37 Burst results for "Albert Einstein"

Who was Einsteins first wife

Science Friction

05:13 min | 1 d ago

Who was Einsteins first wife

"Tashin. Mitchell here this week with a controversy that just will not be put to bed. What do you think Russia language of science? Form Language asked me are the narrowly and a fan figura. Can you guess who this is? How is it that fantastic difficult language if international think of wild wiry hair and dark penetrating is he's arguably one of the greatest original thinkers of all time and certainly in science in strive for. An outdoors. And clarity of. concepts. got. Their. Mutuel. Relation. Anti correspondent who sensory date it's L. Dan Stein yes. predicted the behavior of black holes and their immense gravitational pull through his general theory of relativity, which visualized gravity is warping of the fabric of the universe or space time around objects. But have you heard of a woman called Malaysia Malaysia Marriage Johnston to babies sauce she was his first wife and a promising scientist in the making in her own right when they met and fell in love. Now, there's been a vocal malivert fan club in recent years. It says she was fundamental to Albert's early scientific success, even a key collaborator on his theories and that her legacy was hidden. Will a brand new investigation strongly contests this climb and over the next two episodes I'm going to drilling into that evidence to let you decide buckle up. It matters just to know the truth I and Stein is portrayed as the great hero of Science and N Stein is seen as a god and you don't touch demand. For some people is just like attacking the the Cohen that the Bible, you don't touch those things. We try not to make up stories. And this story appears to be largely the hopeful story people hoped it was true they it was true but it doesn't seem to be true. She. Helped in a great. Measure. That Einstein became what he became. I. Have Serious doubts that he would have got where he is. If he did not have her supporters, he needed someone to discuss them. He needed someone to calculate them. Compare them. So she left us a genius that's her gift to the world. It's important that the truth be told when stories are based on very unreliable evidence. When you start to examine the sources, the stories just aren't hold out. And stories that matter. Mathematical abilities rivaled on stands that she co-authored on Stan's early research that they worked late into the not together blazing a trial for quantum physics. Malivert and our wits relationship really on the came to be understood at all in the nineteen eighty s when early letters between them were found in a family bank faulting California very little other material evidence remained then and physicist Dr. Pauline. Gang Gagnon believes they could a reason for that. Two people were really adamant that this story would not come out about manage. These were Helen Ducasse the personal secretary of Albert Einstein and these are two. Nedam. Both of them became, but they were the executors of his estate and these people were adamant that this story will not come. Polling is a particle physicist now retired in Germany she spent much of her career investigating dark matter at the European Laboratory, a of particle physics soon, and at Indiana University she's taken up. Malaya's 'cause and explains that even elbow full story was with health for a long time. The first biographies came out more than twenty years after the death of Albert Einstein the reason was that do not end for example, not allow anything in writing unless he would be righted himself. The everything that was in the possession of Albert Einstein was cleaned up it has to do with the fact that auto. Natan after the death of militia marriage. In. One, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, eight, or two thousand came to Zurich to her apartment. To search the apartment and probably took everything that he could fine of scientific merit. So these people made every effort to clean up what was there and to erase any trace of market right?

Albert Einstein Johnston Physicist Helen Ducasse Tashin. Mitchell N Stein L. Dan Stein Russia Zurich Natan Gang Gagnon Cohen Stan Malaya Malivert Scientist Indiana University Germany Secretary
Fresh "Albert Einstein" from Q and A

Q and A

00:35 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh "Albert Einstein" from Q and A

"Wallace still wanted to stay in the job. Jimmy Byrne, who had been a former senator and Supreme Court justice, who was now heading the office of War Mobilization for roles about hey, was a possibility. In fact, Truman was going to go to Chicago and nominate Jimmy Byrne. Alban Barkley was another possibility, and the Democratic Party leaders made the calculation. Not that Truman was so well qualified for the job, but that he would work hurt the ticket. The lead He's only 2% of a Gallup poll supported Truman. But they thought, you know he wouldn't do any damage. So that was that was that and he came to Chicago and did not want to pay the vice president. And they finally hooked up a call in a Chicago hotel room s O that Truman. They called him in, and he could over here. The Democratic Party chair Hannigan talking to rose about who was in San Diego at the time, and it was all set up and Roosevelt said, Well, have you got Not that Missouri senator to sign on, and Hannigan said No, he is the contrary. It's Missouri Mule I've ever met and rose out, said Well, if he wants to break up the Democratic Party and see my presidency in the middle of World War two anyway, they put Roosevelt on the phone and the protests didn't resisted for a little bit And finally side of the commander in chief wants me to do it. I'll do it, so he was on the ticket. They get elected there. Inaugurated in January, January 2040. Five and Roosevelt completely forgets about Truman was vice president for 82 days. He had met with Roosevelt in private twice and those 82 days and as you point out, he is sworn in as president about 6 15 6 30 on April 12th and he trusted the covenant tells him I want you all to stay on. They all leave and the Secretary of War, Henry Stimson, says, Mr President, I need to talk to you takes him into a private room and says, I need to tell you About an immense project to develop Ah, weapon of indescribable power. That was literally he'd been vice president, as I say, for almost three months. That was literally the first inkling that Truman had about the existence of the Manhattan project to develop the atom bomb. Roosevelt had never shared it with. So were do we know if any senior members of Congress had been briefed on the project? No. No members know members of Congress had been briefed on the prize. How interesting thing Truman was keyed into all about. It's possible. He was the head of something called the Truman Committee, which was specifically involved and authorized to look into defense spending. And at one point he had been poking around about an installation in Washington state, which in fact was part of the Manhattan project. And when Stinson the secretary of war, got word about this, I think Eh? Three or four. He calls up Truman and says, Listen, Senator, I know all about that project and you know, I just want you to know it's okay and Truman completely backed off and said, if you know if that's what you say, Mr Secretary, I take your word for it. And that was one of the things Truman was astonished by because Congress had appropriated $2 billion in the previous two years, but it had been all secret and Woman couldn't understand. All that kind of money could have been turned over from Congress to the administration, and they didn't know what they were spending little. Where did the Manhattan Project at its name? Well, Ah, lot of the scientists were in Manhattan at the time. The basic history is that in 1939 let me back up just a little bit. So you have a number of Jewish German refugees who leave Germany, A skipper rises to power and they understood that a CZ Jews that they weren't long for this world and they go to England. Or they go to the United States on that includes Albert Einstein, and there is an increasing fear as we get to the late thirties that Germany which still has a lot of brilliant scientists may develop a nuclear weapon, an atom bomb and the last thing any of these scientists what is tohave Hitler? Have access to the on ly atom bomb in the world. So in 1939 Albert Einstein writes a letter to FDR and basically says, You know, we think this technology is out there and the U. S. A free world needs it to develop before Hitler and the Nazis do. Roosevelt kind of sets you on it until 1942. When shirt show on. There were some of these scientists who were in in Britain says Rose about, you know, we really need to get going on it. And in 1942 he starts the Manhattan project. As I say. A lot of the scientists were in Manhattan in one of the things that happens is they assign a major general named Leslie Groves to start putting this together and grows realize you can't have all these fine is all With the country. You've got to put them all together on DH. That's the really beginning in the Manhattan project, and you see three major installations. Oh Bridge in Tennessee, which ends up becoming and a regiment uranium enrichment site. Same thing for Hanford, Washington and then the really brainpower. About 8000 scientists and technicians on engineers at Los Alamos in kind of a very Hurted area of of New Mexico, where Robert Oppenheimer, the scientific director of the project, had spent some of his time growing up is a kid and he convinced Groves. Let's put the really laboratory there on C SPAN radio. This is Q and day. Our guest this week is Fox News anchor Chris Wallace on his new book Countdown. 1945. Can you tell me a little bit more about Robert Oppenheimer's 40 years old at the time? What did he bring? The table for this project. Absolute brilliance. He was ah, brilliant, theoretical physicist, astonishingly intelligent brain power. He knew six languages. He he learns the sand script so we could read a Hindu devotional upon the bag. Abad Guica, which later comes into the story on DH, you know ones were the instinct thing he was seen as You know something about from Adana as a lot of the scientists were, But Groves decides he's the right man for the project. And it was this fascinating combination of groves. Who was this six foot, £250 bulldozer of a guy who in 1941 and two and about a year and 1/2 built the Pentagon on and you know, which is the biggest office building in the world. And, you know, just Massive project and built it right on time. And so the government decides and Roosevelt decides he's the right guy to do this massive project and that he then recruits Oppenheimer to do it. And so you have the military push and drive and discipline of groves. And then you have the sheer scientific brilliance of Oppenheimer, who was the scientific director of the program, And I think Oppenheimer really is the key figure here because on the one hand And you had grows demanding military discipline and security and deadlines, and a lot of the scientists were were bucking out of office. And somehow Oppenheimer kind of had to keep the scientists on board while on the other hand, trying to meet the deadlines that the growth was setting, and Rose was not Marie was not for a patient. He called the 8000 scientists and Los Alamos a bunch of prima donnas and said that he was He was conducting a giant opera. So it was a kind of clash of temperaments and wills. But somehow it worked. I was struck by the quote you had of Oppenheimer's reaction on the news of his death. The quote was Roosevelt was a great architect. Perhaps Truman will be a very good carpenter was Truman knew absolutely nothing about the Manhattan project. The scientists knew nothing about Frumin. You know they had been working, not hand in glove, because obviously that there was some separation and Roosevelt have a lot of other things on his plate. But they knew they were working very much of the direction of the president and that he had taken a keen personal interest in starting and funding and keeping the Manhattan project going, And now suddenly he's gone..

Truman Manhattan Roosevelt Robert Oppenheimer Leslie Groves Truman Committee Vice President Congress Chicago Democratic Party Chris Wallace President Trump Jimmy Byrne Senator Secretary Alban Barkley Los Alamos Supreme Court Rose
Where did they go

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:23 min | 5 d ago

Where did they go

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host kid chrome by popular demand I'm revisiting the issue of vanishing 's. Where did they go the roanoke colonists Amelia. EARHART would a Percy Fawcett vanishing in search for the city of Z. can anything truly vanished in this world, the great vanishing people and things Amelia. EARHART disappeared over the Pacific. There's no doubt that she crash landed or ditched her plane. And of course the question remains why she captured by the Japanese did she and and. Her navigator starved to death on a remote island, but she didn't vanish in the true sense of the word, the question simply what happened to her. In contrast, we have the vanishing of flight nineteen, a group of maybe bombers disappeared during postwar training mission. Now they vanished. No oil slicks no wreckage. The five planes it made up the nineteen. None were ever recovered no trace. A search team dispatched to look for them disappeared, but there was an oil slick in wreckage in. In an explosion was noted the five TM's vanished. The rescue team disappeared by ask a question again. Can anything actually vanished from this world? Let's look again. The Franklin expedition that set sail in eighteen, forty, five with two ships in search of the northwest passage. Now there's an incident that disappeared in the Arctic and were considered lost for two hundred years, perhaps vanished, but the two ships, nearly forty crew, simply vanishing was considered a big mystery, almost as big as Amelia earhart recently. Recently, both ships were discovered as well as many of the graves of the crew yet in the eighteen eighties. We have a bride and groom riding in a wagon. The ten miles from bake of Oregon across follow simply vanish. Their progress has been monitored, and when they didn't arrive at the ranch across hollow where they were to wed a month long search was put on an and not a trace was found not of the horses, the wagon or the bride and groom. That I. my point is that people and things do vanish, but do they vanish from this world. The question is addressed by Professor Vincent Pool he stays did Albert Einstein that there are multiple dimensions, but professor pool believes that there are not only many dimensions, but I in there every evolution they are similar to Earth and they are connected to our dimension by what he calls umbilical connections, and that an individual can easily pass through one of these umbilical connections and seemingly vanish. He also spouses a theory that the reason that we have no contact with you. Outside of our atmospheres of flying saucers or flying unidentified flying objects come from another dimension Professor Pool Sites Fifteenth, century issue between Spanish conquistadors and a priest in ancient village of Crisco, where a priest racing ahead of the Spanish invasion took a gold disc from a church, and ran into the Higher Markelle mountains for upon he met to Shaman who took the disc impressed into rock face that opened the door to another dimension. Sounds like a nice story, right? Yet. There is a place in the higher mountains were stone face has been etched, and a small seemingly pressed into stone at the center of that small door. There is a indentation that circular. That is the same size as the disc taken by the priest when he fled the Spanish. Pool claims this represents the. Into another dimension, so do people and things vanish before you scoff at the idea. Take a trip to Peru. The high remark mountains and try to explain the small door the disc indentation. They're gonNA. Decide and if you can't make the trip, we'll google it up. It's an interesting part of the issue of can things vanish

Amelia Professor Vincent Pool Earhart Amelia Earhart Higher Markelle Mountains Percy Fawcett Google Roanoke Oregon Professor Pacific Peru Arctic Albert Einstein
Fresh update on "albert einstein" discussed on  Killer Innovations

Killer Innovations

01:23 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "albert einstein" discussed on Killer Innovations

"So how do you apply those? How do you make it happen? Step one in box. Think is to define the problem too far in the challenge statement, and I'll cover this a little bit later in today's show. I've covered it many times before. And I always thought I was. I love the Albert Einstein quote. Which says, you know, someone challenged Albert Einstein to say if you had one hour to save the world, what would you do? And Albert Einstein says I had one hour to save the world. I would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and then I spend five minutes solving it. We don't spend enough time identifying and really understanding the problem. So before you think about even running your radiation session defined the problem to find the challenge statement. And I've got a just a quick or Rio that you know, later later in this segment, so stay tuned for that. And the other is that you have to think about the identifying the industry and company organizational constraints. You have constraints. We all have constraints that we have to operate on. And then once you've identified those constraints, then you you're out of the box thinking is select a subset of those constraints. Assume the opposite were true and then and then enhancer problem statement. You know, add on to the end of the problems statement some out or some view of constraints that challenges the people during the ideation session. To then work on the problem differently, just like it inside the box. Select a subset of the constraints and enhancing so the box take the current constraints. Flip them to save the opposite were true. And hand that to the team inside the box thinking, select the constraints and use it appropriately. So what do I mean by constraints? You look a. You know, some of the constraints we've had to operate on Look, so 1998 you know, we were all told, don't get into stranger's cars and Don't meet people from the Internet. Right? 2016 2020. Literally. We summon strangers from the Internet to our house and get in the car. So what used to be a constraint of Don't talk to strangers. Don't get the stranger's cars. Now we do it all the time with uber and lived in those types of things. So you have to understand the constraints you operate on. And then be able to willing to change challenge those for out of the box thinking or live within them within the box thinking so the questions you ask yourself is is under what assumptions or constraint? Does our industry operate under What assumptions or constraints does our industry operate under industries operate? In in some form of structure. At the same time, Ask yourself what are the assumptions of constraints under which your company or your organization operates under? What is the constraints that your company operates under? And when you think about that, under what assumptions traces your interest is your organization operate under or the industry operate under that gives you a long list gives you a lot of things to consider. You can't consider all of the constraints. But you have to consider the ones that you may think are more meaningful. So what does that mean? Well, when you think about out of the box or challenge constraints You got challenged them. You gotta be willing to take a look at them. So take a look at that entire long list of constraints for industry and organisation and ask yourself what if the office that were true? Or what if that constraint isn't true at all? Or what if the barrier didn't exist anymore, And this is what you want to take a look at it when you're signing. Are you doing running a session or sending a team to be thinking about Out of the box part of the box thinking. You want to take those constraints, identify them and then challenge yourself to say. Well, if they don't apply if they didn't they were true if that Barry doesn't exist anymore. What ideas could we come up with? And you want to kind of find a wayto weave that into the problem statement? If you're doing inside the box constraints, then constraints are working. Strange should be considered right. So, for instance, you may have to put a constraint into the problem statement. We need to come to the new product aimed it. Creating a new game for Children that are 5 to 7 years old. Um, that is does not require. You know, a computing devise in the constraint is we have to have it ready for the 2021 Christmas season. That's a constraint. That's a timing constraints. You gotta have it done. Because that's the way your industry operates. 80% of your revenue comes in the holiday season. That's a constraint. You add that constraint and therefore that becomes a push for them. That team inside the box thinking is coming up with something that has to satisfy that constraint. And then ask yourself what the trade isn't through it. All right. For example, some of the unwritten rules every organization has unwritten rules, right? Some of rules just been around, so we've always done it that way. Well, sometimes they don't apply. And sometimes you got to be willing, you know, to challenge those right? So inside the box constraints. So now what is step to you? Now that you've got your this problem statement you've defined The out of the box and inside the box. You've taken the starting problems, statement. You've either added or given permission by adding text to the problem state but to make it clear to your team. Right that, you know, we you know, in the case of inside the box, you gotta have this product done because our industry makes 70% of our revenue. The Christmas.

Albert Einstein Barry
Train Your Brain To Find Opportunities During A Crisis

The Model Health Show

04:54 min | Last week

Train Your Brain To Find Opportunities During A Crisis

"Welcome to the Mater Hell, show this fitness nutrition expert, Shawn Stevenson and I'm so grateful to you today. We've got a very popular episode nine up today with him. Talking about how we can make the most of the situation that we find our society and right now you know with twenty twenty. It seems like twenty twenty came along and through our lives into a blender, but today we're GonNa talk about how we can make it into a delicious smoothie. You know what I mean and right now here in the state of California that just moved to. We haven't even been here full year yet. Society is re shut down there and just shut it down, opened it little bit open the crack and they shut it back down and right now for the upcoming semester children are you back to school we've got millions of people who are unemployed. Countless businesses are closed and this is a very trying time and I truly want everybody to understand that we have not seen the fallout. Fallout yet. The true fallout and I WANNA help to make sure that as many people as possible are in a position to overcome this, because our mental health is going to be stressed, our financial health physical health are relationships, but we can come out better Albert Einstein said that in the middle of every difficulty lies opportunity, and we have to shift our mindset to that, though because when things are going bad, we're faced with. especially uncertainty, we tend to go to the dark side. Are This is how? An CONSI- Walker you know went down the wrong path it was it was presented with You know those those trying times and trying opportunities you know so shout out to Darth vader shadow to space balls IRA out. They get credit. one of the greatest movie parodies of all time all right instead of Chewbacca, the wookey. They had BARF play by John. Candy. Alright a big shot to them. But again in the middle of every difficulty lies opportunity. We have to shift our mindset there and this has been a trying time for many. But I believe that we are strong I believe that we are capable and I believe that this is a time in history that is offering a great reset. It's offering an opportunity for humanity elevate. It makes me think of you know the original Nintendo the original Nintendo. The game console itself had two buttons. One was a power button in one was a reset button. First of all, why don't if I want to reset? Push the power button often. Turn it back on again. They're like no. You're going to need this reset button. The reset says. I'm playing the game. Maybe I made a mistake maybe i. was exposed to clinch. May. Be I WANNA do something different, but the reset says I'm going to keep playing. is going to tap this real. Quick I'm GONNA keep playing. And I think their life right now is a big reset button that is getting pushed whether we like it or not, and so we need to embrace it because it's happening, you know fighting against what is is what leads to allow to suffering. But the thing is we don't have to. We don't have to be content about it. We need to accept it realize what's happening. Realize what is and then put in place an intelligent. Plan of action which starts from the inside. Truly, all changes in inside game and really getting our mindset right and taking control of our own personal. Economy inside of our minds are personal health and wellness inside of our minds, so we can take that and spread that out to our family and our communities so very excited about this episode in as I mentioned. This is my first full summer here in California I grew up the Mid West S. T.. L.! Right in here in California is, it's amazing. The consistency in the weather, but something that I've noticed is very different from the Midwest Summers. Is that here in California you got the heat he might be to say is nine hundred ninety five outside. And If, there's a piece of shea going. Get into the shade in this cooler cycle is nice shadier. In Saint, Louis, it doesn't work that way. Would you say if it's ninety ninety five and Saint Louis? And you see a little piece of shade going. Get some of their shade, but. He's like what do you think you're going? We have this little extended arm, cold humidity, and it'll grab your by your collar. I make your holiday dollar humidity. It doesn't feel good. You know so. It's like I've got a true experience now of going into the shade and me like Oh. This is nice, nice shade. But Saint Louis doesn't work that way shot to all my friends and family in Saint Louis, everybody listening in Saint Louis I love you guys so much.

Saint Louis California Twenty Twenty Shawn Stevenson Albert Einstein Nintendo Darth Vader IRA Midwest Summers John Shea
Time

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Time

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries. I'm your host Kit Crumb. I'm continuing my investigation into the concepts of time travel yesterday. I mentioned three resources. Final countdown. A movie where you can watch. Martin Sheet explained the grandfather paradox of time to Kirk Douglas. Kind of a fun movie came out in the eighties and Christopher Reeves in his movie somewhere in time takes it to a mental intellectual level kind of away from what physicists would like to think when they think of time travel and of course. There's the book by She. Wells time travel Idea that you could just go to the future. Go to the pass by pulling a switch on a machine. One of the things that happened yesterday was I mentioned the grandfather paradox of time and I gave you a place to watch Martin. She talk about this. I got a lot of emails saying why. Don't you explain it? So here goes this kind of scattered a little bit but give you an idea. Besides a physical problem time travel may also come with some unique situations a classic example. Is the grandfather paradox. Which time travel? It goes back and kills his parents or his grandfather. The major plot line terminator movies interferes in their relationship. Now think back to the future so that he has never born or as life is forever altered. That's back to future if that were to happen. Some physicists say you would not be born in one parallel universe but still born and another others say that the photons it makeup light prefer self consistency and time lies which would interfere with your evil suicidal plan. Some scientists disagree with the options mentioned above. And say time travel is impossible no matter what. Your method. The faster than light. One in particular drew derision from American Museum of Natural History astrophysicist Charles Lou that simply mathematically doesn't work you said also humans may not be able to withstand time travel at all. And that's what we're lucky nap today. Several theories time travel traveling. Nearly the speed of light would be necessary and take some kind of centrifuge. But that would be lethal. So let's go back to the beginning and say what is time while most people think of time as a constant physicist Albert Einstein showed a time is an illusion it is relative it can vary for different observers depending on your speed through space to Einstein. Time is the fourth dimension space is described as a three dimensional. Orito and we know that we have up and down forward and back left and right those who are dimensions but he talks about a fourth dimension which provides traveler with coordinates such as length width and height showing location. And then that fourth dimension provides another coordinate or direction although conventionally it only moves forward. Einstein's theory of special relativity says time slows down or speeds up depending on how fast you move relative to something else approaching the speed of light. A person inside a spaceship would age much slower than his twin at home. Also under Einstein's theory of general relativity gravity can ban time picture a four dimensional fabric. Call Space Time. When anything that has mass sits on that piece of fabric it causes a dimple or bending of space time. Let's stop and talk about this fourth dimension for a moment if you look into a Koi pond and you see the fish and they have is on either side of their head they are two dimensional creature stay left and right and they can move forward and back. There is nothing about them. There is no third dimension so if I grabbed one of the Koi and lifted about of a pond that would introduce the Koi to a third dimension so what Einstein in his speaking of this fourth dimension or call what he calls Space Time. That is something that is above us. It is literally another dimension so there you have the idea of Space Time. What that is that is that fourth dimension that's above us like the third dimension this above a Koi pond for example objects move on a curved path in that curvature of space is what we know as gravity both general and special relativity theories have been proven with GPS Satellite Technology. That has very accurate time. Pieces on board the effects of gravity as well as satellites increase speed above the earth relative to observers on the ground. Make at the UN adjustable clocks gained thirty eight microseconds a day in a sense. This effect called time. Dilation means astronauts are time travelers as they returned to earth very very slightly younger than they're identical twins that remain on the planet. One possibility could be to go faster than light which travels at one hundred and eighty six thousand two hundred and eighty two miles per second. That would be a vacuum Einstein's equations though show that an object at the speed of light would have both infinite mass and a zero of length. Go figure that s beyond me.

Albert Einstein Kit Crumb Martin Sheet UN Kirk Douglas American Museum Of Natural His Christopher Reeves Orito Physicist Charles Lou
"albert einstein" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

10:31 min | 3 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"Moral. She watches a lot of her films on net flex anyway. Einstein's is. Einstein anticipated that he would win the Nobel Prize and so he promised that to his then wife if she would agree to grant him a divorce. That award ended up being about thirty two thousand dollars which was more than ten times the annual salary of the average professor at that time so she made out. Okay he really wanted to divorce her so he could marry his first cousin. Okay that sounds familiar. Yeah the Second Mrs Einstein was Elsa Her last name was also Einstein all that saved on monogrammed and address labels absolutely a few days. After the first president of Israel died in nineteen fifty two Einstein was asked if he would accept the position of being the second president of Israel. He was seventy three at the time and he declined the offer stating that. He lacked the natural aptitude and experience to deal properly with people. It's kind of like what Oprah said when they were trying to push her run for president you remember that she goes now. That's just not my makeup. I I know what my limitations are. I kind of always refer back to that quote. I wouldn't want to be a member of any club that would have me. I always think that the kind of people who want to be president oftentimes aren't necessarily the people who'd be best at being president and it's often the case that was was that Groucho Marx. Sounds like Groucho doesn't it? Yeah so part of Einstein's charm was his disheveled. Look he had that crazy uncombed hair and another one of the fun little quirks about him was that he never wore socks really. Yeah he said that he were. They were a pain because they often got holes in them. So why wear them at all? So he was thinking in a whole different level he was on a whole different level. Anyway he has kicked it. It's nineteen fifty fifty five and we're at Princeton Hospital and Thomas Harvey. Who was a pathologist of that hospital? Decided he was going to go ahead with an autopsy. Einstein had pretty specific instructions for him. His remains cremate them and scattered them secretly so that people couldn't like come and worship at his grave. He was very concerned about what he called. Idolators he didn't want that it was just. I'm not here anymore. Let's all move on That's admirable Thomas. Harvey did not have permission to perform this autopsy. Nor did he have the legal right to remove and keep the brain? Yeah this is weird so when it came to light a little bit later that he had in fact performed an autopsy and snatched brain rate out of Einstein's head. He had to go to Einstein's son Hans Albert and kind of get a retroactive blessing. Which his son I guess gave with some has I mean what are you GonNa do now. It's already been done. He wasn't thrilled about it but he did have some stipulations that any investigations would be conducted solely in the interest of science and that the results if any of interest would be published in reputable scientific journals so Harvey Preserved Einstein's brain in in. Let's keep in mind that Thomas Harvey was not a brain specialist wanting to scrape it out like it was like a watermelon rind. Something like that so he was. I mean he was a doctor. But he didn't have special brain knowingness knowing knees. He wasn't a big brain guy man. He just didn't have the expertise to undertake the studies that he had proposed to Albert Einstein. Son It was kind of Shitty while he was in there. He also removed Einstein's eyeballs which he then gifted to Einstein's doctor Henry Abrams within months of this autopsy Harvey was dismissed from Princeton Hospital for refusing to surrender this specimen after he lost his job. He took the brain to Philadelphia Hospital. Where a technician section did into over two hundred blocks and embedded the pieces using a variety of methods. Harvey gave some of the pieces to Harry Zimmerman. Who was his like mentor? I guess and then he placed the remainder into jars which he stored in the basement of his home in Princeton. So Einstein's brain spent some time in a university of Pennsylvania lab in jars in Harvey's basement and when Harvey moved to the Midwest for a period he his brain bits lived a cider box stashed under a beer cooler according to ABC News. This guy moved around a bunch like six times and every time he took the brain pieces with them Even after he lost his medical license he just kept lugging around these brain bits. Please tell me that they didn't end up in a yard sale. No they did not In the early nineteen ninety s harvey returned to Princeton in Nineteen ninety-seven. He embarked on a cross country road trip with a freelance magazine. Writer named Michael Pattern. Eighty Harvey wanted to meet Einstein's granddaughter in California and so they took this track together. The writer was eager to write about this weird shit that was going down and do. Einstein's granddaughter know that some Rando is going to show up with peux PAS brain unclear They just packed it. In the trunk of Harvey's Buick Skylark and made their way across the country. While Harvey had toyed with the idea of giving the brain parts to the granddaughter He even accidentally left it there for a period of time but he went back and got it because she didn't want it it wasn't until one thousand nine hundred five. That harvey was contacted by a Berkeley researcher. And she'd read about the brain and the guy that had it and thought. Okay here's an opportunity for me to do some work and this might be a good boost for the study that I wanna do because if I can do a study involving Albert Einstein's brain that's going to be much more interesting story than Study involving anyone else's brain right for sure pretty much anyone in history so she was conducting experiments that involved brains that had access to stimulating environments So she was using rats. And if you had like a very sterile environment versus if you had a very interactive exciting environment. What how your brains would react and Basically it didn't work out great. Her tests were flawed They were slammed for irregularities and the preparation techniques weren't great plus. Her reporting was great so she had something like twenty six pieces of the brain that she was working with and then only reported the results of four that she had involved in the study. So that shows that I mean she basically left out the pieces of brain. That didn't behave the way that she wanted to very selective. Yeah so Dr Harvey had. What's left this brain? And he was looking for people to do studies on it but he was also very protective of it. He wanted it to be used for very specific purposes but also didn't want to give it away. It was just very weird relationship and so after many many years harvey eventually donated the remainder of Einstein's brain to the pathology department at Princeton Hospital which is probably where it should have been the entire time. Entire time. the parts of it. That didn't make it there where the parts that had already been lent out for that scientific study and pieces that you can see at the motor museum. There Twenty microns thick and stained with crystal violet their preserved in glass slides on display That he did donate before donating the rest back to the Princeton Hospital. I don't remember seeing that. I don't remember seeing that at the motor. Either to be fair. There was a lot going on in that museum and it would have been very easy to overlook which overlooking Einstein's brain. What but there was a lot going on there. Some of which made me a little sick to my Tom. Tom And finally Einstein's eyeballs are kept in a safety deposit box in New York City to this day. Word is that Occasionally there's discussion of them going up for auction but they live in. Is it legal to sell body parts? Not sure not sure mean. That's a gray area. Maybe gray matters how you wanted to go with them anyway. Einstein's eyeballs. Which in this here. I wrote Einstein's edge balls which a whole different thing. Yeah well at least the they're being kept safely in a safe deposit box as opposed to hanging from somebody's rear view mirror right or in a cigar box under someone schooler in a basement. So that's the remarkable travels of Einstein's brain the end I just can't help but think that if Einstein was like you know in heaven looking down on what was going on like in the late eighties. Early nineties thinking really a Buick. Skylark eight the west coast. Thanks for hanging out with us. You beautiful freak. We we really appreciate you taking the time out of your week to spend a little bit of us. Look forward to hanging out with your next time. Keep lying that freak flag fly it proudly beautiful and so let it be known that the box of oddities.

Albert Einstein Thomas Harvey Princeton Hospital Harvey Dr Harvey president Nobel Prize Princeton Israel Writer Buick Groucho Marx professor Oprah Philadelphia Hospital Idolators ABC News Hans Albert Midwest university of Pennsylvania
"albert einstein" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

06:37 min | 3 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"Oddities. Do not dead me thank you yeah. I work hard not to bid. Wouldn't see you work real hard. No that's true. I'm glad you're not dead too though. We had a bit of an incident here so of course everything's weird right now. There's a lot going on. There's the quarantine or the stay at home order. I should say We've been we've been here for three and a half weeks. I think something like that and of course. There's the the corona virus the the Cova did and then we had a freak snowstorm mid April dumped lake ten to twelve inches of snow on us. We lost our power for a day. It was real traumatic into minor earthquakes and two minute earthquakes here in the state of Maine. That's right the apocalypse so the kind of running joke is what's next locusts. So yesterday we had a wind storm. the brought down a giant tree directly next to our house that fell in between two other trees snapped in half half of the tree glanced off our house demolished. My Compost Bin and I was standing at the bathroom window. Probably ten feet from where the tree landed. Just fresh out the shower head. Get BACK IN THE SHOWER. He were standing there in the noodle. Yeah I was in. The noodle was very scary very scary and I was. I may have screeched out a little bit. And you're like what the Hell's going on and I came thundering into the bathroom and said Oh you're in the noodle and totally forgot why came in there but yeah it was a huge ancient oak. I mean the thing was probably ninety feet high a big old tree and it just came right down and Part of it hit our house and I notice today that there's another tree that blew over but it's hung up in some other trees just hanging over our house waiting so we have. We have that to look forward to. Hopefully we can get through these difficult times together though no real damage to the house though just scary risks. Really lucky that it didn't come through one of our window. We have much to be grateful for indeed Sir indeed. My List for today is not being decapitated by a falling tree that Buddha bowl that I made that Lebanon dressing. That was good. We also there was a tick in our house today. I saw the first ticket the season since the end of civilization as we know it. So I'M GONNA distract us from all of this hoop La with a story. According to Legend in seventy CE ROMAN EMPEROR TITUS ordered the city of Jerusalem sacked. He had his soldiers confiscate the two pillars from Solomon's Temple the Masonic Yaqeen and Boas and bring them to Rome now. According to the Bible Boas and yeah keen were the two pillars which stood on the porch of Solomon's Temple which was the first temple in Jerusalem. There are sometimes used as symbols in freemasonry and also the Tarot also. My sister had a chocolate lab named. Beau as they probably were not support structures. They were probably free. Standing based on similar pillars found in a nearby temples at at the time Emperor Titus had these according to legend pillars removed from Jerusalem and brought back to Rome and winning Rome. They were installed as the pillars of a Pagan Temple. And that temple was destroyed centuries later by the Christians But these two pillars remained standing so Christians built a church on the spot where the pillars were still intact. I love this repurposing. It's great the church however collapsed in an earthquake in the late eighteenth century so the pillars were then cut up on the orders of Sebastiano. Marchetto THE PATRIARCH OF PIANO. Making family and some of the would he made into a piano. How it's called the Sienna Piano Forte. More specifically the soundboard in the piano. They used wood from these pillars. Kind of like we were thinking that we would use some of the wood from this downed tree right. Make some sort of like commemorative shelf so Sabatino drew up the designs for the piano. This is according to Atlas Obscure and Wikipedia. He drew up the designs for the piano and started on it but died before he could finish. His son took up the task but then he died before he could finish it. Sabatino's grandson took over the task but like father couldn't devote as much time to his time to it as he would've liked and he died before finishing the project finally his son. Sabatino's great grandson. Nicodemo ferry finished the piano while his cousin Carlos Bartolozzi carve the outside with beautiful intricate work. The finished piano was considered the pride of. What is this like two hundred years later like a hundred years later? What is this one hundred years later about? Twenty five years and that twenty four. Pm Pumping amount was great grandson. His great grandson. Yeah they're not. Pno's you mean children. Yeah yeah that's it well. I said he was pretty elderly and his son was pretty elderly. I guess I mean. It's mathematically possible the piano forte. It's also called the immortal piano and the harp of King David. It's it's timber is similar to both piano and Harpsichord. It's kind of like a combination of the two things and also do to the legend that it was partially built from wood that came from the pillars of the Temple of Solomon. It's considered the spiritual descendant of the Harp of David. Most critics say it's best for playing works of art like Mozart. After his grandson put the finishing touches on the instrument he then gave it to his sister. Rebecca who lived further south in Sienna there. The Piano became something of a local attraction and was regularly played in public performances. It was favored for its unique sound. And you want to hear what it sounds like. Yes please.

Sabatino Jerusalem Rome King David Temple of Solomon Solomon's Temple Maine Solomon's Temple the Masonic Y Pagan Temple Emperor Titus Cova Lebanon Sienna Sebastiano Beau Nicodemo ferry Rebecca Pno Carlos Bartolozzi
What's in Lisa's Amazon Cart

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

07:41 min | 3 months ago

What's in Lisa's Amazon Cart

"We're GONNA jump right in now and start because we have a lot of products and then we have that crazy interview so rather than take up the entire day for people by the way. I don't know what else to do where to jump in and start talking about products. I wanted to start by mentioning a beauty product that I think is very relevant right now because I keep hearing from everyone that they're Harris so grey and they don't know what to do and I always joke like if I don't get my hair color on a month that I Albert Einstein so it's like wishful thinking actually Bam Bam looks exactly like Albert Einstein. But she does not use this product. I do this is a product that I highly recommend to anyone that has any kind of routes that they had issues with. And it's something called. Wow or color while I just call it. Wow powder that's like my shorthand name for it and it looks like this like it almost looks like it would be like some kind of makeup like a plush or something and it comes in a little black case and it comes with a little brush and you could just touch up your roots and it really works so guys. I know you can't eat this but if you're out there and you're wondering why your hair's not looking as good as it did a month and a half ago this color. Wow is the answer to all of your needs honestly. You're wearing a hat today. Did you not put on your color while I did? Not if I took my hat off I would for writing you. We'll be putting my collar. Wow on later before I agree. My facebook live all right all right but now we'll get back to the food. So let's jump into the snack category because I don't know I find myself snacking throughout the day. More eating fewer like big meals and more snacky type things. I don't know if you guys are doing the same thing. I'm totally doing that. Mike is very snacky the other day he came into the Kitchen. And he's just like. I need carrots yesterday. At least see snacking healthy. Good for you. Did you put peanut butter on an even think about that. Wow what is wrong with me? You know what it is is. I think. Peanut butter a peanut butter as a as like dessert. And putting on carrots takes a desert out of it so I have Hamas that I got yesterday that I'm GonNa probably my carrots into. Yeah My love. Carrots in homeless But this one snack that I have to tell you it shocked me. But it wasn't until the corn that I really discovered it and I think it was because early on when I was still going to stores I went to this market that I loved And it had this there and then I realized that on Amazon and then it just changed my life. But Brad's I don't know if you know Brad's a lot of people out. There probably are familiar with breads. I if there is a Brad. He makes a lot of great crunchy kind of vegetable items. He makes chips and Dried fruit and he makes this stuff called. Brad's Crunchy Kale. And it comes in all these different flavors added. These are absolutely the best option if you like Kale and you don't want to make your own Kale chips but you still want them to be healthy. I think Brad's is basically the only option lease. It's the only option for me because serving only has eighty calories. There's two servings bags so even if you accidentally eat the whole bag which is exactly what I do. Eat the whole bag and I always do the math. Like if you get a bag of something. Don't you always the math to find out what's going to happen if you ate the whole bag? So smart That's what I do like. Everybody you guys probably do. 'cause you're hungry Earl Campbell? We do because you. I feel like Oh this is such a you know. There's so many food fakers out there when you go. And there's like three and a half servings and their one hundred ninety calories and fourteen grams of fat this is a real find. It really is and the flavors are amazing. My favorites are Nacho and cheese. It up and they're just like cheesy flavorful crunchy but not greasy and the bag is a good size to serving. So it's not like an eight serving bag where you're going to accidentally eat eight servings and then feel sick afterwards. One of those is up but I think the cheese might actually be Vegan. That sound right. Oh yes there's a big giant V on the bag that I'm holding now isn't that doesn't stand for very good at Stanford. Yes no wonder why Lord these are disappearing and now I know why are you know Lawrence been eating them highly recommend and they have by the way two to three smart points. Serving not bad. Have you tried the vampire killer? One is it's super hot or is it just kind of mild hot. You know. I never tried that one. I've only tried the cheese. It up the ranch. And the NACHO It must be sold out. I don't think you kill a vampire with heat. I think you kill vampire with garlic garlic. Yeah you wonder why. All the Vampires Mike's life are still alive. Okay next NAK. This is something that I have loved for a long time and actually out of the now and I have to order more Bader bean. Boom I like I just like to say that might have been better boom crunchy broad beans fava beans or broad beans. They come in hundred calorie bags in every flavor. Under the Sun there brought to us by our. Bff's at enlightened people who make the best ice cream on the planet these beans come in nine hundred million flavors exact and they just keep creating more flavors and I don't know how they keep doing it. But it's like flavors like sea salt. They're Saracho a barbecue. Ran to sweet onion and mustard. Which is my favorite Nacho cheese buffalo wing garlic and onion cocoa dusted and sweet cinnamon wildfires meadow. Good like I don't know how they make them so crispy crunchy like they're just unbelievable. I've turned so many people onto these snacks I know I always give them out at our events and people go nuts for them and they go nuts they're not not actually stats are way. Better than nuts But they go crazy because of how they satisfy whatever craving for whatever like potato chips type snack you would want and these are just better for you. They have five grams of fiber in each little. Tiny hundred dollar back and only two smart point right. Yeah and protein to write your. There's like seven grams of protein. Forgot about them. That's unbelievable and very satisfying. The kind of reminded me of Member like in Grade School. You'd get corn nuts in your bag of your lunch bag coordinates but one hundred times better than corn nuts. That's so funny that you say that because the next snack that I have is actually exactly what you're saying. So yes they are a little like nuts but if you really do like the real thing or not this next neck which is called love. Corn will like blow your head off of your body honestly. Oh No north. Imagine like you have corn nuts. They they almost like it. Feels like they're gonNA break your teeth. I don't care if you were like two six eleven or ninety seven years old. It feels like your teeth can't stand up to the core nuts but love corn. It's like the size of a regular corn kernel and the texture is. It's got that bite and that crunch but it doesn't threaten the enamel of your tooth you don't feel like your teeth are GonNa fall out of your face when you eat them. And they're so good again little bags ninety calorie bags and their little sweet and they come flavors like sea salt and there's like a chilly flavor that super spicy and then a smoked barbecue flavor that I love and you can get variety packs. I am not kidding. I have like forty eight of them in Mysore right

Brad Albert Einstein Facebook Hamas Harris Earl Campbell Mike Amazon Grade School Mysore Bader Bean Lawrence Saracho
A little extra Time

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 3 months ago

A little extra Time

"Welcome to catch myths and mysteries. Shyam your host kid chrome with everybody shelter in place. I thought it might be interesting to talk about time travel and with that in. Mind the paradox of time on time. Paradoxes any logical contradiction that has to do with time travel. The Classic Paradox Time Falls into the classic grandfather paradox. The grandfather paradox who's usually the screenplay turn novel then movie where the U. S. Nimitz is caught in a storm of thrush and back in time to December sixth nineteen forty one. The dilemma is what the crew knows. What's going to happen? But the grandfather paradox of time gets in the way when the past is changed. It creates a contradiction. The time traveller could do anything that did happen but can't do anything that didn't well an aircraft carrier the size of the Nimitz didn't exist back in nineteen forty one so anything they could have done would have altered the future in a big way. Fortunately the storm that sent them back in time reappeared and brought them back to their time before they could decide what to do for a little more detail watch the movie. The final countdown. I think it came out in the nineteen eighties. Should you can listen to Martin. Sheen explained the grandfather paradox. To Kirk Douglas. The topic of time travel bags of big question. How would travelers go forward or back in time? H She wells painted a picture of a time machine with his book. The time machine. It was simply a vehicle for going forward or back with little regard to the visitors passed or impact on the future or past for the past for that matter that then we have screenwriter Richard. Matheson who wrote somewhere in time and takes the issue of time travel to a new level in the movie. Christopher Reeves is a young theater students celebrating the success of his latest production when the party is interrupted by an elderly woman who break Suda crowd of well-wishers Impresa lock into his hand Luxembourg. The says come back to me long story short. He traces Salak at back. To a stage. Actress of Nineteen twelve and her summer retreat that has been restored to pristine nineteen twelve decor. He buys clothes from the era right down to the socks. He wears a pocket wash from that era than rents a room and focuses on all things nineteen twelve and remember. He's surrounded in a room and a facility that is all nineteen twelve and ZAP when he ventures back out into the hall so hours later it is indeed nine thousand nine hundred twelve and elderly woman is there and a romance began one day. It is raining so they decided to have a picnic and Gorse at some point. She asked the time when he pulls out the pocket. Watch a penny from nineteen. Eighty comes out with it and the spell is broken. Well all this talk of time. Travel's seems a stuff of fiction. The what about Deja Vu? The feeling that you've been there before or met that person before done that thing before could it be that you've visited another time and have a flash memory of the person you met. L. Let's bring it home. The was the last time that a day week or month just seemed to Fi- yet your routine hadn't changed. I can remember going to the gym a specific time day or I would meet a friend. We always did the same routine but after a year or so. We noticed that we were finished sooner than before our next meeting. We TIMED ISH. Exercise routine and the gaps between each workout. The Times were always the same yet. We would finish at different times out of that work at one meeting. We had to stop and re park our cars yet. We completed our usual routine at the same time we had established and still finished early. Not Time travel but perhaps time slip. The Earth spins at Specific Rate. Plants grow in predictable period of time. Are we humans of variable our perception of time altered for seemingly? No reason when I was in grammar school failed to complete my homework. I could still hear my teacher telling me that we all had the same twenty four hours in the day but do we. The world's most accurate clock has neatly shown how right Albert Einstein was a hundred years ago when he proposed that time is a relative concept and the higher you live above sea level. The faster you should age. Einstein's theory of relativity states at time and space are not as constant as everyday life would

The Times U. S. Nimitz Christopher Reeves Sheen Albert Einstein Kirk Douglas Salak Deja Vu ZAP Martin Matheson Richard FI
"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

Personology

09:55 min | 4 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

"Clearly. Albert Einstein was unusually intelligent. He himself spoke of his intense curiosity as an all important asset and I quote. I have no special talent. I'm only passionately curious. The important thing is to not stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing his fame thought experiments like imagining riding on a beam of light. Were actually the use of daydreaming and fantasy thinking driven by curiosity but great discoveries are sometimes made not only by great minds but by the influence and interaction of the current culture that mine resides in in the days before it was possible to know what a scientific competitor was working on a different part of the world. Scientists were often surprised to discover that another person or group was proceeding towards the same discovery. Had they not arrived there I the discovery would still have been made because information bubbling in. The current environment was leading toward a breakthrough. Was this also a factor in Einstein's discoveries? There's an example which illustrates this really. Well an example. Drake's it not at all talk you both of those. I is special relativity. Which is the theory of space and time? It's fundamentally a theory of electromagnetism about what happens when you go very close to the speed of light but at a constant speed develops that in nineteen o five at the patent office and he's talking about it with his friends but there's a mathematician in France on porn career. He's one of the great mathematicians of the day who's developing something very similar at basically the same time and the reason for that is many reasons the two basic ones the first is if you're working with Maxwell's equations and pay attention to them closely. There is a problem with how you measure the speed of light with respect to an ether. That pervades everything. Perhaps but the equations don't require that so you have these equations. That don't seem to fit with the assumptions of the science of time. And if you think really hard about it. Special relativity can pop out. The second is electrical technology everywhere. So the problems of coordinating time. And how do you measure time at the same time in different places that can communicate with each other which is important for railroads and for Surveying and mapping those are real problems that lots of people are thinking about and in different ways Einstein Planck Array. Were both engaged with that problem. One in the patent office and the other for The bureau of Longitude in France. Trying to coordinate time measurements. So it's clear that that's science emerges out of a culture counterexample is general relativity when Einstein expands not just a constant speed but to accelerated speed. And when you try to expand the theory of gravity pops out of it. I say POPs out like it's easy took many many years to work out this theory. But it's weird that a fundamental extension of this theory of space and time would produce gravitational attraction as a consequence of the shape space-time Einstein starts working. He has the idea in nineteen o seven and then he can't work on it for a few years. 'cause he's distracted by quantum theory. Just something else he's innovating in. Holkar it and then in nineteen eleven when he moved to proxy starts to work on general relativity almost exclusively all of his colleagues think. This is crazy. They're like why do you care about grabbed? It's not an interesting area was a couple of tiny problems about measuring this remembering that and we don't need to have a general theory of relativity at present. And while you're doing this. The quantum revolution like the most exciting thing to happen in the physics micro world which you helped build is bursting everywhere. Why are you abandoning that? Working on this tiny thing about gravity is competitors in the gravity area are an underemployed physicist from Finland which is part of the Russian empire and a guy who student amok punks who can't get a job anywhere. It ends up teaching at a place in Italy and they're totally marginal people so he moved from like being with the types of plunk to Competing with people who are not at all of the same prominence because gravity wasn't that exciting topic and Gra- Einstein kind of makes gravity and exciting topic because the scale and the ingenuity of the result. He comes up with is striking but that is a case where it's not like if he hadn't done it somebody else would have. And now with so much excitement about cosmology and gravitational waves extension in the universe. All these topics. It seems obvious that people would care about gravity. Coal gravity was considered mostly assault problem At the time that's one thing that's hard to convey the other thing is to convey or maybe not so hard is how exciting quantum theory. I mean. It's it's born in nineteen hundred Einstein's radical reinterpretation of it with the Photon in nineteen zero five and then in nineteen eleven. He's like okay six years after kind of busting deal. But I'm just GonNa step aside when all the great minds in Europe are doing. This is really surprising. I think it's also port for people understand much of this initial thought an initial work. This was happening. He was in his twenties which today sounds incredulous that someone in their twenties could be making these kinds of completely science. Changing understandings come to life but the reality is that the brain is in a certain kind of peak in terms of plasticity and new neurons growing and the juxtaposition of acquired knowledge with the plasticity of the brain and change being able to happen in. The brain is really a certain kind of peak in the twenty s. Such that you find often that people who make their greatest discoveries have actually had those initial thoughts at that time in their twenties amongst theoretical physicists. Mathematicians the idea that someone in their twenties would make the great discoveries. It's not surprising because they expect that you'll do your best work before you're twenty five and then you're basically done. I think Einstein's actually at the root of that idea that cultural assumption because he did those things when he was young. If you look into the nineteenth century there are very few cases of the great mathematicians being young stuff. The puzzle of did that we all think of now with the buzzers and the dogs. He started that project when he was sixty five. Neuroscientists of course are fascinated by and want you know have wondered you know. Was there something different about Einstein's brain? Someone has looked at some point. I guess shortly after his death and made note of increased number of Saul cy which are basically the folds of the outer shell of the cortex of the brain which is where you know. Higher Order thinking occurs and noted that he had many more soul cy than the average brain beyond that sadly it seems like whatever tissue was available is no longer available. Things seemed to have disappeared. Swirly kind of tragic and then of course even if there are morsel. Cy were there more. Cy from the GECKO. There's no way to know that or did all of his thinking all of his science and all of his work caused the plastic brain to develop these morsel. Cy obviously that's something that you can't answer because of course we didn't have MRI and there was you know we weren't scanning is brain as we went. But it's an interesting question. Yeah I I don't follow the brain stuff but let me tell you why because I have a sort of moral revulsion for the story about the brain so Einstein insisted that he made it. Wanted to ashes dispersed. He didn't WANNA shrine. He didn't want to something that people would valorize later. No one had ever been famous as Einstein unclear whether anybody actually has since been as famous as Einstein was. He was more famous. Charlie Chaplin everybody knew his visage. Everything he said got into the newspapers and to some degree. This was a burden to. Sometimes he liked it but a lot of times. This was a burden as I imagine. It would be the most of us. He didn't want to become some kind of secular saint. He didn't think that that's appropriate. So he didn't want to be a grave people could visit. There's now a statue princeton but it was erected in two thousand five he didn't want any of that and so he went to the Princeton Hospital. He dies there. And the pathologist steals his brand out the brain puts it in a cooler takes it and then drives across the country with keeps it for years in Formaldehyde. And so it's stolen. It's a violation of informed consent to be working with this brand this man cut it out and stole the Brain Lebron and kept it. There are people who track him down leader and he gives them a little bits of the brain he parts of the brain like as a gift. It strikes me so deeply as something. That's disrespectful while it is it's morally reprehensible all right now you can buy an APP for your which will show you scans of Cross section of Einstein's brain. I don't have that on my phone for this reason. People aware that he was the one who stole her. They didn't know where the brain win or they didn't even know. The brain was missing that the brain was missing and be analyzed by people known at certain point. The only thing. That state wasn't happy about that but it was little they could do to get it back but it wasn't immediately known that he had done this. That's tragic end which I didn't even know about a tragic end for Einstein just in terms of what was important as belief system. I mean he'd already suffered. He obviously was suffering mightily toward the end of his life in terms of his feeling about his role in the development and use of nuclear weapons and the ending of World War Two he definitely had some moral dilemmas. That did bother him nonetheless. This was something I didn't know done to him that post mortem that it's really really quite tragic..

Albert Einstein Einstein Planck Array Cy Gra- Einstein France Europe princeton Drake Maxwell assault physicist Finland Italy Charlie Chaplin Lebron Princeton Hospital
"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

Personology

08:11 min | 4 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

"Einstein rebelled against the authoritarian behavior of some of his teachers and dropped out of school at age. Sixteen later he was admitted to Swiss polytechnic and five years later he graduated with his diploma to teach physics and mathematics but Einstein couldn't find a teaching position so he took a job in the patent office because he had to make money. He wanted to get married. There was already a first baby out of wedlock that was given up for adoption. You wanted to get married and start a family. He needed money so he took the job. He likes to Patna Perfect. 'cause he was really good at it so he did very well at this job has superior like them and when you think about what a pet officer has to do when they get a new invention as they first of all if it's new and they have to figure out what the basic principle is the idea behind a patent application is. There's a key idea that is novel and has some utility so he got very good at reading these applications and seeing what are the fundamental principles by which this invention is supposed to work and are they distinct from the fundamental principles of other inventions. That I would that yesterday. That kind of thinking is not dissimilar to what he does with relativity theory where he's like one of the fundamental principles by which we measure time. We need a clock and we need to have mark an event happening at a certain place. The thought that he came in with the style of thinking in that was what made him good at the patent office or did the work at the Patent Office inform his style of thinking then he would go on to us in terms of you know coming to special relativity and general relativity. I think it's got to be a bit of both. He was certainly exposed to patent earlier because his father's business involved that kind of work but even later when he was professor Einstein hold a ton of patents. Later on you had an idea for refrigerator. Filed a patent and I continued to consult for people on their patent applications as a way of earning extra money and also because he was interested in it so he liked the thinking patents and even after he didn't need the money anymore so I think it's probably a bit that his style of thought mapped onto this so it was congenial to him. But I think it's also the practice of doing it day in and day out created certain patterns of thinking so he is newly married here. She became pregnant before they got married. He didn't marry her. Then which is something that he could have done and sort of legitimized her and the whole thing but because he didn't do that she was sort of sent home. If you will to have this baby and sadly it does seem from the few records that exists that there may have been something wrong with the baby But we basically. We don't even know what happened to the baby might have been adopted might have died It might have been. Her family. Took the baby but basically they have nothing further to do with this baby when she returns she may have survived. You may not have. We don't don't know at present. What happened her? People have looked. They're still looking and that's the only daughter. So Einstein then marries her and they have two children hung's Albert who later on becomes a professor of engineering in the United States and has his own children and then Edward or as they called him teddy and sadly we know. That TEDDY ULTIMATELY DEVELOP SCHIZOPHRENIA. And is seriously psychiatric ill. Reliever America. The first wife also later I had very severe bouts of depression. There may be some inherited mental illness. That is going on in this case. But it's clear that Malaysia had her own struggles going on but Teddy Kennedy really suffered badly. If you grow older in pain I see it. His wife becomes more and more miserable partially because she is physics student. Who would like to be doing worker? Self and really is sort of relegated to taking care of the House and taking care of the boys clearly being relegated to you. Know Housewife is not a happy circumstance for her and and yet there is very little evidence that Einstein in any way tries to help or ameliorate her difficulties. His marriage falls apart. He doesn't have a close relationship with his children. E remarried to this distant cousin but he had similarly like a oddly unrelated sort of setup with her where you know the deal. Was you know she would take care of him and be the wife and he would be able to have relationships outside the marriage as long as they were just one at a time you know sort of serial infidelity and this odd way you know even later of relating where he had this room in the house you know private room where people could come in and meet with him but his wife was to never come in there unless invited because young women came in there who were invited for many people who admire Einstein. The relationships with women is the sticking point. It's unpleasant he doesn't have characteristics. We now consider admiral. There's a lot of infidelity. He was immensely appealing to women and he knew it. But it's almost like he was sort of unaware of who got hurt in the process. You know you hear about serial landers that know exactly what they're doing and they're very savvy about it. They're very well aware of who it's hurting. And they have sort of almost associate Pathak. I don't care by their also people who do things in their relationships where it's almost like socially. They're just not so aware they're not aware that they're angry at that. They're making others. You know distressed or angry or in the case of his anti-totalitarian reaction with professors. And I guess just bring this up. Because they're almost no names to put with Albert Einstein in terms of scientific discoveries and the magnitude of them in the genius of him and such that. You know you think of words like savant and when you think of people who have savant like abilities at the same time that socially they do so many maladaptive things you do wonder about you know what. Today we used to call asperger's now we call very mild autism but people who are incredibly intelligent in the skewed way but socially emotionally have difficulty reading. What's going on and therefore do a lot of things that make it hard for them to stay connected to important people. This grows over time his relationship with Elsa the cousin who becomes the second. Mrs Einstein began an extra-marital affair where Melito would get hurt and that begins in nineteen twelve on a visit to Berlin from progress or living at the time and then when they returned to Zurich actually a correspondence between them between Elsa and Albert where he says. You know. I destroyed your letters as you ask. You should probably send your letters to me at my office so he. He's covering up the tracks as he gets older. He cares less to cover up the tracks whether that's a cultural development psychological development or just maybe secrecy. It's hard to know while the divorce is ongoing. He's basically living with his second by. You can't really call Einstein a narcissist because narcissism is a grandiose view of oneself. That's not consistent necessarily with reality. And in his case well his confident view of himself was very consistent with reality so it makes it hard to call him and Narcissus but he did believe he was going. He was doing these things he was going to do. These things such that. He told me. When I win the Nobel Prize I will give the prize money to you and the boys to take care.

Albert Einstein Patent Office professor Einstein Patna Perfect TEDDY Nobel Prize Swiss polytechnic officer Teddy Kennedy SCHIZOPHRENIA America Narcissus Elsa Pathak Malaysia United States asperger professor of engineering Zurich
"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

Personology

09:45 min | 4 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Personology

"The name Albert Einstein is virtually synonymous with the word genius a theoretical physicist. He developed a theory of relativity and brought us the most famous of all equations equals MC squared. He changed our understanding of the universe entirely creative original brilliant and Quirky. How can we understand? What made him tick? Hi I'm Dr Gail Saltz. And you're listening to personality thrilled to how with me today. Michael Jordan professor of modern and contemporary history particularly the history of science at Princeton University and he is also the author of the new book. Einstein in Bohemia was born on March fourteenth eighteen. Seventy nine is born in the south German town of old and his father. Hermann Einstein was a an entrepreneur in electrical engineering firm which he did with his brother so that it was a family business working in this kind of electrical technology and Einstein's early work especially work on special relativity is also linked to electrical technology and a bunch of ways and Einstein worked in patent office largely as a specialist evaluating electromagnetic technologies. It's also the hottest area of physics and is inspired engineering. At the time. It's interesting that did carry through. Although his father really wanted him essentially to go study engineering and joined the family business. That is not what Albert wanted to do. So in that sense they departed from one another. I mean his father essentially let him depart if you will be as though it's some sort of break between the two of them relations don't seem to have suffered terribly because of this. I would say they're in the solid middle class bourgeoisie. But they're not at the top of that they're kind of in the middle but There's always a bit of a struggle going on. Einstein seems to have been mostly shielded from. And when you look at childhood pictures. He has all the classic. Joie child pictures of like bullying school uniform against the backdrop and his relationship with his mother. It sounds as though she is the more strict tough if you will presence in the family between the two parents though. It's not like many people's relationships with their mothers. It's close but it's not unfrocked so. His parents are very typical of Jews in the bourgeoisie. In that period in living in urban Germany they were largely assimilated. They did some of the very surface traditions but didn't observe in any way. They were completely irreligious that regard. When Einstein was about eleven twelve he became substantially interested in the Jewish tradition and started studying the stuff and even preparing thinking about a Bar. Mitzvah and then around age twelve he abandons all of it was it scientific readings material or his his commitment to science. That made him give it up yet so we actually have very few sources about Einstein's youth but one of the sources we have is from a medical student in Eunuch. Who would visit the household so one of the traditions that the Einstein's did which is a sort of classic Jewish tradition for the Sabbath meal have a Talmud student over at your house religious students and feed that as a way of supporting their studies next homeland leader immigrants to the United States changes? His last name to tell me told me writes a book special relativity explaining it to a popular audience and at the back of it. He put his memories of what Albert Einstein was like as a child. So it's one of the few sources we have of that period so Max. Tom Would really hit it off with the boy Einstein. So there's there's over a decade of difference in their ages but they spend a lot of time talking. He works through the proofs of Euclid with him from textbook uncle had given him and they read Other kinds of popular science books together. He gives boy popular science books. And it's that engagement with a scientific explanation of how things go that elite him from religion one of the things that makes Einstein so interesting to think about is he's a mixture of unconventional things and enormously conventional choices. He does both of those in a weird mix. He picks an unusual first spouse but then he expects her to behave in. Exactly the way a conventional spouse would I think in some ways the mixture just as we're talking about in terms of the type of student that he was so on the one hand he clearly excelled in math and sciences certain way and that was where his interest lie in other areas. Not so much. There's a very common method. Einstein was a terrible student. And that's just not true. He was a very good student in the math and sciences and he was a decent mediocre decent students in other areas. Some of that is lack of interest. Some of that is also lack of talent He clearly he had a hard time with languages. Some people learn the more easily other. People want them greater difficulty. His lack of facility with French is one of the things that hold him up and enrolling in the university and he needed to take a year or schooling to get his French up to snuff started learning English when he was thirty. Thirty thirty one and Always learned to kind of imperfectly and his German is enormously expressive almost poetic and places. He had a real facility with the language but not a facility with any other language even though he was eventually competent in French and English and could read some Italian this collection of attending to only things that really really interested him and clearly appearing to not attend and be able to have the same facility therefore with things that did not interest him and then going on to not only attend to the things that interested him. But like what you might call hyper focus. you know a deep dive that few other people could maintain for the lengths of time that he did the depth that he did. And that's why there are some groups that look at that collection of behaviors and say. Could this be a person who has attention deficit disorder in the sense that attention deficit disorder is not the lack of ability to pay attention? It is actually the faulty switch in one's ability to attend when one wants to attend so that even for example. If you're not going to do well in Greek or French and you have to pay attention. You're able to get yourself to pay attention but if you had you would just not be able to do it. You just could not make yourself do it. But if the math fascinated you you could do that better and more deeply and for a longer period of time than somebody who did not have. Add and in addition many people with add because of this faulty switch their ability to harness innovative ideas and to have a greater number literally of out of the box thoughts that are related to daydreaming and fantasy and so on is often superior as an adult. He was perfectly capable of spending many hours paying attention to things. He thought boring and useless. If they satisfied some greater goal so he did a lot of fundraising for the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He found these idiots and pointless but he would do it. He engaged in extensive correspondence concerning the League of nations. And lots of other efforts such as writing affidavits for Refugees and the Nineteen Thirties and trying to get them positions either in the UK or in the US. He complain about how much taking but he would do it with focus so it's not just the mass stuff that he can do this where he can do with a lot of things. I think it's just when he chooses to apply himself. He clearly did cultivate this image of the absent minded professor to some degree. I I don't know perhaps as a way of checking out when he preferred to check out but the whole I don't time is shoe laces. I don't wear socks. My Hair looks like just stuck my finger in a socket. I you know He. He clearly cultivated this image. That vision of which I know everybody listening to this has migrate now. He did look like that but he looked like that. The late thirties onward earlier. If you look at him in the twenties he's dressed in a suit. He's got shoes. They're tied and some of that. His wife died and thirty six and she stopped dressing him but when he needed to look respectable he looked perfectly respectable. It's only as he gets older that Either maybe he doesn't need to. Maybe he cares less. So it's it's not clear to me whether he always wanted to be kind of Schlub. And then finally got the chance. Or if the propensity to sloppiness grew over time. This is a good spot to take a break. Be Back in a moment. Hey it's Ben Henry and Marcus host of the last podcast on the left are shows dedicated to uncovering hilariously horrifying stuff. And now we're only on spotify. Join us if you want obviously never force anyone to just blindly be crazy if you stories about doomsday cults. Who Do exactly that. And more please on spotify visit spotify dot com slash last podcast to listen free..

Hermann Einstein Dr Gail Saltz professor spotify Michael Jordan Princeton University US physicist Germany Euclid Bohemia Albert League of nations Mitzvah Ben Henry Nineteen Thirties Hebrew University Schlub Tom
What Is Pi?

BrainStuff

04:26 min | 5 months ago

What Is Pi?

"Come to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio rain stuff lauren. Bo-bottle here the number referred to as pie has mesmerized mathematicians for four thousand years. It's the rarest of back medical constance and unfailingly accurate ratio. That's also never ending. The digits of Pi have been calculated out more than twenty two trillion decimal places without ever repeating a. That makes it an irrational number. The definition of Pie simple. It's the ratio of a circle circumference. That is the length around the circle divided by its diameter or at the links across the circle. But what's remarkable? Is that no matter. The size of the circle you're measuring that ratio of circumference diameter will always equal three point. One four one five nine two six five three five eight nine seven et cetera usually shortened to three point one four divide the circumference of a tennis ball by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the planet Mars by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the known universe by its diameter. You get the point. Pie is critical to several basic calculations geometry physics and engineering including the area of a circle which is Pie Times Square of the radius and volume of a cylinder which has pyre squared times the height of the cylinder when ancient Babylonian attempted to measure the precise area of circles back in one thousand nine hundred BC. They signed a value to pie. A three point one to five. The ancient Egyptians came up with three point one six zero five the Greek mathmetician archimedes working in the third century BC and the Chinese mathematician. Xue Changsa working in the Fifth Century. Ce ARE CO credited with calculating the most accurate approximations of Pi before Calculus and supercomputers gave us a more definitive answer. Then in seventeen o six. The self taught Welsh mathematician. William Jones assigned the Greek letter P. To this magical number without end possibly because P is the first letter of the Greek words. For periphery and perimeter symbols use was later popularized by Eighteenth Century. Spec petition Leonard Euler but wasn't adopted worldwide until nineteen thirty four. The fact that Pie can be found everywhere not only in circles but an arcs pendulums and interplanetary navigation and intimately long has inspired a cult following that includes plenty of Geeky tattoos and even its own National Holiday National Pie Day was officially recognized by the United States. Congress in two thousand nine but the definitely not square roots of the holiday can be traced back to nineteen eighty-eight and a man named Larry the Prince of Pie. Shaw Shaw was a beloved longtime employee at the exploratorium. A Science Museum in San Francisco California and came up with the idea of Pi Day on one thousand nine hundred eighty eight staff retreat following the death of exploratorium founder. Frank Oppenheimer the date for celebration. Well because the first digits of Pi Three Point one four March fourteenth or three fourteen even better march fourteenth is also Albert Einstein's birthday making Pi Day nerd doubleheader the first Pi Day celebration was nothing more than Shaw and his wife handing out slices of fruit pie and tea at one fifty nine. Pm One five nine being the three digits following three point one four but the holiday quickly gained fame in the bay area. Shaw eventually built be Pi Shrine at the exploratorium a circular classroom with a circular brass plaque at center. Every day celebration at the exploratorium ended with a colorful parade led by Shaw blasting his boombox with a remix of pomp and circumstance set to the digits of Pi and circling. The Pie Shrine. Exactly three point one four times. The parade ended with the singing of happy birthday to Albert Einstein. The prince pipe passed away in two thousand seventeen but the annual exploratorium party continues as do Pi Day celebrations. The world over popular ways to celebrate include. Baking a pie orb some kind of circular treat and holding pie recital contests the current world record for memorizing and reciting the most digits of Pi was set by Sharad Kumar Sharma of India in two thousand fifteen when he recited a staggering. Seventy

PIE Shaw Shaw Pie Times Square Pie Shrine Albert Einstein Pi Shrine Sharad Kumar Sharma Exploratorium Tennis Leonard Euler Frank Oppenheimer Xue Changsa William Jones Congress India San Francisco Science Museum United States California Founder
"albert einstein" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Thank you for joining me this week I'm L. Martinez close to retirement and income radio I specialize in assets in retirement protection and no market risk retirement planning company serving both Colorado and Wyoming so let me ask you a question that you've probably heard before the question is do you know the definition of what insanity as well according to Albert Einstein it's doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results you know from the moment you started investing probably fresh out of high school or college it became very apparent to you that the market goes up in the market goes down you've seen it over and over again that every few years the market crashes and sometimes it crashes hard for the for most of your life he didn't really care in fact if you're like me I wanted the market to crash back when I was young in those younger years and and why because it was a buying opportunity besides I knew the market would recover and I was young enough that I wasn't going to use the money any time soon but you know things are different now the closer I get to retirement the less cavalier I get towards my retirement money the more I realize they have very little or no time to recover from major market corrections and remember Mark Twain once said I'm not so interested in the return on my money as the return of my money you know the quote is true today as it was when he said it corruption uncertainty the ups and downs in the market have ever really not gone away so are you interested more in the return of your money what if we could do more than that give me a call I can help you the number is eight six six nine zero one two two five.

Colorado Wyoming Albert Einstein Mark Twain L. Martinez
Darpa Cranks Up Antibody Research to Stall Coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:27 min | 6 months ago

Darpa Cranks Up Antibody Research to Stall Coronavirus

"There among the more than five thousand new coronavirus cases reported in just the past twenty four hours labs all over the world are racing to design diagnostic tests vaccines new therapies all to deal with the virus and here's Joe Palca is here to talk about a promising pilot program happening here in the U. S. hi Joe hi there what is it worth the effort who's behind it well it's an effort called the pandemic prevention platform or P. three and it's funded by the defense advanced research agency differences Vance research projects agency which does some really cool cutting edge stuff in science for the defense department and everybody else happens it's a four year program it started two years ago and their ideas to be able to respond rapidly to an emerging threat whether it's covered nineteen or something else any Jenkins runs the program for DARPA we envision the P. three five form actually functioning as a fire break in the instance that there's a pandemic outbreak what does she mean by far right well it's something that will at least temporarily protect someone from contracting the virus before a vaccine is ready it might be a stop gap therapy even and the department is interested because what if they have to deploy troops into an area where there is a pandemic going on and they want their trips to get their six without being hurt hi and if even if there were a vaccine you get a vaccine it takes a couple weeks to develop immunity so they want something to work right away but this is temporary would only last for about six months so I know it's complicated but can you explain how this temporary solution the P. five three platform works has two basic parts the first is to identify antibodies so those are the things that ARE immune system used to fight disease they're going to try and get antibodies from people who've been infected with covert nineteen and recovered okay so they you can fish those out of people's plasma their blood and then they're going to that usually that that takes some time but they're trying to shorten that pre to three weeks and then they're trying to develop a rug that can be used based on these antibodies not typically when you make a drug like that you become in these big bioreactors but they're going to try something different they're going to try and just take the genetic material that codes for these antibodies off and put that into people and that the people's own cells make the antibody so the people become the bio reactors but how long does all that take as any of us can make a difference for people who are suffering from the qualifiers well I put the question to DARPA's Amy Jenkins this technology could be used in this current corona virus I will carry out that that this is still a very early technology it has yes ban in human clinical studies but it has not been in thousands of patients it's been and tens of patients so again what does that mean about the time line well it means she thinks that there might be something ready in as soon as ninety days but we'll see two scientists really think that this can work so well the ones I talked to seem to think there's reason to believe that market Killian is a professor of cell biology at Albert Einstein college of medicine obviously is something very much and development but I think the strategy and the basic idea is sound so I I mean the ideas yet it's experimental it's cutting edge it's new but there's something it's something I'm I was actually when I came across this I was pretty surprised that it even existed but apparently it does and they're confident who knows okay well worth watching and here's Joe Palca thank you we appreciate it

Switzerland makes world's smallest gold coin

WBZ Morning News

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Switzerland makes world's smallest gold coin

"How do gold coin minted in Switzerland is one for the history books CBS correspondent Jim Chevy has the story Switzerland has meant in the world's smallest gold coins how small just over a tenth of an inch in diameter it weighs in at one five hundredth of an ounce Senate is gold so it's metal values about three Bucks but you won't get it for that switchman says just nine hundred ninety nine of these tiny coins have been struck and it will be selling them for about two hundred Bucks a piece that also get you a special magnifying glass so you can see what's printed on the coin Albert Einstein sticking

Switzerland Jim Chevy Senate Switchman CBS Albert Einstein
Switzerland makes world's smallest gold coin

AP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Switzerland makes world's smallest gold coin

"An image of physicist Albert Einstein sticking out his tongue is featured on the new gold coin minted in Switzerland the coin is also notable for being the smallest in the world measuring just shy of three millimeters according to the state owned Swiss meant it weighs around six one thousandths of a gram it has a normal value of one quarter Swiss francs Swiss meant said the coin of which just nine hundred ninety nine have been made will be sold for a hundred ninety nine Franks with a special magnifying glass so I'm news can see Feinstein's

Albert Einstein Switzerland Franks Feinstein Physicist
Premature births: One of the biggest public health threats facing the U.S.

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

02:34 min | 7 months ago

Premature births: One of the biggest public health threats facing the U.S.

"Chances are you know someone who was born prematurely last year one in ten American babies were born too soon before thirty seven weeks just station reportedly Albert Einstein Charles Darwin and Stevie Wonder were all preemies that puts me and my family in very good company we've come a long way since my grandfather was born weighing about one and a half pounds my great grandmother kept him alive by putting him in a very low temperature of an I was born about two months early in nineteen seventy nine and in two thousand fourteen my daughter Mira was born at twenty eight weeks weighing one pound thirteen ounces she spent two months in the neonatal intensive care unit five years later she's the spunky S. kindergarten are in New York City so while you may know someone who was born prematurely you might not know how devastating premature birth is for families for communities and for our country as a whole being born prematurely comes with a host of risks ranging from death to lung disease to neurological and learning disabilities the United States has one of the highest rates of premature birth in the industrialized world at ten percent that's for a lot of reasons including big problems that are bad for Americans health like racism and income inequality babies were born early often need intensive care and life support at birth and ongoing therapies as they grow and that is not cheap in fact pre maturity costs the United States at least twenty six billion dollars a year when my daughter Mira was born her ears are still fuse to the side of her head she had one third of a Cup of blood in her entire body her brain was not fully developed she was still in the process of becoming herself in a very literal sense we are so lucky that near as now I. healthy happy five year old knowing how far she's come I hope you'll forgive me for saying I think my daughter is amazing and all premature babies should be celebrated no matter what their outcome has than but just marveling at them isn't enough we owe them more for premature babies just being born can leave them with a pre existing condition not all families can access or afford the care their children need and not all pregnant people can access

Albert Einstein Charles Darwin Mira New York City Lung Disease United States Stevie Wonder
What time is it?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:00 min | 7 months ago

What time is it?

"We're GONNA talk about time. Most states in the United States south time changes spring forward set clocks forward in the spring fall back set clocks EXPEC then you have time zones across the United States and around the world fly far enough and you'll lose a day or gain a day depending upon which way you're going when you perform perform the same activities of over and over the day seemed to fly by or drag depending on the activities for your day with new activities for the day may fly even faster faster. Depends upon who you talk to. There was a time in my life when I worked with people. WOM One and with some clients I would look up at the clock and watch a hand and the clock move from one block bark to another would seem like ours would pass and I look at the clock again only to see that it had just been a minute. Ah Yes perception. But what about time. Slips time warms is time travel possible to Great Luminaries Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking gave us. It's a simple answer. Yes but the conversation on time travel is filled with what is exactly. What did Einstein have to say about time travel? I'm Stein's theory of special relativity says that time slows down or speeds up depending upon. How fast you move relative to something else? Approaching the speed of light person inside a spaceship would age much slower than his twin at home. Also under Einstein's theory of general relativity. Nobody gravity can bend time picture. Four dimensional fabric called space time when anything that has mass sits on that piece of fabric it causes a dimple or bending of space time the bending of space time causes objects to move on a curved path and that curvature of space is what we know as gravity both the general and special relativity theories have been proven with GPS satellite techniques. That has very very accurate timepieces on board the effects of gravity as well as the satellites increased speed from Earth relative to observers on the ground make the unadjusted clocks gained. Thirty eight microseconds today. Who Thirty Eight microseconds does sound like much of a time change to me? Let's let's continue here engineers make calibrations to account for the difference in a sense. This effect called time. dilation means astronauts nonce were time travellers as return to earth very very slightly younger than there are identical twin the remains on the planet. What did Stephen Hawkins' I have to say? About time. Travel Hawking famously held a party for time travellers but did not send out the patients until after the party. No one showed for the festivities but the scientists right that there is still hope the traveling back in time could be possible according to the laws of the universe he pigs is this notion on the premise of something called m theory that suggests the universe may contain seven hidden dimensions in addition into the familiar four dimensions of space time rapid space travel and travel back in time can't be ruled out. According to our present understanding he writes. This is hawking. Science fiction fans need not lose heart. There's hope in theory you have to look hockey's M theory it's a little too long and complex likes for this podcast. There's a lesser known theory about time travel. Though is commonly referred to as the step theory it takes into account that theories expressed grasp both hawking and Einstein. They're multiple dimensions. The step theory states that although there are multiple dimensions they are parallel. Exactly to who are on that some run ahead of ours and some behind and there are umbilical warburton holes or the dimensions overlap further. That many of us unknowingly walked through these openings periodically the Dacia Fu is an example one. Conventional Science Science can't explain that is stepping into a dimension that is slightly ahead of your own. You know the feeling that you've been to displace before or met this person before or even particular activity before but that most of us shake off the feeling as being just a little strange whatever theory you embrace. It's is fairly realistic to state that in the next not too distant future we maybe stepping forward or backward and Thomas easily stepping onto an escalator skeptical. It wasn't that long ago that the concept of traveling in space let alone landing on the moon was stuff of fiction and the greatest scientific minds signs of that era declared the idea ridiculous impossibility. That's sad a little less than fifteen hours ago. I stepped into the future where I sit now.

Albert Einstein Stephen Hawking United States Dacia Fu Stein Thomas
Modern Time Slips

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:27 min | 7 months ago

Modern Time Slips

"Today. Something a little bit different on this podcast. Generally science is acknowledged as something. Let's say a discovery of something and it can be replicated and therefore it is based in scientific fact and the pseudoscience is usually explained away as a simple single phenomena that can't be captured reproduced. So I have on this. PODCAST is a series of modern day. A or modern time time slips began with a white Ford pickup that pulled up to a cattle pasture near Pona City City Oklahoma. This was early in the fall of Nineteen seventy-one if stopped at the gate. Carl Marc and Gordon worked for cattle feed distributor. Were sent to this remote area to pick up a theater but they found their has kept them silent for forty one years. Carl says we opened the gate. which had barb orb wire with no locks and we entered? We went onto the property which was covered with grass up to in some cases over the truck. They drove through grass. Ask to the tank that sat close to Red Barn and got Outta the truck. We realize the tank was almost half full and too heavy to load. Carl said we. We decided to leave and drove around a Red Barn and there. We saw a large two story White House with no lights in front of us. The trio drove back to the cattle feed company and told the boss. He said he'd drained the tank and they could pick it up tomorrow. Carl says we went back to the location to retrieve the a tank the next night he said this time we decided to go through the old white big house on the hill and we brought our flashlights and shotguns. Just in case they they drove onto the property over the past. They've made through the day before they loaded the tank then they pulled around the bar toward the house what they saw burned into their memories. It was no longer there. Carl said we walked up the hill where it stood and there were no signs of demolition no foundation. There's nothing at all what we all seem to witness the night before was no longer there. We've talked to each other over the years but none of us can explain mine division. Did these men witness a time slip. Time slips have been reported throughout history and English women. Vacationing in France Franson one thousand. Nine hundred one claimed they stepped into the French Revolution. The two couples traveling in Spain in the Nineteen Seventies stated an oddly archaic. The hotel. There was simply gone on their return journey. Physicists like Albert Einstein Michio Kaku and Stephen Hawkins have have all said time. Travel is theoretically possible. Our science just can't achieve it but what if nature can another example the light in the sky shown shown white far from the Greens and the reds at Jigsaw during the Aurora Borealis of two thousand four visible in North America as far as the Lower Midwest West Jake fifteen stood outside his parents home in the lake of the ozarks Missouri around ten PM. Twenty eighth of May leaning against a truck rock looking at the lights. He didn't know his life was about to change a bright white glow suddenly filled the northern horizon this look nothing like the the northern lights the Aurora Borealis nor did it behave like that the lights move like the light of a copy machine. The single bar brightness move from west to east over Jake's head and disappeared. I thought that I should maybe go inside at this time and found myself. Unable to move he said Novenas grew in his arms and legs and he blocked out when he woke. He knew he'd been somewhere else. I felt woozy and almost dated. Said time seem muddled in my head. Had He walked into the House to find he'd been outside an hour. It took most of the night for him to tell us parents what happened. Most of the time I kept telling them that I thought the calendar was wrong. It should at least be after two thousand eight he said to this day. My mother remembers bits of this mainly because I looked at her and asked pointblank. Is that black man. Still President. What happened to j seizures psychological phenomenon or did did jake accidentally take a brief four years step forward from two thousand four hundred to two thousand eight Jake slip is just one in a long long line of stories from people who brushed against a different time such as an RAF pilots are victor good ard who encountered airplanes in nineteen eighteen thirty five that didn't exist until nineteen thirty nine one hundred year old Swiss watch found in a Chinese Ming Dynasty Tomb? People may I slipped like this all the time Duncan cal opened the door of his nineteen ninety nine Chevrolet s ten next to a convenience store gas pump trump in Springfield Missouri. Large man accosted him as I left the gas station. Some large melon-headed man dressed in a business suit yelled what year is this. Kel- set the man stood at a spot kill would've walked by when he left the store but he hadn't seen him demand wore dark black suit suit with a rough fiber texture. Kill said along the lines of things in the Teddy Roosevelt era. What year is this? The man yelled again. The the man was white about thirty five or forty years old clean-shaven normal but he asked an odd question. Carol said two thousand three CAL cal. Tolan the man's face contorted anger. What year is it? He screamed at yet cal again. I said two thousand three. The large man screamed the question. One more time I said two thousand three so he could hear me. Cal said then he quit asking. Kelly glanced away from the man as he slid into Swiss truck but safely inside he turned to get another luck and the man was gone. He disappeared from the front of the gas station. Cal said in the Second Institute held to slip into his truck demand simply vanished cal put. The man hadn't stepped inside the store the only place he could have gone in that short amount of the time he was gone.

Carl Marc Duncan Cal Jake Red Barn Missouri CAL Ford Nineteen Seventies White House Pona City City Oklahoma Aurora Borealis Spain Albert Einstein Michio Kaku France Franson Teddy Roosevelt North America Novenas Kelly
Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

Skimm'd from The Couch

11:46 min | 8 months ago

Ambassador Susan Rice: If you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're going to lose them.

"You really have to recognize that the people around you have value to add and that you may be the person in charge you have the vision. You have the responsibility woody. But if you're not able to make the people who you're leading feel valued and feel like their input matters then you're gonNA lose them awesome. I'm Carly's Aken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skin from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have lifted from the good good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better at our place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. Hey we welcome ambassador. Susan Rice to skimmed from the couch ambassador. Rice was national security advisor to President Barack Obama before serving as national security the advisor. She was the United States Ambassador to the United Nations as well as a member of the cabinet. Prior to the Obama Administration at Basseterre Rice was a fellow fellow at the Brookings Institute and began her career in foreign policy under president. Bill Clinton so many questions also ambassador rice as has just published her book tough love the title references. Her parents approach to raising her which prepared her for career in world politics. And I'm guessing a lot more. The memoir has been called both highly personal and unflinchingly honest. It's landed her a spot on the New York Times Bestseller. Lists congratulations. We we are thrilled to get the opportunity to speak with her about her historic career ambassador rice. Welcome to the couch. Thanks so much. It's really great to be with you. Both very excited right okay. So let's jump into it first question we ask everybody. Skim your resume for us. Okay scholar written and published academic work on national security and foreign policy when I was at the Brookings Institution as a foreign policy scholar I've also been a management consultant diplomat. negotiator national security expert. That's the first time we've had those bullets on this show. What is not on your your wikipedia or login? Daniel dropped. Her microphone in a very important question was the literal mic. Drop in writing. Not On your official biography or Kapadia that we should know about you. Well I mean there's a lot but one of the most important things if not the most important things is that I'm a mom. I have two kids one in high school now in one in college and I'm a wife and I'm a proud daughter daughter of two parents who had phenomenal impact on me So family to me is hugely important. What is a typical day? Look like for you now now. It's well now when I'm not on book tour normally. Okay it's so much better comparatively like I can get up at seven you know as opposed to five thirty or six. I can work out and take my time doing it. Not being rushed I can put on my yoga pants I and my fleece and very leisurely eat my breakfast. which is usually like fruit and yogurt or something like that with a lot of coffee and then it depends on what my days as about? When I was writing the book? Sit Down and focus on that. I spend time at the School of International Service at American University. where I meant to our students I do some speaking. I do some travel. I'm on the board of Netflix. And I do some other private sector so depends on what the the the deal of the day is but for the most part the great thing is I'm in charge of my own schedule and I'll have to get dressed up except when I'm on book tour you said You can travel. I'm sure you have traveled so much watch but a lot of it has been in your professional life. Where's the last place? You traveled here for fun abroad or anywhere anywhere. The last foreign trip we took took was to Peru with the family in August which was really fun. 'cause it's been a while given that the kids have jobs in camp in whatever that we've actually been able to do to a cool foreign trip together. Is there a place you haven't gone. That's been on your bucket list. Oh Gosh lots. Let me do a short summer. Yeah I would think you've been everywhere. I've been a lot of places Che's but not everywhere and there's a lot of places I still WANNA go Thailand Morocco Sosa Czech Republic. Ah Norway I've been Ireland into the big places have been you know. China had been Russia into Japan. Indonesia I've been to many parts arts of Africa most of western Europe a good bit of South America but I still want to go to Chile. I WANNA go back to Argentina. Yeah I WANNA go back to Brazil. We should do do a little girls chalet you should. It's amazing you talk about family being really important to you. And that's obviously a huge inspiration from the book. The the title of the book is a nod to your parents parenting style. Tell us about your parents. Well I had to really wonderful parents both past unfortunately but my dad. I was born in segregated South Carolina around nineteen twenty. His grandfather. My grandfather had been a slave. He fought in the Union army in South Carolina during the civil war and then after the civil war my great grandfather rather miraculously got a primary education occasion became a teacher and then got his divinity degree Went to college and after college he An after his early professional career. He established a school in New Jersey. called the board in town school and from the late eighteen eighty s until nineteen fifty-five that school educated generations of African Americans both in vocational and technical skills and in college preparatory skills and Albert Einstein and Stein and Mary McLeod but Thune. Eleanor Roosevelt. All came to the school which was really quite extraordinary in that. Legacy of service of education was what my father was raised with but born in this oppression of segregation and Jim Crow. He really was struggling to figure out how he could fulfil his potential during World War. Two he served with the Tuskegee airman and in the segregated Army Air Force and he had the horrible experience of not being able elite in restaurants off of base but seeing German. POW is being served and so he knew that he wanted to become somebody. He was brilliant and after after college he decided in after the war lead the south. Go out to California. He got his PhD in economics at the University of California Berkeley and then he spent his professional fashion career. Working his way up he worked in the Treasury Department. He worked at the World Bank in a senior position. Ultimately he was a governor of the Federal Reserve. And I'll come back to him but I learned from my father just extraordinary perseverance and basically believing in yourself even when society and everybody around around you is telling you that you're not worthy or you can't. My mom came from a totally different background. She was the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica. That came came to Portland Maine of all places in nineteen twelve and my grandparents on her side. Had No education was agenda when was a maid and yet like so many immigrants immigrants. They came with the American dream in saved and worked very hard and sent all five of their kids to college. Two of my uncles became doctors. One a university president won an optometrist optometrist and then along came my mother the baby and she was Valedictorian of her high school class. She was debate champion. She she went on to Radcliffe College now. Part of Harvard and was president of the entire student body graduated magna cum laude and because she almost didn't get go to college because she was denied a scholarship because she was black but eventually because her principal enter debate coach went to bat on her behalf. She azazel receive another source of money. She made the fight to enable college to be affordable to low income Americans. Her life's passion and she. He was known as the mother of the Pell Grant Program because she was instrumental in establishing and sustaining this extraordinary program. That's allowed eighty million Americans to go to college. My mom was it was a bad ass in nineteen fifty when she graduated from high school as an African American woman. In a very white state of Maine She he went on through her career to be a pioneer. And so these two parents who were wonderful but had a horrible marriage which can come back to really taught me to fight and to be strong and to not be dismissed her diminished or discounted by others how his career talked about in your household growing up. I mean I. I had a working mom and a professional mother from the earliest days of my life and so on the one hand. It was an example in an expectation that you can work and have family at the same time. It was rare. Frankly at that time this has been the late sixties early seventies for the mothers of my classmates for for example to be working outside of the home in a professional capacity. So I had her example and I had my father's example of rising up in government and in private it's sector we were expected to excel. We were expected to work hard and do our best. We are also taught that you know we could be whatever we wanted to be. They weren't saying you gotta be this or you got to be that but the fundamental message was whatever you choose to be do your best at it and make it something. That's about somebody other than just yourself when I hear you talk about your parents and them as role models to you and your family I think about it two ways on one hand. I'm like that is incredible. crediple an amazing and they obviously created such a strong legacy in you. Second thing I think of is that's got to be a lot of pressure at times. Did you feel that growing up. Who is funny not really not in the sense of? I was scared that I wasn't going to meet their expectations and they were going to get mad at me. They had a really important saying that. Did they sort of banged into me. And my brother which was do your best and your best will be good enough and what they meant by that was you know. Don't be a slacker. Don't be fast but if you do your best and it's not you do badly that's okay. You are allowed to fail. You just not allowed not to try your best. And so they gave us a sort of confidence in safety net. They'll be behind us. We can take risks. We can do something thing that we may not be good at but just do your best. The message was you know. Don't be lame and that was kind of their version tough love. It doesn't mean that they expected us to always get as observe. Be The best person on the basketball team or whatever the the thing was but were they gave us a hard time was when we sort of cut corners fit in the Rom- of your imagination that you would have the jobs that you ended up having served in the way that you ended up serving the particular job that I had were not in the realm of imagination. Because I didn't know yeah. When I was young I was going to be interested in foreign policy and national security? I didn't know the field well enough to say. This is what I want to but I knew that I was likely to to do something and do it to the best of my abilities and that it would be an ambitious objective.

Susan Rice President Trump Brookings Institution Maine President Barack Obama United States Ambassador Advisor South Carolina Danielle Weisberg United Nations Carly Bill Clinton Radcliffe College Basseterre Rice Obama Administration New York Times Bestseller Netflix Basketball School Of International Servic
Why the "Fail Fast" Mantra is a Recipe for Failure

Famous Failures

05:39 min | 9 months ago

Why the "Fail Fast" Mantra is a Recipe for Failure

"The Fail Fast Fail often. Kim failed forward. Mantra is all the rage in Silicon Valley. Failure is viewed as a rite of passage. A secret handshake shared by the insiders countless business books instruct entrepreneurs to embrace failure and flaunted as a badge of honor. There are now conferences like fail con dedicated to celebrating rating failure and fuck up nights where thousands of gathered and more than eighty five countries to toast their failures there now even funerals for failed l.. Startups I kid. You not funerals complete with bagpipes. DJ's sponsorships by liquor companies and slogans. Like putting the fun in funeral. I don't buy it. I don't buy it primarily because when you celebrate something. You often don't learn from it when entrepreneurs are a too busy failing fast and celebrating it. They stop learning from their mistakes. The clinking champagne glasses mutes feedback that they might otherwise receive from Failure failing fast in other words doesn't magically produce success when we fail often none the wiser considered the study of nearly nine thousand American entrepreneurs who found the companies between nineteen eighty six in two thousand the study compared the success rates which they defined as taking a company public of first down founders and founders had previously failed business now you might expect at the experience founders. These people launched just a business book before after all and presumably learned from their failure would be much more likely to succeed than those who never started a business before. But that's not what the study found found. The success rate of first time entrepreneurs was nearly equal to the success rate of entrepreneurs who had previously failed in business. There's there's another study that's also on point. Researchers Examines Sixty five hundred cardiac procedures by seventy-one surgeons over a ten year period. They found that the surgeons who botched procedure actually performed worse on later procedures. The result suggests that the surgeons not only failed to learn from their mistakes but also ended up reinforcing bad habits. So what explains these counterintuitive results. Well when we fail we often conceal it distorted distorted or deny it we make. The facts fit are self-serving theory rather than adjust the theory to fit the facts. We attribute our failure to factors beyond our control in our own failures. We overestimate the role of bad luck. Right we tell ourselves better luck next time. We blamed the failure on someone else. We say while she got the job because as the boss likes her more or we come up with a few superficial reasons for why things went south right. We say things like always only had more cash reserves but personal culpability. Often doesn't make the list now. You might be thinking well. What's a little white lie? After all putting a positive spin on failure can help help us save face. But here's a problem. If you don't acknowledge we failed. If we avoid true reckoning we can't learn anything and in fact act failure can actually make things worse and this is one of the problems with the fail fast. Mantra theory can make things worse if we get the wrong messages from it when we attribute at our failures external factors like the regulators the customers the competitors. We have no reason to change us. We end up throwing good money after bad we double down on the same strategy and hope the wind blows in a better direction. This is I think what most people get wrong about persistence. Persistence doesn't mean repeatedly doing failing insanity as a saying often attributed to Albert Einstein goes is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting expecting different results. The goal isn't the fail fast. The goal is to learn fast. We should be celebrating the lessons from failure. Not Not failure itself. Learning has another benefit. Learning can take the stigma out of failure. There's a quote by the author T H White. That I love off came across it recently when I was looking over my journals from from high school and I ended up incorporating into the book he wrote the best. Thanks for being sad is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies. You may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins. You may miss your only love. You may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics or no your honor trampled in the sewers of Baser Acer minds. There's only one thing for it. Then to learn learn why the world wags and what wags it without opportunities to learn why the world wags and what wags it asked t h white puts it. Failure has no upside but if you learn something if this failure means you're more likely to succeed when you try again then failure one hit us hard learning takes despair and turns it into excitement. It takes the the drama that comes with with failure and turns the volume all the way down with that growth mindset you can maintain gene forward momentum even as the explosions pile up even as the work gets hard and even as the obstacles begin to appear insurmountable as Malcolm Forbes. The founder of Forbes magazine Puts It. Failure is success if we learn from it.

Founder Silicon Valley Malcolm Forbes KIM DJ Albert Einstein Ten Year
How a Solar Eclipse Made Albert Einstein Famous

Retropod

04:20 min | 11 months ago

How a Solar Eclipse Made Albert Einstein Famous

"Einstein is one of the most brilliant scientific minds ever to walk the earth. He came up with one of the world's most iconic mathematical equations E. Equals. MC squared which explains the relationship between energy and mass he discovered that time does not move at the same speed at every point in the universe incredibly despite all these mind-blowing accomplishments commits the german-born scientists didn't become instantly famous for his discoveries in fact he almost never became a scientist at all but one event change the course of his life in history a solar eclipse. Einstein studied math and physics at a polytechnic school in Zurich Switzerland but he had trouble landing academic position afterward so he took what he could get and became a patent examiner. Yes a patent examiner. According to the Swiss agency where he worked Einstein nine managed his days meticulously eight hours of work inspecting new inventions eight hours of sleep and eight hours of conducting his own own research while the patent work was wrote and unexciting just a way to pay the bills his side experiments yielded some ground breaking results like redefining the relationship between space and time Einstein got some fancy academic appointments for his efforts but fame no not even close and not even after publishing his theory of relativity in one thousand nine hundred fifteen arguing that what we understand as gravity is in fact from the curvature of space and time and then the eclipse. It was may twenty ninth nineteen nineteen. The eclipse was stunning stretching from South America to Africa large swaths of the world plunged into darkness for more than six minutes a group of British astronomers Novon Stein's work and use the opportunity to test his discoveries. They found that the light from MM stars was being deflected the Sun's gravitational field at exactly the degree on Stein's theory predicted in plain English. The astronomers confirmed that Einstein this patent examiner with a side Hobby and researching complicated physics had in fact discovered covered the source of gravity a pretty major accomplishment the world finally took notice Einstein Theory Triumphs The New York Times declared writing men of science more or less agog over results of eclipse observations. Some people rightfully so came to call it Einstein's eclipse in one thousand nine hundred eighty one. He was awarded the Nobel Prize afterward. He traveled the world rubbing elbows with royalty in Hollywood stars one time he attended a film premiere with Charlie. I chaplain with the scientists actor greeted with equal applause. Chaplain had a theory about why everybody understands me. He told Arnstein Stein but nobody understands you even with fame. Though life wasn't easy during the Nazi Regime Einstein fled Europe and wound up in New Jersey at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study. He was an outspoken pacifist in champion of civil rights and his fame grew along with his role in public life time to conduct research slowly vanished still when he died in nineteen eighteen fifty five at the age of seventy six. Einstein's name was synonymous with genius. All it took was the moon briefly blocking the Sun

Einstein Patent Examiner Arnstein Stein Scientist Nobel Prize Switzerland Zurich New Jersey South America Europe Princeton's Institute For Adva Charlie The New York Times Africa Hollywood Eight Hours Six Minutes
Happy left-handers day! What percentage of the world is left-handed?

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Happy left-handers day! What percentage of the world is left-handed?

"It is international left handers day left handed people make up ten percent of the world's population there are some studies that have found evidence linking left hadn't handedness and intellectual creativity also some evidence that right handers tend to live longer than left handers a lot of famous people are left handed Barack Obama Oprah Winfrey Bill Gates Albert Einstein Marie Curie and Isaac Newton among

Isaac Newton Barack Obama Oprah Winfrey Bill Gates Albert Einstein Mar Ten Percent
Do White Holes Exist?

Curiosity Daily

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Do White Holes Exist?

"Stein made some rock solid predictions from the existence of black holes to the way, massive collisions could cause gravitational waves. One of his predictions that hasn't come true, yet is the theoretical opposite to black holes white holes. And while we haven't proven the. Exist. Yet. Some scientists think they could explain some of the universe's most unexplainable characteristics. So let's talk white holes. You already know that black holes form when a massive star dies and its core. Shrinks, until it's so dense that nothing can escape its gravity inside at that point of no return. The star continues to collapse into an infinitely dense point known as a singularity. The singularity is one of the places black holes, get messy, at least, mathematically, speaking in nineteen thirty five Albert Einstein and fellow physicists. Nathan Rosen fixed that math by extending the point into a path that leads to a second location. This path was called an Einstein Rosen bridge, but you probably know it as a wormhole a black hole is at one end of a wormhole, and that means that the other end is you guessed it, a white hole, while anything that enters a black hole can never escape anything that escapes, a white hole can never return at least. I theoretically. Well, we know that black holes exist, so far. White holes only exist in pages of physics papers. Some scientists say they're probably just imaginary. But there are still physicists to keep coming back to them in two thousand fourteen theorists how haggard and Carlo Ravelli used quantum theory to show that black holes could actually transform into white holes via something called loop quantum gravity that theory. Basically says that the fundamental building blocks of space time are shaped like tiny loops and since those loops have a finite size that means a dying star can't actually collapse into a point of infinite density, instead, right before it reaches Infinity a dying star would experience a quantum bounce that exerts an outward pressure and turns it into a white hole. If true this could be a solution to the black hole information paradox, which says that even though anything that falls into a black hole can ever escape black holes gradually emit radiation until they disappear. Completely that's a problem because information can't be destroyed a white hole would deliver that information safely out the other side anyway, the black to white transformation would happen in a few thousands of a second. But because time dilates in the presence of gravity that fraction of a second might seem more like billions of years to an outside observer that could be a reason we haven't seen a white hole yet. The universe is just too young and most black holes are just too big for now, although white holes sure would be a convenient way to explain a lot of the universe's biggest mysteries. There's a strong possibility that they're just not a thing, still some of Stein's wilder predictions turned out to be true. Maybe we just need to wait another few billion years to find out

Einstein Rosen Bridge Stein Nathan Rosen Albert Einstein Carlo Ravelli Billion Years
"albert einstein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"So let me ask you a question that you've probably perked before that question is. Do you know the definition of what insanity is well, according to Albert Einstein. It's doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results from the moment, you started investing probably fresh out of high school or college it became very apparent to you that the market goes up in the market goes down you've seen it over and over again that every few years, the market crashes, and sometimes it crashes hard for for most of your life. You didn't really care. In fact, if you're like me, I wanted the Mark de crash back when I was in those younger years, and and why because it was a buying opportunity. Besides I knew the market would recover, and I was young enough that how wasn't gonna use the money anytime soon, but you know, things are different now the closer I get to retirement the less cavalier. I get towards my retirement money, the more I realize that have very little or no. Oh time to recover from major market corrections. And remember Mark Twain once said, I'm not so interested in the return on my money as the return of my money. You know, the quote is true today as it was when he said it corruption uncertainty ups and downs in the market have really not gone away. So are you interested more in the return of your money?.

Mark Twain Albert Einstein
"albert einstein" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Oh, yeah. No. That was even hooking. You didn't do that Stephen hawking? Yeah. Do you know what the scene was? No. This is amazing. Stephen hawking appeared in the season finale of season, six of Star Trek the next generation in one thousand nine hundred three and he appeared as himself because Lieutenant Commander data created a holiday program in which he plays poker. With Stephen hawking Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. Guess who wins the hand of cards who after he bluffs, Albert Einstein? Stephen hawking the hand of cards, at least he wants something in fiction. So even though he lost these bets he beat the Isaac Newton Albert Einstein data in a game of cards. Amazing amazing. I was really excited throw this in. We're gonna listener question from Aden. Who asks when you're driving down the highway, and you open a window. There's a head pounding thud the third sound now to combat this. You just open a second window the second one only needs to be opened a bit to solve the problem. What is going on great question? Aiden? Basically, you've turned your car into a giant flute? So when a flute player blows a stream of air over the whole in the mouthpiece the air strikes. The far edge of the hole in creates a pressure wave that moves through the air molecules and the flute itself to create a tone. That's all sound is a pressure wave. The same thing happens to your car window when it's open the air whooshing by strikes. The back edge of the window and creates a constant pressure wave inside the car. The difference is that your car is much bigger than a flute. So the tone is a lot lower. Instead of a musical note. It's more like a deep throbbing against your eardrums. Scientists call this phenomenon. Helm Holtz resonance the reason opening another window help. Solve the problem is that it creates a whole new pressure wave that interferes with that perfect resonance. So all you hear is wind. Thanks for your question. Aden before we wrap up wanting to give a special shout out to one of our patrons for supporting our show to this episode is brought to you by Dr Mary Yancey who gets an executive producer credit for her generous support on patriotic. Thank

Stephen hawking Albert Einstein Isaac Newton Albert Einstein Aden Isaac Newton Dr Mary Yancey Aiden Holtz Commander executive producer
"albert einstein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"So let me ask you a question that you've probably heard before that question is do, you know, the definition of what insanity is wow. According to Albert Einstein. It's doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results from the moment, you started investing probably fresh out of high school or college it became very apparent to you that the market goes up in the market goes down you've seen it over and over again that every few years, the market crashes, and sometimes it crashes hard for most of your life. He didn't really care. In fact, if you're like me, I wanted the Mark de crash back when I was in those younger years and why because it was a buying opportunity. Besides I knew the market would recover, and I was young enough that how wasn't gonna use the money anytime soon, but you know, things are different. Now, the close. Sir. I get to retirement the less cavalier. I get towards my retirement money. The more I realize that have very little or no time to recover from major market corrections. And remember Mark Twain once said, I'm not so interested in the return on my money as the return of my money, you know, the quotas true today as it was when he said it corruption uncertainty ups and downs in the market have really not gone away. So are you interested more in the return of your money?.

Albert Einstein Mark Twain
"albert einstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"This is ROY, masters Have. A different program tonight And the best friend in physics I, ever had was Albert Einstein but he didn't know how much I respected him I've always been interested in physics Interested to hypnotic states hypnosis and it. May be business out of that I've talked to you about that before I discovered hypnosis. Was not a cure for anything it was actually. The problem we need to overcome But. Having said that I want to speak to about Albert einstein And I want to read Reading anything, I like just to be Spoken as high receive the purpose was what Mike. Crater is, giving to me to say but he I think he's let me out a little. Bit because there's something about Albert Einstein because when was young person No it's just a kid I was fascinated with him. And, I bought a book And the book was baby stuff but I couldn't understand baby stuff. Like I couldn't understand the bible which is baby stuff Excuse me saying so. But the words have meaning but the, words, lead you to meeting and. You, can't suck up the woods. Doesn't help you you have to, understand what it's saying oh I see what that means oh I, see what that means So I spent about a. Year, just with a little book For little kids That's all I needed to get start to produce something equivalent to Albert Einstein And I was well aware of his Where he got his. Degree he hardly. Ever went to school he hated school and so all he did was wanted to figure out what the. Meaning of light and what it is And his discovery was absolutely wonderful equals MC squared I think that's what it was But the thing is If I may say loved that man, where he's coming from what he's what was he was doing is I assumed it was very clear from the things. That were coming back That he didn't go to the class he just asked to talk is friends Well it was all about any figured it out right away. Then he's able to get a degree You couldn't be like. ROY masters who never had a degree and I don't give a damn about I have a, degree I know I know as much as actually a little bit more, forgive me for saying this but I went ahead. Of, him and find out what the singularity is but it's. Thing is just a word of life That'd be light I mean But I have done is. To show A guard and I've found out the here the, same kind of heart that I had and I watched him die at about, seventy years old and what he did why he died. And could have lived a long time it was the frustration and The fact that, he had to do more and more when he didn't need any more but, there's something beautiful.

Albert Einstein ROY Mike Crater seventy years
"albert einstein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"I think that's the battlecry we all need to take up and i think that those those things that you were pointing out that the progressive candidates are pointing on i think we all need to get active in the democratic tent push them toward that that area and if they're not supporting them we need to support the candidates more sound that back i mean we all feel helpless right now like okay this is going to heck we gotta do something hometown i call because being a black woman or whatever we've done everything to try to make things better albert einstein called the disease of white people oh talk about racism and the bottom line is white people the dna american to be right i don't we don't need another bill that he had some guys the other day the police killing black like so i mean we all need anymore we know what has to happen in the liberal so called liked people that have been silenced pakistan there's nothing else i can do i'm a victim of it you know what i mean so what black people getting to the point is and trying to get china ask know what what more and more people are it you all do what you wanna do and he will build alchemy these separately and that's basically what it's gonna come down to because anytime you say impeach bill however there's paying forty five to get away with everything and then there's like people are like it's it's supporting why pillage on an ongoing basis absolutely why figure out you're being comment tony i gotta run thank you you're listening to the thom hartmann program called to oh two eight hundred eight ninety nine twenty five we'll be back in more.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"For every single piece of math huh it'd be single piece of math attract pippi have a peace with the whole now um newton want her was able to uh by comparing the ford of on i point to the way the movement moving he was able to figure out how that forced change hutu since the fourth case we co uh the report two masked who saw i mean it drops it was what we could it in the grand oilforfood double that the between two massive spend the foresees four times this week if you triple that if no interns this week so he figured that out such a universe they're trying to force between old pizza match uh um i'm a and i said in in the beginning we don't don't quite understand what the actual won't gravity is meeting described it but we don't actually know what it is what is albert einstein think of gravity or interest to me he shirt the it didn't exist who also ground with feerick uh as i said in the beginning me the newton it was thinking that there was a force between you know the founding era the early think of it as a piece of visit won't taper off i'm gonna be a lie they put connects the uh for the founding and and keeps us constrained to go around the phone forever newton i sorry arnstein we in august that i've seen the illusion uh what the founding smart thous is it the old bends space around it misplaced place telling me not something you can see um i it's it's it's a heart dimensional thing that you cannot cease up at the some actually create some family in the space around it and us rolls around the to the study in my career let full round derail at world so right she there is no full who broke say i feel we just responding to these this data in wapiti of space time and we can't see it she's white crooked genius on storing career life now the ultimate proof but this is correct and the space or space time is that she thing that can be won't tomb bent discovery made in america on the 14th to set for september twenty fifty and that was the discovery of gravitational waves because if space primal space time he's a he's a thing that can be.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Albert einstein was an eccentric man yet he may have been one of the smartest men to walk the earth am stein was regarded for his childlike wonder his wit and extreme dedication and concentration when it came to his work the expanded the works of newton and introduce dustin new possibilities regarding space and time in fact it's thanks to him ideas such as fasterthanlight travel atomic powered vehicles even timetravel came to be all from his complex daydreams even to this day his work is still recognised his face has become the most used image to represent scientists countless awards and things named after him including the albert einstein peace award the albert einstein metal the albert einstein award albert einstein high school the einstein unit of measurement the list doesn't end albert's work has continued to serve as inspiration to scientists hoping to unlock the keys to the universe and beyond said albert einstein we say thank you for your hard work and your enduring legacy you are truly one of our greatest historical figures thank you for joining us for another episode of historical figures if you want to listen to any previous episodes of historical figures you can find them on apple podcast tune in google play soundcloud stitcher and spotify or on our website par cast dot com spelled b a r c a s t dot com a new episode drops every wednesday but if you subscribe you don't have to remember that if you like what you hear please leave a five star review or tell us what you think on social media were on facebook and instagram as at par cast and twitter park cast network it seems simple but it really helps our show.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

"On august six 1945 the first to weaponized atomic bomb was dropped on hiroshima japan the results were devastating einstein was horrified to see his work converted into such machinations einstein had to do something along with so lord and robert oppenheimer the director of the manhattan project einstein founded the emergency committee of atomic scientists in nineteen forty seven the group advocated the kurt tailing of nuclear weapons in serious control over all nuclear technology uh that was nine stein did postwar he became a leading advocate an antiwar sentiments and a key figure in the one world government movement he wrote a spousing the newlyformed un to maintain nuclear weapons as a deterrent einstein didn't stop there in his public activism he staunchly opposed racism calling it a disease and even became a member of the nwa cp finally though einstein retired from teaching in 1945 but continued to improve his universal theory and quiet isolation at princeton he published his paper on universal theory and 1950 though much of it was incomplete one of his great regrets though he continued to work up until one fateful night in april nineteen fifty five mm while preparing for a televised speech einstein suffered an abdominal aortic aneurysm causing severe internal bleeding he was rushed to the hospital while being prepped for surgery einstein stopped the doctors when asked why einstein said i have lived long enough i am content with my life uh the next day on april eighteen th nineteen 55 albert einstein died he was seventy six his death rocked the world of science yet he had given the world so much in fact even after his death einstein was still getting credit for his work he was nominated sixty two times for a nobel prize and won it to more times for his work in relativity in 1993 and 1995 forty years after his death his theories in revelations continue to change the course of history as we know it he has revolutionized how we look at the universe in will forever be known as the grandfather of modern science.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

"I stein couldn't have been more elated though he was surprised when he found out that he was getting his prize on photo electric theory not his work on relativity why am i work with light quanta was successful i find it pales in comparison to that of my theory of relativity it was a bittersweet moment but in nineteen 21 albert einstein was named the winner of the nobel prize though he wouldn't actually received the award until nineteen 22 due to his continued worldwide lecture to her even then he chose to talk about his theory of relativity at his acceptance speech rather than the photo electric theory but in all seriousness the photo electric theory was important because of it einstein was able to prove one of his theories of general relativity it explained how light consists of packets of energies that respond to certain frequencies this idea has been applied to telecommunications photo diodes and solar panels from the 1920s into the 1930s einstein enjoyed an era of scientific prosperity and fame he received numerous honorary doctorates and memberships and medicine science philosophy you name it he continued to tour the world is a scientific celebrity becoming friends with such popular figures as sigmund freud charlie chaplin and rabindranath tagore but all good things must come to an end as the 1930s ruled up the world became a much scarier place for einstein first einstein's son edward suffered a severe nervous breakdown and was placed in an institution for schizophrenia the rest of his life but while his son went through health struggles germany was going through a different type of struggle enrage from the treaty of versailles and taking the blame for most of world war one germany went through a revolution of fascism and radical militarism.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on Historical Figures

"All albert had to do was be patient iin stein was thrilled to celebrate he in malaysia set out on vacation to lake como for a romantic getaway he wrote to her saying bring my little blue dressinggown so we can wrap ourselves up in it i promise you an outing the likes of which you've never seen this would lead to einstein 's darkest secret miliver in einstein's trip was magical but it brought with it an unexpected surprise malifa was pregnant which was quite a scandal for the time in order to preserve her lover's integrity mileva fled to novi sad to have the baby in january 1901 mileva gave birth to lease or all einstein albert einstein wouldn't go see malaysia and lease or although opting to stay in baron working he hoped he'd find a better job soon and support his new child sometime time later miliver returned to ban to join einstein it is unclear whatever happened to lisa real think mileva gave the child to her friend helen sovic others say the child died of scarlet fever one popular theory is that lisa role survived her scarlet fever but was blinded she was then raised by a different family and lived well into the 1990s under the name zorka though this has never been confirmed einstein never got a chance to see her a tragic afterwards mileva went into a bit of depression finally albert received some good news on june twelve nineteen oh to the patent job and barron came through albert was finally employed the job actually turned out to be better than 9 could have hoped it was relatively easy afforded him lots of time to work on his own theories any earned more money working there than he would've as a junior professor in hindsight working as a patent clerk was probably the best thing that could have happened einstein the work was easy with einstein finishing most of his duties in the morning and getting the afternoon to work on his theories for once it look like things were going albert's way.

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"albert einstein" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"albert einstein" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Interesting make egg maybe you did to we did a a well he were there you little ninety boy at the dinner that's what i hear about isis mahdi by did what's called and student matinee thirty in the morning how can that be what does matinee explained means afternoon the high fever anyway so we were there and it turns out that most of the students were like eighth graders and so they got quite a talk about how to behave at the theater and don't interrupt don't talk to each other and i think they took the lead the kids that to mean don't make any noise el paso there were no laughs nothing and they don't wanna miss behavior at all rick xray are but then when we were all dan they lead to their feet and they had questions really yeah there were sort of interesting you know um i have two kids that have adhd therefore i have been diagnosed with adhd and that's what you hear all the time as albert einstein einstein was the one person who did it all yet had adhd any thoughts on that i don't what do you think about albert einstein are getting balls the imagination in the play imagination is everything to bring an idea to life right in front of you uh and that's what he did he do mind experiments he was not a great mathematician and all of his experiments were thought experiments he he couldn't right an equation that would lead to the answers he had the think about the problem and how to solve them mentally and he used to keep sending of what's the name of see my memory all right thank you you were who is a colleague yes a colleague the old niels bohr niels bohr he used to send nieto's bore thought experiments trying to make nieto's bore recognize that there was something wrong with his theory right and nails borowitz spend week sometimes try to solve votes mind experiments he always did so quantum theory is a fact yeah that i just did not want to accept i don't know if it's in your protrayal or if it's in the writing or if it's just the way albert einstein was but the his interaction with both of the characters.

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