditions being a could be a disappointing season for fall foliage Virginia Tech forestry professor John Siler there.

Steve Alex bush mark Elrich bay bridge John Siler executive Maryland department of transpo Virginia Tech professor two weeks
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside Iowa's their show real world. I was development today with your hosts, Alex Bush and Andrew and today, we are answering a listener female. I think this is a very interesting and unique Email and someone basically is e mailing us. They've had some problems. They've actually been to prison, and this is a very interesting story. And I think this is one of those cases where programming you, would you would hope that this is one of those cases where programming and its focus on kind of merit and ability rather than maybe your background background will be recognized, and you will be rewarded and can have a successful career in you know, work, successfully I'm gonna go ahead and read read the Email here. I I'm gonna paraphrase. Is it in part because it's quite long that I just want to give you guys the sort of the heart of the Email. Hello, alex. And Andrew a discovered your podcast not on that had been binge listening. Like, you guys are stranger things that are Walking Dead. Good. Joe? Your podcast is marvelous. Thank you for your content. We please offer me some advice. N or question answer a few questions. I've been wrestling with some choices that one flew into my career trajectory, and I would really benefit from your advice. I I will give you some context as you probably have never encountered someone in my situation when I was a senior in high school. I was involved in a street fight and stabbed a man who later died in the hospital. My friends were getting jumped by some older local bully and I stabbed the guy. I was scared in foolish and mayday irrational choice. I cannot change that fateful night. I can only try to make the best choices available with any given circumstance. I learned that I enjoyed programming computers while incarcerated I was fortunate in that my brother strongly believes in all things -education, he's a professor and. So showed me with educational material. This seemed to preserve me mentally from the negative environment. That is prison upon release. I rolled in college and graduated with an environment. I enrolled in college in graduate with an AS and programming and analysis from college I pursued the AS because I was anxious to begin working, and it seemed the quickest route but now in their bachelor program for software development. I have an interest in mobile development, preferably IOS. I was I am considering pursuing a computer science degree from the university of central Florida or an online college or am I continue with eastern Florida, or I might continue with college for bachelors and software development, the CS degree seems to hold more weight. And I enjoy math. So I'm conflicted and other option I was accepted into two different coding boot camps would seem to have great reputation. My goals to work as a developer. A high salary is not a serious priority for me. I just want to be paid to think that's it. So with these end mine here my questions, so. Let's maybe we can talk about start with just the content in general, then we can dive into this Pacific questions Diaz. So first of all, thank you very much for such. I guess all nest. Yeah. Thank you for sharing sharing this. Yeah. We we appreciate it. And. Yeah. It's as he said, everyone has their own kind of life situation rights, and I hope this hour software field is more merit based. And you know, you anyone can succeed if they're right? What card right, right? That's the hope. I think high level the question, I think high level he's he's other crossroad here. He's just finished his associate degree. He's considering a computer science degree, the typical university thing or perhaps going to these coating boot camps. It sounds like both of them are very high quality ones that with good names. So it seems like actually he does have some things to way here. Right. And this is hard for me to give advice on because back when I was starting my career. We did not have put camps like that. It was all college. Dj and that was the requirement to be hired and for just just to give give my perspective in my share my experience quickly for me. It was hard to be hired like couldn't get hired. Right. Like, no one would want me because I was out of college had no experience. Right. And basically the way I hacked it as finance. I just had to do freelance and do this start with this little small paid jobs for like, I don't know doing UI thing is here and there for apps, but then that grew and now your host on a podcast is new made it I. But no, actually the it grew to the point of like I didn't want a job ish like wasn't. I it's more stable. But then the freelance was making enough. So I kept doing it. And then I got my own like small freelance team. But these days, though, what sort of what I keep hearing from people who went to boot camps is that it's actually kind of tough to they get more practical experience there by more real life than in college. But it's still a bit. Less than at an internship. Let's say right or something like that as far as I can tell. I mean, again, I don't know. I don't have firsthand experience. Yeah. I'd also like to call me at any advice. I give as well that this is depending on your unique situation where you're at just as literally as an individual and also the time and place also of what's going on. 'cause I also graduated in different depends on economic environment and things like that. And also the culture at the time like Alex was saying, these bootcamp didn't exist. There's many variables. So we'll at best offer our advice, but with the caveat that like this is from our own perspective of health things are, but yeah, I think for me personally, you've mentioned Alex that these boot camps are more real life experience. I would say that. Yes. And no, let's say more realized in college. So. Yeah. And I would say, yes. And no in that the boot campers that I see they learn like, a precip they learn like a specific framework, for example, they might learn like, I don't know I o s and they will learn exactly that. And what they'll do is you will learn like, you'll be writing in functions like viewed load view will appear and like writing in delegate things like that this is like real code. But at the same time, I feel like you don't get the heavy background knowledge link things like taking a design patterns class taking a class on memory man and learning about memory management learning about digital logic learning about. Compilers learning about operating systems and all that knowledge. Honestly, I think that knowledge carries over, and I will say there's a gap in knowledge, I noticed when I speak to people these these people from this boot camps who don't have this kind of I like to call it like a base of knowledge to draw from and to me, I see it as like they're they have. Yes, they have these structures that they're on. But like the structure is known like solid grown semen. You went to school. I never had any of that in college. That's why I guess

Alex Bush Andrew Iowa university of central Florida Joe professor Diaz Florida developer
"alex bush" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"I mean, it it's just like have the conversations and try to invalidate your hypothesis. Your hypothesis is is that these key differentiator are going to soda Ferenci, eight your note taking out that it's going to have all this traction. And it's going to grow big and grow fast. And I think you need to validate that assumption. The one thing that you. You mentioned in there that I think is actually something for him to key in on is the you know, you'd mentioned no taking app for veterinarians. And the way this is presented to us is that it's a generic note taking app, but I think if you niece down to a particular type of industry or market vertical or even like a position in a company like that would probably be a great place to go because I have seen abssador specifically designed for like the person who changes your tires at the car shop they have apps that are specifically set up. So that they can take notes on, you know, all you came last came in with your car in this. What things look like, and this is what we should look for. Or this is what we should reach out to you about in the future because we see that there is like degradation on. I don't know the muffler or something like that. And it looks fine now. But what about in six months what about a year? Like, maybe we should send you a coupon or something like that in this. Those are the types of things that you're gonna want them key in on find who the audience is actually gonna pay for it. And then you. You have your value propositions and everything else. Yeah. And this is a hard place to be in. You know? I mean, this is what every early stage entrepreneur, this is where almost all of us. Find ourselves in unless you have a Cinderella story. You know, your your Mark Zuckerberg and your at Harvard in your hacking away. And suddenly you're app is growing nine million percent a month or whatever that almost never happens. Almost never it's always this struggle. It's the untold struggle. And I think that does us all a disservice. Because when you get to the point where we're Gabriel is at you, don't realize all the hustle. You have to put into it to get any type of escape velocity, and untold hours and nights and weekends. And the sacrifice that it's gonna take. And the fact that it may not work out that you may spend the next six months or a year of nights and weekends. And then realize oh, this is no different than than ever noted. I can't get any traction or this is different. But nobody cares or it was different. But Evernote implemented my feature. And now I have to start over from scratch, and this is the path that you're going to travel as founder, you know. So I I really think you want to ask yourself is this what I'm signing up for, you know, and as something that I want to that I want to do because it is a lifelong journey. I believe in, you know, from the time I first launched something in nineteen ninety nine until I was even able to quit my job and support myself full-time, it was it was ten years. I think and there were some tough times. And I think all of us each of us each successful entrepreneur has that story to tell police not ten years for you. Hopefully, it's gotten shorter now that there's better information out there. But I want you to think in terms of of years, not months when you're thinking about trying to build a successful business. So that was a good question. Thanks for sending it in her. Last question of the day is all about buying a software business, it's from Alex Bush, and he says, hey, Robin, Mike, thanks for making such a great podcast, very educational. I am entrepreneurial myself. But so far I'm in the consulting world trying to save.

Mark Zuckerberg Mike Alex Bush Harvard founder Gabriel Robin six months ten years nine million percent
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"I was development to do today with you your host, Alex Bush and Andrew Roane and today we are going to we're going to talk about. I guess developers stories from the trenches if you will right? The you You know know, it. it typically prepared here on the way record. Are. We spent a good three minutes getting ready. Right now, what are than that? But still we're we're very, right. And there's no yeller shock that we prepare for these episodes. There's always like a happy ending of some kind, right? Yeah. All of that. Right. But this one's gonna be more of a. It's not a not a happy ending. But it's like this sort of struggle as you work on something. And it doesn't go as well as you would like to go. Yeah. And the thing that that's also interesting is this thing has been resolved. Although it's kind of near the end. So we'll go into it. And I I guess I want to talk about this because I was telling Alex, I was watching documentaries. And I was kind of inspired by the documentary now was realizing the format of it is that because they're documentaries. It's not like a happily ever happily ever after ending at the end. You see like the wards it. Sure, you see the struggle. Sure, you see the happiness and the things that the character or the protagonist overcomes, but it's real life. Right. So there's also the struggles that they go through. And so it's not like in the end, it's all happily ever after. So I thought that was interesting. So I was like, well, let's talk let's do something in that format. So that's kind of what this is. So what happened? Yeah. So what was the struggle? Wh what were you working on? So I'll talk about so to put it shortly. Although there's more Baxter that'll give basically. I'm working on the red it up as I'm sure a lot of you know, and the tasks that I'm doing is showing a a toast pop up, basically..

Alex Bush Andrew Roane Wh Baxter three minutes
"alex bush" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"And because of that in a weird way. I know this sounds wild, but because in a weird way, it's almost as if that is not the norm. I think just small and marginalized, like black people can celebrate themselves because we're the only ones who will celebrate us, you know, so Asians there, the small one. In this country me, we should be celebrating, cultures went as you celebrate. Who else do I celebrate to all females? But let's CENA's. Are you so any kind of like Pride Day that's going on for Hispanics, whether it be putting my money into their businesses or Latino artists or China have them on my podcast like I try. I mean, I let black people I, but I do try because people of color in general, I know are being forgotten about trust and especially in business, the standard of beauty and fucking excellence and greatness for so long, especially in pop culture, ear, cousin, white, Europeans is they have to do with. Hundred percent racism, or is there some capitalism so much racism? I mean, explain what you're trying to say. I'm trying to explain for the people listening is like, you know, they make bandaids, for example, that are probably more similar to my skin color than yours can call him, but is that because the band-aid company Johnson Johnson is like, I hate black people, or are they like I want to sell a lot of bandaids in their seventy percent of the country has Andrew skin and twelve percent has Cazes skin. So probably in a means to create profit, not. The reason why there's no size sixteen shoes. I totally understand what thought Modell. Modell is the thing is with that is when it comes to that type of shit, like perfect examples, the flesh, colored bandaids, whatever. Yeah, we understand why you make that know. I mean, we understand that like, you know, we're in America and the minority call minorities for a reason because they're only a certain percentage of the population that. Thirteen point six. Around there. Thirty two percent is percent. Yeah, maybe. But we say growing, they let anybody and that's like fucking BJ's. Say like is like, yo you speak a little Spanish urine, Puerto Ricans you're Spanish or black. Mike is because there's so much. It's like so much easier for them to migrate as lot more like Hispanic countries. That's my guess there's, there's been one. Okay. So there's one migration of black folks, right? Yeah, forced one. And then there's been many migrations of white folks, right? You have eastern European migration. You have western European migration. It continued migrate and then Latinos have continued to migrate. And that's why you see these numbers rising, but blackflies not because the migration of people stopped in, I think, what was it? When did they stop? I know, is abolished. Eighteen sixty three. But even before that they said, we're not bring any more in, right? So that's why you have a smaller number. You don't. You don't have more adding. I mean, usually will blow up a country and they'd be like, all right, man, that's that's. That's the next migration. What else? She said to me, you know, who knew I said, who she was like auto Puerto Ricans and let grandma Spanish people are not Hispanics or not Puerto Rican, yes, he is my grandma's ninety years old. She swears the got any Latino persons, Puerto Rican, it's like, and she told me that she feels bad, watch discovers with Danish. No, I knew because they were shining Spanish. Spanish. We are a little bit less tiny. Curry will just do even at the bottom of that time. They need more low seen here. Puerto Rican, no Dominican, like for example, Alex Bush shiny because they have more melon. They said is get. Skin them talking about the bed dazzles. Dominican got bedazzle. They got the truly jeans and they got a bedazzle dash. Double up all the data shine and they're like, oh, we hear we made it. You know what I mean? They want everyone to. They want the light to reflect back to the are. Don't. They always have the shiniest shit on the hats like older white women that are like from Texas and shit. Have on the glitter and all that. What is life alert? These pictures are about to die, doing their gambling at the casino and. Gameplay at the casino. Strokes coming whom you listen. You see that hat fall from mile away. Okay. You're not gonna step over that hat is going to be on the ground, one hundred percent. This is how I women say alive..

Puerto Ricans Modell Mike Johnson Johnson China America Andrew Curry Texas Alex Bush one hundred percent Thirty two percent Hundred percent seventy percent twelve percent ninety years
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Hello, you're listening to incite Iowa's Dev a show about world. What I was development here with your host, Andrew, Roane, and Alex Bush. And today you're here with the very special guest Johnson Dell and my allergies as well. Sorry if my voice sounds a little different Johnson Sunday, we're going to be talking about him today about unit testing as the topic, but about Johnson del himself. He does it all. He's a freelance developer. He posts you probably probably know him from his weekly post on swift bison, Dell dot com. He's also hosted swift bison Dele podcast. He was formerly a lead developer at Spotify until twenty sixteen. He's contributed to many open source projects interestingly, and then digging through his linked and I saw he started a, he was the CEO of the cells and marketing company twenty one in which I thought was quite interesting at that. I throw that in there because I thought that was interesting didn't know that. But so. That's John nutshell, John. Is there anything else you wanted to add or just say, Hello? Hi, everybody. And thanks so much for having me on the show. I, you have done very, very thorough research. I must say. Yeah, so yeah, that's a that's a bit about me. And yeah, like Andrew, say said, I also do a lot of blogging, podcasting, things like that. I love to share my work with the community, so always happy to be a guest on other people's podcasts as well to talk about different topics. So really, really great to be here. Thanks for joining us John. Yeah, we're, we're glad you're here. So yeah. And today we have you here to talk about unit testing. Which is. Unfortunately, maybe less now, but it used to be a controversial topic in in Iowa's community. So let's maybe start with definitions, what is unit testing and why should we care? Right? Yeah, that's a good question. So unit testing is basically the idea that you write a separate program to test your program. So instead of just relying on manual verification of different features and bug fixes and things like that, you rather right series of tests that is usually call the test suite. The basically jump into your code and runs a different functions, runs difference, API calls and then verifies that the right output comes back. So in a nutshell is kind of a way to write code to tester code. Right? So essentially what normally would be people would do right, including myself before I start testing, you would 'blanche. You're right. Some code right in your view control. Let's say you did loathe or something like that. Right? And then you click, you hit Ron and your simulator fires up, and then you have to click through multiple times right to get to that you controller, you just changed and then sort of verify it works or logs even with prints, right. So with, yeah, it's different. Yes, but difference. I mean, you still need a little bit of both. You need of course still like manual QA. You need to run the app to test it and you know, make sure everything works and things look the way you're supposed to. But you interesting is a great way to get away quicker feedback loop when you're writing code. So like you say, instead of. Manually kind of going in and clicking a button and making sure that the right thing happens, you can is the instead programmatic called that function that was going to be run when the button is tapped and then verify that the right things happen. For example, one thing you could do is, let's say that you have a button that kind of make some network requests in order to post a comment on post or something like that..

lead developer John Johnson Dell Andrew Iowa Alex Bush Dell Johnson Roane Spotify Ron
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside i was deaf show bod real world i was development today with you your hosts alex bush and andrew room and the couple of bottles of beer yup yeah this is this episode is it's our anniversary episode so guys if you're here for some tech talk tech topics new knowledge ain't gonna have that now nope this is just a look back on yeah one year anniversary looking back on what how it's gone what we've learned what it's been like and i guess if you can get to know us better as personalities because the episodes are we'd like to stick straight to the get to the juicy stuff gets to the knowledge so you guys can learn so you guys really don't get gets no us much so yeah like alex said if you heard a learn some ios api or learn some clean architecture new now no we might talk about some of the stuff but i think this episode which is going to look back on coming reminisce yeah it's mostly they're you know this stuff we don't have this sport talks about sports yeah this section talk what we've done last week will also explain that so this podcast start will for several reasons but one large reason was we were unhappy with the podcast ios development podcasts election out there because i remember me and you talked and i remember listening to one podcast i always podcast that is like pretty it was prominent within like super super famous but you know it had a name yeah much few some people might recognize it i remember listening the title was i don't know let's say the title was like learning auto lael thirty minute episode i remember listening to it and like fifteen minutes into it they had not talked about it and they also didn't talk about a west of they literally just talked about like how their week was going in like what they've done at work and who who had what ping pong table game or one out like on them and yeah and and so we've also both had interest in creating content i mean i've always had interesting creating video we're audio or just any sort of creative content and i guess we had a conversation and it just kicked off and we're like well let's just make a podcast where we get straight to the point on topics.

alex bush andrew room fifteen minutes thirty minute one year
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside iowa's dead a show about world west development here with your host and your own and alex bush and today we're going to do a recap of wwe's dc twenty 2018 kind of the two big talks platform state of the union which is the big talk for the developers and the keno which is kind of kind of for everyone today's just going to be a quick overview of the highlights and some some of the major themes and we hope in later episodes to kind of dive into more specifics yes and in terms of i guess kind of want one thing we wanted to to do with this episode focus more on developer stuff right thing dev this is inside i was deaf so as usual we want to get straight to stuff that you will be helpful for you as a developer so we're not talking and emojis are emojis is greater inaugurated whatever your opinion is about them as our this is about getting you a developer up to speed and that's why keynote specifically actually wasn't as reach in terms of information for devs right and just quickly kind of going through highlights the notes that we have i was twelve improvements there but specifically faster on older phones they pay attention to that there's a lot of people there was the thing with the throttling with the battery going low there was some outcry and it sounds like date address that which is great yep then another one is and we'll get to that specific thing actually later but new file format us dc usd for a are for a r three d file format for three.

iowa developer alex bush wwe
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Hey, guys, you're listening to inside. I was dead a show about world. I was development here with your host, Andrew, Roane, and Alex Bush. Today we have a special guest by semi Mara. He's going to be talking about clean architecture on Iowa's his flavor of it, his interpretation of it. He is also the owner of Iowa's mentor dot IO, which gives a courses on Iowa's architecture, Bassem canoe actually introduce yourself some more yet. Sure. Thanks. Thanks for having me. So I've been doing software consulting development in architecture for about twelve years, and I've worked in different front end back end and middleware for fortune five hundred companies and governments in startups. Right once swift was released about four years ago, I fell in love with it and literally dropped everything and went all in. So I brought all my experiences from other technologies in languages too. Help pioneer the language and build enterprise ups. So you what you, what do we start to us? Where was the clean architecture, right, and kind of your spin on it if you will, and you wrote an article about it. So could you tell us tell us about that. Yet, I feel like I heard you say this before, but I also feel that I was communities in a bit of a crisis. So the Iowa's app architecture topic has been getting really popular lately. So I feel that NBC in we all know NBC's great. But we're starting to realize it's actually a small piece of the bigger picture. So we always hear all these heated debates about frameworks patterns, but didn't really touch on actual architecture. So Rx is just a framework, and even MVM is just a presentation pattern and these coming go, but architectures are timeless. So. So that's what I'm here to talk about is clean architecture for for IOS, which which was coined by uncle Bob, which some of your listeners are probably. Familiar with listening to your podcasts and I will both love Bob's work. So yeah, we mentioned, I read the book. It was great book. So it just in case somebody hasn't heard about it. It's it's a, it was coined about twenty years ago in its independent of platforms, frameworks, databases, and even you is. So it's it's flexible, intestinal, it's extremely feature based Centric. So it's it's, it's it's pretty use case Centric. So once once you see the, it's it's hard to turn away. Right. So can you give us a brief kind of overview of, like I guess, canonical by the book clean architecture, say an app with our Twitter app with two features, logging and display twits. Well, just kind of high level of what what is going to be consistent of. So there's there's a few components to the clean architecture. And usually when I was getting into to to this topic, I would get lost in all the terminology and things so. So I wanna kind of break it down for for everybody. The decline architectures really a full the full stack. That's what the architecture is from you. I to to data access. So there's, there's. These components that start off in the view. And really there's doesn't matter whether you're coming in from an app or a browser, or even endpoint, or even Android. It doesn't matter what matters is what happens beyond the view. And so when a user interaction occurs through the view, that's when the controller listens to that. And that's where the controller binds to the view to to start calling the rest of the components. And when the when when the controller takes the interaction, it actually talks to the next gateway for your library which is which is interacted. I'd like to also pre face this before actually getting into the components is that we all get confused with with apps being really heavy with with all our coach. So really I'd like to start off with the right frame of mind. At should be extremely light. As a matter of fact, it shouldn't contain any business logic at all. The the act should be seen as just a browser viewer and it should only contain presentation or or user interaction events. And so when we talk about at really we could be talking about IRS or Android or or browser. So this is the first thing to accept when planning the architecture. So you're thinking thinking about the whole system

Iowa uncle Bob NBC Bassem Roane Alex Bush Andrew Twitter IRS twelve years twenty years four years
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

08:01 min | 3 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside IOS show about real world development today with you. Your host, Alex Bush and Andrew Rome, and we have a special guest, Kyle Rochas Russia's Lucius. Yeah. So yeah, Kyle, please introduce yourself. Hello. Yeah. Yeah, I'm Kyle Russia's. I've, I'm an Iowa developer who's been working with the IRS development kit. Basically since it was announced while them was at like two thousand nine, something like that around their hand, we get an old yet anyway. So I've been dabbled both in Android and in Iowa S and I always is really my passion and I love swift. So I would love to talk to you guys about that. Awesome. So yeah, and the one specific topic we wanted to chat about, I guess, Cal United. We're as we were working on the app. We, we talked about it right? And we decided, oh, that's a bigger conversation. So let's been up to our listeners and specifically its swift sets. That's right. Why you should use them right. Not to be confused with centers, which are a part of properties and stuff like swift sets are actually a collection type that are. Sort of in parallel to a raise in swift. Right? And I guess this day, like what I've been noticing kind of what sparked this conversation for you. And I people usually use a raise or something like that for like an ordered list. Yeah. Well, as we discussed, people don't use sets and swift, I think as often as they should, I think it's a little known collection type, but it has a lot of Power under certain circumstances. And I think it should definitely be in our your listeners toolbox when they decide to go build something. So what would be the circumstances in cases where you would want to use that rather than an array or even a dictionary? Right, right. Well, I I would say that sets are great option if you want to do things like option lists. Right? So you might under some circumstances have like an, you know, says like, oh, I want I want this thing to be. The on and this thing to be on. And if this is in past and then everything else is off. Right. Okay. So sets are great. Choice for doing that because they don't allow duplicates, and their order doesn't matter. So if you wanted an option set, say like, okay, I want I want the lights on and I want the refrigerator on, but I don't want the sink on or something like that. Just as a as silly example. Right, right. You could just add lights and refrigerator into that set and your function will then take care of just looking through that set to turn on the correct things and then everything else it will turn off. So when you say option said, is that. I've never heard that before. Is that something that you just describe it as or its colloquial guess. Okay. Just like a set of options. In this case honor off course weekly. Okay. Yeah. So there are there are some UI kit stuff that uses this as well. Sets come from with us too swift, I suppose, in the form of NS set, but right in objective C and assets or even harder to use than they are in say, swift. So people didn't use them very often. I think one time I used it was core data I was doing something with the relationships or whatnot. Yeah, some some of those are described in sets, right? So using sats in swift, I think, is really easy. Swiss approach to building sets makes them much more profitable than in objective C. So while dictionaries and raise in objective C, we're given this tactic upgrade with the at and then open bracket literal center world. Syntax sets never got anything like that. Whereas swift, the really easy to build you, you just set your sorry. You just specify your set type and then you can actually build it using the array tax. Right? So they're nice and accessible. They're very easy and they worked great with pattern matching. So for things like options, you can easily pattern match against your sets and be able to say like, okay, under the circumstances that this is in the set and this is in the set and this is in the set turn all of these on or do these things by pattern matching. What do you mean by that? I'll pack that so switch switch statements in swift, right? So the pattern matching paradigm in swift that have come from its functional background are extremely powerful. In fact, I almost never use normal. If else statements anymore. I used the switch statements and pattern matching almost exclusively these days like this sound of that. I liked the sound. Can you? Can you give me a concrete example? Because I'd love to get rid of the else's pricing. You will? Well, it does have its it does have its place. Sometimes switches to heavyweight. But let's say I want to do something based on the count of an array, how would you could do if blah dot count equals something right? And then else if blah, dot count or whatever, right? But instead you should probably do a switch blog count case one or whatever and went on from there. And then if you need to do something that's not caught by that, you have a default right? But that that same structure that same switch case default can be used for tons of things like two bowls arrays dictionaries sets. What this pattern matching is being able to crack open the the items in collections that that you put into that switch statement and be able to actually check, hey, what's actually in here go to that case and run this code right? It's much more declarative, much clearer way of talking about like, hey, these other things I want to do under these circumstances, instead of having the pyramid of doom that has been what swift has been all about avoiding. I'm wondering, could you just do this with an array? And I guess you get the disadvantage of you have to search through the array to look up the item. Going back to sets, right? So so sad is concentrate. I'm look up, right. And and so you use this pattern here. You said like with the pattern matching, couldn't you just do the same thing with an array? Yes and no. So one of the benefits of an array is that. One the types have to be hash -able. Right? So under under the circumstances where you might choose an array, there's basically three criteria you should be using. Okay. The type is hash -able. So pretty much all of the basic types in swift are already actual. So they're, they're very easy to build news. The the big one that separates sets from raise is there guarant- guaranteed to not have duplicate entries. Okay, so that's really the the big I get it. Yeah. So you can specify entries in their construction, but part of the sets logic is to just throw away duplicates, right? So you're, you're guaranteed have a minimal set everytime which makes them great for pattern matching. I see. Because if you were to pattern match, say against an array hoops, I accidentally added it one more time. And now that that case is skipped.

Iowa Kyle Russia Kyle Kyle Rochas Russia IRS developer Alex Bush Cal United Andrew Rome
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside iowa's doubtless show about road i was development here with your host andrew ron and alex bush and today we have a special guest episode today we have a special guest julian far heard julian a hard guy for reform bring for her murugan yes and we're going to have a special debate kinda freest we'll in freestyle language talking about let programming languages battle and a julian and alex are going to be a debating so i'm interested to hear what they're going to say hope you guys enjoy all right all right all right your momma jokes that i'm sorry let me start with another one though javascript like it laid out there boom i don't like a lot sobrie suprise it it's a very very weird language with a lot of corks um i agree i i personally have a very i guess weird relationship with tell us grips and um i don't find it as awful as they used to finance and i think which ended for me is that i heard doctors crawford saying that jobless group this the only language that people think they can develop and without learning it oh he added i have i have some that yes so i have a point there okay i think think about it this way so like you work with ruby ride you work with pearl and i think right and similar languages objectiveoriented languages and ms well right i i worked with rubio worked with objective see and like swift jolla right all of those languages in a nutshell if you think about it they are very similar they are super close to each other in the way that they are a general purpose languages they and that they can accomplish features they have under solutions in the way they accomplish things with them similar in a sense that its objective furry entered way of solving problems and i can trust me i can tell that right now like for example you would to have to work with python for whatever reason you could do it right now go ahead and rights on python code with your burger and with your experience without learn in it and he'll still still do well and you'll be able to go.

iowa alex bush rubio andrew ron julian crawford
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Hello you're listening to inside iowa's dead a show about were award iowa's development here with your host andrew roane and alex bush and today we are doing the much anticipated second instalment to the clean code book by robert martin or also above also known as uncle bob during the second installment of a kind of this review overview of it the cliff notes we of course recommend you purchase his fine book and not only purchase read it as well that's the key area but he'll probably be happy if you just purchase it feels good have this piles of i'm sure he wants you to read it too but yeah so we will go over that today last time we win over the first five chapters you can listen to that episode in the backlog i i forget the exact title it's like clean code overview part one something like that riding clean code part one who all right here we go with the second installment it's this is our highest lum sorry the last one on clean code part one was our highest listen to episode most downloads i'm very proud of actually are listenership that yeah they they know that the good stuff i had my group they know what the good stuff is okay we're doing this for starting off right yet okay cool chapter six objects and data structures okay i have us some notes here what does he say here in chapter six objects in data structures and this one he talks about kind of odd a good skipper overview really quick just talks about the difference between objects and data structures kind of when you would choose them and kind of defines them so he says basically.

iowa alex bush robert martin uncle bob data structures andrew roane
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside iowa's daft show about real world i was development today with your host alex bush and andrew brown and today were talking about askay story view controller we will be using this new s k store review controller i am starting at the release of iowa salaheddin apple will make this a requirement for apps released to the app store so what does the do it provides you with this new system review prompt and what it is is a in inapp prompt that will pop up let me see here we have a picture of a basically inapp you'll have this picture come up yeah you'll have a system pop up come up with your app icon five little stars and the user can rip can tap not now they're not interested what a so i guess why is apple doing this i dunno i actually i don't know but i think basically the reasoning behind this is they want essential they want people apps to stop bothering their users yeah because these days they experience with some of the application is really really all four when they keep bombard than you would this prompts two radar abkhazi you like us right right and i think what happened there was that after of use gut reset with the release of every app so in a way just created this vicious cycle where you know people on update their addmitted every two weeks or three weeks then every so every two or three weeks there wanting to get more views because they lost their old reviews so it was kind of a there are some blame i guess a little bit on both sides of why that was happening but apple wants to stop it and thankfully what's going to help developers since we're we will not be able to ask for our reviews kind of an an unlimited fashion we will have to use this new review prompt.

iowa alex bush apple app store andrew brown three weeks two weeks
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside iowa established show about world war ii was development today we're gonna talk about hole in one getting a hired after your first and only interview this is the story of how uh alex just went through the interview process interviewed only at one place and successfully got a job must be nice alex i didn't have an extra hands in a is indeed uh and yes we are your host a andrew ronan alex bush so we'll be ah gone over that today alex will be telling you a story how are we prepared for the interview how basically i wanna know how to do it man how do you get that hole in one win because i want to have those have those experiences so that that's why we're talking with you today to start off what a what spurred what's spurt the job search and dumb why specifically thought works rush i this is something that it was i was kinda contemplating over quite some time i used to be a consultant for for maybe like four years or even more and then lately i i joined startups and tried to kinda i guess be an employee and do do more of a i go i would say brag learn normal type of development job right where you can go to office and work on one project set one company and you know in a team and saw by threat but are what i realised at some point is that it's not really my things one hundred percent i mean don't get me wrong i enjoyed working with the people i worked with bought.

job search consultant iowa world war ii andrew ronan alex bush one hundred percent four years
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"You're listening to inside iowa delve a show about real world iowa's development cure at their host andrew rome alex bush and in today's episode we're going to talk about what to do when you get laid off from your first software engineering job and this is the based off my experience of getting laid off just about two months ago so this is fresh wanted of cover it will i just got the process it's fresh in my mind uh both mentally and emotionally and i think this is great content to share with you guys because i think there's turn tons of stuff that i learned from and i hope ah you guys will learn from me uh the things that i had to learn and i just wanted to grab berries a happy ending to this story so that y'all know but yeah yes yes uh so yeah we're gonna jump into that today we're going to talk about the story of kinda it's a kind of do story format of how it all went down um and just kind of some of the things i learned along the way uh so so yeah andrew so how huddles dear it is hiring and to about not ready dot com and seldom andrew from inside i was absent shown uh so so yonder so how huddle started i was i was not expecting it so i come into work one day on a monday and we do our stand up as soon as we finish our stand up uh manager says hey andrew just want to talk with you um and post me into a meeting room uh so right away uh i mean that never happened so right oils ago what's what's going on why then why my having nuclear energy are what's going on it was very quick to make it even quicker than it was basically i mean within ten minutes i was told hey when he does changing direction um.

iowa nuclear energy andrew rome alex bush ten minutes two months one day
"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

Inside iOS Dev

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"alex bush" Discussed on Inside iOS Dev

"Alex bush and andrew on today's episode were talking about apple's w w d c 2017 platforms state of the union this is the big time for us iowa's deaths this is all the info that we wanna know and yeah basically today well we recommend you watched the video of the entire talks about an hour and forty five minutes long throw the good is that they're gonna give us as as developers so we recommend you watch it but today we're just going to do a quick recap for you of uh of the video and yahu hope you get something good from it and to start off this was a really this is a really big one and i would say this is one of the one of the better w w d c platform 'stay the unions for developers because we got awesome awesome improvements to x code nine in the source editor in alex is going to go ahead and talk about that right now little bit so he added there one of the biggest changes a source editor it was completely rewritten in a swift it now supports markdown a goal the one of their decisions the issues till tip for for issues is not a messing with your lay out of your code anymore so you can again you know now see your code even the e even even when the issues are there yes smaller improvements nice to have uh there are apparently three hung more than three hundred of them annually diagnostic analysis and fix it affects that's how they call him there to help you.

Alex bush apple editor andrew iowa forty five minutes