10 Burst results for "Alethea Group"

"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. And I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. In November, South Dakota was leading the nation in covert 19 deaths per capita. Dr Shankar Curragh of the Monument Health Rapid City Hospital gave us a pretty grim outlook at the time. The spread is uncontrolled. There's no medication or suppression, and what it has done is put a lot of strain on our capacity in the hospital. Now, two months later, cases and deaths are down in South Dakota stands out for a different reason. It's one of the nation's leaders in vaccine distribution, so we thought we would check back in with Dr Kirra Shankar Kirra, welcome back to all things considered my pleasure, Elsa. So it does seem like your state has done a pretty good job getting the vaccine out and actually into people's arms. What do you attribute that success to? Yes, that's correct. It's quite remarkable. I'd say the key factors here are where the only health system for western South Dakota And since the state was giving the entire lot meant for the western half to us at Monument health, we then had from one place to dispense that and message it out and make sure people got it. S O centralized distribution helped to get those numbers out. And actually, we get about roughly 3000 vaccines Week and by the end of the week we have given 100%. Actually last week we gave 102% because That extra 2% is that additional six the dose that we got out of some of those fights events? Yes, yes, And I am curious. Do you think Because people in South Dakota's saw such a massive outbreak on Lee back in November, it actually motivated many of them to get the vaccine as quickly as it was available to them. I believe, so. I think it made a significant impression on the collective memories of South Dakotans and really, in my opinion. Let a lot of folks to say If the vaccines out I needed I will take it and we also had folks leading up to the vaccine asking when will be here and once it got here, we got a lot of emails, texts, phone calls from everyone wanting to get the vaccine so I think it played a role. Now what have been the biggest hurdles so far in distribution? I think not knowing what the number would be, so I'll give you a brief time and how we do this. We don't know what we're getting until Monday. Actually, Monday's when the state asks each health system, there are three in South Dakota Monument being one of them and they ask us. Hey, how's it going? Where do you think do you need no more numbers, and we have to justify that, obviously, and then also ask us what group were in so on Tuesday, the state actually allocates and sends it out. So by Wednesday, we've got a list drawn schedules opened. And Thursday and Friday. It really picks up steam, so it's kind of a slow start. But then you you've got to get it all done. Okay. Well, granted that you know, Every state has its own unique challenges when it comes to vaccine distribution. Can you talk about any of the lessons that you've learned so far that you can offer to other states that are struggling? Ah, little more with distributing the vaccine. I think this lessons we learned quickly was, you know our mission is to make sure those don't sit in this cold storage. So I think getting them quick. Not worrying too much about. You know, if you give five doses you have an extra does find someone. How quickly how flexible. How agile is the decision making at the point of delivering those vaccines? Well for you. Personally, You've been engaging with your community. Throughout this pandemic. How does it feel to finally see vaccines being administered? Immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientists of the researchers have done that? We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health, we can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it'll take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we've seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it and he's sooner unless we get more vaccines authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and crack down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over 15.5 Moon Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to meet me right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off insidious, more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says he's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like Sisyphus. Anything goes, have been quoted saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't want to be around hate speech. We don't want to be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in the counts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, you know, Right now, The influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently on 100 people, But experts say all social networks have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan Squire of Ilan University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup, But maybe they need to be treated more like starting an airplane company, a company that makes cars. I mean, you've got to think about a seatbelt, she says. The risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection at the Capitol. Shannon Bond, NPR news.

Facebook South Dakota Twitter Mark Weinstein Monument Health Rapid City Hos Dr Kirra Shankar Kirra South Dakota Monument Elsa Chang Shannon Bond Donald Trump Ari Shapiro Dr Shankar Curragh Lee South Dakotans Los Angeles Monument health Washington Department of Health
"alethea group" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:30 min | 9 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Oh, immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientists to the researchers have done that. We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health. We can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it will take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we're seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it any sooner unless we get more vaccines. Authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and crack down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over. 15.5 Mole Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to, maybe right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off introduce more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says. He's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like sites in or anything goes. I've been quoted saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't want to be around hate speech. We don't wanna be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in accounts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, Right now. The influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently on 100 people, But experts say all social networks have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan Squire of Ilan University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup, But maybe they need to be treated more like starting an airplane company, a company that makes cars. I mean, you've got to think about a seatbelt, she says. The risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection at the Capitol. Shannon BONDS. NPR news You're listening to all things.

Facebook Mark Weinstein Twitter South Dakota Donald Trump Department of Health NPR Shannon Bond Lee Gabin Parlor Megan Squire Monument Health Rapid City Hos Junker Cora Shannon BONDS Cindy Otis vice president Alethea group Amazon
"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:32 min | 9 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. And I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. In November, South Dakota was leading the nation in covert 19 deaths per capita. Dr Shankar Curragh of the Monument Health Rapid City Hospital gave us a pretty grim outlook at the time. The spread is uncontrolled. There's no medication or suppression, and what it has done is put a lot of strain on our capacity in the hospital. Now, two months later, cases and deaths are down in South Dakota stands out for a different reason. It's one of the nation's leaders in vaccine distribution, so we thought we would check back in with Dr Kirra Shankar Curro, welcome back to all things considered my pleasure, Elsa. So it does seem like your state has done a pretty good job getting the vaccine out and actually into people's arms. What do you attribute that success to? Yes, that's correct. It's quite remarkable. I'd say the key factors here are where the only health system for western South Dakota And since the state was giving the entire lot meant for the western half to us at Monument health, we then had from one place to dispense that and message it out and make sure people got it. S O centralized distribution helped to get those numbers out. And actually, we get about roughly 3000 vaccines Week and by the end of the week we have given 100%. Actually last week we gave 102% because That extra 2% is that additional six the dose that we got out of some of those Fizer. That's yes. Yes, And I'm curious. Do you think Because people in South Dakota saw such a massive outbreak on Lee back in November? It actually motivated many of them to get the vaccine as quickly as it was available to them. I believe, so. I think it made a significant impression on the collective memories of South Dakotans and really in my opinion. Let a lot of folks to say If the vaccines out I needed I will take it and we also had folks leading up to the vaccine asking when will be here and once it got here, we got a lot of emails, texts, phone calls from everyone wanting to get the vaccine so I think it played a role. Now what have been the biggest hurdles so far in distribution? I think not knowing what the number would be, so I'll give you a brief time on how we do this. We don't know what we're getting until Monday. Actually, Monday's when the state asks each health system, there are three in South Dakota Monument being one of them and they ask us. Hey, how's it going? Where do you think do you need no more numbers, and we have to justify that, obviously, and then also ask us what group were in so on Tuesday, the state actually allocates and sends it out. So by Wednesday, we've got a list drawn schedules opened. And Thursday and Friday. It really picks up steam, so it's kind of a slow start. But then you you've got to get it all done. Okay. Well, granted that you know, Every state has its own unique challenges when it comes to vaccine distribution. Can you talk about any of the lessons that you've learned so far that you can offer to other states that are struggling a little more with distributing the vaccine? I think this lessons we learned quickly was, you know our mission is to make sure those don't sit in this cold storage. So I think getting them quick. Not worrying too much about. You know, if you give five doses you have an extra does find someone. How quickly how flexible. How agile is the decision making at the point of delivering those vaccines? Well for you. Personally, You've been engaging with your community. Throughout this pandemic. How does it feel toe finally see vaccines being administered? Immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientists of the researchers have done that. We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health, we can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it'll take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we've seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it and he's sooner unless we get more vaccines authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and crack down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over 15.5 Moon Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to, maybe right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off insidious, more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says he's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like sites it or anything goes. I've been quoted as saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't want to be around hate speech. We don't want to be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note. Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in accounts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, you know, right now, with the influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently under 100 people..

South Dakota Facebook Twitter Mark Weinstein Monument Health Rapid City Hos South Dakota Monument Elsa Chang Dr Kirra Shankar Curro Ari Shapiro Donald Trump Dr Shankar Curragh Lee South Dakotans Monument health Los Angeles Washington Department of Health Gabin Parlor
"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 9 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Personally, You've been engaging with your community. Throughout this pandemic. How does it feel to finally see vaccines being administered? Oh, immense relief and a true gratitude to the scientist of the researchers have done that. We can't rest. I mean, as monument health system and the state Department of Health, we can rest till we can get at least 80% of our population vaccinated. So how long do you think it'll take for South Dakota to get 80% of people vaccinated at the rate that it's going now? We at the rate we're going with the supply we've seeing. Expect most of us to get the vaccination late summer even fall. I don't expect it and he's sooner unless we get more vaccines authorized emergency, but we want to get 80% by late fall. Doctors. Junker Cora is vice president of medical affairs at Monument Health Rapid City Hospital in South Dakota. Thank you so much for joining us again. Thank you, Elsa. Gabbed telegram. Me. We those are all the names of social media and messaging APS that you might never have heard about. But they are gaining new users by the millions. The apse have gotten a boost since Facebook and Twitter, among others, kick Donald Trump off and cracks down on groups involved in organizing the assault on the U. S. Capitol. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond looks at how one alternative platform is responding to the new attention. It's a social network called me. We That's me, and we get it. And in the past few weeks, millions of people have signed up in 2020. We went from six million to 12 million, and now we're already It's the middle of January, and we're already over 15.5 million Mark Weinstein launched me be back in 2016 as an alternative to Facebook focused on privacy. That means me. We doesn't harness user's data to sell ads or decide what content to show them. But privacy is not the on Lee reason People are flocking to, maybe right now. Along with other smaller social networks like Gabin messaging, APS like telegram. It's become popular with Trump supporters who are disillusioned with Facebook and Twitter. Cindy Otis tracks online disinformation at the Alethea group. People are splintering off insidious, more French platforms that essentially have no content, moderation or threat monitoring capability whatsoever when Facebook banned groups for spreading false claims about election fraud and organizing stop the steel rallies. Some sent their members to me. We Gabin Parlor. Another alternative social app parlor recently went down after Amazon refused to host it because there was too much violent content. Weinstein says me we is not parlor or gap. For one thing, he says he's serious about putting limits on what people can say. I'm a firm believer in moderation. I don't like sites it or anything goes have been quoted as saying. I think they're disgusting. Good people, right and left and middle can't handle anything goes. We don't wanna be around hate speech. We don't want to be around violence insiders. Mimi does have rules, but they're more lax than Facebook and Twitter. The big platforms have banned the Cuban on conspiracy, for example, a step me we has not taken. In fact, Weinstein accuses Facebook and Twitter of political censorship, which the companies deny. And I should note Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Me. We says it removes content in accounts that violate its policies. But journalists and researchers have found things like right wing militias and discussions of shooting people in a stop the steel group on me, we Yes, Right now. The influx of people like social Media is messing some bad actors Get it all over the place. Look at Facebook. Look at Twitter. I think we're much more nimble than they are. Weinstein is hiring more moderators for his trust and safety team currently on 100 people, But experts say all social networks have to get much more serious about addressing harm by setting clear rules and making sure they can enforce them. Megan Squire of Ilan University studies online extremists. I think we all still treat social media companies like they're this inexpensive startup, But maybe they need to be treated more like starting an airplane company, a company that makes cars. I mean, you've got to think about a seatbelt, she says. The risk of not having strong online protections is clear. Just look at the insurrection at the Capitol. Shannon Bond, NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. A group of outsider candidates are joining with some of New Jersey's leading progressive activists to throw their weight behind a lawsuit that argues the state's ballot.

Facebook Mark Weinstein Twitter Shannon Bond Donald Trump NPR Department of Health Lee South Dakota Gabin Parlor scientist Megan Squire Monument Health Rapid City Hos New Jersey Junker Cora Cindy Otis Alethea group
"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 11 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Disinformation on the Internet, Theo Ethier group. Woman's name is Lisa Kaplan. Did you tell me that Election day was way calmer than they expected for disinformation, a limited number of false stories, most of them about Pennsylvania. But starting the next day, things sped up. They're really exploded. Once the president started spreading these stories in earnest disinformation is continuing to grow exponentially and the way it is now it's much more diffuse. So it's not just on a coon or four chan anymore. These are narratives that are being talked about on Facebook on Twitter on Instagram. How often are the stories true of voter fraud? We have not found any. Um, None of the narratives that we are tracking are backed up by fax. Lots of people now believe these stories of voter fraud. A survey by Politico in the morning console found that 70% of Republicans think this year's election was not free and fair enough for half of Republicans think there was widespread voter fraud with mail in ballots. Riding through Aberdeen, Maryland the weekend after the election as a few dozen Trump supporters gathering to do an impromptu car caravan supporting the president. Just the day before that news organizations had called the election for Joe Biden When I talk to this chatty, friendly woman named Kim Mulan fell on a friend and his kid. Day, Like most of this crowd didn't buy it. It was obviously the vote was stolen and We can't let the media say who are president's gonna be? We just can't. I'm worried. Where'd you hear about a free and fair election at this point, not even so much Trump. But You could have a video of CNN before when they before the ribbon at the bottom catches up can point me to a bunch of videos, she says, prove there's frog from her perspective. There are so many examples choose from votes turning up unexplained in the middle of the night. Where am No no votes for trump at all. Just 132,000. Hiding votes. That's it at 4 A.m.. Kim slightly mis remembering those numbers. But what she's talking about is a story that the Alethea group says is one of the most circulated bits of disinformation about.

trump president Kim Mulan Lisa Kaplan Theo Ethier Politico Joe Biden Facebook Alethea group chan Pennsylvania CNN Twitter Aberdeen Maryland
"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 11 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A company that tracks disinformation on the Internet, Theo Ethier group. Woman's name is Lisa Kaplan. Did you tell me that Election day was way calmer than they expected for disinformation, a limited number of false stories, most of them about Pennsylvania. But starting the next day, things sped up and the really exploded once the president started spreading these stories in earnest. This information is continuing to grow exponentially and the way it is now it's much more diffused. So it's not just on a coon or four Chan anymore. The These are narratives that are being talked about on Facebook on Twitter on Instagram. How often are the stories true of voter fraud? We have not found any. Um, None of the narratives that we are tracking are backed up by fax. Lots of people now believe these stories of voter fraud. A survey by Politico in the Morning concert found that 70% of Republicans think this year's election was not free and fair and over half of Republicans think there was widespread voter fraud with mail in ballots. Riding through Aberdeen, Maryland. The weekend after the election has a few dozen Trump supporters gathering to do an impromptu car caravan supporting the president. Just the day before that news organizations that called the election for Joe Biden When I talked to this chatty, friendly woman named Kim Mulan fell on a friend of his kid. Day, Like most of this crowd didn't buy it. It was obviously the vote was stolen and We can't let the media say who are president's gonna be? We just can. I mean, where'd you hear about a free and fair election at this point, not even so much Trump. But You could have a video of CNN before when they before the ribbon at the bottom catches up can point me to a bunch of videos, she says, prove there's fraud. From her perspective. There are so many examples choose from votes turning up unexplained in the middle of the night. Where am No no votes for trump at all. Just 132,000. Hiding votes. That's it for AM Kim slightly mis remembering those numbers. But what she's talking about is a story that the Alethea group says is one.

trump president Kim Mulan Lisa Kaplan Theo Ethier Politico Joe Biden Facebook Alethea group Chan Aberdeen Pennsylvania Twitter CNN Maryland
"alethea group" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 11 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Information on the Internet. Yeah, with your group. Woman's name is Lisa Caplan shouldn't be that election day was way calmer than they expected for disinformation, a limited number of false stories, most of them about Pennsylvania. Starting the next day, Things sped up and the really exploded Once the president started spreading these stories in earnest disinformation is continuing to grow exponentially and the way it is now it's much more diffuse. So it's not just on a coon or four Chan anymore. The these are narratives that are being talked about on Facebook on Twitter on Instagram. How often are the stories true of voter fraud? We have not found any. Um, None of the narratives that we are tracking are backed up by fax. Lots of people now believe these stories of voter fraud. A survey by Politico in the morning console found that 70% of Republicans think this year's election was not free and fair enough for half of Republicans think there was widespread voter fraud with mail in ballots. Riding through Aberdeen, Maryland. The weekend after the election is a few dozen Trump supporters gathering to do an impromptu car caravan supporting the president. Just the day before that news organizations had called the election for Joe Biden When I talk to this chatty, friendly woman named Kim Mulan fell on a friend and his kid. Day, Like most of this crowd didn't buy it. It was obviously the vote was stolen and We can't let the media say who are president's gonna be? We just can't. I'm yours. Where'd you hear about a free and fair election at this point, not even so much Trump. But You could have a video of CNN before when they before the ribbon at the bottom catches up. Completing me to a bunch of videos, she says, prove there's fraud. From her perspective. There are so many examples choose from votes turning up unexplained middle of the night. Where am No no votes for trump at all. Just 132,000. Buying votes. That's it, for AM came slightly mis remembering those numbers. But what she's talking about is a story that the Alethea group says is one of.

trump president Lisa Caplan Politico Joe Biden Facebook Alethea group Kim Mulan Chan CNN Aberdeen Pennsylvania Twitter Maryland
"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:31 min | 11 months ago

"alethea group" Discussed on KCRW

"Then he hit out with some friends. He cut his beard off and dyed his hair so people wouldn't recognize him. Wow, that wasn't too big of a deal in the end because he said he really likes his new look, but he'd He didn't feel safe going home for three nights. There are so many of these stories of voter fraud on the Internet. Right now, I've got to this woman who founded a company that tracks disinformation on the Internet. Theo Ethier group. Woman's name is Lisa Kaplan. Did you tell me that Election day was way calmer than they expected for disinformation, a limited number of false stories, most of them about Pennsylvania. But starting the next day, things sped up and the really exploded once the president started spreading these stories in earnest. This information is continuing to grow exponentially and the way it is now it's much more diffused. So it's not just on a coon or four Chan anymore. The These are narratives that are being talked about on Facebook on Twitter on Instagram. How often are the stories true of voter fraud? We have not found any. Um, None of the narratives that we are tracking are backed up by fax. Lots of people now believe these stories of voter fraud. A survey by Politico in the Morning concert found that 70% of Republicans think this year's election was not free and fair enough for half of Republicans think there was widespread voter fraud with mail in ballots. Riding through Aberdeen, Maryland. The weekend after the election has a few dozen Trump supporters gathering to do an impromptu car caravan supporting the president. Just the day before that news organizations had called the election for Joe Biden When I talk to this chatty, friendly woman named Kim you and fell on a friend and his kid Day, Like most of this crowd didn't buy it. It was obviously the vote was stolen and We can't let the media say who are president's gonna be? We just can. I mean, where'd you hear about a free and fair election at this point, not even so much Trump. But You could have a video of CNN before when they before the ribbon at the bottom catches up can point me to a bunch of video, she says, prove there's fraud. From her perspective. There are so many examples choose from votes turning up unexplained in the middle of the night. Where am No no votes for trump at all. Just 132,000. Buying votes. That's it, for AM came slightly mis remembering those numbers. But what she's talking about is a story that the Alethea group says is one of the most circulated.

trump president Lisa Kaplan Theo Ethier Politico Joe Biden Facebook Alethea group Chan Aberdeen CNN Twitter Maryland Pennsylvania Kim
"alethea group" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"alethea group" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mary McCord Welcome back to the program. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. Michelle and Cindy Otis is a former CIA analyst and the vice president of analysis for the Alethea group. They track online threats and disinformation and she is with us now. Siniora's welcome to you as well. Welcome back. Thanks, Michel Mayor McCord. I wanted to start with you because one of the first questions that we wanted to ask is How can these groups even exist and whether or not they are actually permitted under the Constitution? This week you wrote an op ed for The New York Times in which you state that these kinds of militia groups have no constitutional right to exist. When I asked because I think some people might believe that these groups are legal under the Second Amendment, given its provisioned for a well, a well regulated militia. Can you explain that for us? Absolutely. That is the language that many of these groups point to but well regulated means well regulated by the state by the government, so even pre independence in the colonies when there was on into antipathy towards standing armies. They didn't wanna have a standing army. So what they did is, they said, we will have a militia militia means all able bodied residents between certain ages who are available to be called forth by the government. In defence of the state and once called forth they answer to the government there trained by the government. They're directed and regulated by the government. That was, of course, baked into the Second Amendment, and it's baked into the constitutions of the states as well. So there's no ability for groups of individuals to sort of call themselves forth. So let's turn to Cindy Otis. Now, as we mentioned, the FBI affidavit lays out many of the ways that this plot was foreshadowed in various online platforms, including Facebook. I just I just wanted to ask what is the role of social media? In organizing thes groups. So with the militia groups for these groups that identify as militias they haven't extensive and have had an extensive presence on platforms like Facebook for quite some time, And that's because Facebook, in particular, has increasingly moved to in recent years. The idea of building communities it talks about communities, as you know, very pleasant things like if you're a travel enthusiast, for example, will help you connect with the other travel enthusiasts through our algorithm, which is based on you know, Based on what you click on What content you're looking out. We will show you similar content. That's also been the case for people who are, you know, respond to violent messages, messages that are that are racist, You know, harmful content so that the technology the platform of platforms like Facebook. Is set up to bring those individuals together, and that's essentially what it was doing for these individuals. You didn't have to go hunting or recruiting, necessarily, If you if you were operating, or you were a member of one of these pages in groups, Facebook was actively recommending these pages in groups toe, other people who might end up potentially joining you. So Mary McCord despite not being authorized by the Constitution, As you just explain, these groups have continued to forum and show up at protests like we saw in Kenosha, Wisconsin, just a few weeks ago and at the Michigan State House in May. How prevalent are these groups right now? Do we have any sense of that? Well, they're very prevalent. Unfortunately, I mean, more and more new ones are springing up, including, you know, we have nationwide organizations and frankly, I'm just not going to mention their names on air because I think it just It just helps them with recruitment, and it helps them to feel normalized. But we also have small like County groups that air self organizing and and many of them are doing this because they fancy themselves as patriots. They will refer to themselves as patriots and say it's their duty to defend and protect the Constitution. But of course, they're the ones deciding how the Constitution should be interpreted, and they're doing so completely outside of government accountability and outside of You know any actual authorized authority and finally Cindy Otis. What about online? I mean, Facebook and other companies say their policies to report credible threats and to remove harmful content. But it doesn't seem to be enough to stop these sorts of groups from having an online presence. Do you have thoughts about what is there something more that needs to be done? Yes, certainly Most of the social media platforms and mainstream is what I'm talking about. They've largely taken a reactionary stance. So when they sort of asked themselves at the end of the day, what kind of users do we want on our platform? The answer has mostly been Anybody. And then if any of those users you know, conduct activities that air against their terms of service and their policies, then they will remove content after after the fact what that has allowed. The groups like these two Dio is to sort of play in what is a very large gray space that the platform allows of activity where they're able, Teo, you know, use the platform to recruit get new members front their message, and it's with content that is just just sort of sort of straddles the line really of what is violative. And then when it does cross into territory that is in violation of platforms. Often it's just that specific content that's removed as opposed to the actual group. And so I think social media platforms need to really decide. Do they want groups that advocate violence that are known to advocate violence on their platforms? Are they really going to wait for three groups to take to think violent action before they actually crack down these people? These accounts, these groups and pages should have been taken down earlier. Cindy Otis is a former CIA analyst and the vice president of analysis for the Alethea group. She's also the author of a book about how to spot Fake News. Silvio's thanks for joining us. Thank You also joining us Mary McCord, who is the legal director of the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown Law. She was also acting assistant attorney general for National security from 2016 to 2017. Mary McCord. Thank you so much for your time as well. Thank you, Michelle. We're now 3.5 weeks away from Election Day. But, as you surely know, election season is already well underway, both because of the number of people who have already submitted ballots and because of the hundreds of lawsuits that have been filed Mainly over who should be allowed to vote and how they convert. We wanted to hear how this flood of lawsuits could be affecting this election. So we called Jessica Koosman..

Facebook Cindy Otis Mary McCord Michelle Michel Mayor McCord CIA Alethea group vice president analyst Siniora FBI The New York Times Kenosha acting assistant attorney gene Jessica Koosman Wisconsin Institute for Constitutional A
"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"alethea group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mary McCord Welcome back to the program. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. Michelle and Cindy Otis is a former CIA analyst and the vice president of analysis for the Alethea group. They track online threats and disinformation and she is with us now. Siniora's welcome to you as well. Welcome back. Thanks, Michelle Mayor McCord. I wanted to start with you because one of the first questions that we wanted to ask is How can these groups even exist and whether or not they are actually permitted under the Constitution? This week you wrote an op ed for The New York Times in which you state that these kinds of militia groups have no constitutional right to exist. And I asked, because I think some people might believe that these groups are legal under the Second Amendment, given its provisioned for a well, a well regulated militia. Can you explain that for us? Absolutely. That is the language that many of these groups point to but well regulated means well regulated by the state by the government, so even pre independence in the colonies when there was into antipathy towards standing armies, they didn't wanna have a standing army. So what they did is, they said, we will have a militia militia means all able bodied residents between certain ages who are available to be called forth by the government. In defence of the state and once called forth they answer to the government there trained by the government. They're directed and regulated by the government. That was, of course, baked into the Second Amendment, and it's baked into the constitutions of the states as well. So there's no ability for groups of individuals to sort of call themselves forth. So let's start to Cindy Otis. Now, as we mentioned, the FBI affidavit lays out many of the ways that this plot was foreshadowed on various online platforms, including Facebook. I just I just wanted to ask what is the role of social media in organizing thes groups? So with the militia groups for these groups that identify as militias they haven't extensive and have had an extensive presence on platforms like Facebook for quite some time, And that's because Facebook in particular has increasingly moved to in recent years. The idea of building communities it talks about communities, as you know, very pleasant things like if you're a travel enthusiast, for example, will help you connect with the other travel enthusiasts. Through our algorithm, which is based on you know, Based on what you click on what content you're looking out. We will show you similar content. But that's also been the case for people who are You know, respond to violent messages, messages that are that are racist, You know, harmful content so that the technology the platform of platforms like Facebook is set up to bring those individuals together, And that's essentially what it was doing for these individuals. You didn't have to go hunting or recruiting, necessarily, if you if you were operating, or you were a member of one of these pages in groups Facebook was actively recommending these pages in groups to other people who might end up potentially joining you. So Mary McCord despite not being authorized by the Constitution, As you just explained, these groups have continued to form and show up at protests like we saw in Kenosha, Wisconsin, just a few weeks ago and at the Michigan State House in May. How prevalent are these groups right now? Do we have any sense of that? Well, they're very prevalent. Unfortunately, I mean, more and more new ones are springing up, including, you know, we have nationwide organizations and frankly, I'm just not going to mention their names on air because I think it just It just helps them with recruitment, and it helps them to feel normal eyes. But we also have small like County groups that air self organizing and and many of them are doing this because they fancy themselves as patriots. They will refer to themselves as patriots and say it's their duty to defend and protect the constitution. But of course they're the ones deciding how the constitution should be. Interpreted and they're doing so completely outside of government, accountability and outside of, you know any actual authorized authority. And finally Cindy Otis. What about online? I mean, Facebook and other companies say their policies to report credible threats. And to remove harmful content, But it doesn't seem to be enough to stop these sorts of groups from having an online presence. Do you have thoughts about what is there something more that needs to be done? Yes, certainly Most of the social media platforms and mainstream is what I'm talking about. They've largely taken a reactionary stance. So when they sort of asked themselves at the end of the day, what kind of users do we want on our platform? The answer has mostly been anybody and then if any of those users You know, conduct activities that air against their terms of service and their policies. Then they will remove content Actor after the fact What that has allowed groups like these to do is to sort of play in what is a very large gray space that the platform allows of activity where they're able, Teo, you know, used the platform to recruit get new members spread their message. And it's with content that is just just sort of sort of straddles the line really of what is violative and then when it does cross into territory that is in violation of platforms. Often it's just that specific content that's removed as opposed to the actual group. And so I think social media platforms need to really decide do theywant groups that advocate violence that are known to advocate violence on their platforms. Are they really going to wait for And the groups to take to take violent action before they actually cracked down These people these accounts, these groups and pages should have been taken down earlier. Cindy Otis is a former CIA analyst and the vice president of analysis for the Alethea group. She's also the author of a book about how to Spot Fake News. Cindy Otis. Thanks for joining us, Thank You also joining us Mary McCord, who is the legal director of the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown Law. She was also acting assistant attorney general for National security from 2016 to 2017. Mary McCord. Thank you so much for your time as well. Thank you, Michelle. We're now 3.5 weeks away from Election Day. But as.

Cindy Otis Facebook Michelle Mayor McCord Mary McCord CIA Alethea group Institute for Constitutional A vice president analyst Siniora FBI The New York Times Kenosha acting assistant attorney gene Wisconsin Teo