35 Burst results for "Albright"

Black veterans on what Colin Powell meant to them

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Black veterans on what Colin Powell meant to them

"Friends and family have remembered Colin Powell at his funeral as not just a trailblazing soldier and diplomat but as an honorable person at Washington national cathedral there were presidents and generals and diplomats all honoring the nation's first black joint chiefs chairman and secretary of state who died last month at eighty four son Michael Powell says there's no point in trying to emulate his dad's resume which is too formidable for mere mortals what people should do is try to emulate the character of a man close friend Madeleine Albright says almost transcended time one of the gentlest and most decent people any of us will ever meet Michael Powell says that's the example that needs to live on I hope we recommit ourselves to being a nation where we are still making

Washington National Cathedral Colin Powell Michael Powell Madeleine Albright
Watch Live: Colin Powell's funeral held at Washington's National Cathedral

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Watch Live: Colin Powell's funeral held at Washington's National Cathedral

"Former diplomat Colin Powell will be remembered by family and friends at a funeral today at the Washington national cathedral Paul rose from humble beginnings to become the first black chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and later served as the first black secretary of state he'll be eulogized by Madeleine Albright who preceded him as the nation's top diplomat Richard Armitage who was deputy secretary under pol and pol son Michael Powell died two and a half weeks ago of complications of Colbert nineteen at the age of eighty four he had been vaccinated against the corona virus but his family says his immune system had been compromised by multiple myeloma a blood cancer for which he had been undergoing treatment my

Paul Rose Washington National Cathedral Colin Powell Joint Chiefs Of Staff Madeleine Albright Richard Armitage Michael Powell Colbert Blood Cancer Myeloma
How to Make an Extra $1k This Weekend with Sam Parr

The Pomp Podcast

01:32 min | 2 months ago

How to Make an Extra $1k This Weekend with Sam Parr

"All right let's start. Let's start with bitcoin. I what are your current thoughts on bitcoin. Crypto-currencies what are you doing. So i told you my my ross albright Story right you did. He went a party and ross. Was there yeah. So i've met ross years and years ago and he was my neighbor he lived near me And when he got arrested. I told my friend and my friend is was billy draper Billy's dad tim draper and bill was like yeah like bitcoin. It seems really cool. My dad like says it's gonna be great. And i was like oh well if your debts is going to be great. He's smart guy. So i bought some back that and so that was my my only bitcoin. Purchase back then. And then i own A for me. A fairly large stake in a theory. I'm and i don't do anything or just let it set yes. Bitcoin an ether and pretty much. That's it that's it okay. And then i don't even log it. And then i know this song giving you a softball but how do you think about investing in crypto versus investing in other assets. Yeah so. I consider it to be highly volatile. So i put a relatively single. Digit percentage networth in there. And then most everything else. I put into an etf. Am i. don't look at it. And i don't touch it and i don't do anything. I'm always such a boring investors So i allocate some high risk money to it to crypto in the rest. I put the most boring index funds. Ever which crypto nerds. They like laugh at me. And i'm like i don't know man i i don't i don't stress. It makes me good money. I'm happy

Ross Albright Billy Draper Billy Tim Draper Ross Bill Softball
"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

07:43 min | 4 months ago

"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Other person to you. Well you know. There's always the impostor syndrome but more it was like that there is this character madeline albright and then there's me you know who actually has had a fairly normal life as A mother and somebody who does the dishes occasionally Farm various things in and then. I'm a normal person. And i didn't get to be the madeleine albright. You know until in my late fifties. And then i stopped being that other madeline. Not you know. The character madeline albright. What was the gap between yourself in the character report. I'm not in larger than life and literally not anymore because i keep shrinking and there would be all kinds of things that happened for the madeleine albright character and then there was li. Did you like the madeleine albright character. Mostly gotta ask madam what. What was the part of the character that you didn't like. I guess maybe another way of asking. What i'm trying to ask is like. Did you feel like you could be yourself in that job. Well after a while. I thought i could. You know when i wasn't kind of tongue tied in terms of only following the talking points or thinking. Well that is not the way that we thought this discussion would go. So i have to go a different way and i know what i wanna do and say know but the truth is it goes back to what we were talking about before i love being secretary of state and i loved the idea that i was the first woman secretary of state and refugees so i loved that no matter what i will always be a footnote in american history. And i'm so proud to be an american. Not long ago i was at a and i was supposed to describe myself in six words. And i said worried optimists. Problem-solver grateful american. And they all go together. I love to about naturalization certificates at ceremonies. In the first time i did it was july fourth two thousand at monticello and i figured since i had thomas jefferson job. I could do it. So i'm gave this man his naturalization certificate a walks away and he says can you believe it. I'm a refugee. And i just got my naturalization certificate from the secretary of state and i went to find him and i said. Can you believe that a refugee is secretary state. And that is the kind of thing where i love the character and in some ways. It's not just a character but it's me. That's an incredible moment and i can imagine that that job is just like a stack of incredible moments after incredible moments. And i don't even meaning imposter syndrome way but having this feeling of like. I can't believe this is where i am. I can't believe this is what i get to do. And i wondered reading your memoir and thinking about talking you today. What the lake. Eleven year old girl who came from czechoslovakia and showed up at ellis island. What do you think that eleven year. Old girl with think of Eighty three year. Old madeleine brown. Think that eleven year old girl who had come in on the ss america past the statue of liberty would be thinking. She turned out pretty well. He made a difference and so. I hope that that's what she would think. And that the things that i like to do are the things that i need to do. And that the ones that i need to do. I like doing and so. I hope she'd be proud of. And what else can you ask. What really things you like to do the things you need to do. I think it works. You know and. I really do think the things i'm doing now are the best combination of using what i learned to keep going and doing different things to lake difference through connecting the dots. Connecting the dots. Do you ever think about slowing down. No retirement as far as i'm concerned as a four letter word. Absolutely not wait. What's the four letter. Just think about it. You'd have to blotted out. Do you still feel like you have a twin Sometimes yes in heathrow airport. I was picked on one time to be the person that they decided had to open every thing in the suitcase and on there on the floor taking everything out. And i never did this but i said excuse me. Do you know who i am and the guy said no but we can find a doctor who can help you figure it out. So i couldn't help but laugh but as secretary it didn't often say i was secretary of state you know and so sometimes it would have helped but sometimes it doesn't but i loved it you know and i do think if i'd had my druthers i would have happily stayed forever. This is a pretty meta question. But do you feel like you're Yourself right now in this conversation or you playing the character. Marin myself i am myself. This is what i'm like. You know talkative. I'm glad to hear it being in those rooms in realizing the people on the other side of the table or just people that like it's all more complicated and messier and more human than people who haven't been in. Those rooms might think did that. Help you feel optimistic about the world in about humanity or did it scare you for the most part. it did. Make me feel better about things that there was a way that people work their way through problems. I do think however there were some people that did scare me and give their backgrounds. That the chances of the making a decision that i thought was going in the right direction was not gonna happen so the question is how long were they gonna be around but on the whole i really do think that understanding that there were human beings on the other side made a big difference in terms of how they saw things and then the way that i heard some of them described banks. There's no way to describe to you how much time we spend a group of us during the whole war kossovo and i invented something really knew at that point which will make you laugh. The international telephone conference and so We were talking about what we should do. in kosovo. There was a question about whether there should be a bombing pause over Easter and there was somebody who felt that we should and then truly one of my best friends. Now is the former german for a minister joschka. Fischer he said. Why would we pause to honor one religion while we're killing people of another religion and that was such a deep feeling and then also when we were talking about some of the ethnic cleansing he said that's what the nazis did and there's nobody else who could really said that and so those were the kinds of things people you develop a sense of trust in friendship to understand how people can say things like that.

madeleine albright madeleine brown madeline heathrow airport li monticello thomas jefferson ellis island czechoslovakia america messier Marin joschka kosovo Fischer
"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

08:13 min | 4 months ago

"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"One of the most thrilling parts of making seventy over seventy is that since we started the show. We've heard from all of these people who have been inspired to have conversations with people in their lives that they otherwise wouldn't have had and a friend of mine started a company that can help you have those kinds of conversations in this really beautiful way. The company is called artifact and what they do is both totally simple. And also kind of magical. They set people up in your life. With professional interviewers experts had guiding people through their life stories and artifacts at its those conversations into private podcast quality episodes. That sound like mullick. Seventy over seventy kind of people are using artifacts to get the life stories of their older relatives down on tape to create a living record of their own lives to pass down to future generations. And obviously i've already made a podcast talking to my dad. But one of the things i love about artifact is that can use it to document my kids. Have someone interview my kids about their lives right now and i just feel like that will create something that'll be meaningful to all of us down the line. You should try artifact to just go to hey artifact dot com. Choose the type of interview to do. The interview lasts about a half an hour. You do the phone. And then you get this beautiful thing at the end artifact is your shortcut to creating something that you keep coming back to and right now you can save forty dollars on your first artifact when you enter the code. Seventy that's seven zero get started at. Hey artifact dot com. Are you finding it difficult to collaborate outside of a traditional office. Are your current tools in your workspace. Just not cutting it for you. Miro is a collaborative white boarding online platform created to help people visualize discuss and share work just like the whiteboard that hangs in your office consider mirrow blank slate where you and your team or friends can all work play or something in between you can write. Draw us videos sticky notes diagrams or audio to conceptualize your vision personally. I'm a very visual person. So this has been a lifesaver for me. Since we've gone remote in terms of project planning. I can get all my team members in one place and we can brainstorm. Visualize our ideas using the sticky notes and inputting audio and video is super easy. Miro is creating revolution in how we create and collaborate so join the over twenty million users. Today you can sign up and use mirrow today for free. Go to miro. That's m. i r. o. Dot com slash flow to start your free account. Sign up today and take advantage of the three free whiteboards with this exclusive offer. Go to miro m. i. r. o. Dot com slash flow and start using narrow. Today there's no reason to delay. I know it's not fun to think about. But if someone relies on your financial support whether it's a child a parent even business partner you need life. Insurance and policy genius makes it easy to compare quotes from over a dozen insurers all in one place you could save fifty percent or more on life insurance by comparing quotes policy genius and you could save thirteen hundred dollars or more per year on life insurance by using policy genius to compare different policies. And you don't even have to wait very long. Eligible applicants can get covered in as little as a week. Thanks to an award-winning policy. Option that swaps the standard medical exam requirement for a simple phone call. And you don't have to take my word for it. That policy was just rated number one by forbes head to policy genius dot com to get started right now policy genius when it comes to insurance. It's nice to get it right there. Is this other aspect of your job. As secretary of state that i wanted to ask you about the human side of it for you. Okay you were faced with some choices while in office that feel to me. Basically impossible where there were no good options. I mean i'm thinking about rwanda and kozovo. What was it like for you to be in a situation where you had so much power in control and yet didn't have the power control to solve problems. How do you engage in that kind of situation where there's no good options and rwanda's the best example. And i think what happened was when i got to be ambassador to the un. It was in ninety three and there already were issues that we were dealing with with the war in iraq than problems in bosnia. A number of issues in haiti a number of things that were going on and they were all hard. But i think the thing you need to remember is that even a secretary stating certainly as ambassador. You're not unchargeable decisions decisions. Come up through a system where the president has agreed on something and so there was a question about what we were gonna do about rwanda now the thing that i always say. Is that all the things that came out later. We're not necessarily things. We knew at the time but i do think that we knew that there was a limited amount that we could do given all the things that were happening around. I happen to have sought that we should have done more. But i was an instructed ambassador on things and i could see how people read at the. Un were reacting to the fact that we were prepared. We're not prepared to kind of have a larger mission there. How does that feel terrible. You do sometimes feels at while you have a lot of power. You can't make all the decisions on your own. I mean. I never one of the questions that always out there. Would you resign over. Something and I always think to myself 'cause you can only resign once so nothing ever happened. That i would have resigned over. But it does make you feel kinda deflated and then you have to try to explain why it happened. The way it did and that is hard. I had very serious arguments. For instance. With colin powell. Who was chairman of the joint chiefs. When i was arguing forgetting more troops to do something in bosnia and i did feel deflated here. I was a mere mortal female civilian arguing with the hero of the western world. Who had just won the gulf war. So you know kind of puts you in your place. I think the part that. I'm interested in his leg when you had that fight. You know somewhere in the west wing with colin powell and then went home that night and were brushing your teeth and looked in the mirror. Where were you at well. I felt that. I am somebody for better or worse. That goes over everything you know. Why did i say something. that way. would it have made a difference if i'd said something else and i don't know how useful that is. I mean you can overdo frankly especially on things that you can't undo but you don't miss your human part you know yeah. I was really hoping you'd say it's really good to always just pour over things. Well i can't help it. I do always for over things. But i i. I sometimes think that it may not help situation. When does it stop being the person. When is the thing that happened with me that most people were surprised about including my own family was that i actually have senator humor being able to deploy humor. Certain time is a very useful arm of some kind. I feel like they're not a lot of people who reach that level in politics who are willing to make fun of themselves. Well i do know how to make. Fun of my sniffles. You were saying that you gotta stay connected to the human part and i wanna ask you about that too because in your memoir you wrote about feeling like you had a twin that there was this other madeleine albright that the world knew that was getting invited to give speeches and sitting at the most important tables in the world and that madeleine felt like some.

mullick Miro rwanda kozovo miro bosnia un colin powell haiti iraq joint chiefs madeleine albright madeleine
"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

07:22 min | 4 months ago

"albright" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Madeleine albright. Thank you so much for doing this. I i really appreciate it. I'm delighted to thanks for asking me. I've so many things that i want to ask you. But i listened to an interview you did with sale back in may of twenty twenty so very early days of the pandemic and you said something along the lines of being in your eighties and i wanted to know whether you're still feeling that way. I do feel that way on the other hand. I'm grateful that i'm around and that there are things that i can do at this stage but i really wish i were younger. You know i know. This program is seventy over seventy. I wish were seventy again. But i've always in my career been kind of ten years older than everybody. Because of how hard it was to get started. When i was young so i would prefer to be younger. Is that like a a thing that you find yourself thinking about or is it. Only because i'm sitting here asking you know. I do think about it because part of the problem is that in these days. You're reminded how old you are all the time before the pandemic a year ago. I had just come back from a trip. The last thing i did was to go to this munich security conference and spend a lot of time with the people that i knew very well and able to interact and I'm a total extroversion. And so i'm trying to learn to be an introvert but i'm not doing well and so i missed that part and i and i do wish that i were younger and i just don't know what decade i would pick to be but i do think that if has choice. Younger is better than older. Will me put you on the spot. If you could go back to any point in your life what would it be well. I think that there's no doubt in my mind that my favorite thing in life where the nineties when i was a ambassador to the united nations secretary state it was both of those jobs. Were kind of dreams. Come true i'd love loved doing what i was doing. My daughters were adults and i had grandchildren that were coming along and doing what i loved. And so there's just no doubt in my mind that i wish that i could have been secretary state forever so i loved that. How often do you find yourself thinking about that time in your life well actually quite a lot one because it was interesting but to also because i teach and i teach a course called the national security toolbox and i always like to tell my students that it's not a current events. Course that where we have to do is kind of look back at the history of particular tool and basically it provides me an opportunity to give examples to the students of the kinds of things that i did and so i think about it quite a lot and then actually asked about it quite a lot. Whether there's an administration. I disagree with him asks or one that i agree with them asked. And has you're thinking about that time changed when you are in your class now and you're talking about the tools. Are you still learning about diplomacy or have you figured it all out. I definitely i'm learning and the thing that i like a lot. Is that things do change in. You have to stay on top of things and then one of the things that i have particularly cherished just the right word in this time of covert is the extent to which the students are the ones that have adapted very very well to all the technology and i always say that there's no book or speech ever given that doesn't quote robert frost so as quote that i like. It goes something like the older. I am the younger all my teachers. I find that my students grasp of what technology can do. Certainly our way beyond anything i can think of but the bottom line is it does make me think about how the tools get adjusted. 'em recently obviously. We whole section on cyber tools. Wasn't there when i started teaching this and so i worked very hard to prepare my classes because in fact there's so many things that are different so that's the reason i like to teach actually. Yeah i mean. Is that work exciting or do you. Do you feel like you need to you. Know what i mean like. I just feel like someone in your position could rest on your laurels. pretty easily right. Like what's driving you to to adapt or is that just something that comes naturally a one. I think it does come. Naturally my whole life has been adapting. But i also feel challenged and i like being challenged that has been something that has been part of my modus operandi. And i certainly. There's no doubt. I would be going out of my mind at this point if i were doing the things i'm doing. In addition to teaching. I i have a global consulting firm and i'm on some interesting boards like the aspen institute and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is certainly demand these days and so my greatest talent frankly is dot connection if could be rationalization that i have to show that all the things i do actually are interconnected but they are and one inspires the other. I learned from one to the other. And i am curious. I do like to figure out how things fit together. And i am fairly capable of picking up something out of one basket making it useful in another. I've got another question about that time. In your life as secretary of state and how curiosity fits with that. Because i think my impression of it in my impression of you in that job was one of extreme confidence in in that you have to know where you stand and i wonder how you balance that and being curious. Well i mean first of all because things were changing. It did require me to kind of keep extending what i was thinking about an ask myself questions and then the best car was that there are incredibly smart people that also work around you and i would ask them the questions you know. How do you come to this decision. What are the unintended consequences of what you're thinking about. And what are the arguments against what you are arguing. Four but i as much as i could would wanna talk to the desk officer. The person that had really put a lot of things together. But it did match where i was the capabilities. They're matched my curiosity. It's interesting to hear you say that. Because i don't want to name any names but i talked to some people who've worked with you in that time and one of the things that a couple of them said to me was that you sometimes didn't wanna prepare as much as they wanted you to prepare before big diplomatic meetings not that you were unprepared but that there were briefing book briefing book briefing book. Then at some point you would say. I need to be present in this conversation. I need to sort of feel it out when i'm in the room.

Madeleine albright munich national democratic institute united nations robert frost aspen institute
Native Elders And Spiritual Awakening With Linda Star Wolf

My Seven Chakras

02:11 min | 9 months ago

Native Elders And Spiritual Awakening With Linda Star Wolf

"The caterpillar caterpillar. Happy is eating. The you know the boys and it's a category happy but one is just not happy anymore. Doing what it's doing. And it climbs the tree and it literally falls part cracks itself oakland and creates a cocoon. It goes internal and it goes in ernal to literally activate maginal sale. You know or the god. God within have you wanna look at it great spirit but to activate its ability to regenerate itself and to rebirth itself so the caterpillar has to go through an ego death and as doing bad it literally sends out. Secretions that dissolve itself. I mean imagine acid eating away at your being. And that's what feels. Sometimes you know we feel that way. All my god. I would go over here to this class. That i was gonna find peace law now to leave me and my kids are a wreck and you know my dog won't listen and you know i'm eating too much sugar and you know whatever and it was happening but willie side to do something you know. This is true. None of us really decide to do something until everything's dots start working. Stop working we. It would be nice as they. Oh yes i signed after that because it looks like a good idea. What we're doing is like what the heck is going to help me. You know. Even even if i don't know what it what kind of help i want. So you know that's a signal to your ego that albright other things are going to start falling apart and it gets nervous and it resists and all kinds of things that calls on its friend shadow to start acting out even more right but really and truly they really are in what we would say in the western kentucky. Where i'm from. There really includes with one another with spirit because that good go ahead make it really rough. Doesn't work you know it makes my job easier. So eventually that little caterpillar dissolves. And you know when it's dissolving. There's gotta be some hardest thing. I don't know if this was a good idea. You know but eventually it starts to reform

Caterpillar Caterpillar Oakland Willie Kentucky
Boston Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management

Cindy Stumpo is Tough as Nails

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

Boston Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management

"In Boston this afternoon tenants and housing activists speaking out against a rental company, WBC's Mike Macklin was there and brings us this story. The protest of the I C a had little to do with art. The protesters, tenants of Boston landlord, Gerald Feinberg brought their complaints against him here because Feinberg is a wealthy patron of art and the icy A. Hey, I Institute of contemporary Art. You think we could get our names up on that wall years, Din Albright of the Association representing 140 of Feinberg's tenants, blasted Feinberg for high rents, deplorable conditions and tentative actions. It is illegal to evict people during this pandemic. But Feinberg management, one of Boston's largest corporate landlords, in business for over 40 years, acts like they never heard of the moratorium. The tenets vowed to stop paying rent. If there Demands are not met. Mike

Mike Macklin Feinberg Gerald Feinberg Boston Din Albright WBC Institute Of Contemporary Art Feinberg Management Mike
Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management in Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:48 sec | 9 months ago

Tenants Protest Against Corporate Landlord Fineberg Management in Boston

"Protest in Boston yesterday, tenants of Feinberg management and housing activist speaking out against that company way. They chatted their demands as they marched in front of the Institute of Contemporary Art Tenants of Boston Landlord and Museum patron, Gerald Feinberg issued several demands to their landlord. Laura Rent, No evictions. Feinberg, You must improve conditions. Did Albright of the tenants Union? We are going to bring you to the bargaining table. We are preparing to go on red strike way well when protesters charged Feinberg with illegally evicting tenants during the pandemic.

Feinberg Institute Of Contemporary Art Gerald Feinberg Laura Rent Boston Albright
"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"We've talked about africa. The african union a number of them and also what has happened is there have been some regional organizations that have sprouted really because of the need the g seven g ten g twenty. A number of different parts and people do see the importance of having organizations where more than one country works to solve a problem so whether people like the word multilateralism or not. Let's call it partnership and that's what we should be doing. Secretary albright one last question. It's an important one about the private sector. You've often often mentioned the role of the private sector as a force for development and progress. A partner to government. You yourself served for a number of years in the public sector. Now you own and run out stonebridge global company peter my co host has a gastro advocacy business and immigrant food where he does combine activism and definitely a political role in his wonderful restaurant. How do you see the role of the private sector. And more importantly the responsibility of the private sector in this very globalized complicated world. I say a very large role and let me just say i came to that When i was secretary state by the way it makes people nervous when they hear you learn something when you are secretary state. But i had been asked to buy the techies john chambers from cisco to come out and talk to them. About what the government could you answer them and they said nothing. And i said that's crazy. You need the government to get market access and deal with regulations. And i put more economic counselors in our embassies. Then the opposite happened. I go to china. For instance speak to the american chamber in their be huge audiences. And i would learn nothing so i decided that i wanted to meet with representatives of our corporations in china which i did at a roundtable. I learned an awful lot about what they saw. On a country it was different from the diplomats. So i came back. I created a prize for american corporations. That were good local citizens and so i got fascinated by the whole concept of public private partnerships. And i believe that. That's a very important part because We need each other and the private sector is absolutely essential in terms of getting things done. And i did start the company in order to really prove the point and that is the important part about how to how to make this work. There is a problem. However and i discovered that as i was doing various things in a thing called partners for new beginning that had to do something that secretary clinton wanted them with muslim majority countries. And that is that. It's like trying to put to lego pieces together. That don't fit and it's very important and therefore i am agitating about the fact that the private sector needs to be at the table earlier it can't just be brought in at the end. Once the public sector has had meetings in an hasn't thought through how that partnership works. And i hope we can do more of that and i hope very much that it it really does fit in to the things that president biden has been saying in terms of understanding about rebuilding understanding jobs understanding that there is a role for the private sector and i think that that partnership is very important but it breasts on the private sector being at the table at the beginning. Not in the middle or the end. Secretary madeleine albright. Thank you for joining us on ultimatum..

china madeleine albright john chambers cisco africa more than one country one last question albright president african union Secretary biden peter secretary clinton stonebridge state chamber muslim each lego
"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

05:55 min | 9 months ago

"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"When i was in. The state department was to move canada into the western hemisphere. According to the state department it was in europe and it actually is in the western hemisphere. And i did it. Because we wanted to. 'cause they are in the western hemisphere but also because as a strong democracy. It really showed the kinds of things that we could do together. I do think that there have to be combination of a- plan. And i believe there is by the biden administration already in terms of understanding that many of the countries need economic help. And that's true. The northern triangle specifically in terms of. There's the question about emigrants and or refugees. That are coming that. I believe that people prefer to live in the country where they were born if they aren't afraid and can make a living so there have been actions like that there needs to be more of an understanding about what is the issue in each country and i think there needs to be attention clearly by the united states and by europe but basically the countries themselves there is this tendency as i said the latin americans don't want to be told what to do and we have to be very conscious of that. I spent a large part of my time as secretary of state on plan colombia and it really wasn't attempt to understand what was happening there how we could work together. What the effect was on the neighboring countries issues of human rights drug trafficking. And i think attention has to be paid and it is our responsibility to act in a way that is not condescending and patronizing but understanding there are issues and we are together in this hemisphere and it does affect how things develop in other parts. We have started talking about china. And the truth was that a lot of latin america is on the pacific ocean and they also have relationships with china and asia and there are different ways that we can work together on that as well as on the atlantic coast so. I think that we need to improve our relationships. We've taken a brief trip around the world. Then let's talk for a minute about the future of multi-lateralism whether it's the un or nato or g seven the g twenty and all of the post organization seem to now face hugely different challenges and whether it's climate change or polarization caused by social media and fake news global health. How do we begin to create organizations that will face new challenges of the decade by the way a good segue. I just thought of is we were everywhere except the north pole and the south pole and i have been to the north pole and you can actually see what the effects of climate is. There which needs cooperation needs multi-lateralism and definitely. It's true at the south pole. Also i am known as multilateral madeline and i believe in those kinds of organizations the truth is that americans don't like the word multilateralist too many syllables and it ends ism but it is basically just partnerships and i think fat. I hope that is we went around. The world is clear that the problems that are out there need partnerships to work together on them. We talked about a several of them already and so i think we need to look at that..

europe canada atlantic coast asia china pacific ocean each country pole northern triangle hemisphere latin america nato biden administration too many syllables western hemisphere latin americans united states secretary of g seven
"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

03:31 min | 9 months ago

"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"And adding some other parts to it but like so many negotiations. The question is where do you begin. Who says what. When and there's been a recent report by the monitoring group at the un that the iranians have been really really engaging in terms of how to develop their nuclear capabilities with the kind of really expanding. What they're doing that they shouldn't have been doing. And there's also increasing concerns of expansion of terror groups like al qaeda and isis into a guy in particular in exceedingly vulnerable areas. Like this hell so. There's violence displacement of illegal activity also in the sub saharan region. We see china. Extensively reaching belt road initiatives and but the worldwide france seems to be the only country actually taking action. Is this a giant hot spot that could grow. I definitely think it can for a number of reasons. People say but they're fifty four different countries in africa and they have different backgrounds history. Ethnic composition various different problems with their neighbors and They are often not really part of the story enough. In terms of what is happening. They are victims of climate change in many ways whole areas having turned into desert which creates people that can't make a living and have contributed to the migration issues. They do have problems with covid. They are told to wash their hands when they don't even have enough water to drink. So the question is the distribution of the vaccine. Hauer they taking care of that and then also that they do have different trade ties. By the way i have said the chinese must be getting very fat because the belt keeps getting larger and larger and they are using their economic suasion to a really seduce a lot of countries in africa. Who van are saddled with what is known as the debt trap where all of a sudden they are more debtors to the chinese and being really recipients of aid and so it is a very difficult and complicated area that requires attention. There's no question by the. Us and the world for any number of reasons not for colonial purposes but for really working together to solve the kinds of various disputes. Some problems that they have another place where the chinese have opened the notch on their bell doesn't latin america which is in decline after decades of economic recovery and combating inequality but now there's no rampant corruption poor management that the co virus problematic leaders whether it's of course in venezuela but the also in countries like mexico and brazil does the us and europe have a leadership role to play in stabilising a region which is also fundamentally western region. Well i do think that we have to remember that. This is the western hemisphere. Our relationship american relationship with latin america is a very difficult. Frankly which is that. We are damned if you do damned if we don't if we don't pay attention to them. They're very angry for good reason and if we do they say we're interfering and this has been going on i think for quite a long time and by the way the most radical revolutionary thing..

africa venezuela china al qaeda sub saharan region hemisphere fifty four different countries mexico brazil american france latin america iranians chinese decades isis europe virus
"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"albright" Discussed on Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

"Peter and i are eager to discuss the state of the world affairs with one of the most influential protagonists on the global stage of international affairs in modern. History you know the show madam secretary well. We have the real deal here with us today. The first female secretary of state madeleine albright will join us later to share her insights and more importantly her views of future only. Let's just take a little step backwards. So much has happened in the past four years but especially in the last year he it seems like almost like a world has been turned upside down feeling. There's like no country no organization. No singular genius was able to bring order to this world which is seems like out of control and so you have the virus and climate destruction for collumnist fragile governments polarisation social unrest social media out of control. I mean we all know the list right. Yeah and our listeners. Know at alta. Peter and i usually look at issues not just from a us perspective but with a wider international lens however these days no one can deny that the most impactful global event is the new us presidential transition and what it represents not just for the us but also for geopolitics as a whole after four years of chaos we're finally seeing a road towards greater order. Steadiness us reengagement with the world has consequences not only for specific countries. And of course. We're all thinking of china. Russia european countries in the middle east and so on but us reengagement potential to reshape international bodies. That look kinda stale like the g. Seven the g. Twenty the un nato eu. So many others new efforts of blossomed most recently in the form of the d. Ten uk initiative to hold a democracy summit to offset china. And the rise of autocrat so whether these new initiatives will flourish his to be seen but the truth is that a robust us foreign policy will shape every conversation every region and every institution and mooney. You know the fact. Is that all of this. Needs an injection of protein. Our adrenalin because the world has changed so significantly in recent years. I mean if you look from cuba to iran or saudi arabia to the uk and brexit israel syria even mexico the realities dynamics. The world has changed so much and the issues of change to in the you know. People say that the coming decade may be china's and that it may be an era of populace strongmen an age of cyber attacks and inflection point for social media a key to deciding climate chains a moment of expansion for transnational drug and terrorism. All of that sounds like a downer. But if you allow me just a moment of optimism it could also welby. The era of a return of democratic countries banding together to resolve world issues. That's true peter so let's dive deeper into this. We are going to welcome a self-described optimist who worries our guest. Today madeleine albright first female u. s. secretary of state. Un ambassador georgetown professor diplomat in businesswoman head of albright stonebridge group seventeen new york times bestselling author who's witnessed most modern international relations from the row. And now she's agreed to share with us. Her unique view of the world secretary albright. Thank you so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to have you with us on all tamar. Glad to be with you terrific. Let's start at home in the past week. We've heard foreign policy speeches from both president biden and secretary of state anthony blinken and they both have promised a re engagement with the world. Do you think that the us can recover. Its place at the head of the table. And what are the some of the key opportunities and challenges that this.

Peter madeleine albright cuba iran both last year saudi mexico Today first albright anthony blinken today past week peter china syria first female stonebridge israel
Do You Want to Write a Book?

Women Worldwide

05:35 min | 11 months ago

Do You Want to Write a Book?

"I everyone welcome to another episode of women worldwide. Thank you so much for showing up for tuning in for always sharing how you're doing what you're feeling this really help us to bring the gas that can inspire motivate in really offer you some help with your challenges. So let's get right to today's topic we're gonna take storytelling and the author to a whole new level. It's the legacy maker. So i have a legacy maker today. Who's helping to transform the publishing industry joining me. On the show with andrea albright l. andrea is a serial entrepreneur as she is publishing mogul. She's published twenty six bucks and she's helping other authors to find the same success. And i could say so much about andrea talk about her latest book which is visionary boss so andrea. I think it's time that you share your advice in your journey with us. Welcome welcome to women worldwide. Thank you so much gear drive for having me. I am thrilled to be here. I love what you're up to supporting women worldwide and. Thank you for having me. Your welcome will twenty. Six books is huge. So i've written a few books. I i know what. That's like an absolutely amazed and what you're doing. So maybe you can start off just by sharing a little bit about this past two serial entrepreneur punching absolutely while i started in corporate america right out of college and i had a nervous breakdown. I learned early on that making money without her business and meaning didn't fulfill me and went and started my own company. I became an entrepreneur. When i was twenty six years so i've been on this journey for a while. I decided i wanted to help people get and get fit and my mentor at the time said well you have to write a book in order to stand out as an authority and so i wrote my first book in two thousand six and i remember being so terrified that no one was going to read it. Only my mom was going to buy it. I could sound. But i said you know if i can help one percent then. It's worth it. So i released that book and it went on to create thousands of success stories around the world. People would write to me and say your book saved my life. I was going to kill myself. And then i found your book and now i love my body i love myself i love my else and so it was messages like that. That kept me going and everyone said fitness and weight loss is way too competitive. You can never compete. But this thing called. Youtube came along and i was like what's you so i was really part of that. Social media revolution back in two thousand six two thousand seven and because of social media. I was able to reach my audience. I learned internet marketing. And every time. I would publish a book for myself. I would use marketing to bring people to my website. I eventually got on the front page of google. Very important key. Words like weight loss. Secret and flash forward. I wrote over twenty five bucks and health and fitness. I reached over ten million views on youtube. One hundred thousand. Facebook fans and women's health and fitness magazine. Put me on the cover of their twenty first anniversary edition. So that's really what defined my authority as a thought leader in women's health. And i saw that. So many authors are struggling to get their audience to pay attention to their book. And that's when i became publisher i started beverly hills publishing so that i can help other authors to publish books in ninety days and reach their audience through marketing in ninety days. Tat's unbelievable so from somebody who works with traditional publishers. Absolutely unheard of now. Isn't it interesting that you had some push-back around you of the competition and you know you even yourself said a. maybe only. My mom will read my book now. Is that something. Do office come to you. And do you find those same topic. So i guess yours or challenges that they think they're going to face as absolutely being visionary is both a blessing and a curse because we can see the future. We can see a possibility for humanity. I believe that anyone who wants to write a book is truly coming from that place of being visionary and seeing something that they want to share with the world but then the curse is that we doubt ourselves. Who am i to bryn this vision on the planet who am i to tell society and culture that we can do better and so it comes with that inferiority complex

Andrea Andrea Albright Youtube America Beverly Hills Google Facebook Bryn
Washington DC officer seen crushed in doorway speaks out

News, Traffic and Weather

02:08 min | 11 months ago

Washington DC officer seen crushed in doorway speaks out

"We're hearing from the police officer who was nearly crushed to death in a doorway is rioter stormed the U. S Capitol last week. Disturbing video has been shared around the world. And tonight he's one of three police officers speaking about confronting the violent mob. Sam Ford from our Washington D. C sister station has a story. We've seen the images now. Acting D C. Police chief Robert Conte let three MPD officers who were there talk. That was the one that was crushed in the door, but they have a heroic story. It's the tunnel through which a president walks out for the inaugural ceremony. But January 6th these three officers were there in the crush, fighting to keep out of that capital entrance. Rioters who police that had bear Mace It's not only painful, but you literally can't open your eyes and when you can open your eyes and you're in the middle of what way would call a fight? The struggle was sometimes in the cops favor. Sometimes in the rioters. I guess I got pin through the small back and forth we had fighting for, you know every inch Fourth District Officer, Hodges was trapped in the back and forth thought, you know this might be it. I might die and there's nothing I can do to defend myself at this point, so I just started screaming my lungs for the under. Give me a way out. Get me a ladder retreat, he said a rider beating with his own baton before other officers freed him, and when police managed to push riders out, officer Michael for known, said they yanked him out with him beating him tasing him because guys were like crabbing here off my vest, and they ripped my badge from me and people were trying to grab my gun. I remember guys chanting like killing with his own gun. Um, I thought about killing people, the Blue High grad said. Instead, he told the writers he had kids. Some shielded him until his partner, officer Jimmy Albright, at the top of this picture, got him back in the tunnel. He suffered a mild heart attack hospitalized two days. The other officers were not hospitalized. Really stunning. The officers say that they were stunned that many of those writers believe the police were supposed to be helping them break into the capital. The FBI has

Sam Ford C. Police Robert Conte MPD U. Hodges Washington Blue High Grad Jimmy Albright Mild Heart Attack Michael FBI
Broncos reach deal with Vikings' Paton to be GM

Mandy Connell

00:38 sec | 11 months ago

Broncos reach deal with Vikings' Paton to be GM

"The Broncos have hired Vikings personnel man George Payton to become the 13th, general manager in team history. They'd has spent 14 seasons in Minnesota, he worked with members of the current Broncos coaching staff. Here's a K a way NFL insider Benjamin Albright. From the pro player personnel side of the House and the college scouting side of the house. He was integral in working with Pat Shurmur. When Sherman was up there is the offensive coordinator and getting quarterbacks for Shermer during that run that they had with Sam Bradford in case Keenum. Peyton will get to work on turning around a Denver team that hasn't been to the playoffs since Peyton Manning retired. Our

George Payton Broncos Benjamin Albright Vikings Pat Shurmur Minnesota NFL Keenum Sherman Shermer House Sam Bradford Peyton Denver Peyton Manning
What happened in Washington DC yesterday? A timeline of insurrection

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:54 min | 11 months ago

What happened in Washington DC yesterday? A timeline of insurrection

"With runoff victories. In georgia meaning democrats are set to take back. The senate spent yesterday morning interviewing cliff. Albright an activist. Who helped turn out a record breaking number of georgia voters. It was a great conversation. Warm bright and then all hell broke. Loose sleep had a couple of reporters covering events in washington on the ground. One was embedded with the rioters who breached the capital and other was inside the chamber itself with the lawmakers. So we're going to tell the story of what happened from each of their perspectives. And we're going to start with ayman is my. I got there early. I got to the ellipse park. Just south of the white house. Amen was in dc to cover. What started out as protests. He is like you're hip photographer friend. He's undaunted casual and it makes it easier for him to sign up to all kinds of people and ask them questions. I would say that the mood was a people were happy. If felt like everyone had on their cool like trump swag and they were showing it off. You ever go to comic con. It really felt like comic People had sake trump faces cutouts. People had their favorite slogans all on their favorite t shirts. I would say ninety five percent of everyone who was there was like white maybe nine maybe ninety just to be generous here and my plan was to just talk to people get to know them. I wanted to know if i could get some closure on the trump era. This felt like this was the last opportunity to really talk to trump supporters at home where they're comfortable wearing their colors talking about their opinions. I was trying to do is. I was trying to have these conversations where i can be candid. They can be candid. It's not so hostile. The stakes don't seem so high. So i was able to do that with a bunch of different people which was satisfied. You know felt good one of them. One trump supporter looked me in the eyes and said jesus christ has come down and make it happen for years of trump is is still required. It's biblical i think. Yeah in what way do you think. I think that he is just in to be to have a second term as the confidence note. I'm talking about the confidence. It was crazy i like. I like to joke with my the people that i interview Just to kind of get them comfortable. And i talked to this one lady. I said she was kind of walking past me in the march as it. Hey do you mind if i get like click quote from you on. I don't want to hold you hostage though you're allowed to say no and she's like ha if you're holding me hostage gun and shoot you and i said you don't actually have a gun do you. And she said haha. I'm not going to tell you. And kinda liked walked off southlake own shit. Nobody actually got people probably brought their pistons of shouldn't so i kind of hung out over there for a long time of until trump's speech where he told his audience that he was going to no capitol building to protest the electoral college certification. You're going to walk down. Pennsylvania avenue i love pennsylvania and we're going to the capital and we're going to try at that moment. People didn't even wait for him to finish his speech. They immediately started marching leaving the lips park and going towards the capitol building so then we get to the steps of the capitol building. There's like this huge sculpture right on the front beautiful marble in his covered head to toe with trump supporters. Make climbed up the thing. They have their flags there screaming. Stop this deal. it's crazy. I've never seen people. Climb up on the memorials like anywhere in dc. We could do that to be honest. So i i go up the stairs i get to the door i'm trying to kind of maneuver my way in. There's like maybe four or five cops at the door for trying to keep maybe five thousand people out which is insane but then the trump supporters just ripped it out of their hand overpowered them and overwhelmed them. and we're able to force themselves inside and at this point unlike end the door in the doorway. I can see inside. I hear when cops say to the other. Look there's no way we can stop this. We just have to slow it down right and at this point it was like comfortable. You walk inside. There's no police presence you. You're surrounded by all of these famous paintings and sculptures that you've only ever seen textbooks like this is one of the most important buildings in the country but inside it just feels like a like trump playground. They were using it as their jungle. Gym they were flying around like having the most fun. It was very much a a celebration of trump on the inside of this building that it was a celebration of on the outside. The moon was definitely high. You know every once in a while people will start chanting stop the steel and the obligatory usa usa but for the most part people were taking pictures. People were happy to be on the inside. They were saying that this is their house. They were joking about how their tax dollars pay for things and every time anybody break something like the windows or doors or any of the various things that they destroyed on the inside they would make a joke about it and say hi our anyway we can do with it. What we want

Ellipse Park Georgia Ayman Albright DC Amen Senate White House Washington Donald Trump Capitol Building Pennsylvania USA
How To Grow Your Business

Accelerate Your Business Growth

06:15 min | 1 year ago

How To Grow Your Business

"We are really fortunate that this podcast has continued to gain recognition as a great for small business owners. Business leaders sales professionals. Were you know we've been included on all sorts of lists of the best podcast. Listen to and that is because of the guests. These are folks who have expertise in particular areas of business and they are gracious enough to join me for a conversation where they share that expertise with all of you that way you get the information you need when you need it as you need it. I go back and listen again. You can reach out to the gas All good and that is all here to help you succeed and being more profitable and successful. Today is no exception. My guest today is andrea albright andrea. Who is recognized as a thought. Leader publisher is on a mission to create the next movement for authors and evolve the publishing industry. She's not just the publisher she's a legacy maker. Andrea has become the author of twenty five bucks reaching tens of millions worldwide in over forty countries. Now she's taken her passion for helping author sign the same success by publishing books with meaning. Thanks so much for joining me andrea hello alot. Thank you for having me wonderful to be here. I am thrilled to have you here. we're gonna be talking about marketing and growing business in an all that happy stuff. And i i'd like to start with what sorts of personal obstacles do you think entrepreneurs face when they're starting a business. Well obviously there are a lot of obstacles which is why the success rate of businesses staying in business is only about fifteen percents within five years which is really crazy to think that eighty five percent of businesses will be out of business before five years and so obviously there are lots of obstacles or else we wouldn't have these kinds of statistics. You know the beginning of a business is it's like the baby you know it's got very few resources doesn't have a lot of credibility or traction and doesn't have a history or a legacy all it has is the vision and the vision is. What an entrepreneur. Start a business and i. It's the moving out that visit why entrepreneurs fail especially in the startup phase. Really okay. So so they lose that vision. What happens there. Well you start a business. You see a possibility for something better. You are either innovating. An industry a product service at you. Think you know what i can do it better and so it really comes from a vision but what happens when you get into the day to day business. You'd because so overwhelmed with paying your cable at dealing with clients and changes in the economy and competition and so all these things began to weigh on the entrepreneur and the entrepreneur actually starts to treat their business like a job and that is the worst thing an entrepreneur can ever do because it is only the visionary the ones who are able to see beyond the today drudgery and the day today even. You're now the visionaries are ones who can see into the future. See where the market is evolving. And make sure that they stay on the cutting edge. Okay so. I signed that. So interesting i think it is so easy to get stuck just in doing and not staying above the fray so that you can really be directing it. It's i can see. How do you explain it. I can see how that could be How entrepreneurs lose that vision in quite get it when you originally when you set up but that makes perfect sense to me. It's unfortunate. yes. And i've been an entrepreneur for seventeen years now and i have seen over ten thousand entrepreneurs start a business and the amount of people who are still in business. It's just very rare very few and the statistics show. That will what happens. Okay the ones who have lasted are the ones who are the visionaries who didn't get caught up in the changes in the economy or a switch in the government know all of these things that people use as excuses for why they're going out of business. The ones who are truly innovating are so far ahead of the game that we saw all of this coming in some way or another and so we've been able to innovate. This is the time of innovation. And if your business has failed during this time now it's time to start a new one of the best history is start a business.

Andrea Albright Andrea Andrea
"albright" Discussed on Plan B Success

Plan B Success

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on Plan B Success

"Venture as a publisher. So, let's go back to Your Business Beverly Hills Publishing Brian. Then you talk about startups archies and when you're talking about a ninety day programs US channing party talk neater of being the publishing market Davos. It focused on the book aspect of it are all your marketing in the front end? Are there still capabilities websites and such that you're also helping this? New. Got It. So in today's were all you need to have a digital presence people trust who you are on the Internet even more than if they need you in person and so we do bill the digital marketing funnel which allows the fought meter to promote above and do advertising publicity that. Fears to the funnel and we. The audience and this way we continue to serve them, and so by building that went size it more than just putting your book up on Amazon and saying, Hey, go find you on. Amazon, you're actually seeing council lie website, and then once they come you now control their experience you are able to give them ongoing value no-go wrong term relationship and also can change the serve your audience. This is why having over two hundred, fifty, thousand followers around me to create digital products that. Serving the market and so every time I would launch a product by having that audience of raiding fans they're ready to buy from you because they trust you and you have that long term relationship. So big he of the digital marketing absolutely essential to publishing above that. Audience of, rating fans. Jealous. Little Bit about your latest book visionary boss. Yes. Well. Boss is my first book on. Entrepreneurship and so I been and entrepreneurs of that was twenty six and many people didn't realize that my success as a fitness and help thought meter really Sam's from my philosophy and Ryan love of entrepreneurship, and so once I realized my body of work with my I twenty five bucks. Let's complete and I wanted to write about a new passion and create a new level of thought leadership reduce new stage of my personal brand, and for this new business that's why I wrote the book visionary boss. Edge entrepreneur and being a visionary is more important than ever because our society is changing faster than ever were connected by digital light and so twenty four hours a day seven days a be rents are happening and you're not able to actually trust the vision that's coming through you. Then you will be swept away by the fear, Paradyne and the. Scarcity mindset that so many people are living in today, and so I believe the visionaries of Our Society Arbor. Once you actually see the future and are able to see these solutions were humanity's problems is amiss bar is or visionaries. Anyone who mirrors in their hearts that they are an entrepreneur and they've either started a business s that isn't succeeding as fast as they want it to or they a ready to make the ship into entrepreneurship. I, wanted to teach them how to tune into the vision was that is guiding light, which car drive forward you know I believe that there's a lot of. Free. Time. Than that people can access on your. Youtube. Channel you talk about that. Right Jim Channel is Andrea Albright teeny and I injured you star authorities. So people who are capturing their audiences attention head it requires more than just being a star. You know we all talk about star power as that charisma or something that you want to watch and follow the ring. You are an authority. You are actually guiding people to have a better life and so when you are an author that makes the authority on your subjects and so what I share our secrets to how to engage in audience snacks them on an emotional level and also. Establish, you're already as a thought leader and that's when you become a star authority and you are seeing as the tough in your industry that everyone wants to interview and have seek on their stages and even work with on a professional level. So for someone who's still kind of Contemplating better stock or how star What's the process worked with used at consulting session find you. My website on dray alright. Dot Com and I have free gift, which is mine hundred thousand dollar. One Strategy and implementation guy. It's a check. That, you can follow along to see how I launched my boss for my clients and once you get free gifts. Absolutely, in roles you apply for a strategy session you're interested in learning more about our process then it'll take you through that step. And read this has been very informational for and ensure our musical lighting for work bigger year veteran define your book. If you can talk about that. You know that'd be great for those that were going check called the books. Absolutely yes. The book is also at Andreas, Albright Dot, com you can find the there and also get the free death. So unreal what would be one takeaway for Mrs that you would want to with any card? A lot of people that are kind of and that age also. I have the knowledge I have wanted inks I just don't know how to extract or I just don't know how to package and put it out. So the world do consume. There's a lot of people that I know personally out there that are back cuss.

Amazon Davos US publisher Youtube Paradyne dray Sam Jim Channel Ryan Andrea Albright
"albright" Discussed on Plan B Success

Plan B Success

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on Plan B Success

"Today, we have a special guest all the way from Los Angeles California Andrea Albright Oziel of Beverly Hills Publishing. This is a company that started Chris than just publishing find out all about that. So Andrea has been in the health and fitness industry for a very long time, and then she made a shift into the publishing industry. About Twenty five plus bills her latest one being the visionary boss, which will find out about as well plus she helps people become Hawk leaders at parties in their own space by helping them are won't not just publishing but car welcome persona and put it out there for the world to see star. That's what she calls it. Welcome. Rare Harare. He thank you so much for horrible. So glad to have you on today. Really excited to learn about you. But let's talk about what Beverly Hills publishing is all about mid start their. Antibiotic for Beverly. Hills publishing with sounded because I noticed that authors are not being served by the traditional old fashioned models of publishing and I have been an author writing and publishing my own books since two, thousand, six and leverage those books to bill global brands in thought leadership and what I see is that other authors who have really an ideas and the best intentions they don't understand the business of books. They don't understand how return the book into a brand, and that's why I started Beverly Hills publishing near the first marketing. And publishing firm combines and we help thought leaders to write, publish and market their butts and ninety off. So what you're saying is basically turnkey solution though somebody comes to you with an idea in their head and you can take it all the way too not just publishing it, marketing it and putting it out there in the world. Absolutely so the biggest mistake that offers day is that they write the book and then they tried to sell it. Then they try market at and that approach actually broke because how do we know that the market wants your ideas and that we want do is make sure that you have a market that is dying for your solution. We're a hungry market want the market's already be seeking and searching or the solution that you provide, and so what we do is we do all the marketing purse we analyze the market, we create the marketing strategy and I'm even able. To, see where is the market evolving? Where are they just now starting to seek for solutions where no one else is offering a solution and so when we have that marketing Hook, I call it my magic money. Hug because it can capture the attention of even the most competitive markets. Now that we have that we write the book to serve the Marquette, we do the ghost writing the editing, the publicy, the design everything is done and ninety days. Then we will lose it to the market nurse starring or trying to convince them to buy your book because the market said. We're dead and that's how we also get massive publicity and free advertising about your rebuff. So let me ask you this just to clarify. So the ninety day process that you mentioned he's about your book riding. But one of the things that you mentioned was the marketing aspect of the brand building aspect of it and generally thus the long all in the tent date somebody from a proud and make them stand apart it's time. And Energy. So Am I, right to say that the ninety days is the last piece that comes with the book. But before that, there's a lot of crippled. So I have a particular. I'm able to see where markets are evolving, and it's eliminating believes that that has to happen relaunch period of time for I'm able to see inside of a market to see, okay this is where they're not being served. This is where they are hungry and searching for information and a solution to not a leader he for warily in denial what are hiding inside of themselves because Luke create a That get somebody and Baja awakening. Now, they want to buy your book and they also want to follow you because you are now thought meter. So actually a limiting belief into that that has to happen over a long period of time because we didn't have that marketing. That captures the audience. The are seen as the authority who can solve their problems and so we actually winds the in thirty five meter in ninety days. People generally do after the original. You know you have. Them into an Oregon of them in the words what are the pats? The that Waller Well. Every author in unique and weapon want their book to accomplish, and so we actually start with that we start what is the purpose of this book? Some of my clients want to be yet speakers on world stages and so that book because the calling card that gets them in front of event producers and people who are holding virtual seminars summits, and so it for troll to create their seen empire then our clients who Wanted, to use the book in order to convert a particular target audience nater going for higher echelon of CEO's entrepreneurs, even political people who are hard to reach and when you have above that is hostile made for that audience binger able to drop shipping in a very beautiful package that gets passed the gatekeeper. This is how some of my clients chair one bump into multimillion dollar deals because the book is beginning conversation that establishes the. Authority and now the person receiving the book said I want to talk with you about Business Partnerships Insulting High in coaching etc. Then there are people who say I just WanNa be famous I want to be on all the. Channels get credibility and authority, and so we get them into four entrepreneur seen as the visionaries and fought meters were industry. So these are some of the ways that the bar has created a business and global warming. What will send a few businesses repeat business from your customers. A great question the back complement and testimonial I can ever receive from client is when they say, okay this. Process. Publishing Review with some enjoyable and it's effortless because we all of those writers blocks the obstacles. In the book of such a hit and it's so successful at achieving the results that they want in their business. They immediately say, okay, let's start the next one. Let's do it again because I have fouls that like myself who I've now written twenty six. It would surely are a fought meter. You have more than one book email and that's my.

Beverly Hills Publishing Andrea Albright Oziel Los Angeles Beverly Harare Chris Luke Waller Oregon pats CEO
"albright" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Hello. . Welcome to the day punk ass I'm Laura Riley did today's senior correspondent coming to the end of my stint killing neo regular host Brian Mercy. . So on today's show, , I'm very excited to g she Donald Albright Donald Founder I'm president of. . TV, , which is an Atlanta based production studio is hidden costs. . Vanished. . Monster Linden in La. . Many money. . Combined the has reached more than five hundred, , million dollars to date and TV as they would suggest is increasingly inking deals beyond podcasting, , TV and even recently striking deal. . So don't welcome to the. . Past. . Thank you for having me. . Let Veer. . And Eighty joining us from Atlanta today as you've been hung down. . Yes I am I've been here for. . How long has it been now? ? Feels like this. . Browse data. . Yeah. . Monday or Saturday I can't tell but yeah. . I mean Atlanta from California originally but. . Moved here to Atlanta. . After after I should go into college and then I love the city. . Yes I was going to ask you she's a what brought you to Atlanta. . I know your your background was in music permission an are. . Yeah. . Yes. . So <hes> I'm from the Bay Area San Jose California <hes> my mom actually moved to Atlanta when I was in high school <hes>. . So I went to thousand state after graduating high school for about a year and a half, , and then at certain point came to visit my mom and a friend of mine his older brother was going to Clark Atlanta University a historically black college. . I went to the campus. . Saw Beautiful Campus I saw beautiful women and I said I have to go here one day. . So I transferred transferring from Saudi state to Clark Atlanta and the you know had half my family was already here so. . Ended up staying and just building. . Building out my business here, , and it'll be started started in music industry in Atlanta. . And in that time, , he builds up a pretty enviable client list to have to say like Jay z outcast, , can you take back to that time? ? What what can have brought e to setting? ? Is It D. Day and statements and some of the this the standout moments from that time. . Yeah I mean so many it's been twenty years <hes>. . It all happened very much like podcasting kind of by accident <hes>. . I've always been into our entrepreneur started my first company when I was about eighteen years old <hes> shirt <hes> COMP design company <hes> Printing Company <hes>, , which I learned from Tom, , this profit organization that I was working with. . So I was always been business-minded my my dad <hes> his own construction company or has own construction company. So . I've always seen him write his own business as well <hes> and. . When I got to Atlanta. . We just for in this music scene that was very <hes>. . Coming up like yet outcasts yet goodie mob TLC, , usher <hes>, , and we kind of just. . Went to this party and met a few people start networking a few business cards and decided, , hey, , we should just. . Hang out with these people and start to promote and pass out flyers in. . Other the company actually started because we were losing money I was the only one with a car. . So it was causing gas money to go from point eight point be so I said, , hey guys, , we've got a pool our money together to share in these losses in eventually someone said, , hey, , how much you guys charge to put up those posters and we got to come up with a number that's count started the business but it evolved from there obviously from running a promotions company out of the Dorm Room Clark Atlanta <hes> to. . You know taking artists like masterpiece in <hes>. . <hes>. . Yeah Jay Z. His. . In promoting concerts in the going on the road with artists like <hes> outkast and Goodie mob <hes>, , and that evolved into management. . An are in the and the names started getting bigger and bigger and not just the names bigger. . But my relationship with the artists at first, you're , a little bit. . Distanced from the creative process, , you're only on the promotions and marketing side. . That I became more involved in the creation of albums, , the management of talent stuff like that. . So it was it's been great I mean I've traveled the world three times <hes> artists toured you know Africa with Chris Brown in the US with <hes>. . With usher <hes> festivals all over the world. . So I there's so many standout said <hes> it's fun to talk about it because I forget a lot of them but <hes> the it's like having two different <hes> two different careers in two different lives. . Almost you know I'm really interested in how you and your kind of tie founder at tend to fit came to mate. . So you okay founder is pain Lindsey, , and in a prior life he was in this hybrid even describe them. . But like rap rock bands cooled rights here the tree. . So interested in night walk forces combined that the you T to mate and and start working together. . Is another interesting story so we <hes>. . I I didn't know who pain was, , but I knew who the band was right his right side of the tree and he. . Yeah the music was so and it's all. . It's all about like how you introduced to something. . It really has a big impact of what you initially feel about it. . So I was managing <hes> an artist's name. . Lloyd, who , was on <hes>. . <hes> what he was on Atlantic or universal at the time. . But big RB artists that Atlanta <hes> and he had producer that pain in his <hes>, , the rest of his band and they ended up collaborating in doing a song. . So pain had a song with a very popular Atlanta artist. . So new the band from from that perspective and like the music and then. . Probably three years later or more actually probably the five years later I got an. . Email from a guy named pain Lindsay I'm I've moved on in my career and I'm managing a new artist on on the verge of breaking through and I get an email from pain saying, , Hey, , I'm money's pain Lindsey <hes>. . A mutated director and I love the shoot a video for your artist and. . I didn't know who he didn't recognize the name but a friend of mine who having dinner with me at the time <hes> I read the email and he said Oh that's pain from rice out of the tree I said okay. . Well, , maybe I'll give this guy a shot because before I wasn't sure if you we already have people to do our videos, , but because of that connection already knew who he was like. . Okay that's that's cool. . There's. . You know there's tried out. . So we shot one video for a couple thousand dollars <hes> turn out to be great. . He was able to I wasn't quite sure like how good he would be. . So I kind of was forcing my creative ideas on him but any and you made them come out great and then we did that times and then I said man, , this guy's good I should probably just let him run with the creative ideas and have him bring the video back with his full vision and when he did that the biggest got even better. . So I just knew like we have a really good working relationship being able to hear each other right and being able to collaborate creatively and in respecting each other from creative and business standpoint. . So. . It was like the foundation of US later becoming business partners

Donald Albright Donald Laura Riley Monster Linden Brian Mercy Atlanta Founder president La
'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

Digiday Podcast

07:05 min | 1 year ago

'Tenderfoot TV co-founder Donald Albright on the podcasting's bright (but consolidated) future

"Hello. Welcome to the day punk ass I'm Laura Riley did today's senior correspondent coming to the end of my stint killing neo regular host Brian Mercy. So on today's show, I'm very excited to g she Donald Albright Donald Founder I'm president of. TV, which is an Atlanta based production studio is hidden costs. Vanished. Monster Linden in La. Many money. Combined the has reached more than five hundred, million dollars to date and TV as they would suggest is increasingly inking deals beyond podcasting, TV and even recently striking deal. So don't welcome to the. Past. Thank you for having me. Let Veer. And Eighty joining us from Atlanta today as you've been hung down. Yes I am I've been here for. How long has it been now? Feels like this. Browse data. Yeah. Monday or Saturday I can't tell but yeah. I mean Atlanta from California originally but. Moved here to Atlanta. After after I should go into college and then I love the city. Yes I was going to ask you she's a what brought you to Atlanta. I know your your background was in music permission an are. Yeah. Yes. So I'm from the Bay Area San Jose California my mom actually moved to Atlanta when I was in high school So I went to thousand state after graduating high school for about a year and a half, and then at certain point came to visit my mom and a friend of mine his older brother was going to Clark Atlanta University a historically black college. I went to the campus. Saw Beautiful Campus I saw beautiful women and I said I have to go here one day. So I transferred transferring from Saudi state to Clark Atlanta and the you know had half my family was already here so. Ended up staying and just building. Building out my business here, and it'll be started started in music industry in Atlanta. And in that time, he builds up a pretty enviable client list to have to say like Jay z outcast, can you take back to that time? What what can have brought e to setting? Is It D. Day and statements and some of the this the standout moments from that time. Yeah I mean so many it's been twenty years It all happened very much like podcasting kind of by accident I've always been into our entrepreneur started my first company when I was about eighteen years old shirt COMP design company Printing Company which I learned from Tom, this profit organization that I was working with. So I was always been business-minded my my dad his own construction company or has own construction company. So I've always seen him write his own business as well and. When I got to Atlanta. We just for in this music scene that was very Coming up like yet outcasts yet goodie mob TLC, usher and we kind of just. Went to this party and met a few people start networking a few business cards and decided, hey, we should just. Hang out with these people and start to promote and pass out flyers in. Other the company actually started because we were losing money I was the only one with a car. So it was causing gas money to go from point eight point be so I said, hey guys, we've got a pool our money together to share in these losses in eventually someone said, hey, how much you guys charge to put up those posters and we got to come up with a number that's count started the business but it evolved from there obviously from running a promotions company out of the Dorm Room Clark Atlanta to. You know taking artists like masterpiece in Yeah Jay Z. His. In promoting concerts in the going on the road with artists like outkast and Goodie mob and that evolved into management. An are in the and the names started getting bigger and bigger and not just the names bigger. But my relationship with the artists at first, you're a little bit. Distanced from the creative process, you're only on the promotions and marketing side. That I became more involved in the creation of albums, the management of talent stuff like that. So it was it's been great I mean I've traveled the world three times artists toured you know Africa with Chris Brown in the US with With usher festivals all over the world. So I there's so many standout said it's fun to talk about it because I forget a lot of them but the it's like having two different two different careers in two different lives. Almost you know I'm really interested in how you and your kind of tie founder at tend to fit came to mate. So you okay founder is pain Lindsey, and in a prior life he was in this hybrid even describe them. But like rap rock bands cooled rights here the tree. So interested in night walk forces combined that the you T to mate and and start working together. Is another interesting story so we I I didn't know who pain was, but I knew who the band was right his right side of the tree and he. Yeah the music was so and it's all. It's all about like how you introduced to something. It really has a big impact of what you initially feel about it. So I was managing an artist's name. Lloyd, who was on what he was on Atlantic or universal at the time. But big RB artists that Atlanta and he had producer that pain in his the rest of his band and they ended up collaborating in doing a song. So pain had a song with a very popular Atlanta artist. So new the band from from that perspective and like the music and then. Probably three years later or more actually probably the five years later I got an. Email from a guy named pain Lindsay I'm I've moved on in my career and I'm managing a new artist on on the verge of breaking through and I get an email from pain saying, Hey, I'm money's pain Lindsey A mutated director and I love the shoot a video for your artist and. I didn't know who he didn't recognize the name but a friend of mine who having dinner with me at the time I read the email and he said Oh that's pain from rice out of the tree I said okay. Well, maybe I'll give this guy a shot because before I wasn't sure if you we already have people to do our videos, but because of that connection already knew who he was like. Okay that's that's cool. There's. You know there's tried out. So we shot one video for a couple thousand dollars turn out to be great. He was able to I wasn't quite sure like how good he would be. So I kind of was forcing my creative ideas on him but any and you made them come out great and then we did that times and then I said man, this guy's good I should probably just let him run with the creative ideas and have him bring the video back with his full vision and when he did that the biggest got even better. So I just knew like we have a really good working relationship being able to hear each other right and being able to collaborate creatively and in respecting each other from creative and business standpoint. So. It was like the foundation of US later becoming business partners

Atlanta Clark Atlanta University Dorm Room Clark Atlanta Clark Atlanta United States Donald Albright Donald Lindsey Laura Riley Monster Linden LA Brian Mercy California Founder Veer Jay Z. His Outkast Bay Area San Jose California
Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

60-Second Science

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Sequential Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

"In two thousand, six, a twenty, six, year, old California man named your riot courtney was sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping and rape despite having an alibi for the time the crimes were committed to witnesses. They saw lineup the police station and they both identified the same person and he was convicted entirely based on those two eyewitness Accounts Salk Institute for Biological Studies neuroscientist. Tom. Albright he says years later the California Innocence Project looked into the case and it turns out that the DNA that was found at the crime scene was not the DNA of Courtney after eight years behind bars courtney was set free, but his case is not unique now. Of cases in which individuals have been exonerated based on post conviction DNA analysis most of these innocent people were sent to prison because witnesses miss identified them somebody. Out of a lineup and that information was taken seriously by the police in the jury believed it why witnesses sometimes get it so wrong Albright explains that our memory for visual events is notoriously flawed. Somebody tells us that they saw something we figure it must be true. They saw with their own eyes lineups. Witnesses photos of six faces, five of innocent people and one of the suspect the eye witnesses simply asked to identify any person that they remember from the crime scene but only having them pick their top choice doesn't account for how well the witness remembers that face. This issue can result in errors. Albright's team thinks there's a better way by tapping into the strength of the witness's memory in an experiment they had volunteers watch a clip of a grisly crime scene from an obscure Hollywood movie. The next day these studies subject witnesses viewed a six person lineup that show just to faces at a time think of an eye test better. Now or now. So on each hair witness will vote for one or the other the faces which one looks more similar to the person you remember from the crime scene, we've been tabulate that vote and the face that has the largest number of votes is the winner compared to traditional lineup techniques. The two faces at a time method lead to a less biased and more accurate identification of the fictional perpetrator people are far better at making relative judgments than they are making absolute judgements. The study is in the journal Nature Communications the researchers think their approach to lineups has the potential to reduce wrongful convictions resulting in more justice for

Albright Courtney Salk Institute For Biological Kidnapping California Innocence Project TOM Nature Communications Rape Hollywood
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 1 year ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
"albright" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I know. I'm finally incentive saying if I die I'm beginning to assume that at some point it's a win And but I do think that This is going to be a very important time as we. This will end at some point and what I WANNA do and this goes back to my to do list is spend an Wyatt liked teaching. And why for me Above said there's no speech book ever written a dozen quote Robert Frost so you know and his the quote that I've liked is the older. I am the younger my teachers. M and I'm fascinated by this younger generation and By the way when my heart at Georgetown we'd do a game simulation? Which is the favorite thing students do? And of course we couldn't do it in person so he didn't virtually about two weekends ago and the students were brilliant absolutely brilliant and they took the crisis side invented which was about Venezuela and a ship that had been seized and they turn the crisis into an opportunity to deal with some of the political issues. That are really out there. Between Venezuela and Colombia. I also think that the thing that we've criticized young people for which is their online all the time and are not as socially adapt or. Don't care about privacy. The day the tools in order how to be in the post virus time and so I look forward to teaching more And and I've never been my. I have three grandchildren. That are college age. And and I plan not to shut up and I feel also very strongly about The role of women And I think that this is a time that By the way I was asked recently in an interview her articles about the fact that the countries that have managed to deal with the virus or the ones run by women New Zealand Denmark and Germany and Taiwan and so what are the characteristics. And so I do think that societies are this back to something else. We talked about in every country. Women are at least half the population and so even though I mean I would say this because I'm a feminist but even the bottom line is why would you waste the talent of those women and so what we need to do. I believe in the democracy is not a spectator sport and So I'm going to keep pushing. I'm chairman of the Board and the National Democratic Institute. I'm going to talk about democracy when we talk about young people and I am going to get rid of the worried part about being an optimist. Well it's it's such a pleasure to spend time with you today and I know you're you're as busy as ever Certainly it's just really mind blowing. How engaged you are and your latest book is Hell and other destinations. People can find you on twitter at Madeline as as you mentioned the The French instructed you at MED. L. E. V. I n. e. Secretary Albright. Is there anything else you'd like to to say or a share before we close this round one on the podcast? You didn't ask me about my hand Yes I should. You know. We're on video and so for people who can't see it. Please tell me about the pin that you have on five Essen Roman and or Avi and and it comes from the following thing. Which is that during a as I mentioned. We were in London during the war. My father broadcast over BBC and I listened to. Bbc is a little girl and they would open every broadcast with the first five notes of Beethoven's fifth with Kettle. Dr Donna down which is Morse code for V for victory. Oh that's amazing. Well thank you so much Secretary Albright this has been a very enjoyable and thought provoking conversation. So thank you for taking the time I have to say. I don't think I've ever had as much fun in an interview. Thank you so much. Oh wow I mean it. It was really fun. Thank you my pleasure and I will share links to the new book to everything we spoke about. We'll have very complete show notes for people to explore everything that you've shared at Tim log foresights slash podcast for everyone. And I wish you all the best much safety and I am confident that you will find a way to put a slash mark through the worried as you move forward as an optimist. Good luck to you. Stay healthy and everything. Great thank thank you and to everybody listening. Thank you for tuning in and take care. This is tim again. Just a few more things before you take off number one this fiber at Friday. Do you want to get a short email from me? Would you enjoy getting a short email from me? Every Friday that provides a little morsel of fun before the weekend and five of Friday's very short email. Share the coolest things. I've found that I've been pondering over the week. That could include favorite new albums that have discovered it could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of Weird. Shit that I've somehow dug up in the world the esoteric as I do. It could include favorite articles that I've read and I've shared with my close friends for instance and it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend so if you want to receive that check it out. Just go to four hour. Workweek DOT COM. That's four hour workweek dot com all spelled out. And just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one and if you sign up. I hope you enjoy this. Podcast episode is brought to you by Helix. Sleep sleep is super important to me. In the last few years I've come to conclude it is the end all be all that all good things good mood could performance. Could everything seemed to stem from good sleep? So I've tried a lot to optimizing. I've tried pills potions all sorts of different mattresses you name it. And the last few years I've been sleeping on a helix midnight lux mattress also have one in the guest. Bedroom and see back from France has always been fantastic. It's something that they comment on. Helixsleep has a quiz takes two minutes to complete that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you with Helix. There's a specific mattress each and every body at is your body also your taste. So let's say you see on your side and like a super soft bed no problem or if you're back sleeper mattress that's as firm as Iraq. You've got a mattress for you. He looks was selected as the number one best overall mattress bic of.

Secretary Albright Venezuela Helix Tim BBC Robert Frost Wyatt France National Democratic Institute Essen Roman Secretary Madeline New Zealand Denmark chairman London Iraq Helixsleep Dr Donna
"albright" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss and welcome to another episode of the Tim. Ferriss show my guest today. Very Special Guest Is Secretary K Albright on twitter at Madeline M. D. E. L. I. N. E. Secretary Albright is a professor author diplomat and businessman. Who served as the sixty fourth secretary of state of the United States in nineteen ninety seven? She was named the First Female Secretary of State and became at that time. The highest ranking woman in the history of the government from nineteen ninety. Three to Nineteen ninety-seven Dr Albright served as the Permanent Representative to the United Nations and was a member of the president's cabinet. She is a professor in the practice of diplomacy at the Georgetown University. School of Foreign Service. Doctor Is Chair of Albright Stonebridge Group A Global Strategy Firm and Chair of Albright Capital Management Llc. An investment advisory firm focused on emerging markets. She also chairs. The National Democratic Institute serves as the President of the Truman Scholarship Foundation and is a member of the US Defense Department's Defense Policy Board in two thousand and twelve. She was chosen by President. Obama to receive the nation's highest civilian honor the Presidential Medal of freedom in recognition of her contributions to international peace and democracy. Dr Albright is a seven time New York Times bestselling author her most recent book. Hell and other destinations was published in April. Twenty twenty for other books include Madam Secretary. Subtitle a memoir. That's her autobiography. The Mighty and the Almighty subtitle reflections on America God and World Affairs memo to the president elect subtitle how we can restore America's reputation and leadership read my pins subtitle stories from a diplomat's jewel box. Prague winter subtitle a personal story of remembrance and War Nineteen thirty seven to nineteen forty eight and fascism a warning without further ado? Please enjoy a very wide range. Conversation with Secretary Madeleine Albright Secretary Albright. Welcome to the show great with you. Thanks. I am so thrilled to have you on the show and I thought we could start at the beginning. I do love stories. You have no shortage of stories. And I thought we could begin with the seller in Notting Hill and the green paint. And that's not gonNA mean much to a lot of my listeners. But could you provide context for why that has special memory and a special place in your mind? Well it was during World War Two And we were in London during the blitz and in order to provide context. My father was a Czechoslovak diplomat. And when Nazis marched into Czechoslovakian March one thousand nine hundred eighty nine He by mother and I were managed to escape and he went to London in order to join the government in exile. I was two years old And we I lived in a bunch of different places but ended up In this apartment house in Notting Hill Gate before it was fancy and it had been an apartment house basically as I understood it built for refugees. And what happened was that during the blitz the bombing We went down to the cellar Which was supposed to be the air raid shelter and spent the night there and I remember my father at some point saying but we have to go down there but it's full of hot water pipes and gas pipe so as not exactly safe if the building bombed the we went down there. So what did happen when I was writing? One of my books prog winter I went back to visit everything to kind of get a sense of where it was and obviously the apartment was a lot smaller than I remembered it and I remember asking then. Also the superintendent of the building was the salaries still there and he looked at me. Like are you crazy of course as sellers there so we went down to the cellar and I all immediately had one of those Recollections that there was this ugly green paint down there and it was the same ugly green paint that I remember from World War Two so We really kind of weird But it was interesting to be there in that apartment house which was full of refugees at the time and then to think about where is now located in Kensington. Park road. Pretty fancy part of London. What are your strongest memories of Your Father? I have many many of them because he was a dominant personality up in my life. But my strongest memories are that When we came to the United States and he became a professor at the University of Denver. all we ever talked about was foreign policy but the strongest memory which really goes to the kind of person he was. He had been a diplomat. He'd been an ambassador in Yugoslavia. We came to the United States We wreckages my mother went to work in the Denver public schools as a secretary and my father was a professor at home And so ambassador Cordell washing dishes and cleaning house. He and I used to do that. A. Together and what an incredible person he was in order to be able to make the abnormal seem normal and he was obviously the major force in my life but but all of a sudden from being an ambassador. He's washing dishes but the thing about him was that he smoked a pipe and so the pipe was always there to most people listening Russian. Say Most but certainly if I think back to my childhood Politics was something that I really only observed in the context of my father getting into maybe dinnertime arguments with visiting uncle. Something like that so there wasn't much nuance to it for my I experienced. Let's just say but when when you say foreign policy. Was this ever present topic of discussion. What might that look like as as a young woman or as a girl sitting at the dinner table? What does that conversation? What might that conversation look like? Well it's about America's position in the world and what has to happen but I need to go back a little further so that there's a little context so we were in England during the war and I was little and then we went to Slavia in one thousand nine hundred forty five When I was eight years old and my father was the ambassador. And you've probably seen pictures of little girls in airports in their national costume. That's what I did for a living. I gave flowers to people at the airport And then there would be people that would come to the embassy of foreign ministers and ambassadors and then one time the a the ruler of Yugoslavia was Marshal. Tito and I gave him flower so I grew up in this kind of a sense of you know who are these people. What is their role? What Czechoslovakia was a small country? Why were we in Yugoslavia? So this was a constant teaching about What was history? And how did that evolve to current foreign policy because he was a professor? There always was as historical context. So then we come to the United States and we're refugees and we're living in Denver and.

Secretary Madeleine Albright S professor Madeline M. D. E. L. I. N. E. United States president Secretary K Albright London Albright Stonebridge Group Yugoslavia Dr Albright Tim Ferriss America Albright Capital Management Ll Secretary School of Foreign Service Notting Hill Gate Notting Hill
Why You Should Give Your Toenails a Break From Polish

Forever35

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Why You Should Give Your Toenails a Break From Polish

"Need to bring up something that makes me very uncomfortable and that is feet. I need to talk about feed Dorey. My feet are ravaged. They are I I so I was getting Gel pedicures on my toenails for probably years. Wow Okay I'd get a Joe pedicure. I'd leave it on for like three months. It would grow out ridiculously long and then I would get it redone. And in December. I got a regular pedicure with regular Polish and then since then and then I painted my own nails like at the start of social distancing. So let's say six five or six weeks ago. Okay and finally. I removed the Polish. And what what was left. Beholding was not a pretty sight. My toenails narrowly in very bad shape. Oh No yeah like I think. I need to do some healing work on my toenails. Okay now I don't even know what I am describing like. They have like little white. Like maybe calcium marks or I don't know if it's like Little Dent indentations. There's maybe a slight bit of yellowing. Which makes me worried. Am I have a fungus? I I just. I have literally not looked at my toenails for years and I just recently am like well. I guess I'm going to use this time to heal my toenails. Yeah I mean so. I typically get dark Polish on my toenails. Which like you're not really supposed to do. Yeah we use that. I don't I always do that too but actually not good not toenails. It's not good for your toenails especially given how long I leave the Polish on. What does it do okay I just did? I just did a little googling and okay Yup Yup Yup. It's not a good idea to leave nail Polish continuously on your toes all summer. Your nails are much more permeable than your skin. As a result they can soak up substances such as Nail Polish that are applied to their surface. The dangerous keep your nail Polish on too long. Is that the pigment. In the Nail Polish can soak into the top few layers of the nail and dry out when that happens fungus yeast bacteria mold and mildew can develop underneath the nail plate. Lovely Great News Rate News. I'm taking my Polish off today. This was news team. I have literally never considered what the Polish is doing. I mean I know that sounds so absurd and like I doing a poor job taking care of my nails. I've just never thought about it. Okay so this article. I'm reading from the Cleveland. Clinic has some suggestions. Do you want to hear them? Yes yes yes so turns out the same permeability that created the stain can help to ease it as well and the doctor advises applying vitamin E. oil or coconut oil to the nail and nail bed underneath the nail where it meets the skin and gently rubbing it in when you do not have nail on okay so tonight I begin. Oiling my toes. Okay if you remove your toe. Polish in your toenails are stained you can tell if the stain is from Polish. If you see your natural pink nail color grow out from the cuticle the stains should fade slightly over time and eventually grow out right and they recommend against using now Polish during the grow out period. No I am now fully in grow out nail toenail mode like I am. I'M GONNA use this time to really work

Nail Polish Cleveland
"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Tonight why the revision Albright from the twenty twenty N. F. L. combine trusting thing happened with the forty Niners they decided after they did finish up the older interviews to basically send their coach's home and you kind of wonder with with the change in format in and going to the evenings when burly teams for the most part watch all this on TV if they've already did their interviews they got a general idea of the medicals but the forty Niners they sent home their offense of coaches this morning they've got no coaches out there I'm I mean I imagine John Lynch might have stuck around and I didn't hear anything about him necessarily but otherwise I've heard growing sentiment from several coaches out here that the kind of bored after they get through the interview process and and you know that there's a lot of down time and it kind of comes back to with what we talked with the Broncos heading into this is the reason why they didn't send out a lot of the coaches because they felt as though it would be a waste of time are are we may be seeing a little bit of a change in the way that teams are gonna be approaching the combine well technology has made the gathering of the data so much more efficient now that you almost don't have to be here you know the whole the whole idea of being here for the interviews is still valuable but beyond that it really is and I think the I think Vic Fangio has started another trend it's really weird on the old school coach is the one star no rifle trends but you know in in he he he you know decided that he was gonna have his guys just stay back and study tape and they need to be here will take the interviews will we'll we'll get the numbers will come back and do it that way the rams because seized on that and it looks like the Niners have kind of followed suit in those are three teams I kind of have a incestuous relationship I guess over time there are you know a lot shopping they obstacles and go back to college and it goes back to you know the Denver Brad Staley left over for the rams organization so there's there's a lot of there's a lot of connection there I and I I just think that they're probably on to something it keeps guys like me from get the more other alone aboard their downtime the public for information and if you're an organization that wants to silo your information keep guys like me forget it that's a good way to do it do you think this is something where I mean it's hard for me to imagine what's happening over at Lucas oil and the coach is having an opportunity in the GM's having an opportunity to see these guys in person to our reverie starring to see do you think this trend gets cut off at some point were were were just this is just a few a handful of teams or do you think a lot more teams will choose this option with the forty Niners did what you talk about the rams what they did with the Broncos you think more to the deck we're starting to see just the tip of the iceberg of that trend probably tip the iceberg I have a feeling you're going to see teams bring staffs out here do with that I understood the bring the staff out here but they'll leave after once the drill starters there's nothing for them to do it that point you know scouts about all that kind of stuff covered what what these coaches gonna do so I think if your head coach if you're a general manager and and you're you're looking around you say what one of my employees doing right now what am I getting value for my dollar right now I think you have to put that in that context to say you know what the probably best served headed back home yeah there's better was more work to be able to do there and as we we've heard from the coaches I well I mean I think Vic Fangio kind of expressed a little bit I had a chance to run to Anthony Lynn last night in in general these guys are kind of like yeah I mean it's a good week to be able to hang out with everybody but but they're not there to pump other people for information right in the back channel stuff tends to be worked by the GM's in the end the coaches they're probably left to sit around because because unless you're a coach that has the GM hat as well then your basically being given this the squad I mean if you get your input and the GM would love to have you take a look at the players and being in the interviews but after that anything else is going to be happening any maneuvering in the draft any conversations about any of that stuff that's that doesn't involve coaches they they don't have nothing to do with that right hand so what you've done what you do in bringing them out here and and the way this thing is structured now as you're leaving these guys with you get them out there and your lead with all kinds of downtime and nothing to do and what that does is create information leak opportunities and and so you know like I said reporters were we tend to be kind of insistent we tend to be kind of annoying we tend to you know try to find ways to get the information and if you don't give me access to the guy to find the information well makes a lot harder to do it I'm with you on that wool brie bringing you some more forty times throughout the evening including Jalen Reagor and Henry Ruggs everybody wants to talk about them another thing that happened out here at the combine today was a discussion about Tom Brady and and the way this is being covered right now is kind of interesting to me because you have for me is P. inside and Jeff Darlington saying I would be shocked that if if Tom Brady went back to the patriots and then in NFL network is kind of being a little it seems like they're being a little more cautious on their end with right in the end what are you hearing about Tom Brady's future I I think he's back with the patriots I I really feel like this is a coordinated leak from died year because they haven't had any communication with the patriots in its its its attempt to force their hand to put them out to like a windows starting number from you before we get out here and start to hit these other teams up and you know Tom Brady also understands he's got a limited window to maximizes leverage because the minute Phil riverside's on the team and Ryan Tannehill gets re signed all the sudden his leverage in terms of going somewhere else falls almost completely through and so if Tom Brady wants to maximize what it is that he's doing he needs to get the ball rolling with doing that on the other hand doing let's look at this and well we're trying to see if this new CBA passes because we need to figure out a few things with your you know with regard to your contracts so it's both sides trying to maximize our opportunities maximize our dollar okay so in the end you believe he's just gonna go back this is a lot of posturing I I I I lied that he will go back to doing the patriots yes interesting because you didn't even seem like that's where you were going a couple weeks ago on this you're talking a lot about the Chargers and talking about I still think they're the mix I I still think the Chargers the colts and and even the raiders to degree would be in the mix for his services I I just I can take a lead knowing what at this point let me leave him like this what would be best for Tom and then what will be best for the patriots give me both sides what's best for the patriots can be retaining Tom Brady you know some type of two year together don't have an option back there behind him now what do you do bring Marcus Mariota in we talked about yeah yeah yeah but it you know at the same time I mean is is that going to continue your your dynasty I mean if you do a double check somebody comes a great coach of all time if he's not already but if you Tom Brady I I don't know I think the colts maybe they've got some they've got some similarities up there they got a great offensive line a line raiders maybe if you could learn the Gruden offense the verbiage there they've got a great offensive line the Chargers or the team that interests me the most because they have a battle line but they're actually the most set up to be competitive you across the board so you know it really depends on if they already run a verbiage it's the same that he runs so if you're willing to build an offense of line around Tom Brady you willing to commit all your resources to to fortifying that align then maybe you could bribe Tom Brady into coming out and then has up there what's best for Tom well I don't know if you if the Chargers they fortify their line you want with them are you saying that you've submitted your in order for anybody who was still on the fence you submitted your status yeah I mean I I have a hard time with six championships almost anybody saying that he's not the greatest of all time is not that I makes me feel good saying something like that buy it when you get to that level championships the most of any quarterback in the history of the game yeah you're you're there by yeah I I I think there's there's always going to be a bit of that asterisk of Belichick Brady breeze that was just some guy we know him saying this was a one begets the other and so you have to find a way and both those guys are looking to finish their legacies out and they want to establish that they were the guy yeah I think I think that's that's pretty fair five five six six nine zero is our text line is up there we're gonna come back and I will talk a little about this tight end class for just a moment maybe the Broncos they did the right thing despite some of the hot takes that were thrown about the Broncos making mistake taking a tight end in the first round with a public awaited maybe they were on to something we'll get to that we come back his Broncos country tonight live for the twenty twenty NFL combine on K. away the.

Albright
"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Twenty Tom by writers but Albright insights analysis all the press conferences office of line and running back say we're going to have some great guests on that two hall of Famer Steve Hutchinson is gonna drop five have a few words with this Jordan reed draft never gonna pop in as well but we love the prospects once again Jordan reed not for what I did at the time and from Washington to get settled back to the court in college this was a good one pretty good it was one I mean is that a really difficult more clear I would ask you okay all right so Jordan reschedule honesty Hutchison's gonna go it's a lot a lot of fun a chat with those guys as you mention office of wine if running backs talk today I'll also get to the list of players in the world who had formal interviews with its kind of extensive list will get a little bit of a clear picture not a problem caused by the target in the draft yeah it's really a really good day some of the interesting names in that thing that makes so if you dissect lights will get to that right here at the top of the arch brought this country tonight live from the twenty twenty level combine okay way Dr residential area on the side now we still got that accident working eastbound I. bowl I three six electric bike I should say all right around what's worth expected to flag circle the next in his well southbound I. twenty five hundred fourth got you backed up as well that was in the right shoulder whereas the one aboard turnpike is blocking all lanes except the HOV lane we're still seeing slowing northbound I. twenty five into downtown westbound I. seventy over the elevated portion west down to seventy as you make your way towards Vasquez and it looks like enough freeway problem six Avenue all right and Delmar circle that accident there with possible closure so be prepared to follow detours thanks thirty one pinpoint weather tonight partly cloudy lo twenty two tomorrow mostly sunny high of forty eight currently thirty two this report sponsored by the Denver museum of nature and science the Denver museum.

Tom Steve Hutchinson Washington Hutchison Vasquez Denver museum Albright Jordan reed Denver museum of nature
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
The Oscars of Podcasting? First 'Golden Mics' Awards to Debut in 2021

Feedback with EarBuds

02:49 min | 1 year ago

The Oscars of Podcasting? First 'Golden Mics' Awards to Debut in 2021

"Just GONNA cover one story today. And it's a big one the story of the Golden Mikes plus last week. I promised we touch on podcast movement. This story has it all. You may have heard about this story via twitter or if you were at podcast movement last week from inside podcasting here goes last Friday February fourteenth wonder. Ceo or non Lopez announced the formation of the podcast academy quote a new membership driven not for profit organization of Independent podcasters and industry professionals dedicated to elevating awareness and excitement podcasts. As a major media category and advancing knowledge and relationships in and around the business end quote while Lopez leading the charge the academy's founding members include Donald Albright from tender foot. Tv Eric Dane from stitcher. On Your Grun men from NPR carry Hoffman from PR X. Courtney Holt from spotify Christie Mayor Ball from Sony Music Rekkem or who is independent Lawrence bore from criminal and Elliott Tavakoli from spoke media. The podcast academy will host an award show called the Golden Mikes in two thousand twenty one note. The membership in the academy is open to individuals not companies or organizations. The reaction to this news was mixed. While some applauded the effort to create an organization that could help elevate the industry others wondered whether Lopez was aware of the similarly named Academy of podcasters which held a now defunct award ceremony for years and still index longtime podcasters into a hall of fame despite skipping a year inductions will resume soon. None of the hall of fame inductees were contacted by Lopez prior to the announcement and many expressed shock that they were learning of it on social media adding fuel to the fire. While the PODCAST Academy's current leadership includes Independent. Podcasts makers virtually all them hail from the world of Radio Not podcasting. It didn't help that. Bloomberg article announcing the award's existence described the media as having been quote born into the halls of public radio and quote. Now before I jump in with my take I encourage you to go to inside dot com slash podcasting to read the entire article that I'm quoting in it. Sky CHATS WITH ELSIE. Escobar of she podcasts. Who was a hall of fame inductee about her reaction to the PODCAST Academy News? It's a timely conversation about how the new podcast scene think. Big Money and movie and TV deals will interact with the original podcasting. Think podcasting circa two thousand five. Go check it out now. What do I think I'm excited by? Anything in the PODCASTS world. That will continue to draw attention to the medium. I think more and more people should be finding and listening to podcasts. However I echo elsie sentiments. I do wish that there was some acknowledgement of the prior similar award ceremony. The question remains where did those hall of fame inductees stand how will their awards be acknowledged by the Golden Mikes? We'll see where this all

Podcast Academy Golden Mikes Lopez Podcast Academy News Eric Dane Twitter Elsie Bloomberg CEO Sony Music Rekkem Donald Albright Escobar NPR Elliott Tavakoli Spotify Courtney Holt Lawrence Hoffman
"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Is brokers country tonight right networks Anthony Rodriguez with you tonight Benjamin Albright expected back with us on Monday the ABS wish we could watch it I do I do miss that you know we're we're doing the show in the and I can watch these games at home because I have direct TV but in the studio unfortunately are not available it's a weird thing is we're it's a weird thing to be in the city of your team and not get to watch them I I am very sympathetic to the fans that don't get to enjoy their team and I'm also gonna empathetic to my friends over out to to this is a this a weird spot want to get into all that because I because even some of it I'm not privy to the goings on with it I'm just gonna say that it's a bad situation and it's it's really difficult here even on this show because honestly like when we had the the nuggets on not used the other night we watch that game we talked about it afterwards there was Luka versus the color is great and the you know I mean this is the sum of that I I I want to I don't know I wanna be fixed I would be fixed Anthony that's it will be eventually just a matter of time it has to in some way just may take a while we take a long while because a lot of money is at stake a lot of undercutting is potentially happening and one is a or two of the I. two of one side our major Kerr major major companies and one is regional it's not going to go the way both sides by one to go as of the old out is help me either in any getting just fans are getting more more matter now and you know it sounds what are the last hi just this week I think it seems as though fans are starting to turn on the regional network a little bit yeah and it's it's just for which is not fair but yeah I mean how many months are we in this thing man really five months in ridiculous that it's it's beyond ridiculous so again I'm not you know there's no soapbox here this is just frustration that we do a night show that I'd like to be able to watch the game to be able to comment on him and unfortunately we we can't we all on for the most part all we could do is real on Twitter or re in and I'm not about to read box scores for you guys and tell you what's going on all I know is watching the avalanche via Twitter has been basically the nor for me I've had by opportunities on nights off to be in a special weekends be able to check those things out not that for the most part ends up being what I get to do all right so we'll we'll we'll table that for a moment maybe a little later on I should you want to get into some Rockies conversation as today there were worse a few deals that were of rocky dribble.

Anthony Rodriguez Benjamin Albright
The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

Rush Limbaugh

15:31 min | 2 years ago

The left Is Imploding Over Events With Iran

"So what happened the president kills a well known terrorist who was responsible for the dance hundreds of Americans including uniform military personnel left no stone the left has a break down if everybody is puzzled by this all you have to do is go back to when trump came down the escalator on June fifteenth two thousand sixteen and announces slogan make America great again member how controversial that once you make America great again what's controversial about that what in the world is controversial about America first but it is to the American left and they're really why is the explanation for all of this of course I'm gonna break it down into many many details for your great to be back folks happy to have you with us the telephone number eight hundred two eight two two eight eight two if you want to be on the on the program Twitter in my mind has become useful I was never going in the gang on the other side of the glass are looking perplexed didn't puzzled because it is well known that I think I'm sure and Twitter is inseparable what Twitter is highly useful right now on Twitter is allowing the laugh and today's Democrats and the media to show normal people how freaking insane they are Twitter has become words while it is incredible I wonder how many as I watch this this this why as I watch the left melt down over the death of a genuine one enemy of the people of this country and signed with an enemy nation over their own country in present I wonder how many Americans independence what have you for I am the fantasy this and are shocked and surprised by and I do because you know you never know the the depth that the mainstream media succeeds in achieving in terms of persuading people and I have found over the course you might find it hard to believe folks but I have found over the course of my stellar big broadcast career yeah I've said things about just take your pick I've said something and I've pounded it for ten fifteen years and people have heard it ten fifteen years when they hear it from somebody else what god did you see rush must be right the words everybody needs verification or a lot of people need verification what we've been one of the missions of this program since its inception has been the attempt and the objective to inform everybody ideologically who the left is who liberals are what liberalism here's how it becomes indistinguishable from socialism yeah yeah yeah yeah and now I mean it's unmistakable who these people are and they are the ones making it well known nobody has to tell anybody what the American left is or what the modern day Democrat party is because they are out there informing everybody you see where Iran has announced it will no longer abide by the terms of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement with a mama the guy like Bill Clinton announcing is no longer going to abide by his marriage vows I mean big deal everybody's shocked whether you're right they never about what in fact they may have a buy because the terms of the deal free them to go ahead and develop nuclear weapons nuclear power and all of this look let me take a stab I'm late to this this issue and stories been around since late last week let me take a stab at explaining this and by the way fox I need to tell you I am so I have some kind of a it's a weird thing I never have this little respiratory called and it has I don't have stuffed nose or throat or any of that I was calling Azam I had as well when I was a kid shortness of breath so if I if I speak a little slower that's why don't be distracted by the trying not to make it distracting why is the left being so blatant in their support for an enemy nation why is the left why is the Democrat party going out of its way to tell everybody that they actually preferred the models in Iran and this dead terrorist awesome so much by the way this guy and I have the inside track on how they did it which I will share with you is the program unfolds I mean the military operation I have the inside track how this was done it is amazing and yet as ironic as it is it's how we may have to really really praise the intelligence community for pulling this off I mean the deep state I you see but this this guy in the revolutionary guard general Qassams stole the money his body is being flown back to Tehran in a cardboard box with his picture on it across three coach seats on a rainy in Ireland the New York Post has the picture he's in a cardboard box course there's not much of a left just his finger with the ring on that that's how he was identified soul but still and they've got his picture on the cardboard box but it was a bad dude folks now why why is the left beside themselves I think and their many reasons for this by the way I am all of them I've discussed before but in in terms of what may be guiding this in a specific sense I think as much is the case with the modern day Democrats it's about protecting the legacy of the Obama administration and Obama himself and the Obama foreign policy to many conservatives and many Republicans Reagan is the president of all time the president president said no matter what kind of assaults are attacks on and they're going to be answered and defend and I think to the left there used to be Clinton I actually now think it's Obama that must be protected above all things must be shielded against all the terms it was the mom administration that ran the crew on trump and it went all the way to the oval office there's no doubt in anybody's mind posted by the way still hasn't sent the articles of impeachment over Josh Paul a senator from Missouri so he's gonna offer a resolution to just dismiss the charges because she won't sandy the articles over and nobody knows when she's going to send them over she's trying to again persuading people to re open the case in the Senate for more witnesses but I think she may be waiting for Durham she may be waiting for the dorm report even if that six months from now and you was the articles being sent to the Senate to blunt whatever bad news might be coming down the pike for the Democrats during could be one thing protectable could be something we don't know about but let me explain this Obama business as as a way of explaining how the left is is imploding on this it is very fashionable actually it's not it's not been fashionable to call them anti American but the reason I asked the question what the world is so controversial about make America great again you realize that phrase sent them into apoplexy make America great again or America first sends them into a nose dive into a tizzy what in the world to do normal decent common citizen Americans what in the world is controversial about that make America great again the answer is very simple there are a lot of people in the Democratic Party don't think America ever has been great do not think America can be great because of our founding don't believe America deserves to be great and in fact thanks America's guilty and they have now become the mainstream of the Democrat party Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright teaching at Georgetown University one of the things that she teaches students is that the United States is nothing but an accident of timing and events that there's nothing special about the United States that there certainly is nothing exceptional about the United States that it was just an accident they were just happened the confluence of events people fleeing the dictatorship of the king in Great Britain it up any number of other things for forces beyond anybody's control brought these events together in a nation was created by it's just an accident and therefore there's nothing really you think about it there's nothing special about it there's nothing noteworthy about it now Madeleine Albright might you might also remember that when the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union imploded that Madeleine Albright was very alarmed that that left the United States is the only superpower in the world and that was not good because you see the concept of America as the good guys does not exist in today's Democrat party in the world wide left do not doubt me on this there is no concept of America as the good guys and that's why make America great again is so offensive to the Americas not the good guys America needs to be cut down in size American needs to be limited America needs to be guarded against so Madeleine Albright's out there teaching young sculls full of March there's nothing special about America it's just a coincidence just an accident and that the United States as a singular super power is a destabilizing element in the world okay that brings us farmers she was secretary state among other things for Bill Clinton she has videos which are common in the modern day laughed and they are common in the American government their common in the American assembly flint that view that America alone as a super powers destabilizing is a view widely held in the civil service throughout the state department it's not an obscure review it's not it's not a minority view took me a long time to learn this long time to believe it long time to understand long time to accept tough thing to accept can't give me you grew up in your own country it takes seven to go to school when you're a young kid you're talking about the founding of the country your aware of how unique and exceptional America's then you then you discovered that people in your own government non biased don't believe it don't think it fact I think just the exact opposite tough thing to believe lot of people don't want to believe it lot of people don't want to accept that our own government there are people who do not believe in the goodness of the United States the concept of America as the good guys but you're looking at it in every bit of this opposition to what trump is non you're seeing it don't if you don't want to believe me do not then I what you're saying did not deny what you're reading they hate the trump did this for a host of reasons they hate the trump succeeded at it in a political sense thank you that trump has done damage to the Obama foreign policy the reason I mention mall mantled right is because Obama was of the same view you know what Obama's policy in Iran was aside from giving them notes but what was the motivation for all bomb I had the same view of the Middle East that he and Madeline Albright and all the rest of them have of the United States the Middle East was destabilized when only Israel was an economic and military power one of the reasons the and there are many it one of the reasons the Obama administration entered into the Iran deal one of the reasons that they engaged Iran one of the reasons that Obama dropped off a hundred and fifty billion dollars in cash on the tarmac in Tehran and don't think that some of it didn't get the Qassams only money a lot of it did by they know who the guy what is the Obama people know who the guy was they were making deals with this guy they know exactly who he was Obama believe that empowering Iran would stabilize the Middle East provide a counterbalance to Israel because once again the Israelis are not seen as the good guys even though they are United States ally and by the way there are many reasons why people like Obama's Susan rice madam Albright all the rest would not see Israel as the good guys there are religious reasons there are geo political reasons strategic reasons racial resent is all kinds of reasons for it but regardless Israel is the problem in the Middle East the United States is the problem in the world at large SO policies must be developed and implemented to blunt the bad guy nature of the United States and the bad guy nature of Israel and so there's Obama

President Trump America
"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Country tonight's right at words been but Albright three oh three seven one three eighty five eighty five phone number if you want to react to last night's game concerns questions things are actually side about let's be excited about with this Broncos team right numbers Benjamin all bright red head out to the hot line a guide that to got to start last night at safety we noticed these things straight Marshall join us on the program tray thanks so much for the time and how are you where are you don't we're doing good man how has your day been Fauria how you feeling the manager on and off the yeah I bet so last night you were the starter a story stage of course he got a couple couple guys doing dub you got that opportunity had that feel the managers this opportunity just another opportunity in the game the preschool games first one go out dancing so we don't really know what I could do to help the team the secondary was playing with a little bit of guys that we would consider you know down rusty you're missing Chris Harris you're missing the it'll Bryce count for a lot of that you're missing Kareem Jackson you guys are Mrs so and we'll how did you guys band together to do so well in the first half closes his head with their own team and light thank you share by known what they can do all the way down the the del sol so we just plug and play what's on the three how crazy deep is the safety room the problem top to bottom you guys are great yeah that is it is a really really good group yeah all of us they also live anywhere so that is it a competition on me all the better in the area we think about Jamal Carter moving linebacker has you doing so far good managers that you could play safety allow that to me so is the mood a you don't feel comfortable with the wall what's you get the it making plays so this is a good move for them to use their save your life get out there and play a game after doing a couple of joint practices against these guys was there any extra motivation anything that happened in practice the hell kind of motivator in the game are we guys just on your game as usual loses will gave his usual I mean of course some will have a new team where everybody knew plays first time since the spurs me upright so Mayweather and crazy but is is again we had to go out and play go back to the debt the safety you know coming into camp we we talked of ton about that and about how difficult it would be to make this roster me if you make this roster the fifty three man roster menu you're you're a heck of a player so does it does it feel like because you had that opportunity to start last night that things are leaning in that direction and how hard you work for this opportunity in your opinion mac V. could at any time so I'll let not in that phase Missouri so I was brought in get a mall everyday practice law saying game well me and as I approach is that it is in the model as well as a year what was your big take away from the game last night personally overall team either or the team would you got to keep working personally I I do a lot of I had to a lot of improvement personally I feel like you know that level good and also it is always room for improvement is care team yet if the mortgage just fill out sorry to rob who are some of your favorite safeties hang out because you got some personalities will parks justice Simmons man there's some there's some cool cats in there who were some of your favorite guys to hang out with the group hello everybody there by the brain like the different so they've conflated with seventeen where is to our peak light you want god Zora mail while being around more and this is every god in every state the light go make you laugh was going to do you can share with you go Hey go you guys push each other a little bit as far as making sure the better yeah don't boneless you get blocked it practice does you mess that was on there everybody will jump the P. Hey everybody to roll go go state so yeah especially this deep it's rather there seems like they're sorely opportunities for you guys to get interceptions in the scheme we've talked to Justin and will about it a lot dream and they they can't say enough great things about the opportunities you guys will be in put in position to come away with turnovers what are the what about the scheme do you like but this game is is this some different you know they were there last year the just allow us to use more about these no says Israel so we can make more plays so we got to get a position and make them play that's cool man Hey what we really appreciate pop analysts I trade in and was great to see out there with the starters we hope to keep continue to see you get more run and make this roster we appreciate it our live pre said one trait Marshall this last night around with us today of course he was starting last night Broncos country tonight right numbers Benjamin Albright trees pretty cool dude and he is definitely not the same kind of vein personality Weiss's will parks or Justin Simmons necessarily yeah they're a little they're they're kinda extroverted Willis these player man he can play trade bill was out there absolutely palm last night was great for him to step in like that like I said they were down three or four guys you know they jump in their boss either down a couple guys jumps right in their yacht on both those guys both those corners had shots interception John came with one I thought Marshall look good I think he's making a strong case for himself remember early in camp yet that day were he was just flying all over the field is get interceptions he he's making tackles he I've ever had to a stop in the hole on a running back you me basically kind of darted right in there Trey Marshall actually played a majority of the game the player I got a look at the number snaps but tray Marshall he played it he played Thomas naps last night because I remember seeing him even late in the second half go find his numbers yeah he played thirty five snaps Hollins played forty six I guess the Mante played forty one but that's that's kind of the top end of the guys that played the majority of that game entry Marshall played thirty five snaps the safety anyways good stuff there N. he right now if we're doing this thing going through the fifty three will maybe get Chester will do this tomorrow he's on he's the fifth got yeah I I think he absolutely is I think is like I said I think that having him out there start having him out there to start I think really kind of tips your head all the way that this roster is going to be constructed think he is the fifth safety I don't think that you don't put him out there to start that game if he's not a consideration for that that job and you know being down like I said without will without so it ray really put put him up in the spotlight stepped up in a big way like I said the first half the Broncos look really good on defense they played very very well any get that many snaps I think that suggests that they saw some things and they they want to further pursue this Broncos country tonight.

Albright
"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"albright" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Country tonight's right at words been but Albright three oh three seven one three eighty five eighty five phone number if you want to react to last night's game concerns questions things are actually side about let's be excited about with this Broncos team right numbers Benjamin all bright red head out to the high line a guide that to got to start last night at safety we notice these things straight Marshall join us on the program tray thanks so much for the time and how are you there are you know we're doing good man how has your day been Fauria how you feeling the manager on and off the yeah Abed hot so last night you were the starter a story stage of course he got a couple couple guys doing dub you got that opportunity had that feel the managers this opportunity just another opportunity in the game the preschool games first one go out of their lives so we don't really know what I could do to help the team the secondary was playing with a little bit of guys that we would consider you know down rusty you're missing Chris Harris you're missing the it'll Bryce count for a lot of that you're missing Kareem Jackson you guys are Mrs so and we'll how did you guys band together to do so well in the first half closes his head with their own team and light megashare by known what they can do all the way down the the del sol so we just plug and play what's on the three how crazy deep is the safety room the problem top to bottom you guys are great yeah that is it is a really really good group yeah all of us they also live anywhere so that is it a competition on the all those better in the area we think about Jamal Carter moving linebacker how's it doing so far good men ages that you could play safely allow that to me so it is the mood a you don't feel comfortable with a more what time you get the it making plays so this is a good move for him the the status of your love got to get out there and play a game after doing a couple of joint practices against these guys was there any extra motivation anything that happened in practice the hell kind of motivator in the game are we guys just on your game as usual loses will gave his usual I mean of course some will have a new team where everybody in the place first time since the spurs me upright so Mayweather and crazy but is is again we had to go out and play go back to the debt the safety you know coming into camp we we talked of ton about that and about how difficult it would be to make this roster me if you make this roster the fifty three man roster menu you're you're a heck of a player so does it does it feel like because you had that opportunity to start last night that things are leaning in that direction and how hard you work for this opportunity in your opinion act you could so only it never that phase in Missouri so I was brought in get a mall everyday practice law saying game well me and those are prone to the exit this will be my letters well there's a year what was your big take away from the game last night first in the overall team either or the team we got to keep working personally I I do a lot of guys do a lot of improvement personally I feel like you know that level good and also it is always room for improvement is care team yet at the morgue assistant up bill but started around who are some of your favorite safeties hang out because you got some personalities will parks justice Simmons man there's some there's some cool cats in there who were some of your favorite guys to hang out with the group hello everybody there by the brain like the different who is so different flavor to the team where is to our peak light you want god does your mail while being around more and this is every god in every state is like go make you laugh was going to you can share with you go Hey go you guys push each other a little bit as far as making sure the better yeah don't boneless you get blocked it practice does you mess that was on there everybody will jump the P. Hey everybody to roll go go state so yeah especially this deep it's rather there seems like they're sorely opportunities for you guys to get interceptions in the scheme we've talked to Justin and will about it a lot dream and they they can't say enough great things about the opportunities you guys will be in put in position to come away with turnovers what are the what about the scheme do you like but this game is is this some there are you know they were there last year the just allow us to use more about these no says this area so we can make more plays so we've got to get a position and make them play that's cool man Hey what we really appreciate pop analysts I trade in and was great to see out there with the starters we hope to keep continue to see you get more run and make this roster we appreciate it our live pre set one trait Marshall this last night around with us today of course he was starting last night Broncos country tonight right numbers Benjamin Albright trees pretty cool dude and he is definitely not the same kind of vein personality Weiss's will parks or Justin Simmons necessarily yeah they're a little they're they're kinda extroverted Willis hazel player man he even play trade bill was out there absolutely palm last night was great for him to step in like that like I said they were down three or four guys you know they jump in their boss either down a couple guys jumps right in their yacht on both those guys both those corners had shots interception John came with one I thought Marshall look good I think he's making a strong case for himself remember early in camp yet that day were he was just flying all over the field is get interceptions he he's making tackles he I've ever had to a stop in the hole and running back you me basically kind of darted right in there Trey Marshall actually played a majority of the game the player I got a look at the number snaps but trade Marshall he played it he played Thomas naps last night because I remember seeing him even late in the second half go find his numbers yeah he played thirty five snaps Hollins played forty six I guess the Mante played forty one but that's that's kind of the top end of the guys that played the majority of that game entry Marshall played thirty five snaps the safety anyways good stuff there N. he right now if we're doing this thing going through the fifty three mold maybe get a chance you will do this tomorrow he's on he's a fifth guy yeah I I think he absolutely is I think he is like I said I think that having him out there start having him out there to start I think really kind of tips your head all the way that this roster is going to be constructed think he is the fifth safety I don't think that you don't put him out there to start that game if he's not a consideration for that that job and you know being down like I said without will without so it ray really put put him up in the spotlight stepped up in a big way like I said the first half the Broncos look really good on defense they played very very well any get that many snaps I think that suggests that they saw some things and they they want to further pursue this Broncos country tonight.

Albright