38 Burst results for "Alberta"

Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

01:38 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"So your NHL writer. I'm Emily Kaplan National NHL reporter. Go all the way from from Edmonton Alberta home of Alberta beef, which is good for eaten or thrown on I. Andries or all sorts of things. And what I was telling Greg though, and he can see it because we facetime during our recording of this is a little inside baseball in my hotel room. Shout out to the West in downtown Edmonton because they've been so hospitable there is a gorgeous painting that's the mountains above by bed. It's distracting. It's really distracting. It's like it's almost like a magic I picture of the mountains and. I think it's been the majority of my time in quarantine just staring at it. See if I can see the sailboat. Speaking of seeing you saw stamp coast scenes, Stamkos as the old campaign used to go and Tampa when he was first drafted there. What was it? Me Give me the give us the breakdown of what it was like. Before game three, insofar as Stamkos watch like when we talked briefly before the game, you thought maybe four or five, you come back and then all of a sudden here he comes looking all like Chris Evans and Infinity War Shaggy and blonde. To come play game three instead. Yeah, well, again, a little inside baseball but us here on site, we're finally allowed to see morning skates, which is great. That's a staple of our job. That's when we typically get to see line Russia's and who's going to be in but we can only see it for the home team because they'll only allow us on the main ice and the away team I guess takes it on the practice ice. The Dallas Stars for the home team for game three. So we didn't get a see morning skate and they think there is you know been hearing a lot of different rumors and a lot of buzz in the bubble and there are some of the belief that you know. John Cooper just doing some gamesmanship in is kinda hyping this up as a tune in to find out but they all knew he wasn't going to come but I've heard some pretty credible people saying he's really close and he's got a common the fact that Julien Brisebois said this before the series is hopeful that he's GonNa come you're going to see them. So. Once we saw his stick on the bench taking ups. You knew he wasn't GonNa take warm ups if he wasn't gonNA play It was a really exciting moment. This is one of those moments though where being in an empty arena was both fascinating and disappointing, it was fascinating because I could really hear the bench and almost see their expressions and when he scored that was a moment of pure joy. And watching stamkos celebrate with the team after the win and come to the Post Game Press, conference. He was Giddy like you could just tell how much this meant to him but it was disappointing and I understand this game would have been in Dallas but those are the moments where he takes the is. Doing of him, what a brought us some energy I'm and I'm hopeful that the Dallas fans would have him and so that just felt a little anticlimactic. Yeah I. think that's accurate and you know his journey back has been really fascinating because wouldn't they bought him out for the Prince of Wales Trophy presentation after the Eastern Conference final. Jarring like here's a guy that we heard about and we've seen him skating a little bit in these optional skates and whatever to actually see him again with his teammates with that shaggy hair with the show. Looking like he just got unfrozen. It's like I was really intrigued with that and at that moment of say to myself. Okay. Is this just like the acknowledgement that he's in the bubble and we want him to be a part of this and he's been a part of this but not actually going to actually come back and play you know or is this an acknowledgement of he's coming? He's he's getting closer and so I guess it was the latter. Really. Fun to see him really fun to see him score very much a guy that. Again, this is no fault. Not The fault the Dallas Stars because they've got a bunch of guys in the same category including their coach, but a guy that you can root for. That you'd like to see the cup with the. Accomplishments that he's had his career but also the absolute just. Tragedy. That struck his career, an injury perspective as well Just, really good to see him back now I mean we only saw him back for like under three minutes. What do you think that means going forward? So. That's the thing the second he didn't come back out for the second period, and then when you see him, sit on the bench the entire time like there's this belief we're not seeing this guy again that would mitt and if so can we just talk take away the bubble take away the pandemic? This is an absolutely. Sports moment the captain who has been there for all this like you said, drama and play off heartbreak since two thousand fourteen when he was named the captain, no other team, the because more postseason wins than the lightning but they have yet to win the cup and then they're doing it without him. He can come for just three minutes and he makes an impact scores that goal and once these scores that goal they know they're not losing, and then if if we never see him again like that's insane poetry, you could not scrip that like Steve Mayor with the NHL as creative as he is he couldn't even come up with that storyline. It's like I said, it's the team that has the best blu-ray that wins the Stanley Cup and that's that's a that's a chapter on the Blu, Ray. Right. Interesting. Those after the game I did ask John, Cooper like when he came in, were there restrictions or limitations? No. Like if a guy comes in, we know he's going to be one hundred percent. We don't believe in specialization guy just coming out to plan the power play and he could stand there and shoot. But then he dealt with what he described as an issue and that's why he didn't come out now the game was a little out of hand. So why risk it I do think those two pieces of information though lead me to believe it's possible that he will return later in the series. Interesting you're saying yeah, great moment. And obviously, as we do this podcast, Tampa's kind of the series. Funny like if you would ask me after the first two periods of game one, what the series was going to look like I'd say, like Dallas School for the sweep they played so incredibly well in the first few periods of game one, and then a game game was third period. It kinda got out of hand because they took a few penalties. They played on discipline Tampa took the game over and Anton Khudobin. Closed the door and it turned out that game the third period of game one was sort of indicative of the next few games, which is not good news for Dallas they've been undisciplined they've taken some a lot of penalties They didn't take three in the first period in game three, but they took two..

Stamkos NHL Dallas Dallas Stars Tampa Baseball John Cooper Edmonton Edmonton Alberta Russia Dallas School Alberta Facetime Greg I. Andries Reporter Writer Anton Khudobin Wales Trophy Julien Brisebois
Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

00:19 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

"Hey Greg. So have you gotten much fly fishing done and Edmonton since you've been up there? You know what I haven't and I'm a little disappointed I didn't get the brochure telling me. I could go fly fishing with mountains. Look this is obviously a topic in our player confidential where the guys talked about the brochures that were given the promises that were made and it really seems like the Alberta Tourism. Department made it seem to these guys? Hey, you're going to go to Alberta greater not just a cement concrete jungle in the middle of Edmonton I will say this. Gorgeous. River. Valley here. Really Nice Path they're gorgeous bridges zero mountains within I believe a three and a half hour radius book that's the thing like. We talked about the river and I was confused because on NBC The keep on showing these majestic aerial shots of a river, but it's cutting through snowcapped mountains are using. That's not what Edmonton is. I think that's Jasper. So maybe this'll it feels like a part of the simulation. Mountains and snow in rivers and fly fishing, and it doesn't seem like any of this. IS THEY'RE? Very confusing. It's quite confusing and you know what I think that just leads to the entire experience in the bubble we just don't know where we're going to get. And this kind of feels like when we watch her rutgers game and they show shots of the Empire State building like exactly right Other. That's only like twenty miles away as opposed to I don't know a couple of hundred kilometers. Mountains early twenty miles away as the crow flies. anyways. Coming up, on ESPN it is today we've got a couple really cool. Guests Ryan Kesler is GonNa join us to talk about his big. Revelation recently about his health. Prank pre a frank. Zano there it is will join us to talk about the Nhl off-season life under a flat cap a former front office guy an an astute observer of the game also former ESPN talking head we found out we'll have to talk to him about that as well. plus a little thing called the Stanley Cup finals going on. So we'll talk about that as well on ESPN and ISOS.

Edmonton Espn Ryan Kesler Alberta Tourism Greg Alberta Jasper NHL NBC Empire State
Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

01:00 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alberta" discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Look at the cameras now for a while when I looked in the camera. Hi, everybody camera keeping it on this guy's Turn Down for What song? About to shout you out. Somebody is this someone to turn my back to you shortly? Okay. There you go. You see yourself seni. Hey guys, go ahead and Page. Yeah. Okay. Oh, yeah Barbie now switch the camera to please. Go ahead girl. Yes, it's your time to shine. Well Let Me Shine Shine. I will move here. Let me see what we have. We have kuna room Williams. Heck you good morning. Natalie right is in the building. Good morning, Natalie. How are you today. We have C live in the building. What up, Charles? Hello. Marcia. Ramos is here. Good morning. Good morning to you the net net. Serano is in the building. Good morning girl England shout out to Whoa, whoa. Hey, how's it going over there at the SS a social security a little tailored tea, how you go back to sit with the pinky up? Okay right there for what you deal with girl lot of T? Cuz I'm sure you get all the teeth. Who was we have here a shout out to Marita. Chocolate Dona Simmons. Hey girl. Terrible lie, he could go before you go back to Berkeley Scott. What Abu hey, hey. Tell April I said hola. Hay khong Alberta is in the building Good morning Joe White. So she makes be next to be right showing up beaming what's up showing a hey girl. What's up with you, It's one of our clients, right? Yep. Rana. Hey girl. What's what's her deal? What's going on for me with her school? She she regular Club. And easy, she doesn't want you to go to that when she's listening Ice Nine when she's list to the show. She's single or relationship with them is married. She got the whole family the whole family kids and all that. Yes. All kids are grown. Yeah got grandbabies all she's so you're only like only just one baby father God. She got a husband. I don't know. be in her business like that. You know, let me know. Let me know what you working with young lady had. How long have you been? When are you trying to be all events girl just saying I was talking to this dude. I was at party the other day Saturday off millionaire. Yeah, you'll see any this house was crazy crazy was in New City, New York Franklin County some Rockland County. That's like upstage Cindy. These people were so rich. What were you doing over there? Tell you there was a networking event. They wanted me to hosting you were networking City. They open bar. They were giving out bottles of Moet dead. Oh like an open bar. You didn't bring one bag. I don't know. You didn't want to put one under the jacket for the team C City. They had a young lady wage. They had an inground pool in a backyard sitting they had a young lady in the Plastic Bubble go into the bubble and they would let her just walk along the water. It's pretty cool off today see me. They would give the food came was a lobster and steak subscribe Lake City never seen. Okay dad like orders and stuff and I say that to say there was a dude they're dead bodies Rich. Okay, everybody everybody is so I just I just yeah, they it was the people were so rich, right and they had all these luxurious cars right off. Did you park my Nissan in the next town and over and over there? Like did you get a uber XL Universe board for that off? Well, I have to get like your router has a kid. I had to get the triple XL Uber to get away City and I say this the reason why I just realized you know, I'm always the story before the story right off. There's a guy there rich young black man, very rich every city. Everybody's they had big chess boards out there to size a little kids. Oh my gosh. I love that and you move the big boss had that nobody actually the same from like a see if reality shows thousand for that and I was performing by the pool. They had a they had a violinist playing and all that play hip-hop music has no the reason why I didn't invite you guys because that I got the job that day Saturday in the morning. I was off. My daughter rented came out here to see her post. My daughter rented came out here and we was chilling out here with over to my crib with Chinese credit. We did a whole the whole thing in morning. I get a text message do so. You'll come get off. When you got this millionaire event, I told my daughter I gotta go count Gone Gone sitting I'm performing by the pool and it goes back to all this goes back to the young lady. I was wondering cuz we have a middle-aged City. This guy this guy one of the guys that were they weren't Rich guys. Yeah every seen any of the women you'll remember tell you have seen like Jimmy. He's sitting right like wage. Yo, like the lifestyles crazy. I've done has been the Vincent thousand time. But this is the very interesting she got the Coco. I mean, right? Yes. Nobody was wearing a national go back to the right page when she'll I saw I said a lot of us lost my into cocoa. They all turned miles on the bike. They are $10. Well, what dog It was a cold out here. That's a body where there was a guy there. Once that one of your legs. Don't call the next week. She's a relationship coach had a networking thing. City the guy he goes. Oh, that's route. And who is this?.

Natalie C City New City Lake City Dona Simmons Serano Berkeley Scott Hay Khong Alberta Ramos Marcia Rana Charles Moet England Cindy Chess Joe White Rockland County Jimmy
Canadian cop chased a Tesla Model S that appeared to have no one in it

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | Last week

Canadian cop chased a Tesla Model S that appeared to have no one in it

"While you're driving. A Canadian man has been charged charged with with dangerous dangerous driving driving for for taking taking a a nap nap while while his his self self driving driving Tesla Tesla was was going going more more than than 90 90 miles miles an an hour. hour. Police Police say say Both Both seats seats in in the the car car were were fully fully reclined reclined and and the the driver driver and and the the passenger passenger were were both both asleep asleep when when someone someone called called the the cops cops in in Alberta, Alberta, Canada. Canada. Police Police say say when when they they tried tried to to pull pull the the car car over over the the Tesla Tesla model s actually sped up. They finally got the car stopped. Tesla cars currently require the driver to remain alert and ready to act with their hands on the wheel. The 20 year old man inside is due in court in December. The man who created a

Police Police Tesla Canada Alberta
Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

"Those vicious predatory dinosaurs that tended to be fairly small as six to nine ten feet. Long snout to tail there. Certainly in the Jurassic. Park movies the things that terrorize people Anthony Fiorello a paleontologist at southern Methodist University in Dallas Texas for more than two decades. Now, Fiorello has been digging a dinosaur fossils, hundreds of miles north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska. So one of the fundamental questions about dinosaurs in Alaska. In the ancient Arctic is, did they live there all year round did they migrate? How did they get their a recent discovery sheds light on those questions this fossil that's the subject study is a baby dinosaur, the baby predatory dinosaur, and it is a baby. It's not just juvenile and given the size estimate of this thing. This probably was not far from where the nesting ground was. So this is the first physical proof. Alley some dinosaurs nested in the ancient Arctic some of the first Arctic dinosaur remains ever found were discovered back in the nineteen sixties in Svalbard, an archipelago north of mainland Norway. Since then researchers have theorized, the dinosaurs must have migrated to avoid deeply cold winters but Fiorello says this new discovery disproves that idea for you know the classic stereotype for dinosaurs is that had been. that they were living in sub tropical environments oftentimes, somewhat swampy if you look at various artwork over generations, that was quite often how these dinosaurs were reconstructed. In reality the climate north of Alaska's Brooks range seventy million years ago was similar to what we might see today in Portland, Oregon or Calgary Alberta. Certainly a place where. Things were cooler. Or who were capable of being cool at times but certainly warmer than the the Arctic today, the fossil find is a piece of jawbone with a tooth from Dromaeosaur Fiorello and colleagues unearthed it along the banks of the call. They'll river not too far from the Arctic Ocean. The bone is the first non dental evidence of that species in the far north the researchers report their discovery in the journal plus one. Of course questions remain. How did they do what they did because even with the warmer temperatures at the latitude, the thieves dinosaurs were living, which is at least seventy degrees north if not even farther nor. Do they endure long periods of light and dark, and that's where the research will go next for now Fiorello says the new discovery proves that these giant reptiles were well adapted to the highly seasonal environments of the late Cretaceous that we still experience today in the Arctic.

Dromaeosaur Fiorello Arctic Arctic Ocean Alaska Arctic Circle Jurassic Southern Methodist University Norway Dallas Texas Calgary Oregon Portland Alberta
"alberta" Discussed on ONE Energy

ONE Energy

07:34 min | Last month

"alberta" Discussed on ONE Energy

"Can. The show folks today on the show I have an absolutely brilliant brilliant man his name Sean Wagner. is currently the lead writer writer and editor for Burda nuclear nucleus, which is dedicated about promoting and educating and bringing nuclear power to Alberta, but also to Canada and throughout the entire world. He based on his bio on o'byrne nuclear nucleus. He is a lifelong nerd. He has a bachelor of science and masters of Science and Materials Engineering from the University of Alberta. His focus was on materials characterization and production, and before starting a nuclear nucleus, he worked for two years as a research assistant under Dr. Thomas. Stunned that formerly of Oak Ridge National Lab Studying Nano, scale gas flows through porous structures. Yes. That sounds incredibly smart. Incredibly cool and no doubt. Our conversation will not disappoint you. He studies nuclear energy on his own because he says that it takes all of the boxes that are needed for combating climate change and promoting environmental stewardship such as carbon high-intensity, reliable, large scale power generation. And just that it has the ability to bring people to a higher level of their quality of life. Without further delay, enjoy conversation check them out at Burda nuclear. NUC NUCLEUS DOT CA algen that's Berta nuclear nucleus dot ca check them out on facebook twitter instagram. Enjoy the show. All right. Going three to. Irvine. One. And we're live Sean. It's a pleasure to meet you Jordan. Pleasure to meet you too sir. So I interviewed Eric Meyer. I. Don't know about last year you came up. and. Obviously from Alberto and I am from burden once I found out there was another guy promoting nuclear got pretty excited and started following your work so. Tell me tell me about about what you're doing. Thank you. Well I run Alberta Nuclear. Nucleus Limited. It's a nonprofit organization that's working towards benefiting education and advocacy for nuclear projects and Kind of capabilities here Alberda we've. As, most people are probably aware Alberta's pretty heavy set into the oil industry and whatnot. A lot of people are saying he probably diverse. is seeing as how most trying to get off oil. So one of the things that we're trying to say is, Hey, like Alberta's got all of the traits people that are required to build nuclear stuff and we also have a lot of things that could be very useful in nuclear fields. Everything we need is here why don't we diversify into their because that'll take the least amount of retraining to get people ready to work. In it and so that's what we're trying to do. We're trying to talk with people about you know what misunderstandings they have or misconceptions that they might be repeating with knowing, and so we we chat with people about that and try and get them to be like Oh. Okay. So I'd never really thought about that for Nuclear and just get the conversation moving in that way. Right. So what made you start over a nuclear nucleus? I was drinking with a friend of mine on her back Parks Fun Day. I don't know how the topic got onto energy I. Think we were Griping about the pipeline or whatnot. This is like two years ago or something like that and I ended up going on a two and a half hour red at. And my friend was like, okay, you've been dogging for two two and a half. And you haven't repeated yourself. Once you need to give a presentation artist. Oh she got in touch with some people at a a little fun little group called Edmund to nerd night. Okay. Which is basically where people can go in and give twenty minute presentations on whatever topic they want. And people will just the day to come in and they sit around and they drink they listen to you give a speech on whatever's interesting to you so I started writing speech them. and talking with them and kind of halfway through writing the speech I realized. You know I've got all this information, but I can't put it all into. This one speech. So I guess I should probably have like a website where I could put all the extra information. So I made a website and I was like, okay well, now I need like an email and twitter account so that people can. Find a way to get in touch with me after they might have read this stuff. So I made that. was just like, Oh, well, now that I have all this stuff, I need some branding. So I got in touch with a graphic designer branding. facebook page, and then I got invited to a bunch of other facebook pages and all of a sudden I was giving a presentation and I had one hundred followers on twitter and people following me on facebook and whatnot, and I was putting out articles like twice a week for six or seven months and it just. It just kind of snowballed out of control all this time I'm unemployed. So I'm just like doing this out of my basement. That's awesome. So main objective to make sure I understand is you're trying to educate Burton's about why diversifying the nuclear would be very beneficial. That's the fundamental part of it a lot of the other. The. Other parts of it are just kind of like they're things that I liked doing 'cause like you've you've talked with Eric before. Heard about some of the other people who are promoting things like Ben hurt is a fairly technical economic guy. He likes to take the the big money pictures on things and the technical aspects, and he's kind of more focused down in Australia and Kersee Gauguin is you know super into the bright new future talking about how we can make things better how we can make sure that everyone frost and All this kind of big social field good stuff that can happen with nuclear and Shell in Brooker is basically just poking the bear all the time. And we've got eric who is another very social person and he likes to bring it music and get people kind of building a sense of community about things me. I'm kind of like the Tech Guy I'm not as techy as some of the like really really technical people in the field I like doing the like the fundamental tech aspects of things. So like taking the the really basic fundamental science that people were learning in like grade ten grade eleven and being like hey. Like this is the stuff you need to know. And that's it. You can. You can take all the stuff you learned and kind of built and propagate it without adding anything extraneous or new complicated on top of it, and that's how and this will be how a nuclear reactor works and you can figure it out just from this. So like you know back when people are you know backward people in Highschool or saying I'll never use science. How do I have to do for it? Well, it's like this is the stuff you need. All you need to understand how nuclear were right right.

facebook Alberta Nuclear Alberta Eric Meyer twitter Nucleus Limited writer and editor University of Alberta o'byrne Oak Ridge National Lab Irvine Sean Wagner. research assistant Alberda Canada Dr. Thomas
Big Oil pivots to renewables, but will it last?

Climate Cast

01:58 min | Last month

Big Oil pivots to renewables, but will it last?

"Corona virus outbreak is costing big oil big billions. The latest numbers BP reduced asset values by seventeen point five, billion royal. Dutch Shell says oil and gas assets are down twenty, two billion. And now, big oil companies are investing billions into wait for it renewable energy. Is Kobe nineteenth speeding up the renewable energy transition? Nicholas Kuznits writes about energy transfer inside climate news. Hi, Nicholas. Welcome to climate cast. Hi thanks for having me. Let's start with big oil's latest numbers. Give us a number that stands out to you and tell us what it means. There is one that I'd point to. That isn't necessarily the largest, but the French company totale said that it was cutting the value of its Canadian oil sands assets by seven billion dollars. So this stands out I think because it was basically entirely due to climate change really or to what too tall sees as the long term trend in governments acting to rein in emissions and clamped down on fossil fuel production. Let's talk about the Tar Sands Oil why are there impacts unique for climate? Change and why are they at risk now? So the Canadian tar sands oil sands is a huge store of oil in Alberta and it takes a lot of energy to convert it into a like a crude oils essentially that you can send a pipeline and because it takes Banerjee, there's also a lot of emissions associated with that. So it's dirtier form of oil than your average crude and in particular because of this and because of the Keystone Excel pipeline. Climate activists, kind of latched onto the oil sands as an embodiment of the problem of the type of oil that we need to leave in the ground if we're going to address climate change

Tar Sands Oil Nicholas Kuznits Dutch Shell Totale Banerjee Alberta
How I Built Resilience: Alberto Perlman of Zumba

How I Built This

05:19 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience: Alberto Perlman of Zumba

"Alberto we had John Foley, Peleton on a couple of weeks ago and saving Lincoln a bar three. Obviously, the industry as a whole has just been absolutely decimated, right? I mean twenty four hour fitness file for bankruptcy gyms across the country are struggling. Many of them may not survive at the same time working from home is really you know Anybody who's tried to get dumbbells online knows it's impossible to find them right now. Right I heard. There's a black market for dumbbells. Yeah. How has the Economic Crisis Affected Zimba? So so we set out and said, let's base our response to the pandemic and we started seeing this in January and February because we have instructors in Titan and our instructors in China were telling us hey, this is really bad. You guys have to prepare for this because if this. Gets out. This is not good. So we said we have to do three things. One most important thing how do we continue to help structure state generate income to how do we deliver a education virtually for people New People want to become instructors or existing instructors who need further education especially, if they're transitioning virtual and three, how do we keep our promise to make the world happy and healthy? The first thing we did was we allowed instructors to start teaching online. They started teaching zoom but Paulo to to that, we started developing our own platform and it's called Zen Studios Instense for Zoom Instructor, network. So in Studio and in studio allows instructors to lyceum their classes in allows them to upload prerecorded glasses with a licensed. It allows them to charge for their classes. It allows him to list their classes on for months, Zoom Dot Com. We really focused on his since studio concept to help our instructors generate income during the the lock them, and at the same time we said we are structures are not necessarily trained in using all this technology. So we better provide all the education that they need. So we created all these courses that were done through zoom and some are learning courses that instructors could take. To become what we call virtual fitness pros and tour surprise within a month and a half, we had about a million people a week taking Zuma classes virtually, which is amazing for a new virtual product. It was really on structure selling their students. Hey, non teaching online income, take my class virtually every week we launched improvements to the platform. So we added chat to the platform. So students can chat while you're taking the class we added emojis we added that thinks to the paywall so that Instructors could take payment, which every were launching new tech at a pace that our technology team had never done before, and I'm so proud of them because they really took it to the next level. Yeah. I mean you basically stood up a virtual platform within weeks. I mean I'm imagining that if you had a plan like, let's say a year ago you said, Hey, we want to do a virtual platform it would have taken you like a year to put together right and you do this In like six weeks. Yeah. Unbelievable. Working nights weekends. It felt like we were starting Zuma again it felt like you know how jeff vessels says they won. It really felt like they won we felt unstoppable. We're going at it. We were talking to instructors to get feedback on how to make the platform perfect for them, and at the same time we said we to also help our instructors and the world at large during the pandemic in other ways. So we created a community fund where we Gave a funds out to instructors directly affected by covert themselves who were hospitalized, who had family members that pass away or instructors that were because our instructors sometimes are. Their site job. So we had a lot of instructors who are nurses a lot huge population of nurses who are also instructors. So we help them their frontline workers, we help them with their services. So we created this community fund and we also did something that we call the one class, one meal program for every person who took a virtual class which. We make revenue on all the revenue goes to the instructors for every person takes a virtual class with donated meal a during the month of June, and we donated one point, one million meals to food banks around the world while. So Alberta's when when somebody signs up for a virtual class on the Zimba- platform, all that revenue pays for it goes to. The instructor yeah everything instructing well. So so I mean, how are you guys? I mean you're still a business you still have employees how're you kind of managing the business and I mean have you had to have lay-offs or furloughs for example? Yeah. So we didn't do any layoffs wouldn't do any for those. Surprisingly are clothing business is doing very well people. Buying fitness clothing to work out at home and we were able to manage. It obviously is not going to be of very profitable year because we made a lot of investments to make all these things happen but that's not our objective. This year objected this is about the people it's about the instructors is about their students is about our employees it's always been. And this year, it's even more about a just helping out others and a

Zuma Zoom Instructor Alberto China Zen Studios Lincoln Paulo Peleton John Foley Instructor Alberta Zimba Jeff
Montana court blocks ballot collection law

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 2 months ago

Montana court blocks ballot collection law

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez a Montana court has blocked a ballot collection on the state which tribes a native advocates say restricts the right to vote for native Americans Yellowstone County District Court granted a preliminary injunction Tuesday halting the. Montana Bala Interference Prevention Act Tribes and native vote. Soon saying the law would disenfranchise native voters, especially those in rural areas by ending the practice, a ballot collection by vote organizers who transport ballots to tribal election offices, native groups and British Columbia to fight on after a major legal defeat as down, carpenter reports the Supreme Court of Canada has dismissed an indigenous appeal of the Trans Mountain pipeline of all the dismissal. Dismissal came as usual with no explanation from Canada's highest court, and a now effectively upholds a lower court decision, approving the project as sound was also the last known legal option to overturn federal government approval of the project government leaders say they worked hard to accommodate concerns that native communities had, but they welcome the court's decision, saying it's an important project for. For Canada but several first nations in BC say they will keep the fight against the Trans about pipeline expansion, going chiefly at George Wilson is with the sale with tooth first nation, it is a major setback for a reconciliation in reduces consultation to a purely procedural requirement. George Wilson says the ruling is not the end she will consult with their community before deciding. Deciding on the next step, other opponents say they will continue to push back some vowing that the expansion will never be completed. Government leaders say the project will provide nearly forty nine hundred jobs, and will triple the amount of Alberta oil, flowing to terminals on the West, coast, and then by tanker to overseas markets for National Native News I'm Dan Carp Chuck. The US Supreme Court's refusal to reinstate water crossing permits for the keystone pipeline puts construction on hold as environmental studies are conducted, an attorney says those studies should have been done years ago Victoria. Wicks reports a Montana. Federal Court ruled in May that the US army. Corps of Engineers use of a fast track permit was insufficient for oil and gas pipelines. Judge Brian Morris's decision applied to all new oil and. And Gas Pipelines in the country Morris isn't junction nationwide permit. Twelve was affirmed by the ninth circuit. Court of Appeals last month, and the corps of Engineers then asked the US Supreme Court to overturn that Decision Doug as a senior attorney with the Sierra, Club. He says it's important to note that both higher courts have now affirmed Judge Morris decision in the K. Excel case there's no doubt so far. Far In either the ninth circuit opinion or the supreme. Court decision that that ruling was cracked. So you know we're confident that that the night circuit will find the same on appeal. Hayes says the core now has to complete a thorough environmental study for the K. xl before it can be built I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota. The United National Indian Tribal, Youth Organization or unity has gone viral. Viral this year and light of the ongoing pandemic. The gathering continues this week as Christine Trudeau Reports Unity Executive Director Mary. Kim Titlists says as native youth continue to play a vital role and tribal communities combating covid nineteen. It's important for them to take time to connect with peers at workshops, shirt, talents and build on self care techniques to help navigate stress and anxiety management amid lockdowns and isolation what? Conference has to offer is a message of hope and empowerment, just connecting with each other I think that's really important. During this pandemic is that we connect with each other and we inspire each other registration is free at Unity Inc Dot Org, those with limited WIFI access can still participate by telephone or received content via thumb drive I'm Christine, Trudeau and Antonio Gonzalez.

Yellowstone County District Co Us Supreme Court Supreme Court Of Canada Antonio Gonzalez Montana Brian Morris Christine Trudeau Court Of Appeals Federal Court Canada Corps Of Engineers British Columbia United National Indian Tribal George Wilson Montana Bala Doug Trans Mountain Us Army Wicks
Indigenous stories from the field: Lessons learned from the rez, a river and a canoe

Unreserved

04:24 min | 3 months ago

Indigenous stories from the field: Lessons learned from the rez, a river and a canoe

"Kevin Washer guy who Lewis Wash it Asu dig on. And then Kevin Lucy's my name from Moscow I sick, which is mystic lake in Saskatchewan? Kevin Lewis has many things at cree language speaker, a builder, a father and he's a teacher. Kevin built a traditional culture camp at our producer. Kyle Musique went to visit. And discovered for himself how profound certain lessons can be? Kevin Louis leads me through the forest. The Sun shines through the trees. He gathered, spruce root birchbark and spruce gum all the materials. He needs to build a birchbark canoe. He points out some sweetgrass as sweet-smelling sacred medicine used in ceremony. He knows this area like the back of his hand. And really enjoyed the life right by the water I really really lucky and blessed to be a really close into your own fresh water and fish like that, and of course the Pelicans that we saw today in the ducks and geese and stuff like that. Here is. One of the basin monistic when Lake were Kevin, ancestors used to camp and fish. It's where he used to swim with his cousins from dawn until dusk. And it's where he teaches in immersive creed language culture, Camp. They built baskets build canoes. And they build Nia when language speakers. Who? Who Do not go. Over. A little overlapped. Panelists. It took me four hours to drive from Evanston Cassock. I grew up about four hundred seventy kilometers away. Treaty eight territory known as Slave Lake Alberta. There are many I should and mateen communities nearby, but my connections are only in our common last names. Much Mateen tradition was wiped from our family and previous generations. The closest. I've got to picking medicines. Was the raspberry Bush outside my house hunting. If chickens count I've certainly never built a canoe. So a lot of this is new for me. Never, had cattail before. When did you see these? Little Kids. This is exactly where we'd come. and we'd come here. And then instead of going all the way back and running back to back home for a meal. one of the older. Older cousins is like well. We don't have to go back. Listen care. And then they started pulling cattail for so somebody showed that person. And then once we started eating and we're like okay well. We don't need the go home. You know the Cisco back from the water again. What do you think it tastes I'm trying to put my finger on it. I'm not sure kind of like for me. It was a key in between cucumber salary I. Don't know if that's like around that area consistency, but it's like. Now you can actually flower that up the like the roots, but then also like what I'm gathering right now, the top park, which is the like the pollen, so you can, you can create like a flower and somebody was saying like a pastry or some sort of with this so. I'M GONNA. Try it and I think it's I hope. I is the right thing. The the pick we'll see. This place is isolated. It's thirty minutes away from any community. There's zero cell service. Mistake! When means island in? The English name for Kevin's reserve as island lake first nation. They endured significant intergenerational trauma from residential schools, but Kevin says they're `isolation helped of semiotics. Elation is kind of good for us. So in that way, we kept the language a little longer, also the ceremonies. kinship the connection to land. It's it's still here. But technology and connection to the world is it's encroaching, but you know it's also. It's all right. You know you can't be stuck in the in the passes well, but we still can't forget the past, and then hopefully we can develop a better future for

Kevin Kevin Louis Kevin Lewis Kevin Lucy Kevin Washer Kyle Musique Island Lake Slave Lake Alberta Moscow ASU Evanston Cassock Saskatchewan Producer Lewis Wash Mateen Cisco
Canadian officials dropped charges against a First Nations chief whose violent arrest sparked protests

Native America Calling

03:48 min | 3 months ago

Canadian officials dropped charges against a First Nations chief whose violent arrest sparked protests

"The National Native News Making Camera. Kim for Antonio Gonzalez tribal governments have joined environmentalists Labor activists sent a lawsuit against new rules that rollback federal, clean water regulations, earthjustice filed the lawsuit on behalf of the possible Yawkey tribe of Arizona bad river band of Lake Superior Chippewa the on Indian nation of Washington State, the Fond Du Lac band of Lake Superior Chippewa of Minnesota. The menominee Indian tribe of Wisconsin and the tonal autumn tribe of Arizona. A C central reports, the suit contends the new federal navigable waters protection role actually weakens expanded protection for streams and wetlands that were put in place by the Obama Administration. The new rule took effect this week. It eliminates intermittent and ephemeral streams from bodies of water, protected under the Clean Water Act. The possible Yawkey tribe is concerned. The rollback will lead to damage of a major water source state officials in Arizona have supported the federal rule change, even though environmentalists warned the state could lose protections for more than ninety percent of its water bodies under the new rule. In Canada charges have been dropped against northern Alberta first nations chief who is the subject of a violent arrest a couple of months ago as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports, the arrest caught by police dash camera led to anti-racism protests across Canada chief Alan Atom of the ATHABASCA one first nation, no longer faces charges for resisting arrest and assaulting a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer. Adam was the subject of a violent arrest in March. Police Dash Cam video showed him. Him, being tackled and punched in the head, he had been stopped for an expired license plate a statement from the Alberta. Prosecution Service says it had reassessed prosecution standard based on an examination of the available evidence, including the disclosure of relevant material and has withdrawn the charges. The arresting officers are under investigation over the incident chief atom says he's overwhelmed that the charges have been withdrawn having that it's time to move on a sign of relief in regards to. The whole ordeal that. Transpired under early mornings of Mark Steyn. And described that put aside in. Time to move on and continue on. Supposed to be doing. Adam called on Ottawa to address injustices against indigenous people, and said Canadians must open their eyes to the reality is that indigenous people have lived with for decades, the national chief of the Assembly of first nations welcomed the dropping of charges, but said it's clear that racism is embedded within most public institutions, especially the police Adams lawyer also said the decision throws a spotlight on systemic racism that has gone on for too long unchecked in Canada for national late of news I'm Dan Carpenter? In South Dakota the Cheyenne River Sioux. Tribe filed a lawsuit this week. Against the trump administration of what it says were threats to impede COVID, nineteen relief funds, and to take over policing on the reservation. The Grand Forks Herald reports. The tribe set up checkpoints leading into its lands in south. Dakota in April to protect tribal members from the spread of the corona virus. The lawsuit says pressure from Washington DC came after pleas for help from the state's governor and congressional delegation. The tribe is asking the US District Court for the District of Columbia to block the federal government from taking over tribal policing and forcing it to remove its checkpoints. On the Navajo Nation this week president, Jonathan, Nez and Vice President Myron leuser issued a proclamation to fly all flags at half staff to honor Navajo. Police officer Michael Lee who passed away to covid nineteen on June nineteenth Nez said lease saved many lives during his twenty nine years of service, and give his own life to serve and protect the community the funeral for officer. Lee is being held on Thursday June. Twenty fifth in Chandler Arizona. For National, native news I make an camera.

Adam Tribe Washington State Arizona Menominee Indian Tribe Canada Yawkey Officer Lake Superior Chippewa South Dakota Obama Administration Alberta Mark Steyn Wisconsin Michael Lee Chandler Arizona Royal Canadian Mounted Police Minnesota Fond Du Lac
Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

"Alan Adam is no longer facing criminal charges. The elbert first nations leader was charged in March after RCMP officers violently arrested him. When news of the incident became public a few weeks ago, many people including the prime minister were shocked by what the police had done. A DASH CAM video recorded by the RCMP shows an officer tackling chief Adam. He punches him and puts him in a chokehold leaving his face bloodied. Today chief Adam was cleared of any wrongdoing. The officers are under investigation by Alberta's police

Alan Adam Rcmp Officer Prime Minister Alberta
How worried should we be about foreign takeovers?

The Big Story

07:41 min | 4 months ago

How worried should we be about foreign takeovers?

"There's an opportunity for investments from China into Canada today. The innovation minister was forced to stand in this. House acknowledged that he misled when he said that the company. He's selling our retirement homes to was Canadian. Under Chinese ownership. You could be forgiven if you missed some of the stories that inspired today's episode. I mean look. It's my job to be tuned into all the big stories. And I know I miss them. The fact that moves like this one. Don't register on. Most of our radars might be a problem. Right now obviously Canadian businesses are suffer. Not all of them are going to make it through Colfax now. And that makes some of them. A tasty target for foreign buyers who are looking to acquire assets in a stable and relatively prosperous. And in some cases, those investments are badly needed in other cases, though especially when the purchasing company has direct ties to a foreign government. There are real security concerns. I mean. Why would a foreign government have interest in owning a failing Canadian business? So much interest that they are willing to pay more than anybody else. What kinds of risks do we take on when we allow Canadian companies to come under control of state owned businesses. How can candidate government balanced the need for foreign investment especially during an unprecedented economic crisis? With the red flags being waved by our security and intelligence agencies. And also just. Why, don't most of us know or care about this? What part of the big picture is missing here? Jordan Heathrow, and this is the Big Story Stephanie Carbon is an assistant professor of International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University. She also has a book coming out this fall on you, T. press, which is called stand on guard, reassessing threats to Canada's national security. Hi Stephanie. I want you to start. If you can buy explaining a recent deal that kind of put this question in our minds in his why we reached out to you, can you just tell me a little bit about The Hope Bay Gold Mine Project, and what it kind of means for national security in general, so the Hope Bay Gold Mine is a mine eighty S. he was a Canadian control. It was it was kind of being run by. by US t, T MAK RESOURCES INC and it unfortunately unperforming, it's one of actually three mines that have been unperforming recently where there's been some kind of take over, but this kind of raised eyebrows because it's been a basically taken over by a company called Shandong Gold Mining Company, which I also goes by St. Gold and the concern is that this company is considered to be a state owned enterprise. The Chinese government has a forty seven percent. Share in this company, and often when you at the other owners, the you can dig down and find that there's actually probably more links to the state. Generally, so this seems to be an a case of a Chinese state owned enterprise, taking over a Canadian natural resources firm something that you know has raised concerns in the past say in the last ten years and seems to be happening even in this Cova era or perhaps because of it. Why does it raise concerns? I? Mean pretend I know nothing what's wrong with them? So. This is a really good question. Canada is is a small country, right? We're a country, thirty, seven, thirty eight million people, and that means we. Need for an investment in order to grow our economy. especially up north I mean it's very expensive to develop things up north, and we know that successive governments have wanted to encourage business up north to try and improve the lives and conditions of people who live there, but we get concerned when we see these government, company or state owned or even state champion enterprises coming into the market in order to provide that foreign investment, and sometimes they are the only companies that are interested in providing that financial assistance to get these companies going. So you know the first concern is for a long time. We saw the government trying to get of business. Right privatizing various companies, but we're seeing. Despite the Canadian government getting out of these businesses, we're seeing other governments. Take their place, and this is something that actually Stephen Harper warned about in two thousand and twelve thousand thirteen. Canada has spent a long time. Trying to privatize its into industry, but not in such a way that we want foreign governments coming in and taking over those. Businesses instead, so this is. This is something that we've worried about for some time and. Part of the reason that these state-owned enterprises are problematic is that we often don't understand what they are trying to do in. You've taken a normal company right? McDonald's any other company. You know that they're trying to make money, right? That's what they do, but with state owned enterprises. Is there some kind of geopolitical or Geo? Objective that they have in mind. Particularly in the natural resources sector that we have to maybe be concerned about you know, are they trying to strategically placed themselves in such a way that they have control over Canadian resource in a way that perhaps maybe Canadians or the Canadian government would be uncomfortable with. Do we have any examples of that happening that we can look at and say you have this was A. A mistake we shouldn't have gone down that path so a really good example of this would probably be nexen people would point to next is of course a oil company. It's out in Alberta and in two thousand twelve. It was kind of putting itself on the market, and it was taken over by Seahawk. which is a Chinese state owned enterprise, a petroleum company and there was some concern that you know. Do we actually get want. These kind of government owned enterprises owning these businesses, and it paid well over the market price in order to get access to accent. A Louis. Some national security concerns that were raised at the time. Eventually, the Harper government did let it go through, but you know a lot of the promises that were made as a part of the deal. Really haven't gone very well. the business hasn't been as profitable as as was hoped. There's been some safety issues. Accidents with regards to nexen owned critical infrastructure, and even recently we've seen a number of layoffs. I mean. There's so many layoffs in that industry anyways in my heart goes out to the the oil workers, but. It. Really just hasn't performed as well as hopes, and this is one of the concerns that I think has often been raised. Is that state owned? Enterprises can't fail they are. Backed by the state. They're not subject to the same pressures as a normal company like again. Going back to McDonald's. You

Canada Canadian Government Chinese Government Hope Bay Gold Mine Project Shandong Gold Mining Company Stephanie Carbon Harper Government House Stephen Harper Carleton University China Colfax United States Hope Bay T. Press Cova Mcdonald
Mexico reopens economy after two-month COVID-19 lockdown

All Of It

04:09 min | 4 months ago

Mexico reopens economy after two-month COVID-19 lockdown

"Take you to Mexico now the country looks set to Paul's ten thousand deaths from corona virus this is the second highest toll in Latin America off to Brazil the authorities recognize that Mexico is now at the peak of the pandemic never the less they'll gradually reopening the country from today the first of June this week to journalists on a government level house in Mexico City M. what Mexicans think then of the idea to start of starting to ease the look down on the camera when the peak of the pandemic is is ongoing in the country Hey when Mexicans are deeply divided about these government decision many are uncertain the relief that the economy is re opening because more than half of the population making a living in the informal sector and do not have a fixed salary so for them this lockdown has been especially hard but on the other hand there is another part of the population which stinks that easing the lockdown is very contradictory since specially now the corona virus is spreading really quick so these people are worried a friend even more sharply increase of the cases and the I W. I had the flu shot and this is what he told me the decision for re opening Mexico is being taken since its economy won't receive a long time to slow down situation however for a successful re opening the publishers should be should commit themselves to to be respectful of the measures required to control the street of the disease we are not sure if the city will be possible in Mexico so it's highly improbable to see a rise in the number of cases during the next days there is the after re opening challenging the out by the media and the extremely health services it's what every country is bouncing right then our public health versus the need to get the economy back running again so so what changed what we see today Mexico in terms of using the lock down the economy will be allowed to resume operations and that's the government's case it would be done gradually and the friendly in each part of the country for example in Mexico CD that so far has been dead the epicenter of the pandemic the schools we continue to be close but the construction will be respected also restaurants would be allowed to operate that thirty percent of their capacity be a production so will be respected and the seas has been particularly because of the debate since the government has considered it an essential activity so we should point out that Mexico in Mexico the lockdown has a strong get western he advised by the government and imposing some places such as schools and working centers but not to the general population so Mexico is a country of many different realities and some people carry out on working through all this time and somehow stop the work depending on how old they are absolutely it's the same the world over isn't it is is there any clear idea then why we're looking at the situation in Mexico with a maternity right from corona virus is so hard to just behind Brazil's when the mentality rate is really high he did so one of the highest in the region G. journey so nine point eight percent on the Alberta check over that of the people is fifty nine years so is leading junk considering like comparing to other countries especially in Europe so expressing that the reason behind east another up and then make a **** the country before the coronavirus which is over sixty Mexico with the U. S. is one of the countries with the highest number of obese people in the world and that conditions comes with other related problems such as diabetes and hypertension so according to though W. it show this contributes to higher rates of CDS complications from cardiac thank you for joining us on Capitol hasta Tony is live from Mexico City

Mexico Paul
"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

01:52 min | 4 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"<Music> us. I <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> thanks for tuning into <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this episode of pause <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in the spirit <Speech_Music_Female> of reconciliation. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We'd <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> like to feature land <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> acknowledgments recorded <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> by students <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of the Virtual <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> School project <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a cohort <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> folks building a new <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> education model <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that incorporates <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> indigenous ways of knowing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in creates <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> new pathways to <Speech_Female> meet the Truth and Reconciliation <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Commissions <Speech_Female> Call to <Speech_Female> Action <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Monte <Speech_Female> six territory <Speech_Female> home to many first <Speech_Female> nations including <Speech_Female> but not limited to <Speech_Female> the Mateen cree <Speech_Female> blackfoot <Speech_Female> denny. <Speech_Female> Soto <Speech_Female> and Makoto soon <Speech_Female> acknowledged <Speech_Female> the ancestors <Speech_Female> of the many first <Speech_Female> nations on treaty <Speech_Female> six territory who <Speech_Female> no-trade and continue <Speech_Female> to nurture the land <Speech_Female> making it <Speech_Female> possible for us to <Speech_Female> be present here <Speech_Female> acknowledged <Speech_Female> that it's my duty <Speech_Female> as a newcomer in <Speech_Female> all of our duty <Speech_Female> as its inhabitants. <Speech_Female> To <Speech_Female> respect the land <Speech_Female> in view it is independent <Speech_Female> of the <Speech_Female> economic transactions. <Speech_Female> We subjected <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> acknowledged <Speech_Male> that it is. My <Speech_Female> duty <Speech_Female> is already. <Speech_Female> It's not only educate <Speech_Female> ourselves on history <Speech_Female> but to <Speech_Female> act on that <Speech_Female> knowledge for a better <Speech_Female> tomorrow. <Speech_Female> The guilt of the past <Speech_Female> may be a starting <Speech_Female> point but it <Speech_Female> means nothing if <Speech_Female> venture on a similar <Speech_Female> path <Speech_Female> so acknowledged <Speech_Female> the land but also <Speech_Female> voucher respected. <Speech_Female> Not See my <Speech_Female> wants and myself <Speech_Female> is superior <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> if you <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> enjoyed this episode. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Please <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> help us out by sharing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> it with a friend <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and rating us on <Speech_Female> your favorite listening platform. <Speech_Female> We'd <Speech_Female> like to thank our funding <Speech_Female> partner. The Senate <Speech_Female> Energy Foundation <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer editor <Speech_Female> at least Martin <Speech_Female> Oscar about C- cannot <Speech_Female> series <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> producer. Naomi <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Mahaffey <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and theme Music Creator <Speech_Female> Eilly. Aurora. <Speech_Music_Female> I'm Dobson <Music>

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"So I think that this collective learning of you know technological engagement skills will be really impactful for volunteer sector within the next little while you're giving me a great idea that Beyond connecting now about the questions that were that were thinking of during pandemic we should connect post pandemic and chat about how things have actually changed. And what we anticipate changing if that if that came true or if we just are back to the way things work yeah right now. We're in like back to the future mode. You know trying to anticipate what the world is going to look like you know. We should put in a hypothesis of what we think might happen flying cars. I would like transporter for going down robbed. Philippi to be halfway across the world like fifteen seconds. That would be lovely. Yeah I would. I would agree with that. As long as they don't have the fear of a pandemic nothing lead to travel and yes more seriously. I think one thing that I really hope that we do see the seat in the next little while I honestly don't know if this will be as natural change for some people but like I think that right now it's really key for people to think about how they volunteer positions are structured because a lot of organizations on especially a lot of volunteer managers. They'll come into an organization and the volunteers that exists are kind of just there. You know you just so you know this is X. Organization and we bring in volunteers to do you know like Ab Up but I think that something that's really crucial for volunteer managers to learn is How to take those positions rearrange them to better suit your organization's Risks Needs in strategic directions and operational plan and. This is a great opportunity to do that. Because they have to take a lot of those positions that exist right now in the different elements of them and reorganize them to fit this virtual space so learning. That skill is also really really important. That people able to kind of take it into the future regardless of their limitations virtual or in person. I think there's like an aspect to that grant where it's also not just moving into virtual but switching positions for the risks and responsibilities as well as the people doing the volunteer so we often have this idea of a perfect volunteer like Debbie. Does it all kind of person? And the warm bumming chair and so now we're going to think of different ways to actually engage different groups of people whether they're highly skilled volunteers or other students with very little time or the recently retired sea ears. We're GONNA see maybe more attention paid to the or more attention paid to the audience versus just the position the needs of the organization itself. Actually that's really important you touch on because that's another thing that comes up in that grassroots organizations Conversations well is that we're also seeing a lot of people worrying about safety with those things because like a lot of formal nonprofits. They have accountability and liability when it comes to their Volunteer Gauge Strategies. So if they are filling volunteer roles that directly interact with seniors people with disabilities or youth or something like that. They have formal structures all Allah's his To to deal with the risk of getting people that way whereas a lot of these kind of grassroots organizations don't necessarily how those things so that's another thing that I hope not just fits learn but in community based organizations will learn how to manage risk regardless of you know policy Or sorry Regardless of formal structure. I completely agree. Graham End I think you just ended that on such a beautiful note that will camper conversation there so again big. Thank you to the three of you for taking time. Out of your day to chat with me about the thoughts that you have all sitting on your coaches at home Very appreciative of you. Sharing Your your knowledge and your wisdom and what you're thinking about so thank you so much make you so much. Thank you so much elise wonderful. Thank you all will be in touch.

Philippi Debbie Graham
"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"Hi I'm babs river and welcome to paused at home and Alberta Social Innovation can act podcasts the pandemic and economic downturn this spring have forced many change makers to pause and pivots as we head into summer although our province is experiments with opening some aspects of our lives. We still have a lot to adopt in light of our work. Structures changing on a daily basis. And the pause were home. We've decided to touch base with change makers across Alberta to hear about the new questions and reflections on their minds during this period of systems. Change if the question sparks new thoughts for you at least share in the comments on your favorite listening platform and let us know what you think. As the way we engage with each other ships the way we volunteers changing to what does volunteer engagement. Look like right now. House covid nineteen bringing people together new ways. What does this mean about are shifting priorities and the way volunteerism those even the smallest social needs on today's episode at least Martin Ascii sits down with Daniele Graham dearden and UNICENTER ONI. These three for volunteer. Berta the association that connects volunteer centers and agencies who rely on volunteers throughout the province..

Alberta Social Innovation Daniele Graham dearden babs river Alberta
How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

The Big Story

09:09 min | 4 months ago

How workers are fighting for their rights in a dangerous gig economy

"I was doing my grocery shopping at ten thirty last night and by doing my shopping. I mean I was picking things out on an APP that somebody else would get for me at the grocery store the next day and delivered to my front door and if for some reason I couldn't get a spot on that APP INSTA- cart and I guess we'd probably have ordered delivery for dinner using another APP that relies on another person to pick things up at the scary world and bring them to me. Yes I feel guilty about that but not enough to stop using these APPS and doubt that I'm alone in that right now we're relying on workers and the GIG economy more than ever and their job is far more dangerous than ever and most of them. Don't get hero pay or have job security or benefits. Some of them will have been fighting hard to change that and some of them have even one including a group here in Canada. The provinces Labor Board has ruled out food door couriers more closely resemble employees rather than independent contractors creating a groundbreaking precedent for others in the GIG economy. So today will tell you their story and we'll also tell you what happened right after that historic victory and we will do that as soon as. Clare. Who is just back from vacation gives us an update on covid. Nineteen this weekend Clare. Welcome back where did you go? Hey Yeah I took a few days off last week but didn't go anywhere. Obviously the furthest I went was to the park down the street. I am just glad that you came back. And before you update us. Can you explain to listeners? When will hear your updates now? Because we're changing that alphabet. Yeah will you know? I think we're kind of over the initial shock of Covid nineteen down the world and we've been hearing the phrase new normal lot so there will be fewer news updates at the top of the show from now on basically a couple times a week will update you on anything big happening with COVID. Nineteen in Canada. So yes you'll still get the news you need but maybe not every day and of course if God forbid a second wave hits and things do go downhill we will then be right here going down that hill with you every day and speaking of a second wave Clare. Let me guest as your report. Today involves some idiots in Toronto. Who were doing their best to make that happen this weekend. Yeah well that was what everyone was talking about this weekend. Because it was nice and warm out in Toronto and people wanted to go out so there were these huge crowds at Trinity Bell Woods Park on Saturday. Thousands of people were there with practically no physical distancing the city of Toronto. Call this dangerous behavior saying that. This threatened to undo all the work done over the past ten weeks so on Sunday. The World Law enforcement officers in the park and making sure that people were keeping that two meter distance. This is happening. As the number of cases of Covid nineteen is actually going up in Ontario and perhaps coincidentally two weeks after Mother's Day in Alberta the cities of Calgary and burks joining the rest of the province in allowing bars restaurants and hair salons to open today and there will be more restrictions lifted for those cities in particular on June first and in Quebec their concerns about an upcoming heat wave a minimum of thirty degrees Celsius for three days. Starting tomorrow the concern is people in long term care homes who don't have air conditioning. A long term care homes as we know have been hit the hardest throughout throughout this pandemic in Canada especially in Quebec so the Quebec Council for the protection of patients says. It's ready to go to court on this one as of Sunday evening. Eighty four thousand six hundred and ninety nine cases of covid nineteen in Canada with six thousand five hundred and fifteen deaths. I'm Jordan Youth Rawlings and this is the big story. Sarah much heads. Ida is the work and wealth reporter for the Toronto Star. She frequent guest on this podcast and now she has a podcast as well. Her new show is hustle. It's about the David versus Goliath battle. For Workers Rights in the GIG economy and episode two drops today Hazara high. You told us about this podcast when we had you on a couple of months ago and you've been putting the whole thing together. I guess well. The landscape has been shifting dramatically. So why don't you just kind of take us way back to the beginning and tell me about the GIG economy and food aura in particular When you first began this project which is a little over a year ago. Yeah that's right. It's sort of the May year anniversary of reporting on this story and there is really being so many twists and turns over over the course of the year. Some of which we sort of new would come a big battle at the Labor board an effort to try and unionize food aura careers. And then some that were just totally unanticipated. Obviously picked the pandemic being the major one there. So it's been a. It's been a really interesting. Year of following wet was really a unique kind of first attempt to change working conditions for workers in the GIG economy. Which I think is a word that we're all familiar with and we're so used to using APPs to get an uber left or order a meal to our doorstep but you know often. We don't interrogate what is happening behind the scenes. And so that was sort of the inspiration for taking a deeper dive into what the realities of this kind of work are like a new followed a group of food or careers for a year. Just tell me about them. I mean who are they? How did they meet? What are they like? Yeah so Fidora careers are really a diverse group of workers in the city. You know we've all probably seen them on their bikes with a big pink Fedora. Bag on the back or food or a jacket But they're not just cyclists. They're also drivers who go around the city delivering meals and I think a lot of people kind of assume that Workers doing this kind of job are often like young college students especially downtown a lot of the folks that you'll see on their bikes are are younger people but the reality is that the workforce when. I started meeting. Carriers was so much more diverse. You know a lot of drivers who are working in more suburban areas. Are you know New Acadians? Were supporting their families and haven't been able to find work in in their field. You know it's people who really do this as a full-time job is their career. Really They've been doing it for years And I think that the kind of overwhelming feeling that I sort of got from from talking to careers over. The course of the past year were just the fears and concerns around the protections on the job and a sense that this is a job that has really kind of fallen through the cracks that disentitlement workers from a lot of supports that many people take for granted. I think most fundamentally is a job where many express expressed just feeling like. There was a lack of respect and and one career Chris Williams who was involved in the Union drive. Kind of summed up why careers started organizing and trying to change that the broader issues around health and safety wages and dignity. And all those kind of stem from this other issue which is Fidora's misclassification of their couriers calling them. Independent contractors instead of employees or dependent contractors and that misclassification allowed them to avoid taking any responsibility for carriers. You talked about that kind of the goals of forming a union and one of them with dignity. Why is that so important? It's the hardest issue to define by in some ways. It's the most important careers have value. And I think it's the most important because that's personally by the way I think it's the most important because I think it's the one that justifies everything else like. That's why wages are important in many ways for me is because it's hard to live a dignified existence if your wages are two or uncertain if you don't know whether you'll make your daily quoted today or not and obviously health and safety connects to dignity because it's hard to be now when you're wearing constantly about your health you know it takes a toll it takes an effect. I want to explore that a little bit more but I I find the idea that we can talk about. These jobs is having fallen through the cracks kind of crazy. 'cause can you give me a sense of the scale of the GIG economy and Canada because it's everywhere right? Yeah anything I think

Canada Toronto Covid Provinces Labor Board Workers Rights Clare Trinity Bell Woods Park David Rawlings World Law Fidora Labor Board Sarah Calgary Quebec Council IDA Reporter BAG Quebec
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

08:28 min | 4 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"The Senate assignments first off welcome to front burner of very happy to be here so I want to talk with you about a very devastating story to come out of this pandemic and that of course as you well know has been the mass outbreaks at Canada's largest meat processing plants cargill plant in high river very badly hit. It is the site of the single largest outbreak of covid nineteen in North America. We're talking about people that are elbow to elbow challenging rooms that are just crammed to the. It's so scary to go to work every day. Wondering am I gonNA contract this virus and when I contract this as well die from it but all told in Alberta more than fifteen hundred meat processing plant workers have contracted this virus and at least three workers in one family member have died. You have spoken out about the safety of food inspectors. What is most concerning to you? Well the size of the outbreaks. Not just at the cargo planet in High River but at the J. B. S. plant in Brooks and the harmony plant which is just on the outskirts of Calgary. It's deeply concerning because we have such a concentration in our meat-packing sector when it's are in peril like this. I mean obviously. The first concern is is for the frontline workers but also it affects the integrity of the entire beef system in Canada because those three plants provide eighty five percent of the country's beef in are major sources for our export markets as well and so I was concerned as a as a human being about the safety of of workers but also very concerned about the integrity of the beef economy and Alberta what it would mean to our ranchers and our feed lot operators if those plants were offline and what does it mean for consumers and so because I may senator and I operate in the federal realm the occupational health and safety piece for the the employees of the meat. Packing plants is in provincial jurisdiction. So I started thinking okay. Well what are the federal implications of this and the obvious one is? They are federally inspected plants and it's federal meat inspectors who are working those environments and I should say at least forty. Meet a plant inspectors in Canada. Twenty one of them in Alberta have contracted covid nineteen according to their union while inspectors. Continue to fall ill. The Union says the Federal Government is threatening disciplinary action against employees who refused to be reassigned to work at covid. Nineteen infected meat plants. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Says it's a balancing act between insuring. The food supply continues to flow and protecting workers safeties and among the infected or eighteen. Thirty seven inspectors cargill near High River. Which is south of Calgary so this is hitting a levels if I can put it that way of the meat industry or what what happened. Last week. I've been speaking to the United Food and commercial workers which is the union that represents the employees of the meatpacking plants. I'd spoken to the CATTLEMEN's Association. I'd spoken to the feet lot operators and I thought well what's the piece I'm missing is the CSI inspector? So I spoke to their union last week and it was at that point that the Union representative told me about these forty cases across the country. Twenty one and Albert Eighteen at the one plant and at that point most that information was not yet public. And as you will know because you and I worked together back back. Many eons ago in the last century at the I was a journalist for thirty years and when I spoke to the the union rap and I said well use this information public and he said Oh. Yeah it's public information. I said well I I haven't seen it anywhere and so I I went to twitter as I am won't to do and I tweeted a. I tweeted out this information and it it created quite a ripple effect because I think people hadn't realized just what the consequences of this were. Part of. The problem is that it's very difficult to keep people safe in a meat packing plant. The temperatures are chilly to keep the meat safe. And as a result those cold temperatures are very good for the virus People work in very close proximity. Because if you think of it not so much as an assembly line but a disassembly line people are working elbow to elbow breaking down the carcasses and one of the other reasons that there are so many vectors for transmission. A meat packing plant is because it's a very loud environment and people have to shout above the noise to be heard and just out that loud talking can also create. You Know A. We won't use the word moist because the prime minister mock for using the word moist but it certainly when people are shouting it allows it allows for that kind of transmission and finally it's very humid there's real moisture and when I spoke to the Union representatives. They said part of the problem is that when inspectors were given masks and even when they had shields the humidity the moisture would build up under the shield and the mask would become soaked and it wouldn't be very effective for protecting people against the spread of copay nineteen. Fabian Murphy is the National President of the Agriculture Union which represents Canada's food inspectors circumstances adequate personal protective equipment. Such as a respirator on this case would normally be provided then normally what we what would happen is if you can provide that protection against the hazard to the worker. Any wouldn't assigned to work with those duties. This is fascinating. I have never been item like most Canadians. I've never been inside a meat processing plant. And here you are Senator Simon. I'll call you Paula. Only to say that you were shining a light on these kinds of issues as a journalist and many years later here you are taking it. Up as a senator in a different way of course in the political realm. Why is it so important to you to shine this light at this point? You know I was thinking about this and I think part of it goes back to my days. As an investigative journalist is not a grand term for it but I was a columnist and reporter for the internal during the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy outbreak in Alberta at a time when the Americans closed their borders to Alberta beef when other countries closed their borders. Talbert beef the. Usda close to imports of all live cattle after case surfaced in Canada of BSE so-called mad cow disease since the border closure three more cases were discovered all trace to Canadian hoods and I remember how absolutely devastating it was for the economy of my province and for Albertans reputation for the brand of Alberta beef and I know how absolutely essential it is that we have the best meat inspection procedures in North America if not the world. It is absolutely essential to protect the health of Canadians and to protect the reputation of Alberta's market products. And so when I heard how. Many's food inspectors out SEC. I thought will then who was inspecting the beef because and I want to be really clear about this code. Nineteen is not a foodborne illness. There's no evidence that it can be. You know that you can get cove nineteen from your hamburger or your pot roast but cf inspectors are in those plants to look for all other kinds of food borne illnesses and risks. And you need inspectors for the plans to operate without them. Nothing gets processed. Well not only. Do you need inspectors but you need inspectors who are properly trained and skilled and one of the problems has been the. Cfi has had to hire a bunch more inspectors to backfill. The people who've been ill the union alleging that people are being asked people who are not meat inspectors to go into those plants and then there are real concerns. Because how confident would you be if your employer told you to go back into that situation I mean and I wanna make it really clear. I'm desperately concerned for the employees of cargill and harmony and J B S. Many of whom are new Canadians. fairly recent immigrants to Canada. Who are working in very dangerous and difficult situations at the best of times. Been at the best of times working in a meat. Packing plant is a very physically and emotionally difficult task. So I'm very concerned about those workers. I'm very concerned about the fact that there's been so much community spread. The potential for spread from these epicenters in these plants is devastating. Not just to the beef industry not just at the frontline workers but to but to the whole rest of the rest of the Calgary oath reaching.

Canada Alberta Union high river Calgary North America senator covid representative cargill Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Brooks Senate twitter United Food Senator Simon Albert Eighteen Paula CATTLEMEN's Association
Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

The Big Story

14:46 min | 4 months ago

Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

"You can say one thing for the current crisis. It's given us a chance to try a lot of things that we might never have had the will to do otherwise I amongst those just giving people money okay not everyone but millions and millions of people in Canada and not forever but at least for a few months and this isn't a new idea. It's been around in some form or another for decades. You probably know it as universal basic income and you might associate it with the most progressive voices come the liberal side of the spectrum and you may also associate the opposition to it with complaints of lazy people want free cash instead of working but despite having a long history as a potential way to ease poverty and improve health. This has never been tried on a large scale or for a long time. So the people arguing on either side of it have never had enough evidence to prove their point. So it's been a political football until like with so many things. These days along came the virus and now getting money to people who need it quickly is absolutely essential governments around the world even the most conservative of them have done that and those who support or oppose that kind of policy have mostly agreed on the need for it. It's what happens next. And what we learned from that will determine if we finally give a universal basic income. A real shot. So we'll explain history of the policy small tests that we've seen on it be political behind it and whether or not it will stick around when we get out of this current mass. And we'll do that as soon as Claire gives the details on this current mess cargill is dealing with the outbreak at one of its meat processing plants. This one isn't Schambori Quebec southeast of Montreal. Sixty four workers have tested positive. There cargill had another outbreak a few weeks ago at a beef packing plant in high river. Alberta in that outbreak more than nine hundred workers tested positive. It reopened last week after a two-week shutdown also in Quebec schools in the western part of the province are set to reopen today but attendance is optional. Desks will be spaced apart. And there can be no more than fifteen kids in a classroom at a time. Ontario reported the lowest number of cases of Cova nineteen for the province on Sunday since March. Two hundred ninety four new cases. And this comes. The province reopens Provincial Parks and Conservation Areas. Although camping is still not allowed and things like beaches playgrounds and public washrooms are still off limits. And lastly schedule and is suspending the sale of alcohol in the Northern Community of La Lush to help control the spread of cove in nineteen. The alcohol store will be closed for two weeks. To prevent people from gathering. There will be support for those at risk of alcohol withdrawal as of Sunday evening. Sixty eight thousand eight hundred and forty eight cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand nine hundred and seventy deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Max. Faucet is a writer and a reporter for many publications including on this project for the Walrus. Hey Max he joined our. I'm doing as well as can be expected. Which is how everybody should hopefully answer that question. These days you start by defining What is a universal basic income Broad is that term. And what does it mean? Sure so I mean you know this is an idea that's been around for some time now and and there can be competing definitions and I suspect. We'll get into that in a second but the one that I adhere to the one that you know certainly I informed Andrew Yang's campaign in the United States and that has been informing most of the conversation about UBA. Right now is It has three conditions it's automatic. It's unconditional in its non-withdrawal. So basically that means it comes every month doesn't matter who you are you get it. You could be making a lot of money or a little money and you get it. And then it's non withdraw so It's not means tested. So it doesn't get clawed back you know as you as you make more money you know. There's much conversation on you know econ twitter about various amendments and adjustments to that formula. But I think that's a good way to think about it. Can you give me a little history of it? You mentioned it's been around for a long time Has it been tried for real anywhere where to come from that? Depends on your definition of for real right. I think people look at the idea of giving people money from the government. And they think well this must be a left-wing idea but actually the first real experiments with it happened in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies and it was driven by a Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman. Who is the father of supply-side economics? Yeah they saw it as a way to replace the welfare system and so they their idea of a basic income is not quite the way I just defined it. It was something called a negative income tax. And so let me. Just get a tiny bit. Wonka share the way it worked in their conception is basically they would give people a percentage of the difference between their income and defined income cutoff or like the point where they start paying income taxes so if they set the cutoff at let's say forty thousand dollars and the negative income tax percentage was fifty percent. Someone who made twenty thousand dollars a year would get ten thousand dollars from the government. They made thirty five thousand they would get two thousand and from the government so is this sort of sliding scale where topped you up up until a certain point and then it went away right. They cancelled it in one thousand nine hundred and you know the the the Reagan era kind of buried it under under Nixon's legacy in Canada. Did something called the men come experiment? Which was the Manitoba Basic Income Experiment? That was more that was closer to the basic income that that I described earlier in the one that a lot of people are talking about right now so that says that gave thirteen hundred urban and rural families in Winnipeg and don't Fan Manitoba with incomes below. Thirteen thousand dollars a year back then money. But by the time that the data was collected in nineteen seventy eight so they ran up from seventy five to seventy eight. The Canadian government kind of lost interest in and they cancelled the project. So we've had these these aborted attempts to gather a sample and it hasn't really provided any conclusive evidence In the in the American one. There's some evidence that it that it you know Negatively impacted people's willingness to go to work in the Canadian won the data suggested otherwise. But there just wasn't enough data to conclusively determine the impact of giving people money on their both on their willingness to work and on on the outcomes that the government's wanted to test. Which is you know better. Health Outcomes Better Labor outcomes better social outcomes so you know the jury was still out right. Will what kind of a sample size and study length? Would you even need to determine that because again we had one or at least something like one here in Ontario Under Kathleen Wynne. A few years ago and the next government came to power and it was immediately phased out. So you know. I don't think we got more than two or three years out of that either. So what kind of scale are we talking about? Yeah I mean to make it work. You would needs multiple cities multiple tests populations and a long duration of study. This is this is a a bold policy intervention but you need to be able to control for extenuating circumstances and factors the Ontario project. Was it had some really promising results. As it turned out there was a study group at McMaster that basically interviewed the people that participated in the program. Some of the data they had eighty percent of of people reporting better health outcomes. They were using less tobacco drinking. Less eighty-three percent said they had better mental health. They were feeling less stressed. They had a better diet And there was even interesting. Data around better labor market outcomes people were basically using the minimum income the guaranteed income to improve their jobs to look for better job. So it's disappointing that the government scrapped it after basically what amounted to one year and left us in the same spot that we've sort of always been with these things where we just don't have enough data for either side to conclusively prove that their argument is right and you know maybe not maybe now is the opportunity to kind of walk in that that longer sample size but you know the problem here is that. It's always tempting for governments to to start these programs and then abandon them or different governments to come in and cancel them. You'd need some sort of agreement by all parties that they're going to let this run. Its course and we haven't really seen that yet. So you mentioned that it's seen mostly now at least as a left-wing idea might have begun under Nixon. But certainly I think that's how most listeners would frame it as you know Whether or not you support it About the side of the spectrum that it comes from but as we've started to see government's realizing how badly they need to help people as the economy collapses during this pandemic have seen any movement On the other side of the aisle towards this kind of idea I think we've seen much more movement on on the conservative side than we have on the progressive side the beano progressives are are are very wary of guaranteed income proposals because I think you know quite rightly they remember certainly the academics who studied this. They remember that it was originally an idea that was intended to get rid of welfare and other social supports and that is always a concern that if you bring in a guaranteed income. Is it really just an attempt to shrink? The size of the state is an attempt to get rid of targeted support programs that that make people's lives better and I think that's a totally valid concern when I when I posted my article from the wall or something twitter. I got a lot of feedback from economists about that where they basically said you know. Oh here we go again. People people don't realize that this is a an attempt to slip in through the back door reduction in social programs. That's really interesting. Yeah but you know. Over the last few months we've seen a really array of conservatives. Come out and say that this is a good idea. Hugh Seagull. Who is a former senator standing red? Tory I WOULD. I would describe him as a thought leader. He's been he's been banging the drum for for guaranteed income for quite some time now but he was always sort of out there in the wilderness as a conservative suggesting that this was a good idea and he wasn't one of the ones who was saying that it should replace social programs. He was saying it should be an augmentation to them but in the states over a matter of weeks you saw people like Mitt. Romney coup is basically the Avatar of hedge fund capitalism. Coming out and and suggesting that this was a good idea that would support. Americans during the fallout from Cova and ultimately Donald Trump's government. It's not it's not a permanent basic income. But they sent a check to every American and that is sort of one of the hallmarks of a basic income. So it's interesting the degree to which we've seen conservatives rally behind this particular policy flag. I think that it is driven by shorter. Term political objectives American politicians having election. That they're looking at in November and one of the surest ways to get defeated is to be in being government while people are losing their jobs losing their homes losing their livelihood so I think it's more self preservation than a genuine change of heart but in from a policy perspective. You take the support where you can get it and you build on it from there. So you know I think advocates of a U. UB. I should take their support and and leverage it in order to build their movement if you can may be explained to me the thought behind the benefits of this applying to absolutely everyone including people who have job because that's really And we can debate in Canada versus the US for however long. But that's that's like the primary difference between what trump's government has done and what Canada's done with the baby. Yeah that's the tricky part. That's the part that a lot of people struggle with conceptually and intellectually as is the idea of giving people who don't need money more money right. Yeah and Ken Boston cool. Who is is a former adviser to Stephen Harper and Christy Clark? He's been kind of driving the bus in Canada around the need for a UB. I you know he's he is preferred that to the more targeted approach that the government has taken with Serb. You know his idea in the short term is we just need to get money into people's hands right. Now we need we need to stimulate the economy and ultimately will tax it back next year on people's income taxes that's the thing about a guaranteed income in the context of the system. We have here is if you're making sixty seventy thousand dollars a year. This is going to a portion of this. We'll get taxed back right and so it's not. It's not really free money. It's a little bit of free money and I suspect there would be some social programs that would get pulled back a little bit to to make the numbers work but you know at the end of the day. I don't think you can let the weaknesses in the policy that that might impact a few people. Override the benefits that would impact far more people. You know there's there's all sorts of data out there that suggests that a basic income would actually stimulate economic growth. There's all kinds of data that suggested improves. Health outcomes and Lord knows improving. Health outcomes would save taxpayers and the government a lot of money. Because that's where an increasing increasingly large part of our social budget is going and we'll continue to go in the years and months to come so you know it it is It's a tough idea to get past for some people that I find working already. Why should I get more money from the government but that money's going back into the economy and it stimulating economic growth that supporting jobs? It's reducing healthcare costs. You know I think there's a pretty good case for it and and you know it's one that we should be willing to explore. I am I am more than open to criticism about the cost factor that I suppose we can get to that in a second but I think we also need to look at the benefits and look a little a little bigger in terms of where those benefits accrue it. It's not just lifting people out of poverty. Although that's that's an obvious benefit it's improving people's health outcomes improving their labor market outcomes. Let's people who have a

Canada Richard Nixon Ontario Cargill Cova United States Claire Schambori Quebec Provincial Parks Manitoba Mcmaster Twitter Winnipeg Jordan Heath Rawlings Quebec La Lush Alberta Kathleen Wynne
Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

The Big Story

02:51 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

"The the first thing you should know about our guest today is that. He's got flower like in his house and he just bought it in a store. Really all kidding aside. He is living proof that despite what I might see at my local grocery stores Canada's food supply chain is working even for flower but if it is and why can't I find flour. And why can't my friend who lives up in the country? Get fresh bread in order to answer that you have to start with the basics of how Canada's food supply chains operate. I say chains because when you start to have it explained first thing you learn is that there are two of them and those two supply. Chains are very different so from a beginner's guide to those chains to the impact of cove in nineteen breaks and meat packing plants on them to why you should really think about eating fries while you're on lockdown and how much more you might pay for groceries this fall. We're going to walk you through with the past couple of months have done to the journey. Your food takes between farm and table. And we'll do that as soon as Claire tells you what you need to know today. The federal government is pledging two hundred and fifty two million dollars to ease pressures on the country's agriculture industry. Last month the Canadian Federation of Agriculture asked for two point six billion dollars but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the amount being given now is a point. We will continue to work with farmers with a stakeholders and industry representatives with provinces and territories to ensure that food food capacity in this country. And those people who worked so incredibly hard every single day to feed Canadians get the support that they need through this crisis and beyond Alberta plans to double its capacity to test for the current a virus four point five million dollars will be spent on new equipment and technology right now. The province is doing about seven thousand tests day and they want that number at sixteen thousand Quebec. The hardest hit province in candidate is lifting some of the restrictions on private seniors homes for nearly two months. Now residents have not been allowed to have visitors and they've not been allowed to go out and accompanied the premier says now some residents will be allowed to go out on their own and they can have visitors but they have to be outside as of Tuesday evening. Sixty two thousand forty six cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand one hundred and sixty six deaths Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Michael von Maso is an associate professor of food agriculture and resource economics at the University of wealth where he also hosts their food focus. Podcast

Canada Michael Von Maso Canadian Federation Of Agricul Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Trudeau Federal Government Claire Prime Minister Associate Professor University Of Wealth Quebec Alberta
"alberta" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:37 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Current

"Right there is certainly You know a lot of talk around one inspection that was done by the Department of Occupational Health and safety the Friday before the culture and I understand occurred is that an inspector he facetime inspection of a plant of thousands and thousands of square feet. Workers weren't interviewed You know it's very curious. And t-that a health and safety officer Relies on facetime inspection to conclude that the plant is safe when he himself Would set foot in the plant. We asked the Labor and Immigration Minister and the Agriculture Minister for interviews both declined but the Labor ministers office said that there was a union rep at that video inspection done and it was done to your point in order to minimize exposure to the virus that they didn't want to expose further people to the virus. Who you do via facetime. You're saying that that wasn't sufficient. Well you know to suggest that there was a union representative. There is not true We have individuals in the pants. Who Volunteer They're they're involved in the union. Their Union supporters Colt shop stewards. But these aren't individuals with health and safety or professional labor relations training so they grabbed one of these people perhaps another employee and sort of took them along for the ride As it were the points That they did this To ensure that wasn't spread of infection or that was proper. Social distancing underscores our very point No-one should be in the plant. And that's an admission on their part that no one should be. There are questions as to whether the virus spread at the plant itself or whether it's spread in the communities or the houses of those who work there have listened to Craig snodgrass. He is the mayor of high river. Alberta cargill would have closed day one. I do not think our situation in high river changed because primarily. The spread is taking place at home. It's taken place and in these large groups that are congregating and living conditions etc so then it spreads outside and into our you workers that are in our grocery stores in our healthcare facilities or long-term care centers Thomas Essay. What do you make of it? Well you know I would call that a call that Nonsense a plant this size with this number of workers and you know all roads lead back because I plant so I've heard for example. Some officials say well people were carpooling. You know three or four car and that was you know those. Those tight spaces led to this cargill outbreaking. But if it wasn't if it wasn't for the plan being open they wouldn't have been carpooling and going to the plant so all roads lead back to the plant in terms of social proximity In in living conditions Yes there are at times for six people living in the same place and but that's all tied up with employment at the plant. They came to work at that plant. And you know. These people aren't well off with paycheck to paycheck struggling to pay rent so it's not surprising that they live together. Many of them are new immigrants and temporary foreign workers as well. Yep many but so the reason they're living together it is because of employment at the plant and it is it is the plant that is at the epicenter of this. There are no gatherings going on that large without much. Proximity there you know. It's a petri dish in the middle of town and all roads lead back to the plant. Thomas Essay. Good to speak with you about this. Thank you pleasure. Thomas has as the president of the United Food and commercial workers. Union local 401 that union represents workers at the cargo plant in high river. Also represents workers at another plant in southern Alberta J. B. S. has a plant in Brooks Alberta has ninety six cases of covert nineteen linked to the facility. But the plant is still open when asked about plans to close it. Alberta Premium Jason Kenney had this to say I can say that Alberta Health Services Occupational Health and safety the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Alberta Agriculture together with the plants have all worked very closely on plans to deal with meat packing facilities these these constitute an essential part of the food security of Canadians. In fact Just one of those plants represents forty percent of The beef consumption in all of western Canada and so Obviously food security constitutes an essential service and so the direction has clearly been from the government to take every necessary Health and safety precaution and Should there be advice for public health officials that there should be a suspension we would we will obviously perceived that but There has been very strong interagency cooperation with the companies the unions to ensure as much as possible to save to people in those plants. That's Auto Premier Jason Kenney Dr Jia who is one of Calgary's medical officers of Health Dr Good Morning to you morning when did Alberta Health services learn about the first case of covert nineteen at that cardinal plant in high river? We limit the first case on April third in the first lap confirmed case You know on the fourth. We had a request Inspection by cargill which was conducted on the seventh the employees of the plant. And you just heard one say that. There was no official announcement about an outbreak until there were thirteen cases of the plant. Why was that? I think the the official announcement was made On the seven or around the time that we heard about roughly ten cases. Initially it was hard to determine if they're all plant associated or you know part of the within the town of river another facilities. I do think one of the things that we can do better in the future. You know I. I do knowledge that I think you know mistakes were made where we could have identified some of these interventions earlier. Somebody faces earlier and I think one thing that you know. We're learning about it. Oh boy to health services Many people are around the world. Just know how quickly coded can spread around in class one of the things. We heard though from that employees that the people who are working on the floors there are working shoulder to shoulder. There's not the opportunity for physical or social distancing in a plant like that where three to four thousand animals are being slaughtered a day and as the union says this is all about efficiency. Alberta has faced criticism for not closing the plant sooner. The Union called for the jobs plan to be closed as well. Why weren't these blinds closed earlier? Yeah so I mean. I think we did the inspection on the seven. You know. I'll go to health. Services made a number of recommendations for control measures And you know some of those control measures including You know physical separation possible and would not physical barriers. Were actually erected between workers and workers were provided Peaky including masks and face shields so about point know we did feel that the the risk of transmission on the on the platform itself is quite low and I think that is demonstrated by some of the epidemiologic numbers where we do see a reduction. In the number of cases amongst flat workers you know op control measures. We'll put in place. You know that being said you know what I think. Some of the things that we you know getting recognized the time but now recognize those. Dan You know how many of these workers living these large household settings and truly the biggest risk of transmission now is the within household transition piece so to a. and that's where we'll see ongoing for his vision and that's why we're planning to do things like that set up isolation hotels for for people so they don't They have cooler. They don't to their families. That's why we're engaging newcomer organizations like Calgary Catholic Society to ensure that you know we can communicate with the workers and linguistically and culturally appropriate way. You know I I think moving forward. There's a Lotta things that Y. We will be doing better. It'd be better for any future plant. I guess if you go back to the plant itself though We heard from that employees. Who said that? There wasn't physical distancing that he wasn't able to get a fait shield shield. And you mentioned the inspection is is is facetime inspection appropriate video inspector appropriate when you're trying to learn what's actually happening on the ground in a massive plan like that Yeah well the the video inspection was done by you. Know Await U. S. and I can't comment on. You know what they do or don't you? I will say that we didn't go there in person. You know on the seven and then I went there again in person on the seventeenth and you know at that point. In time I went to the plant floor. You know saw that there were barriers and people did have those things. I don't think that I really thank the worker for sharing his story. I I don't think I can't say there. Were definitely there when he was there But you know it does go to show that there's a lot for us to do still and a walker us to learn. Is it possible to keep these plants open? In an era of physical distancing. I think yes Depends on the plastic self. I wouldn't say we should shut down all the plants everywhere. I think we have to be really digilent- about our case detection. I think we have to be really vigilant about. Maybe adopting some of those control measures proactively. And you know I. I think the biggest lesson from plant was just around. You know understanding you know not just the plant's operations but the you know the holistic picture no including carpooling piece which Tried to you know. Get the initially asked. People not to Carpool not recognize. That was a difficult thing to do for people. You know given sort of their socioeconomic situation And so I think if we recognize that picture and you know we understand where the transmission is happening and what we can do to support people both in the plant and outside of the plant. Then I don't think they'll have to close but I think you know Berta across North America. We are learning to be very very cautious about These particular settings given the risk of transmission of cold Ed's part of this is also about protecting the nations food supply. Something like ninety. Five percent of beef in Canada goes through three processing plants. Two of them now have cove it outbreaks. How do you strike that? Balance between ensuring that employees are protected but also that. The food supplies protected. Well I guess fortunately for me is somebody. Who's a public health condition? You know my focus and my priority is on the health and wellbeing of the population including the population of the workers. So you know I think if I do believe there's a threat to the health and safety workers that can be ameliorated than we take action and the you know the play obviously is a very important thing but it's not my primary consideration. I appreciate speaking with you about this. This is an important issue not just in Alberta but right across the country.

Alberta Union facetime cargill Canada Department of Occupational Hea Labor and Immigration Minister Alberta Health Services Occupa Alberta Health representative Canadian Food Inspection Agenc officer Labor ministers office official Jason Kenney Dr Jia Brooks Alberta Craig snodgrass
NHL making contingency plan in effort to complete season

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

NHL making contingency plan in effort to complete season

"Alberta premier Jason carries as he took a phone call from NHL commissioner Gary Bettman wanting info on the province's status in combating the coronavirus premier Kenney says they have not received a formal proposal in the conversation was very general the message left with the lead from the provinces chief medical officer of health is the NHL needs to prepare a detailed plan before play can resume Amy says it's clear they would not allow large crowds Scott Johnson Edmonton

Jason Commissioner Gary Bettman Kenney Medical Officer NHL AMY Edmonton Alberta Scott Johnson
"alberta" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

04:01 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Cliff Alberta the Kogan is said that was the message this afternoon from Senegal county health officials today as they reported three more people dying from the corona virus in San Diego county bringing the total now for the outbreak to sixty three all three of the victims ranging in age from the thirties to the seventies had underlying medical conditions but the county supervisor Nathan Fletcher says despite the progress that has been made in slowing the rate of cases residents in Senegal county can not drop their guard the virus has not changed the level of transmission that it can generate has not changed what has changed has been our actions and our actions are the things that have put us in a strong position but if our actions change we will be just as susceptible to widespread community outbreak we will be just as susceptible to overwhelming our health care and hospital systems as all of those places where you have seen the tragic stories on the news and you've seen the horrific pictures play out here in the county there were seventy five new cases of cold at nineteen over the last twenty four hours that brings the total since the outbreak began to two thousand and eighty seven cases president trump is your live here on a coca this afternoon laying out plans to start re opening the economy from the corona virus shut downs the president praising the courage of Americans amid the corona virus outbreak these have been trying times a girl virus from adjustable and has unfairly claim thousands of precious American lives to every citizen who has lost a cherished love one your pain is our pain trump says his plan for started we open economy will be in three phases it'll drive give St step by step guidelines to get back to business the president saying that some states will begin to re open sooner than others and added the economy can get restarted again that is safe and structured fashion the U. S. navy this afternoon has identified the sailor from the Senegal based USS Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier who died this week of cold at nineteen complications he was forty one year old Charles Thacker of Arkansas he died at the US Naval Hospital in Guam four days after he was found unresponsive the navy says his wife an active duty member station in San Diego here herself was flown earlier this month to Guam and was by his side when he died governor Newsom today announcing a plan to help front line workers in the food industry in California during the pandemic news about a message today for food workers were scared about not receiving a paycheck we don't want you going to work if you're sick and we want to make sure that you know that if you're sick it's okay to acknowledge it and it's okay let your employer know and still know that you're going to get a supplemental paycheck Newsome said food and grocery workers will get at least two extra weeks of sick leave under this new plan he says the food industry is essential California residents livelihoods during the current pandemic summer and setting it goes going to be a lot different this year with the loss of the county fair at today's announcement that the Senegal pride three day event in July has been called off the city good tourism authorities says visitors spent nearly twelve billion dollars in San Diego each year Bob Roches hotel owner tourism consultant he tells reported Porter ten news this recovery could take awhile and we won't recover the money it's not going to get that robust that we were actually will recover the money is lost forever the six billion dollars that I anticipate over the next twenty one months but I think will recover by twenty twenty two or twenty twenty three even with the county fair cancelled the del Mar thoroughbred club says is still planning to hold summer races is scheduled no word yet on the future of comic con on Wall Street today the Dow lost ninety one points to finish at twenty three thousand four hundred and eleven companies time forty four let's take a look at those freeways right now and here's Cobos Laura K. let's start off at our borders where there is an hour and fifteen minute delay reported it send the cedar with three lanes open time mesa thirty.

Cliff Alberta Senegal
Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

03:54 min | 5 months ago

Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge. Wednesday invalidated a key hermit for the keystone xl pipeline. Judge Brian Morris says a permit issued by the US Army Corps of engineers bypassed necessary environmental reviews the order says TC energy formerly trans. Canada cannot build across waterways along the pipeline route until the core does more work on the permit Victoria wicks. Has This report. Doug Hayes is an attorney for the Sierra Club one of six environmental agencies that sued the Corps of Engineers Hayes says the core used a streamlined approval. Process called nationwide permit number. Twelve that precludes public review and circumvents transparent approval processes good pipeline would cross approximately six hundred eighty eight. Different waterways rivers streams and wetlands across Montana South Dakota and Nebraska and the Army Corps of Engineers is the agency that approves those crossings in the Order. The Federal Court notes that the expediter permit is used. When a project will result in minimal damage to aquatic environments Judge Morris also notes that the core failed to consult with us fish and wildlife or national marine fisheries before determining the pipeline. Construction would have no effect on endangered species or critical habitat. Hey says the car has to do further environmental review and consultation under the endangered species. Act before it can reissue the permit. Qc energy cannot build through any of the waterways along the pipeline route until it revamped its process into related cases tribes and environmentalists have challenged permits for the one point. Two Miles of pipeline. That crosses the border between Montana and Alberta. Tc Energy has started preconstruction on that segment for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Judge. Morris is hearing arguments in those two related challenges to the keystone. Xl Pipeline. Thursday. He'll issue an order in those cases at a later date. Many tribal leaders are calling for Alaska native corporations or an sees to be excluded from funding. Set aside for tribes in the Cares Act Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. Gerald Grey is chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa in the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council he says Anne Siese Corporation status should preclude them from accessing the eight billion dollar tribal stabilization fund. The last good native corporations should not be getting any of the funding because they're not tribes and We just basically don't feel that you know a good idea to be doing that this week. The Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council urged the US Treasury Department to exclude an sees from the emergency funding. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman Association when a step farther calling for the removal of Tara Sweeney. As Assistant Secretary of Indian affairs. They say since she wants worked for an there's a conflict of interest at play but Shauna President of the KONIAK regional corporation says Sweeney simply following the law simply put Alaskan native corporations are eligible for funding under the cares act because we're included in the law and we're going to use the funding from the cares act to help our communities prepare and respond to the nineteen tribes in an CS. Have until Friday to apply for their slice of Betrayal Stabilization Fund. It's not yet clear how the money will be divided up for national native news. I'm Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Tribal. Police have verbally warned or issued citations to more than one hundred and fifty people on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota for violating curfew or shelter in place orders the tribes currently on a fourteen day lockdown due to a public health response to Cova nineteen. I'm Antonio

Brian Morris National Native News Us Army Corps Of Engineers South Dakota Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Trib Tc Energy Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadersh Antonio Gonzalez Montana Great Plains Tribal Chairman A Victoria Wicks Doug Hayes Tara Sweeney Corps Of Engineers Canada Federal Court Pine Ridge Reservation Wyoming Alaska
Atlanta - Two Georgia school districts end year early, others considering it

Dana Loesch

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

Atlanta - Two Georgia school districts end year early, others considering it

"Coronavirus strives to George's school districts to end their school year early and others are thinking about it mark Albertus is superintendent of Carrollton city schools Alberta says in his video announcement on vimeo the Carrollton school here well M. may first students and parents ability to effectively continue at home learning over a long period of time is a concern we want to ensure we do not add unnecessary stress to families amid what already exists terrorism is west of metro Atlanta

Coronavirus George Alberta Carrollton School Atlanta Mark Albertus Superintendent Carrollton
Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

The Big Story

10:11 min | 7 months ago

Are you tired? Theres a reason, it's Daylight Savings Time

"I I don't know about you guys but I'm tired. Part of that is the ceaseless Rahm of end of the World News. Of course part of. It's just work or family or the everyday things that always get to me by the end of the week and this week in particular there is another reason. I'm tired and you know it. Or at least most of you deal with the exception of most of Saskatchewan and none of it. You Lucky Jerks Canada's sprang forward this week and if this world isn't seem bleak enough now it is once again dark when I leave my house in the morning every year more and more people ask why we have daylight saving time and the calls to abolish it grow louder and now we may in some places be ready to actually do away with except there's about of course there is what happens if some places in Canada eliminate daylight saving time but their neighbors either to the south or to the side. Do not put up some places decide to stay on permanent daylight time and others decide the opposite. What if every province and territory makes their own call and we end up with a maze of time zones the plays hell with scheduling things like sporting events are flights or deliveries. The last thing any of us want is they solution. Daylight saving time ends up making us even more tired. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story. Alex mckean a reporter at the Toronto Star and their Vancouver Bureau and she's Ab. As tired. As I am I out. How are you? I'm tired like I said this time shift always throws me for a loop. Yeah me too. I mean I was actually not only experiencing the time change weekend but I also flew to Toronto and then back to Vancouver so I've got double jetlag going on so your province is perhaps maybe on the verge of getting rid of daylight saving time and we will talk about that but first because this is a really good part of the story. Can you just tell me who is Ray Saunders? Sure Ray Saunders is a gentleman who just recently turned eighty years old and not a lot of people in Vancouver may recognize his name but they certainly would recognize his most famous creation. Refunders the maker of the Gas Count Skin. Kwok which is one of the biggest tourist attractions in the entire city of Vancouver. It's this incredible clock that is powered by steam and has whistled plays a tune every I think every fifteen minutes or so tourists come and look at it in the context of this historic part of the city gas town with. Oh it's a it's probable streets and they take pictures with it and Race unders is is the guy that built it. He built it in nineteen seventy seven and for a long time he He maintained it as well. Now it's maintained by the city of in coober but she wrote back walk and two hundred other public clocks in Vancouver Canada and all over the world to we can a year. He goes around to all of the Public Clark's in the city of Vancouver and surrounding area and he has been the guy who's responsible for manual we. Changing those public Clark's to reflect the time change at daylight savings time so He he describes me that during the this spring forward period which just happened this past weekend. Most of the public clocks they'll have kind of a speedup function and so it'll take about Six seconds he said that for the two wine forward an hour to reflect the new delay time and of course the the opposite happens during the fullback period in November. So He's been doing that for twenty years or so. It seems so quaint in a way but this might be the last weekend that he'll ever do it. Tell me about that. Yeah that's right. It might be the last weekend he ever does it And it's you know it's kind of fitting away because as described when we were talking. He's getting older. He unfortunately experienced a fall recently which which made ladder finding a lot more challenging for him. Of course you have to climb up the ladder in order to reach the public bases. So that's part of this task that he's been doing for for the last couple of decades So but personal reasons aside and personal limitations aside He also possibly last weekend that That this kind of topic will be required in the city of in coober because Bc is looking out just mixing the time changes all together And I I think you're right it it is. There is something kind of quaint about it if if I could just describe a little bit about Something that struck me talking to ray was that he has this really interesting relationship with clocks and time so I mean I'm a millennial and I will admits that most of the time that That I'm actually checking the time. I do wear wristwatches but most of the time I'm looking at my computer screen or looking at my phone that's the thing. That's like really intuitive to me. Ray has this this cool relationship with clocks. Where he says look. There's something lost when you're just looking at numbers on a screen. The clock face the circular nature of it the fact that the hands are always kind of moving around the tell us something about the time that has passed and the time that is yet to come. It's more You know accurate to the way that we actually walk through life and I thought that was such a such an interesting idea not anything that I considered at all so I think he his sense of affection for these public clocks in and the analog nature of them really came through so why is British Columbia considering getting rid of daylight saving time and how did that movement sprang up and come to be yeah. It's a great question And different people will tell you different responses as to the origin story of why British Columbia's dealing with this thing but I'm gonNA start with the practical elements of it. Which is the. This is a conversation that it's also happening South of the border in the western state so Washington Oregon California all considering changing to a permanent daylight time and that has pretty significant implications for us here British Columbia because we're coordinated with those states. There's a lot of commerce that happens between those days even things like as work scheduling. That happens along the West Coast and these are things that it makes sense to be in in the same time as them so Washington last fall passed legislation to change their approach to time to permanent. Be Lifetime. And that hasn't happened yet because they need the approval by the The Federal Congress there in order to make it happen but our premier John Horrigan Here British Columbia was in conversation with Governor of Washington State and said look. Maybe this is something. We're interested in in British Columbia is well. It's something that the the government launched a public consultation on. They sent out a survey and they received within the first month or so. They received more completed surveys than they ever have in the history of all public consultations on on this topic of changing to permanent daylight time so they received two hundred and twenty three thousand completed surveys Colombian yeah and overwhelmingly ninety. Three percent of people said get rid of it. We don't want time changes anymore. We just want a permanent time. Is that something that we see elsewhere in the world You mentioned it's happening already on the west coast of the US but also some parts of Canada. Don't have it as well. That's true and you know after I published this story on what? Bc is doing. I got quite a lot of emails from folks in Saskatchewan because the way described it in the story was that Scotch Wayne is on permanent central standard time but both insist on reminded being over over email but in fact according to the line to Scotch. When is that? It should be on mountain time zone for the same time zone as Berta so the fact that it's on permanent central standard time actually means that it's it's more on a permanent stay like time similar to what? Bc is trying to do so it all gets a little bit confusing but since nineteen sixty six scotch and has been the Canadian exception to this time. Change practice that we have been doing and the they've been on the most places in Scotland. Anyway have been on permanent central standard time. Alberta has considered it. I understand that there's also a private member's bill In Ontario on this topic. So if it's something that people are increasingly aware of but the one that I has really caught my attention in the last couple of weeks was the Yukon because of course the Yukon is also a jurisdiction along the west coast. And they've already pulled the trigger. They said okay. We went to move the clocks forward an hour this past weekend. And we're not going to change them again. It's just GonNa stay dot so Yukon. Who is the one that's most recently has actually made the changes that British Columbia is talking about? Making what is the case in this day and age for daylight saving time? Can

Vancouver Canada Ray Saunders West Coast British Columbia BC Coober Toronto Saskatchewan Yukon Columbia Rahm Clark World News Washington Jordan Heath Rawlings Vancouver Bureau Kwok Alex Mckean
What happens when the global economy gets sick?

The Big Story

11:10 min | 7 months ago

What happens when the global economy gets sick?

"I won't pretend that I pay much attention to the stock market. Let's just say I don't have much reason to do so. Occasionally though it is unavoidable now with all the reaction to the corona virus world markets have tumbled phased suffering. Its biggest drop. Since the nineteen eighty seven crash Wall Street plunged the most is the financial crisis the losses so steep on both sides of the border at it actually triggered a trading halt for the Fed and other central bankers drop in oil prices is adding another complication as they try to gauge. How the corona virus will impact the global economy the fascinating thing about the reaction of markets around the world to Cova Nineteen. It's not really about dollars and cents. Yes a lot of billionaires lost millions and millions more are are. Sp's have taken ahead but watching what's happening here even if you have no money in the markets is a glimpse to how we all value risk. So what have we seen in the past few days and weeks? It's different from financial shudders like the crisis of two thousand eight. Where could the markets go from here? How far could they sing? And what will the world's governments do to prevent that and what happens beyond dollars gained or lost as a result of all this weather or not. Stock prices surged again. When this is over what happens in other words when global economy comes down with flu like symptoms. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Mike Apple is these senior business editor at six eighty news. He's been busy the last few. Hello Mike How are you? I'm doing well. Why don't you quickly outline? I keep in mind that we are talking in the middle of the day so stocks may do any thing quickly outline. What have we seen in the past couple of days with stock markets and oil prices? You have to go back actually three weeks because up until about the mid part of February the markets were on fire. Everybody was buying everything you could not lose money It was the greatest momentum rally not necessarily based on fundamentals which turned out to be a bit of a problem but Tesla was at a record SPACEX and Virgin Galactic Apple Microsoft all these big companies record highs and krona virus was starting at March so to speak in China. That's peculiar. Why isn't the market more worried about this well? Then as it started to spread people include in and airlines were. I think the first trigger where they started air. Canada cut flights to China. So there was this wakeup call that this was going to have an economic impact and that started the selloff for stocks and over the course of the past three weeks we have seen the biggest point declines and subsequent point gains on the benchmarks in history like there have been massive swings one day huge selling next a big buyback and we are coming off now the subsequent largest slump ever on a points basis. I WanNa make that designation for the Tsa X. Endow because when we look at it on a percentage basis. It's big but not October. Nineteen eighty seven big where the Dow Single Day drop twenty two percent. It's massive. We're talking trillions of dollars of market value. I don't want underestimated but again I wanNA put it into some context. The TSA was down over ten percent. Second biggest ever point percentage decline. Explain what's driving this. You touched on airlines. Yes okay. So that was the that was the first economic shock that the tourism industry was was seeing a major revaluation. People weren't traveling companies. Their supply chains were being shut down in China ripple effect elsewhere than into Italy in Europe and Potentially into North America. So that was the first wave of selling and then what happened? Was the reaction from the market for what? The Saudi Arabian government announced on the weekend. Last week they wanted to cut production to stabilize the oil market which had seen a bit of a downturn so they were holding meetings OPEC cartel and Russia. There's sort of a new player in the global market newish and they wanted to cut production well. Russia had been playing ball the better part of a couple of years but then for some reason they walked away from the table on Friday. They said we. We're really not thinking about cutting production. Now we think we can withstand lower prices. Have at it as you will. This incense the Saudis who say okay. Fine. We're going to raise output in an already oversupplied market to record levels. We're going to crush the low hanging fruit. Any company that produces at say forty or fifty dollars a barrel every barrel they produce is going to lose money but the Saudis can produce it around twelve to fifteen and we're still around thirty and change and the Russians are close but that was the second hit so to speak. Do we know if those two are connected the the sort of oil price wars and the corona virus? It is because the first reason oil dropped was because China basically came to a standstill China's one of the largest buyers of oil prices dropped dramatically. And then this next thing developed at the worst possible time for the market really. It's like really you got to do this now anyway They don't seem to care because this morning again. They said starting next month. Twelve million barrels Russia said okay. We'll match that or very close to it. You've got Canada in the mix the US already at record levels. Suir a globe that is going to be a washing oil which just kind of sounds gross by at least a lower prices lower prices at the gas gas stations. Great for consumers horrible for the industry. Guess what Albert is going to get hit again. Yeah how efficiently can Alberta Produce oil? And and what do they need? Oil PRICES TO BE AT in order to not crush their economy. More than it already. Is this Most recently the tech resources project that was mothballed by tech a few weeks back had a break even price. I think it was north of fifty dollars per barrel okay so significantly higher than than where we are now the established producers son core and the others. They're at a lower price point because they're already moving commodities around and this is why we're talking about you know the oil market being a barometer of the global economy and then you've got the travel and tourism industry in the mix and why the markets have done what they've done they they've re priced risk They've lowered earnings expectations. Apple has already said that its sales in China dropped substantially in February. They're gonNA drop again in March. Their supply chain has been hit again. Apple's got deep pockets. They don't have to worry. Long-term THEY'RE GONNA come out of this. But is the company worth a trillion dollars anymore. Right it's all a repricing and the pendulum that we see moves incredibly fast because everything and and it was funny to to to hear commentators about how quickly markets dropped and then recuperated in previous crises whether it was eighty seven or the DOT COM bubble. Or whatever over there was SARS or murders or any of these other things the Russian ruble crisis it. All of these would take months if not years now. We're talking about weeks and that's that's what shocks and scares people. Because it's like what do you do it? So let's just talk about people like myself and probably like many people listening who don't have tens of thousands of dollars sitting in stocks and aren't you know directly impacted the second. This happens when you look at a ticker in your money's dripping away. What does the crash of the market mean for someone like me? It's psychological more than anything else. Because you're not you're not selling you're not buying necessarily not cashing in for X. number of years on your RSP. So I mean time is your friend and all of the old market adages but you see that and you say wow. Do I want to go and buy anything big today? Do I WANNA spend money? You know when you're when you are in a good mood you're more willing to be happy consumer and when you're not and you see all these negative headlines You Kinda Kinda retrench. That's the biggest problem and again from an investing standpoint. You know it is so difficult to sell it. The high and via the low people do the inverse ratio. As you're thinking who I'm missing out when things are hitting records and then when things are on sale you don't WanNa touch with ten football so now is actually time it it. It's it's not over yet. We still seeing the virus ripple through. This is going to take some time. There's no doubt about it. Bought companies that were priced. Way Up here in the stratosphere a few weeks ago discount if you like them then should love them now and that's the hard thing to get past. How much risk has the priced in already? You know we've Seen Corona virus spreading in North America particularly So far at least in the United States is a larger spread of that already priced into these drops or could it get even worse as it expands it it. It could get worse but we are already looking at the forecasters saying okay. We are expecting that. The economy will slow dramatically. Hopefully it doesn't but it is likely going and they are already saying that interest rates which were cut last week going to fall that much further over the next two months you know the bond market which is another one of these barometers of risk and worry and flipside euphoria We have seen bond yields dropped to all time record lows lower than what we saw during the financial crisis when banks were going out of business which is just to me remarkable now as it was explained to me the reason they're lower than where they were then because they never got back up to where they were previously so you're starting at a lower point and then dropping from that so it okay that kind of makes sense but you know we could see zero percent interest rates in North America. This was something we were looking at in when Greece was defaulting. Right right and people were going. How does that work? You're getting zero percent. Yeah because you're buying that bond or whatever it is because you think that the stock market or any other asset classes going to drop further than just keeping it at something get zero percent and again that that adds to the concern in the caution right. How much of a role does politics play here? I mean there's a tremendous amount of discussion in the United States about the role. The economy will play in an election year. And I'm wondering how individual governments and especially Let's say prominent world leaders How their response to the crisis might drive the markets and impact. Well again. You're talking about a health. Risk as opposed to a financial risk more than anything. Oh Eight Oh. Nine was banking industry crisis.

China Russia United States North America TSA Canada Mike Apple Apple FED Cova
"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

14:03 min | 7 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Of indigenous studies at York University Brock. Brock era can Our topic takes us to the Alberta Legislature. Where just days ago? The United Conservative government began its spring sitting by introducing a single bill bill one that critical infrastructure defense act and according to a report from wind speaker under the proposed law. Those who shut down rail lines and roadways would each face minimum fines of ten thousand dollars for the first day of Action and then twenty five thousand for each subsequent day. They also face the possibility of six months jail time as well corporations that aid council or direct. The Commission of an offence are also open to fines of up to two hundred thousand dollars win speaker report. Also notes that. The bill's introduction came just five days after a group calling themselves cousins for it so again blockaded CNN tracks in West Edmonton okay. Can you live in that provincial? Capital the belly of the beast speak. So let's start with you and let's start with what reaction has been like and by that. I mean generally among Albertans but also in particular among indigenous people. What are you hearing or seeing The funny thing is about this bill is that it's it's kind of being is has been overshadowed by the new budget. It's almost like they buried this thing underneath like as really horrendous new budget that just passed but going back to bill one. There was actually an interesting split. I found on various social media sites. An I you know speaking of win speaker. I used to work there. So that's one thing I gotta make clear to everyone that I am a former employee and I'm still friends with the publisher of Prophet. So I actually sit on his site and watched a lot of the stuff that goes on there were a lot of. I can trust that. I'm looking at a large group of indigenous people who sort of cross-legged spectrum right. So it seems to be like mostly against the bill But there are some people who are strongly for it so I would if I was like I have no real metrics on this so a but just my initial feel for it now just to be. Honest is just just feel that I got from reading. The sites is that it's kind of like two thirds against the bill versus like I think a strong third of indigenous folk Su Do Support it. Sort a third of indigenous folk support. Yeah Yeah it's it's quite There is there is a body of people People in Alberta who really feel that the their strongly tied to a lesson development oil and gas development. The this put it this way. The blockade out here really wasn't strongly supported to say the one that happened in Saskatoon. Our anywhere else in this country it was up in. It was down fairly quickly. There wasn't a lot of broad support from other First nations people for it in the sense of the way. We've been seeing that kind of physical support that shows up right like the Saskatoon. One like had a lot of support from the local community local districts community who came out. And you know meet. Your everyone was warm. Made sure they had enough food. Made sure the the you know. They're being protected. So none of that existed as strongly out here in. I'm not trying to. It's not a sense of me. Criticizing the blockade. But since I did not see the equivalent amount support I've seen elsewhere now Dot put you on the spot. But I'm going to anyway If we had ven diagram of those indigenous people who were? Let's say supportive bill one and those who work or in some way earned their living through the throwing gas industry. Would we see One circle or significant overlap. Yeah you definitely see largely one circle that would that would be the case This is the industry that drives Alberta and of course first nations people here derive benefit from it when they get employed in it and Up until I believe the eighties nineties. Several bands around Emerton that generated massive amount of revenue from the oil and gas leases. They had on reserve. So it's really quite The this is a very strong Strong very strong pro. Oil and gas feeling amongst the indigenous communities. Here not saying as universal. Yeah Yeah but those who a benefit from it from it how are for it and also here in the city of Edmonton the south side of. Emerton sits on an illegally surrendered. Cree reserved Chase and they've been people who've been trying to get the land claim Set up get their membership back and their chief Carl. Bruno has been very vocal. About being pro pro pipeline. Right you know. He's all about prosperity for his people and he sees it in oil and gas. And you know the Manitoba Matey Federation as come out. Supportive of oil and gas development generally Brock you live about. What is it three or four hours drive north of time to Negga territory? So I don't know the extent to which Maybe your life has been impacted by by the blockade there by by Mohawks in any case the premier L. Berta. Let's get you back. To Berta the premier there is selling this legislation as a necessary response to what he calls. Virtual Anarchy and lawless mockery of our democratic principles. An attack on her nations and our provinces prosperity meanwhile Alberta Justice Minister and Solicitor General Doug Schweitzer Francis as decisive action to end the lawlessness blockades in our province which jeopardize public safety. So there's a lot of elements to to this particular frame. What do you make of it? What what stands out there for you. One thing that stood out right away was that it doesn't seem that this bill is being brought forward with a Mike Universal support even Alberta others the statement from AFN regional chief Marlene Poitras and she ended up pointing out the Essentially that it was unnecessary in she was urging the provincial government. Alberta to withdraw the bill and Y- we also saw af en national chief Perry Bell Guard. Also come out and and Kinda chastise the the premium for for bringing this in and even the the leader of the opposition in Alberta Rachel Notley former premier herself as she came out and said that this was unnecessary that with the existing legislation police already have jurisdiction to enforce an injunction and so essentially the seems like. It's more maybe kind of as Ken mentioned in some ways almost cover a really bad budget a government. That's just desperately trying to look like it still can defend oil and gas and restore the Alberta Economy at a time that Albert Alberta Families. I think in our are struggling financially with relatively high levels of unemployment and then the cancellation of the Frontier Mind Yup. Yup so I in some ways. I think this is You even mentioned the Justice Minister Rick. He had a a kind of a ridiculous response when it was pointed out to him. That wouldn't this. Proposed legislation also have an effect on the so-called yellow vest protest movement that that's very much pro oil and gas. In that case he emphasized that police would have discretion as to whether to apply is where imprisonment. So it seemed pretty clear like this is really just You know waving the flag for oil and gas extraction and Alberto and Yeah and it would be a deterrent for for anybody who opposed oil and gas to try to protest other than in the very restricted way. At the justice. Manage Service was permitting. So he mentioned. Oh you can stand beside the road you can show up the legislature. But just don't get in anyone's way or cause any significant inconvenience. Yeah I have to say I felt that reaction to it Didn't really get at the NUB of it in terms of you know. What is the problem. This new bill purports to solve. What is supposedly missing from current laws on the books as you just so you know well laid out Brockman it. It's it's not clear what it adds except Let me quote more from that. Win Speaker Article Premier. Kenny stress. That blockades were already illegal activities and Coordin- junctions to stop them weren't necessary but clearly the existing penalties and court actions were not having the desired if impact quote we're using the powers that we do have to create summary offenses of this nature with penalties with administrative fines with potential jail time and so he says on the one hand this gives police and prosecutors additional tools to crack down on illegal blockages of critical infrastructure. And we're adding to the disincentive of that kind of lawlessness. With the power that we have under Alberto legislation said Kenny so This is really interesting to me. Because this theory of disincentives usually comes up in discussions and debates around getting tough on crime quote unquote. You know things like murder theft assault and and to me to kind of lump or associate blockades with with those kinds of offenses. I mean I'll stick with brock. I mean there are those who would say this risks. Criminalizing dissent What do you think of that? Yeah I completely agree. And I think it's telling in terms of how can you presented it. But there was a great phrase used that got caught in some headlines or sub headlines about urban green laughed zealots target that quote unquote that. Jason. Kenney blamed for the supposed anarchy. But the amazing thing is. I looked at the the whole quote in. I'm paraphrasing part of it. But what he's actually referring to there is again quote urban green last zealots who appropriate or have been trying to appropriate the cause of first nations but are actually slamming the door shut on their prosperity and so he goes on to say that his vision of this is quote reconciliation through prosperity So he's the way he's messaging is that he's actually trying to heat like he's the friend of first nations. Alberta and presumably elsewhere in the country. That's on side with the extraction industry. I mean that's where it seems like this is a very in some ways. Although it does seem hasty as you pointed out it was only five days after the cousins for wet solids in action. It seems like they're really trying to again. Show show some action. I would probably is it. Pretty frustrating situations seeing the tech bind. Go down and again. There's been the long-standing dispute between BC in Alberta over the construction of a pipeline to tidewater. So he he's promised so much is a relatively recently elected premier. And my mind. This is just kind of More proof of just how helpless he is. There's there's much greater market forces at play and I think what global concern over climate crisis that the his recent budget did nothing to address and he still seems to be a trying to avoid taking meaningful action that would allow albertans to transition to a new economy. Not One based on fossil fuels as I would say. There's another motivation to this law. You know it's not above. His personal ambitions are to be the prime minister and I think he sort of I think he knows this is not really that effective of a love because he can only apply in all BERTA and again. There isn't the kind of broad support here on the ground for any kind of like action yet. You're not seeing it Mellberg the way we're seeing it anywhere else. I kind of see him going. If I was prime minister. This is a kind of law I would pass Canadians. Take note you know that I would do something about this sooner than later. I am struck by what Brock said that. This is actually a sign of weakness. This is a desperate act as opposed to a sign of strength and machismo. Oh Yeah Yeah I agree I did. I don't disagree with that. I think it makes but I'm also saying there's another motivation to that. He probably knows it's not not an effective law and not when he's really gonNA have to us anyway it's just I think he's firing a broadside at at Trudeau Trying to show off what kind of leader he would be if he was the prime minister. Now the focus of the legislation can is on pipelines oil and gas production refinery sites highways railways dams bridges electric gas water facilities and telecommunications lines. That's quite a big quite a big list. It's in keeping with Type of Scope that is laid out by the federal government through the Public Safety Canada. And if you go to its website and look at what it considers to be critical infrastructure. It includes health food. Finance Water Information and Communication Technology Safety Energy and utilities manufacturing government transportation. Starting to think of might have been easier to list. What isn't considered critically district man now and and.

Alberta Brock Edmonton Alberta Legislature prime minister York University Brock Saskatoon Justice Minister CNN Alberto United Conservative government Emerton L. Berta Public Safety Canada Albert Alberta Families publisher Rachel Notley
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

02:56 min | 8 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"When we talk about the clearing of this wildlife. What is the company? Say about what they would do after the life span of the mind is spent. How will we recover if at all what was lost? A BERTA has regulations in place for reclamation or or the cleanup of of oil sands. Mines of the scale should look like One thing to note Just as an aside is that Alberta's oil sands in the last fifty years have only received what what we call re reclamations tickets for about one percent of the total land that was disturbed The industry will say that they've made efforts for about six percent. But just I haven't received the final regulatory certification yet for that land. So what regulation looks like can vary from project to project but the the company should be replanting trees and trying to restore wetlands as best they can and making it habitat that is habitable for species Lake Wood Bison and Caribou and links and those were there before as you can imagine. It's a very difficult process you. You can't put back in old growth forest to the way that it was. It's a long process years. Okay Tech for its part says that it's given about twenty million dollars for indigenous groups to conduct their own research into this mine. They will also be supporting the groups as they call on the Canadian government to create a buffer zone around Wood Buffalo National Park. We have these immediate adverse effects and then of course there's this big question over any sort of oil and gas project which is carbon emissions uh-huh and climate change so sort of the big picture and I know that the company mind this tech says project represents best in class for greenhouse gas emissions from oil sands developments. But let's talk about the effect. This project will have on Canada's ability to meet its climate targets should should it all go forward right because you can't you can't have one of these minds without emissions right and the first thing I would address in that. Is that the idea that the project didn't as best in class has been disputed by a number of environmental environmental groups and also by environment and climate change candidate itself in its submission to the panel so the project is depending on who you ask going to be responsible for about about four megatonnes of carbon dioxide emissions per year. Maybe up to six depending on how you calculate it and to put that into context you have to go back a bet and look at Canada's international commitments that we made in Paris at the climate conference in two thousand fifteen. So when you kind of do the math on that you find that the entire our country. In two thousand fifty can be emitting one hundred fifty megatons of emissions so that means the frontier mine just one oil sands mine in one province would be you. You know three or four percent of the total carbon budget of the country. Well just this one mind could play three or four percent of total carbon urban mission rate.

Canada Lake Wood Bison Wood Buffalo National Park Canadian government Alberta Paris
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:42 min | 8 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Sharon Hi Jamie. First of all I I know this project is a big one but how big put this into perspective for me. Yeah you're right. This is a big project it didn't it has a long lifespan. So this is a project just to give you some context. It'll be northern Alberta. I'm just outside of Wood Buffalo National Park and it's a proposed major the investment in Alberta oil sands and do before we talked about the mine itself. I think it's important to talk about the oil sands and what a substantial part of Canada's oil production they represent Um so the oil sands accounted for over sixty percent of Canada's oil production in two thousand eighteen That's a lot. That's according to actual resources Canada so in the oil sands ends. There are already seven open. Pit Mining Projects Albert them. Those would be the more famous names. You may have heard of the secret and SUNCORP YUP FRONTIERS TECH project. Wants to be the next. And it'll be as you said one of the largest if not the largest oil sands open pit mines ever proposed in Alberta Right. And how long is it. Projected to operate for the. The proposal says that they'll have their first oil producing twenty twenty six. It will operate for forty years and it will take about another twenty years for them to clean it up so we're looking got cover most of the century long term and we save. His mind is big so you know. I think it's supposed to be like double the size of Vancouver. Is that fair yes. That's about twenty nine thousand hectares. That'll be that'll be footprint. And that is about double the size of the city of ink. Hoover would produce about two hundred and sixty thousand barrels of bitchy everyday everyday at its peak. Okay so the future of this project is as as I mentioned at the top of the show in the hands of the federal government as we speak and it got there with the recommendation. Tation of a joint panel of federal provincial regulators. WHO found this project was in the public interest though they conceded that there would be significant adverse effects? And I want to get to the adverse affects with you in a moment but first why did they find this project in the public endorse. What's what's the benefit here? I mean put it simply the benefit is money yeah The panel took techs projections of how much money this project will bring in in the long term so over around seventy billion and economic mkx benefits In terms of royalties and taxes to the various levels of government. They also are talking a lot about job creation so the mine would according to the company Penny create seven thousand jobs during construction require another twenty five hundred acres during operation and they have more estimates that You know lots of billions of dollars in figures are they say that this will contribute two point one billion to Alberta's annual GDP it'll increase household income by another two billion. It's it's just expected to have a a lot of huge economic impacts. Okay I was ahead. I know this is something Alberto premiered. Jason Kenney has been touting. He's a big supporter of this project last month when Alberta's premier sat down with the prime minister. Turn off the proposed tech tear oil sands megaproject was among the first topics discussed. That would create ten thousand jobs. Seventy billion dollars in revenue for for governments to pay for healthcare and education. Okay so let's go back then to those significant adverse effects The regulatory panel mentioned. What are the sort of immediate effects? The building of his mind would have on the environment in this part of Alberta. So as I mentioned it's about twenty nine thousand Hector's that would be its footprint as you can imagine that is currently mostly forested area. That would all need to be removed for it to be an open pit mine. So the the panel found that close to three thousand hectares of old growth forests would be removed for the mind to be built They also said that wetlands cover about forty five percent of the area. They looked at that would be drained and removed and then importantly they also looked at peatland which is seen as an important carbon sink and found three thousand in Hector's of peatland would be destroyed by the minds construction and the panel found that would be an irreversible loss. So that's not something you can put back after you're done producing and mine define nine carbon sink for me right. So peatland is just an important place where carbon stored so when you remove peatland you release a lot of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Okay and you know you mentioned that this would be a forested area with wildlife as well. I would imagine that would for sure. Yeah there are a couple of Free roaming disease-free herds of wood bison in the area and that's why would buffalo national park has its name Athabasca Chippewa. First nation is concerned served about the Ronald Lake. Bison herd the herd is listed as threatened. Dishes hasn't been touched it. You mean to tell me dot dot dot greedy Goddamn power of money to goon damage dry d environment. They're also Caribou which are in the news a lot lately for being at risk And then a number of other species migratory birds bats Links all sorts of species that would be affected according to the panel the fourteen creed Denny and Matey groups have signed participation agreements with tech resources joining us is Ron Quintal. President of the Fort MCI maintain the fact that environmental aspect of things is is the number thirty I think ultimately slingshot of the foreword wouldn't by way of the community at least one cheap admit signing the deal wasn't easy all the first nations are signing on with tech words. This is leave us out of love to fight but to has to be a time when you have to draw the line.

Alberta Canada federal government SUNCORP Sharon Wood Buffalo National Park Jason Kenney Ronald Lake Vancouver Hoover buffalo national park Denny Ron Quintal Alberto Fort MCI President prime minister
"alberta" Discussed on The Current

The Current

13:20 min | 10 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Current

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark net the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators. The environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get at your podcasts. This is a CBC DC podcast. Hi I'm Laura Lynch. This is a podcast from the December twelfth edition of the current. How do you teach students about climate change and land use in a province where a significant percentage of many people's financial security is connected to the the oil and gas industry in Alberta? The answer is very carefully. Take what happened earlier this month at school in Central Alberta it started with a social studies. Eddie's lesson in a great for class some parents got mad. Threats were made serious enough that last week the school canceled its annual family. Christmas dance to avoid voight potential confrontations. Our friends at as it happens spoke with the School Superintendent Jason Level. Yesterday the teacher taught a lesson and that particular regular day and by the end of the day post went up from a parent believing that it was a very biased and one-sided approach from the teacher it was a facebook it formed and then from there. It just took off an awful lot of very very strong language that indicated that there was a risk to an event that was scheduled last Thursday as they evening. The Christmas dance. It was at that point that we did contact the RCMP. They decided that That some steps would be taken to address one parents in particular who had posted hosted using language about confronting the teacher. Jason level is the Superintendent of the Wolf Pre School Division in Alberta. Jason chilling is the president of the Teachers Association. He's currently on leave from his job teaching high school English and drama and he joins us from our Edmonton Studio. Hello Good Morning Laura. What exactly was the assignment that students were given in that great for class from what I understand from the reports that I heard in the media the statement was looking at the energy sector and so the teacher shown a video from one perspective and then a video that was produced by the government and then ensued a conversation? And this is actually the way that it's it's listed out in the The Guy to education for controversial issues is that you present both sides. You provide multiple viewpoints. You let the students do some thinking about it and then you help them form their own opinions on it so from what I understand. The lesson was sound and appropriate so that the other as I understand the other video was Greenpeace video and it was looking at the oil industry. Yes from what I understand as well. Yes and you're saying there's nothing out of ordinary about that lesson plan. No not at all. I mean the curriculum is is Is Put by the government for teachers to follow. And that's what Teachers are hired to do the professionals. And so they follow the The prescribe curriculum and and Laid out the controversial issue with the two approaches to it the viewpoints and allow the students to make their own opinion based on it. What do you make of the reaction from some parents in the controversy verse? That's ensued from that. Well I find it a little. I find it disappointing and disturbing because I think that The heat in this situation and around this idea of teaching controversial issues in the classroom really needs to be turned down It's one of those things where teachers Approach controversial issues according to the curriculum and then Try to get that balance approach to it and so to have this reaction I think that it it sort of creates a situation where you kind of appre pitting people against one another and. That's not what teachers want classrooms. Did this surprise you that this happened a little bit. Yes I think that You you know. There's this division that sort of being created that pits that guest teachers against the energy sector and I find that really bizarre because teachers live and work in their communities. They WANNA see over to prosper as a province just as much as the person next door. Oh from a teacher's perspective. How difficult is it to examine these kinds of issues? Environmental issues issues land use issues in the classroom. Well I don't know if it's too difficult because you can go and find the information that is available to us a teacher through resources and you know through Your University training through the job that you do through following the curriculum that Guy -education that's produced by BERTA education. These are the steps. She follow when you cover these issues in its laid out really clearly and so as long as you follow on those those aspects. It shouldn't be that difficult to talk about things I mean. We want to produce critical thinking democratic. You know students in our classrooms. We want them to think about the issues that are facing our province today in looking at solutions for moving forward now we know that that the premium of alerted Jason Kenney had earlier said made accusations that left wing policies were being smuggled into the school curriculum. We know that the Education Minister on Lagrange at tweeted her own criticism of exam questions that she said we're biased about the energy industry What what do you say to members of the ruling party that say teachers are being too political when it comes to climate change? I don't I don't see that in in what I see with teachers in the classroom. Yeah I think The tweet that was put up by the Minister of Education was taken out of context. Those questions were When you look when you talk to social studies teachers and they look at that question they can see that? That question is actually a really good one in terms of asking about critical thinking skills. Because you're asking students to Interpret what what they think an author is trying to say and so that is something. I do my own classroom in my English classroom when we read authors is what is author trying to say. So you're trying to get the students to really I think about what is being presented and then making a choice with that afterwards so for listeners. The question was about valid arguments multiple choice. What value valid arguments are there against oil oil sands development? The government announced an advisory panel earlier this year to review the provinces entire education curriculum. What are you hoping comes out of that well? Well the curriculum process was well underway before the the election in the spring. And so I'm hoping this process will actually not impede the implementation of this new curriculum. Because it's something that Teachers have been looking forward to to using in the classroom. And I know that We want to be able to make sure that. There's a balanced approach just within the curriculum that we have going forward in Alberta and there are no currently employed teachers on the panel. What do you make of that? Well that was. That was a a major bone of contention for me when the panel was announced because the we had a relationship a partnership with the Elber Government to develop curriculum within the province. And that's long standing. We've had a relationship with the government for a long time with that. Teachers are integral to Developing Curriculum in Alberta so to have this panel announced not have one an active teacher on that panel was extremely disappointing in. I've I myself felt a little bit disrespected teacher because we're required to take curriculum than has developed and make it come to life in the classroom and you need the input of teachers to help determine whether or not the curriculum that is being put forth will actually the be viable in the classroom. Have you spoken with the teacher. Who's been the subject of the threats? No okay I'm just wondering what you would say to him about. What's happened here? You know now I would say to teachers who who get caught in mixed up and things like this To not to rely on the community rely on your school family. Family rely on The fact that you know that he this this teacher did a really good job. The they had AH balanced approach to their lesson and not to get caught up with this like I said We really need to turn down the heat on this and I hope that everybody who's involved in the education system can actually work together to sort of tone down the rhetoric that is out there because Pity teachers against the energy sector is just not good. Jason chilling. I thank you for your time. Thank you Laura. Jason and chilling is the president of the Upper Two teachers association. He was in our Edmonton. Studio Dimitris Nikolaidis Albert as Minister of Advanced Education. He's in Calgary today. Hello I'm wondering what you make of what you heard from Mr Schilling. This idea that. The provinces politicizing education that the heat's been turned up too much on this well on on the contrary the province is Is Interested in in finding an approach to de politicize education. I think it's something that we've heard comments from from parents and some examples as as he had talked about with your previous guests and our priority I already in our focus is to ensure that we are able to take the politics out of education. It's not the role and the place of our educational system to to the engaging in political discourse our our focus and our view of course that our educational system is centered it around the student centered around the development of the Knowledge Skills and competencies that our students need In order to be successful in the future. That's that's our primary focus and they'll do want to ensure that there's a deep politicisation of our educational system right so this lesson was about and the teachers teachers presentation was supposed to be about critical thinking And you heard the superintendent of the school districts. There was nothing wrong with it. Why do you think it became so heated? Well I think it became heated because of The the current state that our province Linson our energy sector find itself in. There's of course as we know a coordinated foreign funded Campaign that has been very active in seeking to target Alberta's energy sector. That's been quite clearly articulated and clearly documented not to mention the challenging economic conditions. That we've seen in our energy sector and in our economy more generally over the last few years but does it help in your own on your. Does it help when your own premier says that left wing policies are being smuggled into the school curriculum. That doesn't seem to me to help. Turn tone it down. Well which is why we've been clear that are intended objective is to de-politicize and and take the politics out of the classroom again. there was some Some discussion with your previous guest about The curriculum panel that our government has convened which is is has been struck to help ensure ensure that the emphasis is placed on knowledge development skill development development of of critical thinking skills and foundational skills and competencies that students need in order to be successful in the future. Do you think that assignment In that crate for classroom was about critical thinking. Do you accept that. Well I haven't I haven't seen the assignment myself but again that's that needs to be the priority and we always ensure that were reproaching. The educational delivery from the perspective of students Being very mindful of changing societal and economic conditions to ensure that our students are well positioned for success in the future. So you're not sure that this actually was a valid lesson. Then I mean we know that there were two video showing one from the Alberta government the other from Greenpeace. They they were asked to write about how the province should cope with competing. Demands for land. Use is that political. Well you know I think at the end of the day Just just coming back back to to to the issue of course It's it's it's important that we always keep the experience of of the student and The the environment of the teachers at the forefront and there's never any circumstance and there's never any situation that warrants threats and the comments and other types of threats that we saw in this particular situation. There's nothing that warrants that kind of behavior that that's always challenging and and Obviously has led to the cancellation of the Christmas school. Dance which is Not a situation that is That is productive right but I just trying to get some sense from From you of what you think of the lesson itself I mean you've been quoted as saying this is in context of universities. It's not a place to shutdown discussions or ideas that are popular but to encourage individuals to put forward alternative viewpoints. Do you embrace that schools as well. Well again with our school curriculum The easy the the Focus needs to be on the development of foundational skills needs to be on the emphasis of the the attainment of needed. Knowledge and competencies is that our students need for For.

Alberta government Superintendent Jason Laura Lynch Teachers Association president Jason Kenney Minister of Education facebook Central Alberta Upper Two teachers association MOORHEAD RCMP Edmonton Studio Christmas school Jason Level Elber Government
"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"Time and time again one thing I love about hearing from the coalition's is that when they're facing challenges of confusion they stay curious when they're discouraged They find courage and continue the conversation when there's division they are connected and the keep connected when there is doubt the Hi I'm me Mahaffey and welcome to pause an Albert a social innovation connect podcast we invite partners and collaborators to pause from their busy work and sit down together to reflect on what they're learning as they seek to address the root causes of complex problems in their nations when used well they help change makers bring their unique perspectives and efforts together to better understand an address complex problems in today's episode would we hear from three change makers within a province wide coalition called echo the early childhood coalitions of Alberta we turn over the Mike to Janice Kramer One of echoes Coalition Liaisons to host this episode Janice did a beautiful job of summarizing echoes model she also invited to incredible local coalition leaders to sit down with her for reflective conversations about what this work looks like in their communities and what they've learned along the way before we jump into that conversation here's Janice introducing.

Mahaffey Albert Alberta Mike Janice Kramer
"alberta" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Big Story

"Sometimes the things you think you know about a place when you're outside her. Turn out to be completely false. This is not one of those times the angry and ignored the feeling among the two thousand protesters here frustrated by the enormous discount alberta crude what is being sold for him to the reason for that crisis and this protest an inability to get canadian oil to market due to a lack of pipeline capacity and rightly or wrongly wrongly in this crowd much of the blame for that lies with justin trudeau. If you wanna know how alberta is going to vote in october you ask yourself how the oil and gas industry. We'll be doing by that. Ask yourself if the long-awaited trans mountain pipeline will be under construction by them and ask yourself. How does berta typically feel about leaders named trudell this week. Our lay of the land project dives into canada's conservative stronghold where a good eighty five percent of the writings can be called like right now but that doesn't mean there's nothing we can learn by examining just how trudeau and the liberals else came to be so hated in this province or by looking at what has voters in the few swing ridings that exist still making up their minds or by wondering what if with anything could dent andrew shares chances and this province because as he might be learning from ontario polls right now electing an overwhelmingly conservative the provincial government doesn't necessarily guarantee the federal vote will go that way too. Hello i'm jordan heath rawlings and this is the big story. Jason marcus off is the albert correspondent for maclean's. Hey jason audi as out here how democracy going out now berta. Oh it's always churning in war rooming and going forth we are now at least a couple all of months. You would know better than me removed from jason kenny's big win. How's that going. It's been what since april so that's maybe seventeen months. I think jason kenney any <hes> you know acting a lot of promises. He had a pretty big detailed agenda. It helps knowing well in advance that you almost definitely going to win. So you can basically cle- just put out the manifesto for all the things you are promising you do to do and then you do a bunch of those things set a bunch of them in motion so they've scrapped the carbon tax you know the federal backstop will come in soon lick. It has another provinces but he's scrap. Carbon-tax launched a or announce. He's is gonna launch yet. Another <hes> court challenge against it. He's cut corporate tax. He's done a lot of consultation. I mean the you know as one. Does you put out a bunch of consultations. Do things a bit later whether it be because you just wanna make sure you get all your ducks in a row once you actually have the the books when you're in government ferment or in a lot of what jason kenny's doing he's actually postponing some major decisions including the budget until after the federal election jason kenney being very sensitive to not wanting to upset the apple cart for andrew scheer. He's actually delayed the false sitting of the legislature until october twenty second. That's happening out here on -tario as well. I think <hes> i mean there are two reasons for that. I would i would gather one. One is to make sure that your political staff and m l. a.'s can take some leave and do some campaign work and help the federal cause but also not not paint it yourself as a target jason kenney liked doug ford and ontario has promised to take aggressive action on the deficit and that means a lot of public service cuts and we've seen what's the furor through various service cuts and reforms in ontario. Jason kenney is really trying to keep those out of the headlines headlines until after the election by actually keeping them out period of the public eye. Nothing is decided nothing is happening technically until sometime in late october once we figure wrote who the prime minister for the next four years give or take are going to be well. It's interesting because on -tario i think <hes> in a province that's kind of a swing province. A people are linking king andrew shears candidacy to what they've seen from doug ford's government or at least that's what <hes> that's what the polls are showing but in a province that's pretty much just faithfully conservative police police slingy of us all yes yeah do voters link sheer and kenny that closely like we'll kenny's policies reflect on potential share prime ministership and n._l. Berta maybe i mean it'll keep in mind what's in play in alberta so we have thirty four seats twenty nine of them are conservative for urwin liberal last year which was a high water mark for quite a while and one of them went in dp and those are all urban seats <hes> three in into in calgary and those are really the only seats that are in play in the rest of the province is reliably conservative. Nobody is really going take those two seriously as ones that could flip and because of that what kenny does won't really have any impact on sheer because the loyalties unflappable the support is not going to shift you know unless there's something really astonishing if andrew scheer suddenly behind closed doors making fun of burton's and and now she my skin is gonna rip up all pipeline plans then maybe people would lose faith in him in alberta but i don't really see that happening so much well in the places that are up for grabs them what issues are albertans voting on what could swing those writings one of the big things with two thousand fifteen is a watershed for intruder the liberals they hadn't won anything in this province in the harbor years. They hadn't won anything in calgary. Read the liberals since nineteen sixty eight wow then they picked up two seats a former minister khair downtown and a seat in the northeast in a in a in a writing with a lot of new canadians and they want to an eminent sort of in the same configuration downtown and a separate with a lot of new canadians in those areas the issues will be the same as in the other in the rest of the province pipelines and the economy the alberta alberta economy took a deep dive around twenty fifteen around the time of the last election and never really recovered and a lot of people people blame the whole pipeline carbon tax issue for that <hes> some of which is justified some of which is certainly played up by conservative politicians. Jason detractors just those policy. He's bought the pipeline <hes>. He bought the trans mountain pipeline but you know. I don't think he's gotten any much credit for that. People saying thanks justin trudeau. We're going to give you more years because you're saving our pipeline. That doesn't really count to play people in this province have decisively turned against justin trudeau and only in the most liberal areas where there are concerns about andrew scheer and support new canadian communities for the liberals over the conservatives. Do they have a hope. It's going to be a scrape for these seats for the liberals very much. My next question was going to be about the pipeline because again as a a casual observer from outside of the province. It doesn't seem like there's been a lot of movement since the liberals purchased it and presumably the point of purchasing it was to get moving and bring jobs to albert and and and keep albertans or at least a small pocket of albertson's <hes> approving of the liberals so what has happened well shortly after they purchased it in the spring of two thousand an eighteen they had the hard hat photo ops and people digging shovels and they were starting to do work on it then came the federal court of appeal ruling in favor of a number number of first nations communities n._b._c. saying that they didn't consult properly the same wrap that the conservatives had for northern gateway that wind up scuppering that pipeline plan so they've had to go back. Do more consultations get a new approval that happened in the spring just last week on on wednesday. The federal pipeline company announced that they're going to be moving forward on starting construction in september which means that there will likely maybe some photo ops a new hard hat for the liberal government more hard hats more shovels more smiles and in the last case eight invited the the provincial government then under rachel notley to don those hardhats with them. They were very eager to thinking that this was they were driving confidence. They were saying that look our compromises work with the liberals working <hes> they're on our side. They're moving forward and we're getting results. Jason kenney is not playing that game with things nor as much of the oil sector in part because they've been burned in the past. They know that if you don that headline that hard hat you can look pretty funny if in a few months later there's another court ruling right saying you didn't consult enough still go back to the drawing board or if there's a lot of people are expecting a lot of civil disobedience and activism to visit among indigenous activists and environmentalists trying to physically block some of the construction zones in british columbia and and the other factor of course is that jason kenney does not want to give a lot of credit any credit really to justin trudeau for things so what they're saying is. We're going to hold our celebration until the pipelines ashi completing oil flows nats <hes> twenty twenty two. What are the chances that shovels actually end up in the ground for real before the election and i don't mean i don't mean for a photo op. I mean work really starts and if so does that change anything <hes> about albertson's opinions minions of the liberals this announcement was that they're going to start hiring people and and they will be in a position to start work at various points in the pipeline route through d._c. And starting in alberta as of september so there will be actual won't be ground move but they'll be putting things in place they'll be getting doing some land clearing and whatnot they'll be photo ops for things that are not just announced but things that are actually going to be happening but that doesn't instill much confidence now because that puts the pipeline in the same place that it was in the middle of last year and then people saw what happened. There's a lot of skepticism skepticism concern <hes> any confidence is very reserved and you also still have jason kenny and a lot of people in the oil patch gotcha who are the advocacy ed keeping on kudo much more criticism not for what he did with trans mountain for what he's done with everything other everything else in terms of pipelines lines so people are in alberta and what the conservatives have tried to engineer in large part are much more likely to blame him for the things he's done that would limit future pipelines than what he's done on positively on the current pipeline. Is there any point and maybe this is a dumb question but is there any point or anything anything that the liberals could even try to do to reach out and court. Some of those voters or is the split deep enough that it's probably a a waste of campaign resources. They're going to devote some tauruses to albert and part of that is because you don't want to be seen as abandoning alberta right. There's already that myth out there and has been very aware of that ever since he started his leadership campaign back in. I think it was only thirteen for. I got elected. He was coming to calgary in alberta on a regular basis having covered harper all this time. We've never in recent years prime minister. Come this often too alberto. They've made a lot of investment safe right to say. We're not giving up upon you. We have your back. They're trying. Are they going to vote a ton of resources. Are they going to do anything serious to expand their footprint. No they'll try to keep the three empty seats. They half half if things look really bleak if they seem like they're really really hard up. They may shift resources out but liberal crowd a lot thinner than they were four years ago <unk> at upper events. Do we know how the general populace of alberta feels about climate change because this is one of the issues. That's come up repeatedly as we've. We've asked people in other provinces and asked pollsters about you know the top voting issues. Alberta is the province that believes at least in the immediacy of the climate change crisis in the country in terms of lack of faith in climate change science.

alberta jason kenney jason kenny justin trudeau andrew scheer calgary Berta prime minister jason audi Jason marcus albert Jason canada jordan heath liberal government doug ford
"alberta" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Takeout

"The electorate which by the way is an argument that not that many people in the Democratic Party would disagree with there or is a way to message that without tapping into these darkest most impulses of the electorate that the president seems so mechanically trained to do it so it's almost like in his sleep. It's his Goto. It's I don't I don't know if I think he just views it. As the highest percentage shot to use the basketball terminology it's just a slam dunk that he knows galvanizes his base of supporters. So in this final segment of the main program I want to just T- up something for Tim Alberta because we had a guest on the show not so long ago named Kevin McCarthy at the time he was the House majority leader at the time he was on the program <hes> the special guest we have this week Tim Alberta just published a story saying Paul Ryan then the speaker of the house was going to soon leave. I asked Kevin McCarthy about that very topic on this show show Sarah. You know what number sought play that now please Paul Ryan was on C._B._S.. This morning just today. This is Wednesday folks. You're gonNA hear this on Friday said he's not leaving Congress. He's not and that would mean. You're not going to be the next speaker that I'm very happy charity leader yes eh Paul's not leaving that was a speculative story based on people who had heard things or misheard things what because I know the reporter who didn't he is not an irresponsible is not as a really good reporter. Tim Alberta knows his stuff in today's world Israel. Being speakers are very tough job and I think everyone associates tax reform with Paul his whole career so they just they just not unreasonably yeah. They guess what we got it done. You should leave who who would put up with all the crap. You have to go through being speaker. Paul loves that job <hes> Okay Okay Yeah. There's nothing there Paul Ryan left months later and that story was dead on. I don't know if this is the sweet smell of validation or if it's just the chicken wings but thank you for sticking up for me defending my honor and now I know Kevin McCarthy couldn't come on this program and say well Yeah Oh yeah he's gone but he also tried to. I mean you you had the store you had a cold. It was going to leave and he did did leave and for all the reasons that are available to read in this book American carnage and I just want to because I reading that up ladies and gentlemen because we have to close out here this week Kevin McCarthy also as House Minority Norton leader said he wasn't quite sure if some of the accuracy of the reporting in the current book American-carnage I know because I saw Tim Alberta on another show say it's all on tape. I'm quite sure it is I'm just using that as an example to vouch for the accuracy and the depth of reporting involved in this book american-carnage Democrats have you with major this was a treat from me we go back and you are mentor of Mine in our National Journal days so I really appreciate you having me and I appreciate you defending my honor against Kevin McCarthy congratulations X._p.. Thanks man for more from this..

Paul Ryan Tim Alberta Kevin McCarthy Democratic Party president reporter National Journal Congress Sarah Israel
"alberta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"alberta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Thousand square feet in the jasper national park in alberta jasper right okay so i mean like the queen is she stayed there before apparently think is hilarious because who doesn't want honeymoon where you're graham has been real time any like one time my family went up to trout creek because my dad's like we went here as kids and then we got to the hotel we're this is haunted and we will die even my dad is like we are leaving at six in the morning home because this is this is the this is the exact same hold on and this is a nightmare to you why are you calling this one of your goods because listen we're all very thirsty to connect the royal couple is in any way shape or for are we i mean i think there's been like if you just google megan markle tronto a million interviews and by million i mean the same one where she's like canada's like my second home so i think there's that connection and also we love tourists marketing strategy so i mean that's it doesn't hurt to have canada under the spotlight for something ridiculous i understand what you mean i'm from newfoundland on north ever mentioned that before but i feel like they shut all the tourism commercials on the one nice day we had all of them we got one day in the middle of july to take this to convince people to go and better than i think everybody that i've ever met outside of canada's like don't you all live in cabins and it's like no rich people have kept what's your band okay so my bad is i can't another repeat topic talked about the sport to before while amazing i don't know if you've heard about this movie it's called solo solo you can't hear you yeah hey i was going to say like you know somebody's guitar seen on a whatever this is the new making jokes this is the new star wars movie based on the story of huntsville correct so here's what happened i made one hundred million dollars at the box office it was expected to make three hundred million dollars at the box office and long story short lucas in lucasville disney or freaking out issuing statements saying they're going to reassess their strategies they've like learned from this.

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"alberta" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"alberta" Discussed on WGTK

"On that and unfortunately there in the breeding cycle of breeding right now getting ready to go back into the ground and laid their eggs so you know we have lots and lots of people coming in to bat what is the perfect insecticide for use in on those while i'm glad you asked you know if you were smart enough earlier into the spring and on your roses maybe you're alberta spurs may the other different types of evergreens or flowers that you've had and you were smart enough to use which called from bonn add a systemic insecticides granviel and what that is early in the spring usually in march you pull the mulch back you sprinkle the grand y'all on top of the soil around the root system and the new march that back over than ever time that mother nature and god would water those for you or if your hand watering it would push a lot of that systemic ranyal down into the root system leaching the kimiko out of it and the plant is absorbing their back through the root system and hopefully to at that point you were used in the holly tone from a small ma armed sign up the holly tom but the rose tone and bay in conjunction with using those to the systemic insecticide will take care of any type of cheering sucking or boring insects and the rose tone we'll give you all the energy that you need to have dr green foliage and beautiful flyers on that now by backing up in thinking if you were smart enough to do that then you have beautiful roses you have to dark green coloration that would look for the multiple flyers that.

bonn alberta
"alberta" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"alberta" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"A few years later the university of alberta student and still just as awkward i would often head for quick swim on the grounds that the main fountain on canada day after watching the fireworks light up the city skyline with a few friends but of course none of my memories are really what this iconic building is all about someone who can tell us the real history of the building is will mitchell a programs assistant an interpreter for the l byrne a legislature so let him take it away and tell us the true story behind the buildings history the legislature itself is a building a belongs to everyone in alberta and retake it as sort of an important part of our show operation here that this is going to be a place where there's wash symbolism and our history gets sort of recognize the collected and celebrate so when we're going around what we're gonna be looking at or awad of features the building and and artifacts were here in it that schrafft's serve that purpose so actually i wasn't that far off the mark when i imagine that one day i would live at the legislature it is the building the belongs to the people of alberta after all jokes aside the building truly does tell the story of a province and here is were welcomes in again to let us know how it all began to begin was talk the building itself the building is constructed in what's called the beau arts style of architects.

schrafft alberta university of alberta canada awad beau arts one day