17 Burst results for "Albert Barnes"

"albert barnes" Discussed on Maranatha Ministries UPC

Maranatha Ministries UPC

09:42 min | 5 months ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on Maranatha Ministries UPC

"Your needs. And the writer here at this chapter was so overwhelmed by his affliction. He was going through a mental battle physical battle social battle and a spiritual battle all of the same time. Let me just tell you something real quick as I wrap this up my upset a wrap this up, but I I just feel like God. I'm just trying to touch somebody right now talk to somebody. Your mental battle affects your physical life. Is your mental battle might put you in a situation that could affect you physically can rob you of your appetite so that you become sickly. Your physical battle can affect you mentally and emotionally how many of you ever gotten sick physically and you just felt cut off from God and emotionally like you were lost these things are so intertwined with science can't figure it all out how the spirit combines with the soul and the mind and the heart of man. They can't figure out how all of these things are. So intertwined there's only one that can do and it's the one who made us my friend. If you have not taken off able to the one who made you you are missing your chance for an answering the mental physical social spiritual crisis what's going on in our world today with Riot sucks streets and and looting of stores. I'm going to tell you something. It's not because another man got shot in the street. It's because the horror of man has let go of the things of God and do not understand why they feel the things they feel and they have not brought it to the only one that can make a difference. His name is Jesus and until we turn back to him. There is no home. He also uses this vivid imagery describe how seriously affected people are buying problems. They face in life. The verse three said my days consume away like smoke and my bones are burned like a Firebrand. There's a mental strain that comes upon us off many people fight depression that feel useless there. We some people we call them lazy. They're not lazy. They're so depressed. I can't they can't get up and go to work. They did Jesus. The new Jesus I close with this Albert Barnes who is a Bible commentator. He said the he said this is often the feeling and trial listen carefully. And yet you're ready for this. I went to the Musicians come up so that you're not distracted by them walking cuz I want you to hear this statement for your sake. I want you to hear what this man said about the problems you are facing right now trouble. You are fed the hardships you are facing right now. Listen carefully to what he said. These are profound words. He said this is often the feeling in trial. What do you means is the depression the discouragement the hopelessness? I'm tired of this. I can't take it anymore. That's often the feeling and try but this is what he said and yet. In trial man may be more useful and he may do more to accomplish the real ends of life. He may do more to illustrate the power and the Excellence of faith in God than he ever did in days of prosperity. to hear that He's saying you can do more for God with all your troubles and someone who's in prosperity could ever dream of doing now tell you how it works. Somebody pull this parking lot and a brand new Lamborghini going and they stepped out with a 2000, What's what's an expensive suit these days five grand is up too much for a suit. Probably about two grand to Grand and walk in with a $2,000 Sudan and they've got $2,000 shoes on and they've got gold bracelets and and Rolex watches and Page designer eyeglasses and they construct in here and they tell you how good God has how do.

writer Albert Barnes Sudan
"albert barnes" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

07:28 min | 10 months ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Discipline it. So that? Over a period of thousand years thirteen hundred years, fourteen hundred years, there was this rule that there was a conceptual structure within which you had to interpret everything, and what that did was turned the European educated you European mind into a systematising cognitive entity, and that wants that systematising cognitive entity had been established that it could free itself from those underlying disciplinary structures and go off and do such things as Produced the scientific revolution, for example, which required credible, systematic thinking and so Nietzsche had this really interesting idea about freedom? And he believed that slavery was an intermediary between the undeveloped individual and the free individual that you had to. You had to submit yourself to some intense disciplinary process for some period of time in your life before you could develop any true freedom, and so you think maybe you WANNA learn to play the piano. It's like that's not going to be any fun for a really long period of time. Right because you're really bad at it and there's a million things you have to memorize, and you have to stumble around like. Like an amateur and the same thing happens when kids learn how to read, and some of them never get past that point, and they never get to the point where they can enjoy reading, but in order to put yourself together, you have to put yourself enough vase, and allow yourself to be constricted mangled, even by the the thing that enslaves you, but the goal should be that as a consequence of submitting to the discipline. You become disciplined. And then once you become disciplined, you can emerge from the disciplinary structure as someone who's free, and that's something. That's very much worth thinking about as well. So. That's illustrated conceptually in this. In this? Piece of literature. Let's say because what what the psychological meaning of what God tells Abraham is that all people? All people are subject I mean not equally obviously all people are subject to the tyranny that precedes and that that ideas is. Repeated over and over in the old, comes out most particularly in the story of Moses Right? Because of course, that's the story of movement from tyranny. Where do you go from tyranny? It's an absolute catastrophe. You go from maturity into the desert. You know where you starve. It's harsh. That's what happens in story of exodus, and so that's so interesting, too. Because what it means is that. Sometimes, if you're going to move up, hail the first thing that happens, is you move downhill a lot and so if you want to escape from the Straits, bind you now. You're not going to move forward and go up. You're going to move forward and go down and that's another reason. This is also something that you talked about a lot. Is that you know on the road to enlightenment? You encounter all the things that you don't want to encounter I like all the weaknesses of yourself. All the realizations of the tyranny of the world and the catastrophe of nature, and all of that, and so you step out of your encapsulation. You're ignorant encapsulation and its immediate plummet into something. That's a desert. Let's say where everything is chaotic and where you're wandering around without direction a real catastrophe, so it's because one of the things you might ask yourself. Is that if enlightenment is possible? And why aren't people enlighten because if it was just a matter of going from a good place to a better place, it's like well man. Let's just get added. It's no, it's no problem right. Why would we ever stop doing that? But it seems not to be that. It's that you're here. And that's not good, and it's unstable and you step out of it and it's down. Down to where you don't want to be, and you have to contend with that, and then maybe you can start your struggle upward and so, how God is telling Abraham this and. He's also telling him that it's okay. It's rough, though and now now go to father's in peace, thou shalt be in the good old age. But in the fourth generation, they show come hither again. That's the Israelites at the descendants of Abraham, for the iniquity of the Emirates has not yet full. God is going to leave the tyrants alone until they've. Manifested their full tyranny for reasons that we don't fully understand. And it came to pass that when the sun went down was dark, behold, smoking furnace, burning lap, the passed between the pieces. All Albert Barnes said the oven of smoke and lamp flame symbolize the smoke of destruction, which we've already talked about this catastrophe of of the initial stages and the light of salvation they're passing through the pieces of the victims, and probably consuming them as an accepted talker face are the ratification of the Covenant on the part of God as the dividing presenting of them were on the part of Abra. In the same day, the Lord made a covenant with Abram saying onto Tuesday seat. I've given this land from the river of Egypt unto the Great River Euphrates. Now Sarai. Baram no children. And she had handmade Egyptian. Whose name was hager. visit big catastrophe for Abraham especially in those times, and perhaps now as much. Although, perhaps people aren't as conscious of it as they once were for Abraham without. A biological son, there was no. There is no. There is no vision forward into the future. I mean we don't really know what sort of Timespan over which the Archaic People Thought, but the medieval people already said could think three hundred years into the future without without batting, an eye, and these people who were who were concerned about their descendants were obviously thinking about existence in a way that wasn't just focused on their immediate existence, right, they were thinking about while their children and the grandchildren great grandchildren, maybe the whole society that that stemmed out from them, and that's that's smart. You know one of the things I learned from Piaget, at least in part was that. His idea of the. State which he thought about as part of the biological basis of the idea of moral progress. It's something like that. He was very very smart psg. We said that the the property. State is one where magic you have a family. You got five people in it and you're doing what you want in your in your family. What's good for you? But you're doing it in such a way, so the other four members of your family agree with what you do, and that it also facilitates them doing what they want what they should be doing, and so it's a really tricky arrangement, because it isn't just for you. It's for you in a way. That's for them, and you could also see that that would be something. That would be a multiplayer right because if you have everyone working. Voluntarily towards the same common goal. Then you get a multiplying effect of that, and then you might think well. It's not just you. And your family, it's you and your family today and next week next month next year and ten years from now so you have to take the time span into account, and then it should be you and your family in a way that works well in society, and then it should work well now and next week and next year, and into the future it should be able right that's like sustainability at something like the idea of sustainability, and now that's I would say that's a reasonable way of conceptualizing the holy city. It's something like that. If you're trying to make it concrete, it's like how should. Should you live your life well? Let's say you live your life. In a manner, that justifies its limitation and tragedy. That's a good start, but then let's say that it does that in a way that also reduces the limitations and suffering of the people that you interact with and now and into the future well. Maybe there's a way to do that. I mean a good negotiation. Does that right because if you're negotiating with someone like your wife, for example, what you want is for her. Do agree with the negotiation and one of the things that Ajay said which I think was brilliant, brilliant he..

Abraham Nietzsche Moses Great River Euphrates Abram Ajay Albert Barnes Piaget hager.
"albert barnes" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Note a common sleep through wariness, caroline carelessness, but a divine ecstasy. That being wholly taken off from things sensible he might be holy taken up with the contemplation of things spiritual. It. Really makes you wonder what Abraham was up to in his campsite. So. He was participating in something that enabled this experience. And low or horror of great darkness fell opponent, this was designed to strike upon the spirit of Abram into possess him with the holy reverence, holy fear prepares the soul for holy joy. God humbles first and then lifts up. Echoes of Psychedelic experience and he said to Abram. Know of not that I see a stranger in a land that is not there's, and she'll serve them, and they shall afflict them four hundred years, and also that nation whom they shall serve I will judge and afterward shell they come out with great substance, and now shell go to father's in peace thou shalt be buried in the good old age, but in the fourth generation they show come hither again for the iniquity of the Emirates is not yet full. Commentaries of Joseph Benson once again. They show come hither again hither to the land of Canaan where in the note are now art the reason why they must not have the land of promise in possession, until the fourth generation is because the iniquity of the Emirates was not yet full. The righteous God, is disturbed, determined that the Amer- rights shall not be cut off till they arrived at such a pitch of wickedness, and therefore till it come to that the seed of Abraham must be kept possession so. So the interpretation of the story, essentially, as Abraham's descendants will end up in slaves in Egypt for long a lengthy period of time, and eventually come back to the land of Canaan, then it's interesting, too. Because this is part of Abrahams bargain with God, and in this divine vision, I mean he's been promised everything, but it's a pretty tough bargain because you know when when when God is pushed or reveals himself. Let's say he says look. You'RE GONNA get your damn descendants. But it's not gonNA be. It's it's. It's going to be a tough journey. They're going to be slaves and slave for a very long time and eventually come back, and you won't see it. You'll be dead long before then, and so it's a realistic promise in a sense, and you might say well. Abram is so desperate to keep the faith that he's willing to read. Good into what isn't good, but I think I think I. Don't think that's the right way to look at it and I think the right way to look at it. The people who wrote these stories for very. Very realistic and they knew that even if things turned out well for you, we're still going to be real. You know it wasn't going to be some fantasy. It's like let's say you have a family that flourishes is people are still going to die. They're still going to get sick there. They're still going to have. There's going to be alive. You know with all of it suffering, but it'll be the, but it'll be a life. It's rich enough and complete enough so that it'll justify its its nature essentially. And so. It, came to pass that when the sun went down, and it was dark, behold, smoking furnace and a burning lamp that passed between the pieces. Albert Barnes American theologian commented on this the oven of smoke and lamp of flame, symbolized the smoke of destruction in the light of salvation. They're passing passing through the pieces of the sacrificial victims, and probably consuming the mess, and accepted sacrifice are the ratification of the Covenant on the part of God, as the dividing and presenting of them were on the part of Abram. In the same day, the Lord made a covenant with Abram saying Unto Thi- seat I haven't given this land from the river of Egypt unto the Great River the River Euphrates the key nights and the Kennedy sites and the Cabin Nights, etc.. Now Sarai Abrahams wife bear him no children. And, she had a handmade. Wait a second. I think we'll stop there. I'm tearing out and it's just. It's nine twenty nine. That's a very good place to stop so yes. So. So I should. I should close properly and just some up. So what happens here? Is that.

Abraham Canaan Egypt caroline Joseph Benson Sarai Abrahams Amer Great River the River Euphrate Albert Barnes Kennedy
"albert barnes" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

Dead Celebrity

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

"With complex issues of gift estate entrusted taxation. Jackie also has a strong background in international state planning factor compliance and pre immigration tax. Planning thanks for joining us. Jackie Dave Bahir subjective. Today's episode is Albert C. Barnes Barnes was an American businessman best known for his massively valuable collection that he devoted most of his life to curate the nine hundred piece collection which was worth some twenty five billion dollars featured one hundred eighty-one in-laws sixty nine says on sixty matisses. Forty four Picassos and fourteen Medaglia Ottis to just give a few highlights. Barnes intensely disliked the elite Air quotes of the art world and negated his life to providing education to less fortunate. You defied convention by grouping is our peace based on aesthetics philosophical reasons instead of artists are period Andrea. Matisse said the foundation is the only place to see Harken America Dr Barnes never had children but he took great care to plan for his legacy in one thousand nine hundred eighty two created a title. Trust agreement call the trust indenture. This trust established the Barnes Foundation a charitable organization to manage his art gallery as an educational institution in Lower Merion Pennsylvania. And if that name sounds familiar. That's because it's where Kobe Bryant is cool his lengthen. These documents that was not be sold moved placed on tour or even rearranged within the gallery itself. He wanted used primarily for education but open for the public on a very limited basis. He restricted how it could be viewed when only one day a week usually and how much could be charged to see the restrictions also made it very difficult for the board of to keep the foundation profitable or at least that's what they climbed so little by little a filed corpse-eating asking for permission to change the trust. Provisions Trustees engaged in expensive litigation in court arguing that the terms of Dr Barnes's trust impossible because of the great costs needed to maintain the collection and the final blow. Came in two thousand four when a judge ruled that the Barnes Foundation which now supported by three wealthy and elite Charles Foundations and the Pennsylvania attorney general can move the entire collection to the museum district or Downtime Philadelphia right next door to the Philadelphia Museum of art for context of House offices. Barnes had once said the Philadelphia Museum of art is a house of artistic and intellectual prostitution so safe to say probably not what he wanted. So how could he wishes have been so blatantly disregarded or because of a doctrine of deviation which is a legal principle that allows court effectively rewrite a charitable trust if the purpose becomes impossible to maintain without changes. The trustees argued that there was no financially viable way to keep the art of the building. Dr Bars created for the collection could only be maintained. You'd by permitting the move and I'm sure. The allure of creating a huge tourist attraction by relocating at twenty five billion dollar Philadelphia certainly offered no motivation at all. Now there's more twisters to this story which inspired the excellent documentary the auto steel. And we're not gonNA cover them here. Our focus was just how surprisingly easy. It is to have estate planning documents and wills in particular modified overturned. So Jackie how worried should clients be about how close to the letter? Their estate putting documents will be enforced after they're gone if someone just leaves a will and everything's going outright to their beneficiaries. I think that clients can essentially rest assured as long as they've picked a a trustworthy executor that their wishes are going to be carried out. Same thing with a shorter term trust for beneficiaries. For example. You might leave your child or a younger person Entrust to a certain age. I think that you can probably guarantee who the trustee is going to be or who the trustee and potential successor will be so that you can have pretty good control over these dispositions link where clients do have to worry is especially in this area with long-term charitable dispositions. You have certain people that you're going to put in charge right after your death. Almost a hundred years later you might have an entirely different board running the organization. Different Trustees of a trust and then your vision can start to go awry if you haven't done some really careful planning. What's the difference in this situation between the will and trust and what those different instruments are supposed to do and of what they can do? They can be quite similar documents depending on the type of woman type of trust here we. In the case of Barnes we would have a a well with which essentially disposes of your estate at your death and then we have this trust which established his foundation ultimately to hold this art and carry on this educational mission. This charitable mission rather than necessarily run art museum so that's very different and also obviously Your estate isn't going to last forever. The idea is to administer an estate and have it wrapped up within a year or a few years. This other plan in which the arch foundation was held was mental last. Ideally in perpetuity are as long as possible. And I think that we should talk a little bit more about the doctrine of deviation to and how that's brought us to where we are today in terms of how have you made your wishes known to your fiduciaries how major wishes known your executor if you have a will and how have you made your wishes known to trustees if you have a trust or how we made wishes known to Charitable Corporation. That's going to continue beyond your debt. Obviously some methods making your wishes known or not going to be ultimately legally enforceable when they applied the doctrine of deviation to barnes they essentially were trying to anticipate how could most closely meet. Barnes is desired end. When circumstances changed so I think that something. That's it's important to talk to clients about is what's your ultimate goal and get that in writing. Even if it's not legally enforceable I think if Barnes have been consulted on this and someone had said well it's down to this re they're gonNA move your entire collection right next door to the Philadelphia. Museum are moving out of the suburban setting that you chose change. The way to the artwork is presented from what you designed to something that's perhaps and more accommodating to the General Public. Would you rather have moved? And your vision changed in that way or would you rather sell. Certain pieces certainly arguable. That might have said sell certain pieces or we might have come up with a different way to raise funds to keep the off foundation operating as it was one of the difficulties. When you're dealing with these plans that are intended to last in perpetuity. Right is that that's impossible along the way and you have to anticipate not just through the various scenarios that could occur over the ensuing rest of time but also the legal changes that are and all that stuff is just impossible for an estate plan to like completely for. See it in any way how good you are all. That's kind of why it's best to sort of building at certain points. Some safe spots here where where things can transfer or where where things can change a little bit in some flexibility. Because you know the only fact that you know is that things will change. You have no idea what the changes are going to be necessarily. Yeah in hindsight is twenty twenty but I think that if I were assisting with creating this plan I might ask those questions. If you're endowment runs low in years what changes would you be most okay with if changes had to be made because we never know even if someone gets a hundred million dollar endowment today the market crash could be invested in something that seems really safe at suddenly becomes unsafe or sometimes organizations are even victim of produce aries? Obviously we don't see that very often but it does happen. So how are we going to necessarily plan for all contingencies? That can happen there including running out of money to keep the operation going until depicted the night honestly in this situation despite what I just said. It's kind of the most obvious question right pure album. Barnes's stay planner and he's putting all these rules saying people can come in once a week and it can only be X. People at once and you can only charge this or it's just simple math. Look at and be like well. Rent costs this much to say like a house. It's going to work out. And would Albert Barnes of preferred to allow more people in at a time or preferred to have partnered perhaps with the city of Philadelphia or even with Philadelphia Museum of art to transport people easily from Philadelphia to Marion in that suburb where he was located rather than have the artwork moved. I think people describe Albert Barnes being someone who got what he wanted and who might not have been particularly open to hearing different perspectives. But I think that this is the kind of thing where if someone brought in this concept for an estate plan. You'd have to push back if the individual wasn't willing to sort of look at the different contingencies and plan for them and I think that you know now we have the example of Albert Barnes if someone doesn't WanNa plan for different contingencies. We can say okay but if these unforeseen things happen we want to know. We most like your opinion on what should happen because that can be instructive for how changes should be made. And if you don't provide it you're leaving it up to the court and you're leaving it up to whoever might be in charge of these assets or your plan to one hundred years after death. And that's probably someone who has no personal connection with you concede the Barnes case the smallest possible genuine to the most closely adhering to your wishes can be nowhere near what his wishes clearly would have been right out in. My last possible thing you to do was hurt. His Art to go to this autumn quote elites in the Philadelphia Museum. It's also possible. That was the best way to do it now. You know it's sort of a a weird situation. Where even sometimes the closest possible best solution can be the last thing that person would want if they haven't specified right exactly. I mean he might have wanted everything to be sold and wound down if it got to this point. But we'll never know because obviously it wasn't anticipated the endowment would deplete to the point that they were in grave financial trouble but these are the kind of questions that we need to think of as a state planners. And that's why we why we study things that's why we read case law. People might not have been as aware of these problems back in nineteen twenty two or back. No one this estate plan was initially created but we have the benefit of an extra hundred or so years of history to guide us in making a state clowns. Obviously don't think that most of our listeners have clients with twenty five billion dollars collections. That they're gonNA have to worry about this about unless you do. In which case awesome. Why the Hell you listening to me? You know. I think this concept of what porn was doing this idea of dead hand control and sort of the risks inherent in that and the natural idea that sort of the natural tendency toward of powerful people to want to do that is something that can be instructive for all advisors regardless whether working on estate planning on vacuum. I'm just talking about the dead hand a little bit with that. Mean a good way to phrase it. It's essentially trying to control beyond your death. What happens to your assets as we discussed at the beginning of this podcast? It works best for a shorter amount of time in the longer. It's been since your death the harder it can be. For example sometimes clients will want a particular financial firm or financial advisor to be working on their assets. That usually works fine. If it's just going to be your estate but if you have perhaps a lengthy trust and you might not even think you have a lengthy trust. You mentioned that most listeners probably don't have huge art collections to dispose of. But if you have younger people in your life either. Children Nieces and nephews. Whoever even the children of family friends? Who might be inheriting from you? You have to anticipate that if these kids are three years old today you might be putting something in your estate plan that has assets in them for trust until they're thirty five forty so that's going to be a fairly lengthy amount of time and if you're restricting to certain financial advisers. We don't know what could happen with that. For example people retire financial firms emerge and go under and it might not be clear what to do in those situations so I do try to draft with a certain amount of flexibility to.

Albert C. Barnes Barnes Philadelphia Barnes Foundation Philadelphia Museum Albert Barnes Barnes trustee Jackie Dave Bahir Medaglia Ottis Kobe Bryant Andrea run art museum Picassos Matisse Lower Merion Pennsylvania arch foundation General Public Pennsylvania Dr Bars
"albert barnes" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on WDRC

"Who complied with the customers demand for a server who was not black has been fired Amira Donahue a hostess at the chain's Evansville Indiana location told NBC news that the customer complained to the manager about both her and another black coasters we're working on Saturday evening she made comments about me to my co workers concerning my race and saying I should work in a strip club instead she has to buy me even black and if I'm from here Donahue added the customer a white woman well then loudly demanded that the manager replace the black server and the manager complied you know what I think in that case the customer is not always right if I'd been running that place I'd have said number one that customer can leave my establishment we reserve the right to refuse service to anybody and number two I don't think you should be able to say I don't like this waiter or waitress if it's an attitude that's one thing if it's the color of their skin you tell the customer to leave and you apologize to your employee unfortunately the manager of that olive garden didn't exactly follow that she followed the customer's always right sometimes I have to say it even though I've said the customer is always right from time to time in some cases you have to decide the customer is actually wrong I want to ask you whether or not a ten year old boy should be charged with a felony crime for pointing a fake gun at a car it actually happened Gavin carpenter was pretending to be a character in the video game Fortnite on July twenty fourth last year when he spoke to driver by pointing a toy rifle the rifle did have the orange tip that indicates that it's a a toy the driver slammed on his brakes causing the tires to screech then he began yelling at Gavin and his friend who had aimed a bright orange nerf crossbow with the truck the man followed the bewildered boys who ran to the grandparents home nearby in Colorado springs video captured by a ring doorbell camera shows the man yelling at an adult who answered the door minutes later el Paso county sheriff's deputies handcuffed young Gavin who is ten years old at the time officers escorted Gavin to a booking center where he was fingerprinted and had a mug shot taken and then the boy was charged with a felony and of course the crime in that case was menacing should a ten year old face a charge like that well since the ten year old is going to end up in front of a juvenile court judge I don't see that it's inherently harmful and I do understand that if kids don't understand you don't point even toy guns at somebody especially in public and especially with strangers because they aren't going to understand that it's a toy necessarily it's the kind of thing that could have got the kid shot it could have ended up causing an accident on the road it didn't but do you know we tell to tell adults who pretend to have a gun in their pocket and rob a liquor store even if the gun is a fake even of a gun doesn't exist it's somebody's index finger that is still the crime of armed robbery even if there is no gun this young man this boy ten years old should have been told by his parents you don't point a gun at somebody unless you intend to shoot them at age ten you shouldn't be doing that either fine to have you with me if you want to join the conversation it's eight six six Hey Lars that's eight six six four three nine five two seven seven I love this email and this may tell you something about me from listener Albert Barnes who says Lars it is so comforting to know that the millennials next door who live in a seventeen hundred square foot house on eight twenty five hundred square foot lot well that's how's it runs right up to the edge of the lot have the right to crowd my driveway with their garbage can and they're recyclable B. S. not to mention the two cars that have never nosed into the attached garage they park in front of my property because it's more convenient I just got a kick out of that one and then did you hear that Starbucks in response to corona virus concerns an infection they have now announced that they are temporarily pausing the use of personal cops if you've never done this before most of the places that have coffee including Starbucks and Dutch rose a number of others if you drive up and you have your own coffee mug you can ask them to fill the coffee mug they usually ask you to take the lid off on your own and that again is for concerns of cleanliness well apparently Starbucks which has pushed hard on the reusable Cup by one of their mugs and then use it over and over again instead of getting a drink at a coffee in a paper Cup and then throwing the couple way every time you have a Cup of coffee they have decided to temporarily pause the program I think I get a kick out of this because there are people out there who have declared war on straws they've declared war on paper plates they've declared war on paper cups and plastic bags and every other kind of thing they're actually very convenient and very sanitary and now all of a sudden having pushed hard on these policies to eight people to use reusable personal cubs instead of paper cups Starbucks after has to admit they are an infection hazard and they're going to give them up all drinks will now be served in disposable cups for the time being in the United States and Canada scientists have said in this is worth noting that the corona virus can live on surfaces for up to nine days and the company has also announced it will step up cleaning and sanitizing procedures for all stores along with giving staff extra eight hours to complete that work now the fact is most Starbucks Arbor walked into I I I don't think I can remember ever walking into a thirty one thirty fast food outlets yeah I've seen a few of those I also kind of wonder the it seems the fast food joints were a little bit ahead of their time because in most of the fast food joints as the minimum wage is going up places like Burger King and McDonald's and places like that have decided here here's your Cup go fill it yourself with the soda they decided to outsource the job to the customer which is actually kind of a Tom Sawyer move I kind of admire what they've been able to do with that and finally this people for the ethical treatment of animals I don't think much of the group I've actually met and interviewed the founder of the group Ingrid Newkirk who famously said a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy in other words a human child is equivalent to a rat well Peter is upset because U. S. marines who are caught behind enemy lines should turn to vegan options as they fight for their lives in jungles across the globe the Washington times has the story the animal rights group recently blasted an annual jungle survival exercise known as cobra gold because marines along with allied troops around the world drink cobra blood and kill animals to keep themselves alive general David Berger who is the marine corps commandant was sent a letter lamenting the crude killing of animals during the annual cobra gold twenty twenty military exercise stars and stripes reported this story this week Peters complained continued by citing the killing of geckos and scorpions and chickens and other animals as simply unacceptable the department of defense technologies the marines due to the necessity of the situation will at times find a vegan options in their quest to support to survive you know I think that's a little bit of Bologna they say fruits and vegetables herbs and insects are other options found in the jungle as far as I'm concerned I haven't served in the United States Marine Corps but I admire them all day long and twice on Sunday if you're out fighting a war in a jungle and you find yourself without resupply from home base if you're going to eat something you should probably eat something that is in you know high in protein like a gecko or chicken rather than try to fill your god full of a bunch of green stuff out of the jungle I think Peter is way out of line and frankly they like to dramatize a lot of this nonsense it's really kind of sad because they don't understand these are people who are fighting for your freedoms including the freedom to be a Pete a network if you so choose glad to have you with me oh and then there's this Randy writes at large I find it interesting in a week that Congress found eight billion dollars to stem the tide of a virus but they claim a lack of resources to stem the tidal wave of illegal aliens flooding over our borders obviously it's not a lack of money to stop the invasion it's a lack of political will more to the point one party the Democrats.

Amira Donahue Evansville Indiana NBC
"albert barnes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

14:37 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Breathless god I hope I don't say I sound all right Derek it's you'll give me the signal if I sound a little bit stressed I'm having I'm having fun and I am celebrating good friends who have died recently also and now you may be commiserating with all of you who've had recent loss and another good friend professional in the Ann Arbor area who is gravely ill right now my friend Chris and this is for all of them this is for all of them because I kind of believe the way the Romans believed in I a bit I'm a Christian hi we believe in what we talked about before with about heaven and everything like that but I've got to say that kind of kind of have a soft spot for the way the Romans believed how the the the the continuing influence of departed loved ones how then there never really gone if if you remember them if you if you had a house we actually could afford sculptures of word or death masks of loved ones it was called the tablet in a in a sort of a big you know Roman house usually a townhouse indeed there would be this sort of connecting room where the ancestors would be and you know the father of the patriots would always bring the children strictly the sun to familiarize him with his heritage and remind him kind of weak sort of think of it as an a plus bleach but that the idea that you are part of a continuing and these these figures maybe senatorial met may maybe maybe not means that kind of a family maybe not but they would have you know statues and likenesses of the departed family members that when you spoke of the menu said good things about them you fed them in the afterworld and I've always kind of I believe that so you know I I sort of this show is really commemoration and a thank you to these people we've mentioned today and I guess by extension it's kind of like speaking of our Memorial Day generally for everybody for all of you and all of your family members and all of you who've suffered losses particularly recently it we're talking about the Phillips collection with Duncan Phillips came from a of what is similar background to a Charles Lang freer of Detroit we talked about him he left is fabulous Asian art collection and first museum outside of the Smithsonian castle to be located on the national mall at the turn of the twentieth century with Duncan Phillips is very much like him he was not only highly knowledgeable about our history but he also had the courage to collect in areas that others were not collecting in so those pieces were relatively cheap you know at the time for for free he would be collecting some vases and and and and and Tong dynasty pieces at a time when everybody was going for the really heavily floral ceramics of the Ching dynasty of the last honesty in pain you know even more than a hundred years ago thirty thousand dollars for a vase imagine that being it is about seventeen to twenty times by value into to match today's dollars cities by these other things in traveling there and getting these pieces at very reasonable prices that are now considered more aesthetically are important certainly for art historians but also in terms of value today when they come up for auction Duncan Phillips was the same same way his house became a museum of the Phillips collection I definitely urge you to go to that well we left off with the flagship painting the luncheon of the boating party painted in eighteen eighty one by Pierre Auguste Renoir after the time that he had sort of shifted away from Monet Passaro Sisley and his other that that that sort of like fraternity of like minded artists is it basically is kind of like the Beatles joining together but the Beatles and say nineteen sixty nine we're still together but we're doing our own things already that's the way the impressionist were from day one from the time of the first impressions exhibition in eighteen seventy four they all have their own ideas about where they wanted to go it was kind of like this confraternity all to get we're here to get now I don't know whether we're going to ever exhibit again well they did they they would exhibit into the early eighteen eighties actually and some sometimes all of them to be together usually there would be others who it's sort of like set out for one of the the the annual showings it but the luncheon the boating party showed it shows run while when he finally realized kind of like what Cezanne already decided with the guy had always been being one of France's great portrait painters anyway even before it became known as a modern artist that he needed line he needed some waiting this to his figures that wasn't enough to have the broken brush strokes of that remember the promenade we talked about last time which I saw when it was still part of the British Rail pension fund collection on more or less permanent exhibition at the National Gallery of Scotland in it and I saw there that was my pick for me I'll tell you in the art world going to that museum those were all sold and and nineteen ninety four a very handsome profit to the British rail pension fund I can tell you but that style from eighteen seventy the year the Franco Prussian war for Renoir he finally gets rid of that and he is now in new territory I actually started doing it in the late eighteen seventies by eighteen eighty one with lunch in a voting party he's turned the corner we are looking at real flesh and blood people yes they look very very peachy I I'm I must say that that this is like going to a farmer's market in a way right in the middle of summer and everything's right all these people in their skin they all look right up the also all look alive the people who own the restaurant boating concession along the send just a few miles outside of Paris where everybody's gathered at one of the most beautiful still lifes of the late nineteenth century I mention the wine residue in the glass of the woman Eileen shar ago who will marry run while in become his wife in just a few years plane with a little dog and then the others other other friends of his other fellow artists actresses in then behind them I didn't get to describe I broke off but now I want to describe the way that they are all girdled for word to us which makes us feel like well we're at we're in a chair just off the end of the table world were seated looking at them because they are girdled not only by the canopy and the posts supporting it but by these beautiful reeds and tall grasses that run while was expert at now he maintain this from his earliest days remember he started out as a a painter of the most porcelain so the idea of floral bouquets on ceramics he was great at doing that and where did that come from that became because he always loved the rococo style of French art decorative art in the blustery paintings over doorways and beautiful French tells the town houses where the aesthetic is that everything compliments the other piece you just don't have a painting in the paneling in one of these rooms that the that the painting compliments the paneling which is gilded in beautiful eggshell white in fact you've got the egg shells ground into it which is reflected in and of itself you've got chandeliers you've got the bric a brac usually Chinese vases but in French warmer will decorating the the mantle you've got the parquet floor you've got the loop what we call the Louis the fifteenth style furniture of course which always has this Capreol legs that are meant to look like you were seated in something that is yielding to your weight it's almost like you're in a garden or whatever and you sit down on a set teammate of lines everything was meant to seem organic of course you know in a highly artificial kind of way in a very fantasy idealize kind of way but it was meant to remind you of nature I and it it worked it worked for a long time in the neo classicism slowly comes in and I love that period actually it's my if I have to go in French furniture and decorative arts the Louis the sixteenth period I into the direct what period is probably my favorite but ran while loved that period in and basically much of his art of impressionism is a reinvigoration of that art we see that in the beautiful grasses behind the people the luncheon of the boating party there's a there's a story about this with with Duncan Phillips where he and the other Titans collector of the time of modern art these two collectors along with America side did more to final great modern works of art from Europe in American collections and ultimately museums more than anybody else however at C. Barnes is the other one known as the terrible tempered Mister Barnes he is like the the evil cousin think of like the witcher whatever we've got Samantha and I heard her evil sister cousin comes and she's got the dark hair and whatever but obviously it's the same actors with these two could be they're very similar but polar opposites at the same time give Duncan Phillips slight unassuming again a teacher a natural teacher a collector lives with his own his own art people are welcome into into his house eventually is left is a museum and they move elsewhere on Foxhall road and and Washington Barnes he's like that too with a very similar idea that education and being the millionaire collector who allows the collection to be seen by the public but he's more restrictive he certainly more guarded he has a pretty volcanic temper that leads to his death in nineteen fifty one Mister Barnes apparently did not like stopping at at stop signs and he was driving his big Cadillac he would beat this morning we go through the intersection this is in the town where he lived in Merion along the main line just outside of a Philadelphia we've hit by a truck he's not just hit by a truck the truck rolls over him I and the man who drove that truck was actually a friend of a teacher of mine who became a mentor of mine in high school and a friend for the rest of his life Mr Hartman and even I can use for say I always called Mr Harmon and his friend said to him he said I couldn't believe this freaking this guy Barnes you would see him he just simply beep go through the well this time he was so close to me I couldn't stop he ran right over nineteen fifty one ended the life of one of the most important collector educators but the two of them are in Duncan Phillips this house the Phillips collection in DC and Barnes we've discussed it was famous for collecting run what he had I think he has he had more than a hundred of them maybe about a hundred and fifty run was all together the predominate far more than any of the other artists he loves also in his own collection of the Barnes foundation now in Philadelphia downtown but Barnes is they're looking at the luncheon the boating party in in he says Iraqi this see only run while that you have isn't it and Phillips looks at him and says it beautifully any chest this is like one of those little asides record here would say in the sixteenth century it's the only one I need it took him ten years to be able to latch on to luncheon of the boating party and when he says it's the only one I need he meant it and when you put that I love the run was in the Barnes collection affect the curator laughed when I said on about eight years ago on one person was on again yeah I said I've always loved his run was later nudes his his later are I call them the drying newts and he knew exactly what I meant and and and laugh but he rifled them off dozens a year I luncheon of the boating party is a different thing it is a standalone masterpiece so one collected quality and quantity the other one collected supreme quality in one example I and it's a large painting and it's it's a fantastic price another story about Albert Barnes he created in at the end in the late eighteen nineties he created a a drug an analgesic called Argyros which believe or not is still around I think it it's been brought many times of other pharmaceutical companies might even be called something different now but its properties using silver are still are still being used it was a major treatment for probably the major treatment for about thirty years for gonorrhea I and it went through an explosion during the World War two years as you would imagine but he made a huge fortune from it I and he funneled like Philips did with his inheritance in in his own business interests funneled most of that into collecting has part any collected art that other people really didn't want number one the impressionists and the post impressionists he wasn't afraid of small canvases or or or or works on on panel I he was at the same time highly jealous of his collection and he was very restrictive about who could come in for years decades he had a woman named violet dimazio who's French who was kind of like his major domo you had to go through her all the way into the mid eighties you had to go through her to make appointments to see the collection in the original museum house in Merion a few years ago about ten years ago moved to downtown Philly and I described had a totally re did it to make it look exactly like the original house it's incredible or the hangings or or a completely do a complete double cuts of what they used to be but you had to go through her to be able to get in there and when he first opened it up say to the public journalist would go and you know they they would comment on it and they savaged his collection William Manchester was not very kind to Barnes is collection and wrote about it in The Philadelphia Inquirer I think it was and Barnes got back at him and he didn't even know it all of a sudden Manchester's there he notices him in one of his galleries commenting to somebody about one.

Derek Ann Arbor
"albert barnes" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

"Stuff? I believe in a higher power probably have to call myself more spiritual children religious today but you know everybody got everybody got a layman roof. Everybody but at the point where call behavior and arcade perspective that leave loopholes a very very poor. Moral behavior by powerful man doesn't interest me bad Mojo Mojo in the height of blasphemy. You said earlier you don't WanNa talk politics and I don't WanNa get into politics. It's but there is the reality that your guy that travels the world and you travel. The world has an American. Have you felt any sort of difference in the last three to forty years traveling the world as an American not really okay because you know driving while black is worldwide first of all so the black experience in the world is what it is whether you're up the ladder and protected by a white or financial buffer. Or whether you're out here in the Bush doing your everyday day You know the punishment is five times harsher for us no matter what the the punishment is so dealing with the microaggressions at whatever. I know when I'm in Europe. My spatial reference has to be different. We're GONNA get bombed more. People are more physical cool except it. This is the wrestling Jim. I'm going to have to wrestle here. Great be out of here in three hours course. You know what I'm saying do that so I haven't felt the difference in that sense. That's but I have felt a difference in the way people talk about American politics and the fact that they come fleet Barack Obama's ethnic make up with With the behavior of gentleman Like people talk to me about Barack Obama as if he's an exception to the nigger rules and now they got a nigger in office. This and they gotta talk to me and so it's very healthy space because it brings all of it out Are you happy to see it out. 'cause I like it better that way. Well you no institutional racism and classism you know the classism of it is beginning to show. Why folks of Humble Beginnings are beginning to understand that the one percent things that they're just as much a nigger as thank you and me is Naggus so I do? I hope so I do I I have to hope so I do. I think I mean I I see it in my classes. You know when I'm teaching teaching more often than not like it's and one of the things I always go back to when I'm talking to them is like you know I don't envy the fact that after you leave me and the people that you like to hang out with and all those good vibrations when you go to the crib you gotta deal with an elder elder. WHO's on some Maga- ship? Whatever your whatever your people's version of it is right and that's why you gravitate to us the way you do? Russia balanced different. We talk to you openly. We let you comment space. You got a voice in here. You're only white girl in here but when you in here with all those Brown folks you feel real fucking empower. Don't you and then when you go home all that Shit is sitting on your head then you you. You do. Rebellious shit to rebel against it. And this art in this style. Stuff that you come into this part of it is all it ashes jet black. So let's talk about it and to see a nineteen twenty year old kid whether the states and the Netherlands on Europe wherever be like you know that shit makes sense what you said to me. What's been the most rewarding thing about the experience for you? Seeing kids starts figure this shit out even if they're shit as your shirt. I'm just paint a picture for them and make them see some different. You know. Just just be like you being effective in somewhere. Let me just say one thing to a kid. Light them up send him on a better path. I mean I've only had one full semester has a professor teaching for eleven years. I had one full semester Lincoln. And there's a few kids in my class. I was like Oh you don't you can't approach this like you're go skate through it. You know you're going to get out of here with a D.. What's the point? And you want you studying. What communications -tations? So you're just GonNa do like the cliff notes Bam minimum weak- pedia. Uh Take Home Homework level of it you. You don't give a fuck you just here because because you what you don't want to be in the street because you trying to get away from the series you're really care about this and take that kid and have and be like wait a minute. Say That again same. Can you say that's lower. You know what I'm saying. That's Boston seems seems. That's that's shedding skin. That's opening doors for kids. Are you going to continue to do it. was it something that you just kind of off and on are you going to be tenured for a while Yeah I'm going to do it for forever. Well they got a lot to share with people. Think you know it'd be nice relationship with the institution that wanted to build on something. Do you have to go to these schools to take classes or it's coming observed because I want to see one one day so far you'll have to come. I mean I'm I'm doing my next teaching and Philadelphia's at the Barnes in March for the thirty Americans exhibit of doing a one day seminar. Okay what will that be on. That's Albert Barnes and his relationship with the Civil Rights Movement and the Harlem Renaissance and African art teaching at the Barnes for the last three years for eight weeks per per semester. But we can one day seminar like a eight hours seven all day In March and so you marbot that you know. It's not like given so much information out here. That people just all go after wouldn't think to go after only you can give it to them and they can use it to make their situation though more clear coat so we've talked to chip and and read about different cities different vows as a DJ. Are there certain cities that are similar that you can play the same set to have a great time but it wouldn't work say Orlando Atlanta Interesting question I think that each city has a complexion and disposition and affinity to certain things But I don't I don't know if I really subscribed to vocabulary of if I can't get away with this in this city like for me that that's that that's that athlete challenged ship. That's challenging to me. I'm like Oh you can't so thing that you played at peak time in Philly. You tell them you can't play it out of Miami says who okay. That's word okay. I'm not GonNa Played Eight at Pizza. I won't play at ten minutes to peak time just to see it's just a song about four and a half minutes if they don't like it they're going to slow down or go to the bar or go to the bathroom. They're gonNA love something. I play in the next ten minutes. Right let me stick that jab out there if I can get this guy if mark I'm making Bite on a jab it'd be bites I`Ma pop them real clean and in those and it'll be over quick. Do you have like a Goto like like you. You start to feel the energy lagging again a little bit at some point. You're like okay I need to. I need to put this one I need to put this went on to get every piece of emergency. The universal dance is back to the same questions back to the same question. I think is ability to think on your feet. I think it's the free style of it. You know I mean keep making these athletic analogies if it was a fight and you got popped on a clean one and you got a little goofy. What do you do to get your base back onto you? That's what you WANNA do between around. You got some older going right two minutes before you even get ahead. Yeah Yeah right you just got caught with. Are you saying you like Shit. But you're a guy that's got forty thousand records. I mean how can you be like. Okay here's exactly.

Europe Barack Obama Albert Barnes Shit classism wrestling Bush Boston Miami Russia Netherlands Harlem Philly Orlando Philadelphia Civil Rights Movement mark
"albert barnes" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

"Don't you and then when you go home all that Shit is sitting on your head then you you. You do. Rebellious shit to rebel against it. And this art in this style. Stuff that you come into this part of it is all it ashes jet black. So let's talk about it and to see a nineteen twenty year old kid whether the states and the Netherlands on Europe wherever be like you know that shit makes sense what you said to me. What's been the most rewarding thing about the teasing experience for you? Seeing kids starts figure this shit out even if they're shit as your shirt. I'm just paint a picture for them and make them see some different. You know. Just just be like you being effective in somewhere. Let me just say one thing to a kid. Light them up send him on a better path. I mean I've only had one full semester has a professor teaching for eleven years. I had one full semester Lincoln. And there's a few kids in my class was like Yo you don't you can't approach this like you're go skate through it. You know you're going to get out of here with a D.. What's the point? And you want you studying. What communications -tations? So you're just GonNa do like the cliff notes Bam minimum weak- pedia. Uh Take Home Homework level of it you. You don't give a fuck you just here because because you what you don't want to be in the street because you trying to get away from the series you're really care about this and take that kid and have and be like wait a minute. Say That again same. Can you say that's lower. You know what I'm saying. That's Boston seems seems. That's that's shedding skin. That's opening doors for kids. Are you going to continue to do it. or is it something that you just kind of off and on. Are you going to be tenured for a while Yeah I'm going to do it for forever. Well they got a lot to share with people. Think you know it'd be nice relationship with the institution that wanted to build on something. Do you have to go to these schools to take classes or it's coming observed because I want to see one one day so far you'll have to come. I mean I'm I'm doing my next teaching and Philadelphia's at the Barnes in March for the thirty Americans exhibit of doing a one day seminar. Okay what will that be on. That's Albert Barnes and his relationship with the Civil Rights Movement and the Harlem Renaissance and African art teaching at the Barnes for the last three years for eight weeks per per semester. But we can one day seminar like a eight hours seven all day In March and so you marbot that you know. It's not like given so much information out here. That people just all go after wouldn't think to go after only you can give it to them and they can use it to make their situation though more clear coat so we've talked to chip and and read about different cities different vows as a DJ. Are there certain cities that are similar that you can play the same set to have a great time but it wouldn't work say Orlando Atlanta Interesting question I think that each city has a complexion and disposition and affinity to certain things But I don't I don't know if I really subscribed to vocabulary of if I can't get away with this in this city like for me that that's that that's that athlete challenged ship. That's challenging to me. I'm like Oh you can't so thing that you played at peak time in Philly. You tell them you can't play it out of Miami says who okay. That's word okay. I'm not GonNa Played Eight at Pizza. I won't play at ten minutes to peak time just to see it's just a song about four and a half minutes if they don't like it they're going to slow down or go to the bar or go to the bathroom. They're gonNA love something. I play in the next ten minutes. Right let me stick that jab out there if I can get this guy if mark I'm making bite on a jab it'd be bites I`Ma pop them real clean and in those and it'll be over quick. Do you have like a Goto like like you. You start to feel the energy lagging again a little bit at some point. You're like okay I need to. I need to put this one I need to put this went on to get every piece of emergency. The universal dance is back to the same questions back to the same question. I think is ability to think on your feet. I think it's the free style of it. You know I mean keep making these athletic analogies if it was a fight and you got popped on a clean one and you got a little goofy. What do you do to get your base back onto you? That's what you WANNA do between around. You got some older going right two minutes before you even get ahead. Yeah Yeah right you just got caught with. Are you saying you like Shit. But you're a guy that's got forty thousand records. I mean how can you be like. Okay here's exactly the one that's going to always go offer honest songwriting. I think that if I had going to answer you as honestly as I can. I think there's a thing about songwriting and Melody Army. That's that's everybody on the same page. Okay so you know some songwriters you really love. I mean good guy. Where do you start the forty thousand records? Two Thousand Twenty three. Have you seen. I mean because we're all similar age rolled ahead. So do you think the music less honest now. Well I think the music is more frank you know the from the seventies into two thousands it was. Hey listen if you give me a chance. I'll take you to dinner Nice. You know what I'm saying Hold the door for you now like sticky pussy out so and that goes across the spectrum even even would with the video commercial stuff. Sometime isn't ironic. Though that we're living in this age where everybody's real concerned with political correctness and yet the music seems to be Maybe more aggressive than it was thirty forty years ago. Well you know pop. Music is now invaded. Everybody space because is everybody functions through the Internet. So you know there's a whole bunch of things that are conflated together on top op of our and you know and it's a way of life for a lot of people a lot of people who have nothing to do with the music industry following that model of how things go. And what's what's what's important and what's popular and what's trending and what's moving the needle in terms of you know how our the crowds different now. There's been a whole generation. That's come up since you started. Dj Our the crowds different when you play a show now than they were or is that too. General question is does one the enormous gaping difference. It's that because of the way. Social media works because of the way people tie themselves to UC rooms all the people who are recording. What's happening in order to show people? Who aren't there right? That they had are right. Yeah so bizarre man. It's so crazy crazy when you think about that. We came up in an era where you did things because you wanted to right. He didn't do things because you had to show everybody that you did it. You're like Oh this is a cool thing. I I WANNA do it now. It's like Oh wait. Everybody else finds out where I was. They're gonNA be mad actually picture of this whole scene right here. Ah We don't have to wait because you know the boy you can stick it out there immediately. And you become this purveyor of taste for other voyeurs us. And they become purveyors of taste for other voyeurs and US makers are out here making shit trying to figure out how to straddle right between that shit and make shit. Yeah I mean. We're we're at a weird weird time and you guys. All three of you are in music music we. We were such a radically different industry than it was when any of you guys started to still for them. And if we maintain that vocabulary Larry with enough of the makers out here the you know industries and models come and go if you're vested in find your little shit in it and do your shit or go work somewhere else man. Hit a shit her anymore right. Fuck Outta here Bro. It's different in back in the day because you get immediate feedback on what you're doing right back in the day. It wasn't like you throw a song out on soundcloud or Youtube. People do thumbs down immediately if they want to change so you had to hope. They made it to the station in time for the show. Hope they got the handshake and talk. Hope to pay all right so many levels man. Yeah you know yeah you got big Daddy Kane tape. He had to take the bus to the rectal. Okay got it got it that Oh shit I got six also get a big Mac. The Rock I still remember when the saying Wu Tang forever drab cut school that they were my cousin wrote around smoking fucking dirt. We'd yeah playing that thing and it was like the best they ever actually. It was an experience. What's it like? Now they just open up. Their Sitter Ruben alone. Download the salt. They could they could still be in a car. I don't think in had the weeds probably mad butter. Uh sticking to the blunt so this is the rapid rapid fire..

Shit Albert Barnes Europe Netherlands Boston Miami US Harlem Wu Tang Philly Orlando Philadelphia Melody Army Ruben mark Civil Rights Movement soundcloud
"albert barnes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"How we roll on this Monday. so if you were at Paul Brown stadium yesterday to watch the bangles my condolences. it was a gorgeous day and obviously there were better options for your time. forty one seventeen was the final it was not that close to the bangles are now into it I'm not even going to get into percentages of who starts into an who makes the playoffs and all that nonsense because it's not applicable here this team has some major major problems that they have to address and I just don't know how you do that two weeks into the season but maybe someone who does. is the second most ravishing redhead in the city of Cincinnati and he's just back from one of my old home towns told so by god Ole new USA in the great state of Oklahoma he is rocket J. Borman rocky welcome to the show and how the heck are you. and I couldn't be better how are you do you enjoy toll so that's a very nice town. hot. during the broadcast it was like a hundred and thirty on the field I was like no no shade anywhere by but a nice town like the downtown is pretty unique have some some develop parts in imports that are just kind of you know kind of not really develop some cool restaurants for NYC yeah it is good town I'm not on the tourism board but yeah good town all right so you like me consume this game yesterday and and here's the thing is I think this this the the football hasn't changed in a hundred years the he who blocks and he who tackles usually wins the game and this team can't block rocky it can't block it they've got players now that were in that game yesterday there were injured but even before yesterday this team's offense of line cannot run block they could not get any kind of push and I'm just wondering where you go to find that at this point in the year. that's a tough thing can because what was the issue last year with this team because one align right off season comes around free agency nothing really happened nothing of of any sort of significance comes around we address the position but then bam just like that first round draft pick it out for the season so it's just really essentially the same guys is last year on the Michael Jordan is in there he's plan and and doing okay I guess rookie but you know what yesterday twenty five yards rushing and the biggest thing can was when a defense can get pressure without bullet scene the best when you're hitting on all cylinders in just right from the first time the fact in you don't yes they won his backup phone based on his own ends on a poor man rush in the offense of line look completely and that there is no where to go with the ball because seven guys can now drop into coverage and in the store all day long when a team can can pressure you without blitzing it is going to be a long day and potentially a long season and a an egg and again if you can't run you can't throw and if you can't buy role you can't well I mean it's just it's it's a it's a cat. it is but why would they not think this would have been a problem I I get the Jonah Williams injury I mean you know it's it's just bad luck this team seems to have bad luck with offensive linemen but you knew that this was a this was a group from last year that really need an overhaul they brought in a guy from buffalo who looks like just a guy they run out at the start of free agency in the first thing they do is give Bobby hard money and that you they they would have to have known I mean this is a just a let's Clint bowling Haiti heavy come there he sues moment in July they would've had to of known at some point before then that bowling was at least contemplating retirement I just I just don't know how they painted themselves in the in this corner of my being too critical here. I think you're right on the money and and I was fully expecting Cameron when the final roster cuts were made after you know that Thursday night final the fourth preseason game you last one teen early start on the ground who couldn't cut was sort of veterans are maybe late more career management team camp on a roster spot forms some of those guys become available before reaching the bangles didn't didn't do much there and so I mean that was really the end of it I mean it was the all season okay created you come around let's let's address this position wasn't really done okay we had the draft but that didn't work out but then also training camp and then at the conclusion of training camp no moves of any significance were made so I I don't know it's just a. expect to see that you've massively different results when you got the essentially the same pieces I know their coach terror in there and there's some different schemes and different things they can do and and by all accounts was happy with the offense of line in pre season but here we are in in room service to I think one of the things I took away from this game in fact the week one versus the Seahawks what would we see both sides the ball ever was real impressed with the scheme dry Austin's of skins right there was a restriction of your horizontally vertically defense only we saw five down Lyman sets we sell three thank you for that too so lots of things that look like a computer the thing oxen and the merits of this all week that was the first game James all show anything anymore at all in preseason so schemes on week one can take other teams by surprise and certainly look like it did take the Seahawks but after that he come here this week versus see this the the the forty Niners. how can a man is a genius okay in terms of play Collins otherwise coaching. going to figure those things out then it comes down to our your players better than their players and right now I don't need to look at this roster Albert Barnes state wow I player shouldn't even better than the forty Niners really in any position crashes enough for that that was that that will be working to neutralize coaches in this league are so smart can figure out your schemes elephants crucial scheme when they are deficient in there if you got the best player his line of employer government a man you could recommend a man Zazzle instant quarterbacking but when you we see when when you don't have that you have to school the ban was more successful with that in week one this week they were not in their players part just played better in the bank so much for the offense on defense no sacks for the Bengals one tackle for a loss to quarterback hits I mean the what I'm looking at numbers like that rocky I'm looking at at at a defense that either was out coached or a defense and at times they look this way they look Gast a defense that was struggling with conditioning problems or a defense that was completely mesmerized by a forty Niners offense that that's good it's not great what was going on on that side of the ball I couldn't provide me can I I couldn't figure out your part here here's a defense boils down to you know is the knowledge from playing it he walked along a scrimmage interest like a hundred option the play the author could run right between that time and time they snap the ball your job as a defensive player is the window down all the option as an intern in a kind of a person that sort of situation and say okay the least thing they could do but down defense okay because of that you can only make a play they may run and then were there on the field you can call the lemonade another thirty percent a play that one can you start looking at formations can you should look at line then splits yeah you look at wide receiver splits in started again and as the players want to get that okay here into this office and then from there it was just we are. but the thing was they had no idea who they were completely off guard no anticipation of what the plays at the forty Niners require one in particular what does it come when it comes down to split so many times I I I I can tell you how many times it looked like it was happening to forty nine or you can dance that's why we're here is like in a bunch that circling back you know what you think you're gonna happen even the wide receivers are going to break out which means you're going to start Compaq and then break out almost to go try to create space wondering now alignment because they want to get an angle on you block you for an outside line and that happened to the state you know linebacker I don't know how many times just like. the wide receiver gonna come down on you in either going or anything which is very risky but you can make a big place or go over the top and be in a position where you can have a harder edge yeah and that didn't happen at multiple times cannot did not happy you've gotta have a plane you got a state we're gonna do this order. and then be ready it looked like they were just their heads were spinning their like they have no idea what the forty Niners may do on any particular play what do you give us some hope here because every afternoon a three year track getting into the studio all right and you get. you have the audience hold give us some hope here where we can look at this and say there may be a light at the end of the tunnel what what can you tell us right from your vast experience as a player as a coach as a broadcaster what can we look at here and say get no it's not as bad as it looks give us some hope here rocky well rounded hitting me that comforting as a union record of an answer but I I've been a parts of in parts of games like this can were literally nothing on the wall and sometimes it just snowballed it's just not your family in just thing to start the religious finish discourages flowing Tapia boom boom boom boom boom years nothing you can really do so I hope that you come back and take a look at the tape you want something you start to work on the. ation of what the other teams down to list you want and that sort of thing I don't think it's I can't be in despair again just how the bottom often been special teams every hi I just hope that you know it is not this bad again I don't think the bangles are are the greatest team only obviously by any source but I can imagine being this bad in the players and the fan of thousand times and the post struggling to go back to work they got a place you know I mean agent Greene hope was gonna come back soon yeah but some of the things you're doing often salute don't look so Hey you when it's time but I don't know I I think you're gonna see more times canister the path of yeah which of course the defense can react to but without being able to run the ball and without being able to get junk yards plays down the field it's it's pretty hopeless offense John Ross finally looks like he gets it I I know we had yet to drop yesterday Bali sure to call it but the fact of the matter is when he gets the ball when he catches the ball and he runs with it there's nobody that can keep up with them so I'm kind of hoping he's turned that proverbial corner of board looks bored to me looks good I like boy I me but their wares the there was little separation yesterday between world defensive backs and wide receivers offense of linemen in defense of line I don't want to I I don't want to I don't want to wish that all of this good will that came to town here with Zach Taylor is being eaten up in the last couple weeks what made out say what if they don't play any better than what they played yesterday they're going to get thought the buffalo this week. no question about it and it's it again I I don't think it's is is I don't think yesterday I don't think we one was an indication of where the seam gonna be I don't think necessarily yesterday was no indication of who exactly this team is probably somewhere in the middle but you know there there are some positives but is system especially in the line of scrimmage cans we've talked about when you can't run in your in your quarterback who looks like he really likes enjoys and is still alive in the offense but we can't say this to you can get the time to put the ball on the weapons it's it's gonna be tough so. schematic leader to work around that whatever they got to do it's this has a lot of games ago canelo games you got a lot of schematically is coming up today at three o'clock rock we can't wait to hear you and Eddie back to get it he's back right. you got a tan we've got you know I think he drank all the Bourbon in in the southwest so we'll be back injury to go he's tanned rested and ready your red head you never tan you stay out of the sun together again at three o'clock today rocket thank you for joining me and will be listening to you later on this afternoon. you're the best thank you there is rocky boy man who sees all and knows all and has been there and understands what it's all about. man I'll tell you what that was brutal yesterday base don't get up nine fifty two newsradio seven hundred W. L. W. seven hundred W. L. W..

Paul Brown stadium Cameron seven hundred W twenty five yards thirty percent hundred years three year two weeks
"albert barnes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Thursday night final the fourth preseason game usually last one came early start on the ground who's getting cut what sort of veterans are maybe late more clearly just nineteen camp on a roster spot form some of those guys become available for whatever reason the bangles didn't didn't do much there and so I mean that was really the end of it I mean it was the all season okay created you come around let's let's address this position wasn't really done okay we had the draft but that didn't work out but then also training camp and then at the conclusion of training camp no moves of any significance were made so I I don't know it's just how do you expect to see that you've massively different results when you got a sense of the same pieces I know their coach terror in there and there's some different schemes and different things they can do and and while accounts was happy with the offense of line in preseason but here we are in and let me say this to I think one of the things I took away from this game in fact the week one versus the Seahawks what would we see both sides the ball everyone's room press with the scheme dry offense of skins right there was a restriction of your horizontally vertically defensively we saw five down Lyman sets we sell three thank you for that so lots of things that look like a confused the thing off to an American accent that's all we got to look at that that was the first game don't show anything anymore at all in preseason so don't we one can take other teams by surprise and certainly look like it did take the Seahawks but after that he come here this week versus the the the the the forty Niners. Canada union okay in terms of play Collins otherwise coaching. going to figure those things out then it comes down to our your players better than their players and right now I don't need to look at this roster Albert Barnes state wow I player shouldn't even better than the forty Niners really in any position to set up for that that was that that will do a thing or neutralize coaches in this league are so smart can figure out your skiing elephants crucial scheme when they are deficient in there if you got the best player his line of employer government a man you could recommend a man's eyes listing for back and go but when you when you see when when you don't have that you have to school the ban was more successful with that and we won this week they were not in their players part just played better. so much for the offense on defense no sacks for the Bengals one tackle for a loss to quarterback hits I mean the what I'm looking at numbers like that rocky I'm looking at at at a defense that either was out coached or a defense and at times they look this way they looked gassed or denies that was struggling with conditioning problems or a defense that was completely mesmerized by a forty Niners offense that that's good it's not great what was going on on that side of the ball I couldn't provide me can I I couldn't figure out you are here here's a defense boils down to you know is the knowledge from Plano he walked along a scrimmage interest like a hundred option the play the offense that run right so between that time and time is not the ball your job as a defensive player is the window down all the option is in into in a kind of a person that sort of situation and say okay the least thing they could do but down defense okay because of that you can only make a play they may run and then were there on the field you can call you eliminate another thirty percent a play that one can you start looking at formations can you should look at Lyman split wide receiver splits in in the store again it is the players want to get that okay here and do this or that and then from there it was just reaction but the thing was they had no idea who they were completely off guard no anticipation of what the plays at the forty Niners were going online and in particular it will come when it comes down to split so many times a containing only time to look like it was happening to forty nine or you can dance that's why we're here like in a bunch that circling back to you know what you think you're going to happen even the wide receivers are going to break out which means you're going to start Compaq and then break out almost to go try to create space for the remote alignment because they want to get an angle on you block you put outside zero one and that happened to the safe you know linebacker I don't know how many times just. the wide receiver gonna come down on you senator dole or anything which is very risky but you can make a big play or go over the top and be in a position where you can have a harder edge yeah and that didn't happen at multiple times can that did not happen you've got to have a plan you gotta say they're gonna do this order. and then be ready it looked like they were just their heads were spinning to their like they have no idea what the forty Niners may do on any particular place what do you give us some hope here because every afternoon a three year track heading into the studio all right and you get. you have the audience hold give us some hope here where we can look at this and say there may be a light at the end of the tunnel what what can you tell us right from your vast experience as a player as a coach as a broadcaster what can we look at here and say you get no it's not as bad as it looks give us some hope here rocky well rounded hitting me that comforting is a union record of an answer but I I've been a parts of in parts of games like this can were literally nothing in the law and sometimes it just snowballed it's just not your only ingesting the start the religious just discourages flow on top your boom boom boom boom boom years nothing you can really do so I hope that you come back you take a look at the tape you want something you start to work on the presentation of what the other teams down do you want and that sort of thing I don't think I can be in despair again just how the bottom often that special teams every hi I just hope that you know it is not this bad again I don't think the bangles are are the greatest you know he obviously by any source but I can imagine being this bad in the players and the fan of thousand times and the post press conference go back to work they got to play you know I mean agent Greene hope was gonna come back soon yeah you're right some of the things you're doing often salute don't look so Hey you when it's time but I don't know I I think you're gonna see more times Janice could be quick path of yeah which of course the defense can react to but without being able to run the ball and without being able to get junk yards plays down the field it's it's pretty hopeless offense John Ross finally looks like he gets it I I know we had yet to drop yesterday Bali sure to call it but the fact of the matter is when he gets the ball when he catches the ball and he runs with it there's nobody that can keep up with them so I'm kinda hoping he's turned that proverbial corner of board looks bored to me looks good I like boy I me but their wares the there was little separation yesterday between. world defensive backs and wide receivers offense of linemen in defense of line I don't want to I I don't want to I don't want to wish that all of this good will that came to town here with Zach Taylor is being eaten up in the last couple weeks what made out say what if they don't play any better than what they played yesterday they're going to get thought the buffalo this week. no question about it and then started again I I don't think it's is it is I don't think yesterday I don't think we one was an indication of where the seam going to be I don't think necessarily yesterday was no indication of who exactly this team is probably somewhere in the middle but you know there there are some positive but it's just them especially in the line of scrimmage cans we've talked about when you can't run in your in your quarterback who looks like he really likes enjoys in describing the offense but we can't set as you can get the time to put the ball on the weapons that it's gonna be tough so. schematic leader to work around that whatever they got to do it so this is a lot of games ago canelo games you got a lot of schematically is coming up today at three o'clock rock we can't wait to hear you and Eddie back together and he's back right. you got a tan he's got you know I think you drunk all the Bourbon in in the southwest so we'll be back each ready go he's tanned rested and ready your red head you never tan you stay out of the sun together again at three o'clock today rocket thank you for joining me and will be listening to you later on this afternoon. you're the best thank you there is rocky bloomin who sees all and knows all and his band there and understands what it's all about. man I'll tell you what that was brutal yesterday based don't get up nine fifty two newsradio seven hundred W. L. W. seven hundred W. L..

Seahawks Lyman Canada Albert Barnes Collins seven hundred W thirty percent three year
"albert barnes" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John bass this is the job losses on discussing with professor Stephen F. Cohen Russia Gators five Gator what it turns into which is an investigation of the contact with the Obama administration during twenty sixteen and perhaps a piece of twenty fifteen yeah investigating the trump campaign however there are suggestions there were investigations of other campaigns as well the Obama administration was unveiled of the National Security Agency and other modalities in order to gain political information we're not going to follow all those routes because there are a lot of rabbit holes here I want to stay with what we know now about James commies activities while he was FBI director for Donald Trump for Donald Trump remember he stayed on after January twentieth he didn't leave his job as a ten year appointment while he was Donald trump's the FBI director and after he had been fired by Donald Trump his conduct is what Mister Horowitz is investigating and Steve is asked very carefully why did they concentrated trump why the persecution of trump Steve I'm gonna use occam's razor here old fashioned way of saying I'm going to take this straight just course I can find James James call me while FBI director while meeting with Donald Trump he met with him January six before trump was president vice president elect him back with them in February met with them in March while he met with them he believed he believed there was credibility to the allegation that trump is is too important he believed that potent had to intervene in the U. S. selection to distort the results he believed that his FBI investigation continuing with FISA warrants and using spies sometimes called agents sometimes called interlocutors anyway they were watching Carter pay. they were watching others in the trump campaign to develop a did develop a an allegation of promo allegation against trump and his lieutenants and he believe this so much that he concocted to publish a notes his notes from contemporanea as conversations with the president that's what the heart which is finding him yeah I miss handling violating policy by taking those notes and sending them to publications The New York Times and others he believes that that investigation was going to come to something a criminal investigation would come to indictments he believed us so much that he concocted to have the molar investigation launched we don't know entirely about how he got his best friend Bob Muller appointed the head of the investigation but we know right away the investigation went badly big Muller either well informed or completely misinformed then hired two of the plotters two of the FBI conspiratorial a Lisa page in Peter struck he hired them to investigate trump there's another fellow Andrew Weissmann who was from the department of justice who was the chief prosecutor and Weissman was surprised impressed diverse deals allegations against that against trump in twenty sixteen he was part of the briefings he knew about it so Miller puts together a team all of whom are consistent with homies opinion that trump is a stooge of the problem and Steve I know it's fantastic to hard to believe that grown human beings working in the U. S. government would believe such a bad pot boiler the kind of thing you buy an airplane and don't quite finished but you think it's got a great first chapter but my explanation Steve is that how may believe that and still believes it still believe that trump is a hireling of the Kremlin. it's too fantastic to comment on. I it it never occurred to me actually. but now I'm thinking about call me in some of the things he's done this call we really believe this story. there's some countervailing evidence. in the beginning after trump was elected call me behave toward trump in a semi obsessed obsequious way that suggested he wanted to keep his job as head of the FBI he would agree with that right yes and even you know this famous story I suppose our listeners remember the famous steel dossier all this on verified as like people say rumors about trump's conduct in Moscow including sexual. so call me goes to president elect trump. and shows him only that piece of the steel this is January sixth twenty seventeen coming around was left alone in the room clapper and Brandon laugh they were set up we know yeah that's what is that it would embarrass you wouldn't want to live right right I clapper who was in and out of the office of the national intelligence and Brennan who is head of the CIA I eight would not be in the room right and best we could tell from the telling by the two men are call me and the president the lack that up. Colby came as though he was a friend bearing gaps or. an item a black male that he had something bad on trial. I mean the only thing the shouting it causes a lot in the steel posse the only thing showing was this bit about an alleged sexual episode in Moscow now let me digress for one second and just focus on that because the media. bought in swallowed and then churned out the steel dossier it was preposterous on so many accounts may I give you two examples travel anywhere any rational person who knew anything what I realized is still made it all right. what is Donald Trump do for a living and what is the dont always career he's owned and operated hotels luxury hotels correct yes. here's a where itis. that certain hotels maybe not by trump maybe some by trump the certain luxury hotels in the world our survey hold that they have video and audio equipment in those rooms this is well known I mean and certainly in Moscow where those of us who travel to Moscow over the year which have been told that not only luxury hotels but other hotels have a number of rooms at our survey you accept my word yes I don't know if it's true but I always acted on the assumption that it was true. that I should do anything in my hotel room but I didn't want anybody to know about. now trouble no. so is it in any way conceivable to an eight who usually inform purse that Donald Trump would run hotels all his life would go into a hotel room. hotel he did not older control didn't know much about in a city that had a reputation for surveilling hotel rooms and do anything improper. it's just inconceivable no images ambition in addition there's this little detail with Mr trump that he doesn't like to be in anybody's establishments but as I'll make some very nice well because he doesn't control the environment I understand so then it was unbelievable from the beginning in the act it was made a kind of orthodoxy in the liberal democratic media that this actually happened but if you know a little bit about Moscow and about that book tell the Ritz Carlton in particular you would know that this could not possibly have happened so that's part one that's unbelievable secondly steel let's remind everybody steel the former British intelligence agent who grew up to so called dossier based on so called sources claimed that that information that anti trump information correct still was an anti trump document do we agree yes NH well it was meant to harm truck it was based on high ranking sources in the crime that's which deal set and yeah and yeah we are told that the boss of the Kremlin like dimmer potent wanted trump elected correct correct how do you square those two things that still had all these high level sources in the Kremlin who didn't care what their boss wanted it makes no sense and yet John this is the most fantastic part of it the American media bought into this narrative from the beginning and only now which partly because of the collapse of call me up is the narrative breaking down yet they still haven't let go it made no sense from the beginning now where are we at today just to move the story forward because I think it's important officially. we now have three investigations of how all this began under way correct by Attorney General Horowitz am I right great inspector general harlots yes no no I may I misspoke yeah it's a general investigation authorized by Attorney General Barr William correct who has appointed Mister Horowitz. now yes our which is inspector general and he was under way before bars a point that's right now he is investigating the FBI and bar is a point and a man named John Duron right the fact the US attorney from Connecticut yes correct and he apparently is supposed to investigate the CIA so you and I might say this is good news that the questions profound questions about the worst political scandal presidential scandal in American history that we have people we're gonna tell us how it began and we need to go out and do you know if only so where we take care doesn't happen again. so what do we got well you already mentioned that what horror which is made known already about calmly who is bomb as FBI chief is pretty damning the violated a lot of procedures commedia right and yet it is impossible for me to believe that call me and originate over exotic Russian at that that that that's a that's a of a brain twister stave because come a what if story he did he use in order to conduct his investigations before and after the trump presidency eight well. it will drive so who who's in charge well that's a very that's why I think that and I have thought all along that to the extent that somebody made up invented originated rushing game. it was brown and that the CIA not call me at the FBI. I think this for several reasons partly having to do with the way grant has behaved and what he said over the years but also because I don't think call me had the wit to pull off an operation I think it was passed. by the CI a and by Brandon and he followed up on it but Brandon is sad under testimony a lot of things and this is why I come back to something bars. he used the word predicate. and I'm not all that well educated he said he was going to investigate this is bars words the predicate of the whole Russian gate phenomena trying to get apparently me. the the the the primary basis for or the origins out no big why. why did all this began. what in my mom this then leaves us with questions that people are going to have to think about. the first thing so bar he said he's going to do that she's going to get to the bottom of how it all began. he's appointed. Dora. to look at the CI a aspect correct S. CI a F. B. I. yes the whole thing yes correct during hell no during turned to my understanding has no limits on where he can pursue his investigation yeah Albert Barnes self all has already made statements about the misbehavior of call me and the FBI so he doesn't need Duron to callin about backed wear dark can't reach and by the way he was once in the CIA show he has some knowledge of that was special world he can't reach the so easily into the CIA so that's my first question on the assumption that bar and door want to know the C. I. A. role can they really investigate see I the FBI is easy it's a flabby it's not the F. B. I. and J. Edgar Hoover it's not a lean mean nasty. by the machine I mean it three years it's been and slow. I don't doubt. I mean and call me is a manifestation of god's sake but the question is investigating the F. B. I.'s nothing from far reaching to the C. I. A. raises the question of whether he can do that and bar has said I forget his exact words but that he's had trouble getting in nation I'm certain sources he said that. I assume those are C. I. A. shores shop. quite the second question in my mind is the cause bar the Attorney General and Dora his chief investigator are trump appointees and a fact will their investigation be accepted or supported by Democrats and by these Republican never choppers in other words how much support new bar and his team have to do what I think is absolutely essential for our national well being find out how all this week. and. reading from reading the. mainstream American media which fairly accurately reflects liberal democratic opinion they don't have much if any should know that there's very little curiosity as to who started this and who told mistruths and who is responsible for these last thirty five months of mania professor Stephen F. Cohen New York University Press university Russian history emeritus you note that while we discuss Russia gate there's no Russia here we will get back to Russia but Mr call me and his colleagues have managed to concoct a story row where Russia looks to be it the the the subject but is in fact not the subject is the United States of America in the twenty first century I'm John dot Sir this is the John basso show..

trump FBI CIA Moscow Brandon Stephen F. Cohen Russia professor president John bass Colby Brennan Duron Attorney J. Edgar Hoover United States John basso John dot New York University Press univ America
"albert barnes" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:56 min | 1 year ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John bass this is the job losses are discussing the professor Stephen F. Cohen Russia Gators five Gator what it turns into which is an investigation into conduct for the Obama administration during twenty sixteen and perhaps a piece of twenty fifteen L. A. investigating the trump campaign however there are suggestions there were investigations of other campaigns as well the Obama administration was unveiled of the National Security Agency and other modalities in order to gain political information we're not going to follow all those routes because there are a lot of rabbit holes here I want to stay with what we know now about James homies activities while he was FBI director for Donald Trump for Donald Trump remember he stayed on after January twentieth he didn't leave his job as a ten year appointment while he was Donald trump's the FBI director and after he had been fired by Donald Trump his conduct is what Mister Horowitz is investigating and Steve is asked very carefully why did they concentrated trump why the persecution of trump Steve I'm gonna use occam's razor here old fashioned way of saying I'm going to take this straight discourse second find out James James Comey while FBI director while meeting with Donald Trump he met with him January six before trump was president was president elect him back with them in February met with them in March while he met with them he believed he believed there was credibility to the allegation that trump is is does your boat and he believed that Putin had to intervene in the U. S. selection to distort the results he believed that his FBI investigation continuing with FISA warrants and using spies sometimes called agents are sometimes called interlocutors anyway they were watching Carter page. they were watching others in the trump campaign to develop a did develop a an allegation of criminal allegation against trump and his lieutenants and he believe this so much that he concocted to publish a notes his notes from contemporaneously conversations with the president that's what the heart which is finding him a mis handling violating policy by taking those notes and sending them to publications The New York Times and others he believed that that investigation was going to come to something a criminal investigation would come to indictments he believed it so much that he concocted to have the molar investigation launched we don't know entirely about how he got his best friend Bob Muller appointed the head of the investigation but we know right away the investigation went badly big Muller either well informed or completely misinformed then hired two of the plotters two of the FBI conspiratorial a Lisa paging Peter struck he hired them to investigate trump there's another fellow Andrew Weissmann who was from the department of justice who was the chief prosecutor and Weissman was surprised impressed diverse feels allegations against that against trump in twenty sixteen he was part of the briefings he knew about it so Miller puts together a team all of whom are consistent with homies opinion that trump is a stooge of the Kremlin Steve I know it's fantastic to hard to believe that grown human beings working in the U. S. government would believe such a bad pot boiler the kind of thing you buy an airplane and don't quite finished but you think it's got a great first chapter but my explanation Steve is that call me believe that and still believes it still believes the trump is a hireling of the Kremlin. it's too fantastic to comment on I it it never occurred to me actually. but now I'm thinking about call me in some of the things he's done this call we really believe this story. there's some countervailing evidence. in the beginning after trump was elected co me behave toward trump in a semi obsessed obsequious way that suggested he wanted to keep his job as head of the FBI he would agree with that right yes and even you know this famous story I suppose our listeners remember the famous steel dossier this on verified as like people say rumors about trump's conduct in Moscow including sexual. so call me goes to president elect trump. and shows him only that piece of the steel this is January sixth twenty seventeen coming or it was left alone in the room clapper and Brandon laugh they were set up we know it yeah what is that it would embarrass you would know what a ride right right clapper who was in and out of the office of national intelligence and Brandon who is head of the C. A. I. A. would not be in the room right and best we could tell from the telling by the two men call me and the president elect that up. Colby came as though he was a friend Bering gaps or. and I am a black male that he had something bad on trial I mean the only thing you showed it causes a lot in this deal. the only thing showing was just bad about an alleged sexual episode in Moscow now let me digress for one second and just focus on. because the media. bought in swallowed and then churned out the steel dossier it was preposterous on so many accounts may I give you two examples shop anywhere any rational person with the bank what I realized is still beta right. what is Donald Trump do for a living and what is he done always career he's owned and operated hotels luxury hotels correct yes. he is aware itis. that certain hotels maybe none by trump maybe somebody trip but certain luxury hotels in the world our survey hold that they have video and audio equipment in those roles this is well known I mean and certainly in Moscow were those of us who travel to Moscow over the year which have been told that not only luxury hotels but other hotels have a number of rooms at our survey you accept my work yes I don't know if it's true but I always acted on the assumption that it was true. that I should do anything in my hotel room that I didn't want anybody to know about. yeah trump would know. so is it in any way conceivable to any reasonably informers. Donald Trump who run hotels all as well. going to a hotel room hotel he did not older control and didn't know much about in a city that had a reputation for surveilling hotel rooms and do anything improper. no it's just inconceivable no it was his ambition in addition there's this little detail with Mr trump that he doesn't like to be in anybody's establishments but is I'll make some very nice well because he doesn't control the environment I understand so then it was unbelievable from the beginning and yeah it was made a kind of orthodoxy in the liberal democratic media that this actually happened but if you know a little bit about Moscow and about that book tell the Ritz Carlton in particular you would know that this could not possibly have happened so that's part one which unbelievable secondly steel let's remind everybody steel the former British intelligence agent who grew up to so called dossier based on so called sources claimed that information that anti trump information correct still was an anti trump document do we agree yes NH well it was meant to harm truck it was based on high ranking sources in the crowd that's which deal set and yeah and yeah we are told that the boss of the crime and the dimmer Putin wanted trouble active correct correct how do you square those two things that still had all these high level sources in the Kremlin who didn't care what their boss wanted it makes no sense and yet John this is the most fantastic part of it the American media bought into this narrative from the beginning and only now which partly because of the collapse of call me up is the narrative breaking down yet they still won't let go but it made no sense from the beginning now where we are today just to move the story forward because I think it's important officially. we now have three investigations how all this began under way correct by Attorney General Horowitz am I right great inspector general harlots yes no no I may I misspoke yeah it's a general investigation authorized by Attorney General Barr William correct who has appointed Mister Horowitz. no yes which is inspector general and he was under way before bars a point that's right he is investigating the FBI and bar is a point and a man named John Duron right the fact the US attorney from Connecticut yes correct and he apparently is supposed to investigate to see I show you and I might say this is good news that the questions of profound questions about the worst political scandal presidential scandal in American history that we have people we're gonna tell us how it began and we need to go out and do you know if only so where we take care doesn't happen again. so what do we got well you already mentioned that what horror which is made known already about calmly who wish Obama's FBI chief is pretty damning the violated a lot of procedures commedia right and yet it is impossible for me to believe that call me and originate over that question that that that that's a that's a a a a brain twister stave because come a what if story he did he use in order to conduct his investigations before and after the trump presidency eight well. it will drive so who who's in charge well that's a very that's why I think that and I have thought all that to the extent that somebody made up invented originated rushing game. it was Brandon at the CIA not call me at the FBI. I think this for several reasons partly having to do with the way Brennan has bay and what he said over the years but also because I don't think cold we had the wit to pull off an operation I think it was passed to. by the CI a and by brand any followed up on it but Brandon is sad under testimony a lot of things and this is why I come back something bars. he used the word predicate. and I'm not all that well educated he said he was going to investigate this is bars words the predicate of the whole Russian gate anon twenty yeah. green beans the the the the primary basis for all the origins no big why. why did all this began. what in my mind there's been leaves us with questions that we're gonna have to think about. the first thing so bar he said he's going to do that she's going to get to the bottom of how it all began. he's appointed. Dora. to look at the CIA aspect correct S. CI a F. B. I. yes the whole thing yes correct during hell no Jordan returned to my understanding has no limits on where he can pursue his investigation yeah Albert Barnes self all has already made statements about the misbehavior of call me and the FBI so he doesn't need durable to callin about backed wear dark can't reach and by the way he was once embassy I. show he has some knowledge of that was special world he can't reach so easily into the CIA so that's my first question on the assumption that bar and during one of the C. I. A. role can they really investigate CI the FBI is easy it's a flabby it's not the F. B. I. N. J. and grow it's not a lean mean nasty. by the machine I mean it three years it's been and slow. I don't know. I mean and call me is a manifestation for god's sake but the question is investigating the F. B. I.'s nothing from our we should do the C. I. A. raises the question of whether he can do that and bar has said I forget his exact words but that he's had trouble getting improper nation from certain sources he said that. I soon those are C. I. A. shores. shop. the second question in my mind is the cause bar you turn each. and Dora his chief investigator or trump appointees in fact we're their investigation be accepted or supported by Democrats and by these Republican never choppers in other words how much support new bar and his team have to do what I think is absolutely essential for our national well being find out how all.

Donald Trump Moscow FBI CIA Russia Stephen F. Cohen John bass Colby professor Brandon investigator Brennan Dora. Albert Barnes Jordan N. J. twenty fifteen L three years one second ten year
"albert barnes" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

"Can both make a place for people to hide away. But at the same time create a sense of wholeness is something that has always infused our work someone who's visited a few of your buildings many of your buildings when you're in them. You never lose sight of the fact that the architecture is working at the scale, you just describe scale human being the scale of you know, how tall you are how how wide your arm span is as you've been working on progressively larger and larger projects museums educational in. Sitution stuff like that. How do you mediate between the human scale and the large figurative scale? How do you make something that both works is the skyline and works for human being in a room? So we really designed from the inside out. And when you do that you end up with something that looks kind of lumpy and not so great Tuttle says, no windows, no windows in this building. So it is really starting to assemble a piece of architecture from a room. And then of course, you end up as I said with this sort of lumpy windowless thing. And we realized well we need to look at the outside. And then you're starting to prune and shape the outside. But it always comes back to the room. I think I think I was deeply influenced by good night moon. Oh, you mean the children's book goodnight moon? I love that book. What did you off about it? It's a room. And it's a room that defines the world of the bunny, and in that room are all the things that the bunny loves in that make up the sort of universe of the bunny. And so I really believe that that sense of the room, and how it holds you. And how it contains those things that connect you to the world was really the basis for me of architecture. Now is that difficult to convey to clients in my experience clients, hiring architects, what they want to be shown as a rendering of how the thing they're building will look from a distance, you know, this edifice rising against the horizon to the mist. And you're describing almost the time metric opposite of that experience. How do you take a client through your process where it's inside out as you say, well, I would say all clients. Now somehow seem to imagine that one can magically fly through the building. In fact, that will happen. Put on the goggles. And and you're there, but I think over time we've learned that the best clients to work with our ones with whom you share set of values. And so the people who end up choosing us or probably not choosing us because they think will do the most photogenic on the skyline building you got the assignment a very high profile assignment to do a building for the Barnes foundation in downtown Philadelphia. And it occurs to me that that assignment is almost entirely about an interior experience. Can you talk about the very specific challenge there, which I think if you're if you're seeking parameters for your work. I can't imagine a more parameter be set project than that one. Well, the Barnes foundation was actually a house museum that was. Was the love of a man named Albert Barnes who collected impressionist art in great numbers and built a museum adjacent to his house actually connected to his house where he hung the work in what he called on sambas. So each wall has a series of paintings that are hung interspersed with hardware and its medieval hardware, mostly. But sometimes it's just looking like hardware. Ngos, perhaps a fork something like that? And the organization was tremendously important him. I like to imagine him patting around in his pajamas sort of moving fork or hinge or Cezanne. Because he did do that. But the Barnes foundation was facing serious economic issues. And so they couldn't take care of their collection. And they decided the trustees to move it from wealthy suburb to downtown Philadelphia. And in order to do that they had to go to court because Barnes specify that. He didn't want the paintings to leave the house and the judge ruled that the paintings ensembles needed to be kept intact and the sequence of the galleries needed to be kept intact. So in many ways, people would feel this was a huge constraint. Because it's like, well, what can you do? You've got the paintings. You've got the galleries in the end, it was actually, very helpful. Because I think we kind of like these tight parameters, and what we did was we looked at every single aspect of the traditional galleries and slightly tweaked them or change the colors or. Used wooden instead of metal. But always with the idea that we were simplifying an intensifying that was a whole sort of mantra that we had as we looked at the galleries. And then we created public spaces never were part of the original program because it was his house museum. So there was no sense of the four of a kind of large lobby or any place where people could have a meal or even use the restroom and easy way. And what people said when the Barnes open because a lot of people felt that it was the wrong thing to do to move the collection. They said, oh you've reproduced. It exactly as it was in Marian, which was its original home, and we just sorta smiled because when you put aside by side photograph of the galleries, you would see that everything had changed. So in a way, we were creating a memory of something that never. Really existed, but it felt right to people who had a memory. So it sort of reinforced this idea that what was in the present was actually what was in the past. And I think that has to do with actually taking the time to understand the essence of what it was made that so special and not sort of erase it but honor. The

Barnes foundation Albert Barnes Philadelphia Tuttle Cezanne
"albert barnes" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

19:42 min | 2 years ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"Welcome welcome. I'm Val the Ford. I'm your host is amazing to talk to someone as -ccomplish as my Knicks. Guess Shapiro is says. She's the real deal at welcome. Thank you, welcome. My pleasure. I tell you what this the collectors apprentice is just a beautiful beautiful book. It is. So it's so much of a I don't know heart thumper is like, no, no, I'm sitting here like the movie theater shouting book. So tell me what brought you to think about this amazing collection of characters in to bring in the fact that probably not as many of these days know, about the arts know about the great masters because fortunately, a lot of schools are pulling out those programmes this gave a beautiful introduction to a story will of intrigue and love and lust, and despair, but all the time incorporating some really great information about the arts in the great masters. Well, I have always loved art when I was a little girl I wanted to be an artist, but although my parents were very supportive turned out. It was the parent pretty quickly that that wasn't where my strengths lay. So I became an art appreciator, and I travel a lot and everywhere I go I want to immediately go to see the art. Museums. And there's a museum in Philadelphia called the Barnes foundation. It actually isn't a museum it's foundation. And I went there in my twenties. I had a cousin who was a big mucky muck there, and people could not just go and see the art you had to know somebody who knew somebody who knew somebody and because I had this relative by I got to go and I stood in the centre the main gallery looked around. It's kind of embarrassing. But the first thing I thought was I could never be too rich because being surrounded by this art, just made me so incredibly happy. And then I found out that the man who had amassed this collection. I named him Edwin Bradley in the book, but he's actually Albert Barnes was this eccentric brilliant awful controlling. You know, just just revengeful man, but he was brilliant. And he had amassed a collection post impressionist art at a time when no one in the United States and definitely not in Philadelphia where the foundation is could appreciate Matisse Cezanne Picasso. I mean people who now we know our great masters, but you know, they thought they were crazy people, and he had this wonderful mysterious assistant named be a let demise Lia, and I looked at the art. And I listened to my cousin talk about these people. I thought some day I'm going to write a book about this, right? And thirty five years later. I finally did. Well, you did it quite beautifully. 'cause I could see Edwin being the person who rose up from poverty didn't have anything became the self made man went from being an MD to Kim is to a business person. And then collector, and how sometimes that new money feel was just a little too much. And he just went overboard. Ooh. Yeah. But in the meantime, he would use opposed to do obviously married. Well, yes. But then he became smitten with younger woman who really knew the art world who had the privilege of growing up in a place where she had the masters hanging in her for. Yeah. What about that? That happens at my house. Oh, it's just amazing. She talked about the column and how these beautiful portraits were there and how her relationship with her father blossomed because he found her in tears looking at this portrait. Yes. And it was a Matisse who later on in the book becomes her liver. And of course, then is not her lover. But that's not. So this Bill at the Mazia who was originally. Barnes's apprentice? Was very mysterious and nobody knew anything about her background. So I decided to make up some new and intriguing background of this young girl whose name was Pauline who grew up with wealth and art, and she fell in love with George George swindler turned out to be a kind man when it consummate. Yes. I love him. He's you know, he's I think he's my favorite character. I have ever created. And I hate him. And I'm just fascinated by the the workings of is mind. Also by the emptiness of soul. I just you know, is he was just so much fun. But he was a bad guy, and he swindled her and her family, and everyone they knew of millions and millions and millions of dollars, and it's nineteen twenty and she's nineteen years old and her parents. I think she had something to do with it. And they kick her out, and there she is lost in Paris in Paris. At least she had that. I wasn't gonna like lever in full gory or something. And she has to figure out how to make her way in the world, and she does not easily. But she does. And I never realized it when I was writing this. But I realized just recently that this really is a coming of age store is without ever meaning for to be. Right. Yeah. Just the fact that she went from being basically a spoiled rich girl daddy's girl, she was the only door. She had two brothers and she had daddy right in the perfect place finger, but then when he throws her side, and basically only aunt is the one who who wasn't swindle. She doesn't didn't invest, but then she had to learn how to appreciate things like when she lived in that little apartment where the smell of saddles on one side. And what a good reader. No, I love I saw it. I mean, absolutely. And then the friends that she made and how she came later with these women who had nothing who knew how to turn a ragged peace of dress into something exquisite. And then when she had a couple of dollars. She came back and gifted them. I mean that was something that she wasn't so busy saying, I don't belong here in this river place. She valued them. And she ate for them at different parts. We'll she. When when you're gonna be this book took me three to four years to write. And if you're going to be spending time with a person that intimately for that long. I need them to have a kernel of of good. I just don't want George. I love wanna hang out with him. He only had like five or six chapters. Pauline slash Vivian had the whole book. So I wanted her to be yes, she was a spoiled brat. But she wasn't ruined by it. She had you know, it was there bit the goodness. Was there? Plus, I really liked those friends. Well, and in the thing is that she had this part where when she had the opportunity to rise above it by being with Edwin by being his collectors assistant that she was also afraid the whole time that she'll be found out. So in order to to. Come out of the muck. She had to put herself in danger all the loan. Yeah. She did. And she, you know, she assumed a different identity, and she ran away from Paris, and the people who hated her there and went to the United States to try and make a new life for herself. And then George comes back. Not only George comeback even before. Then though Georgia's been in and out because he's a sneaky little guy a weasel in this thing. But he is he's personable. He's obviously gorgeous by visualize him. He would be beautiful. So, but then she runs into these people periodically who know her, and she's just knows not me. But the wife, of course, picks up on it. And then able to use that against her down the road. So it's it was amazing because I learn more about art because I would take the opportunity to go back say, okay. Let me see this. And thank God for the internet. I can scroll out to say. Oh, oh, I can see exactly what you're talking about. This Jackson position of. Yeah. You have this artist. You're trying to see who is the influence in who is the influence e-. It was it was really. So much for saying that. That's really lovely. And I don't know lot about art. I mean, I've seen a been great museums have the chance to travel the world, and I've seen things, but to to be able to to have this look back at the conversations of what perhaps Matisse would have been saying what go GAM have been saying they might have thought he's a fool, but I like this color or we don't like light in. We wanna we wanna play with the dip that with the background or the foreground. So those were things that were really very pleasing. Why thank you because that's you know, it's writing historical novel and also writing a novel where you know, you're dealing with an area like post impressionist art that a lot of people don't aren't familiar with. And of course, I'm fascinated by all of it. And I did tons of research which can put too much research in the book, you can only, you know. So like, I did the research, and it's literally, you know. Not literally the tip of the iceberg. That's in there to try and draw the reader into that world. So when people tell me that then they went online and looked at the paintings or went to the Barnes. Or you know, it's like this is why I do this. We'll definitely I can see the people who will not have an appreciation of art will be curious enough to say, oh, I want to see that. I wanna see how could he do this? I would love to have seen the mural. Of course, didn't get to see them euro. But I would love to have seen the just all the work. But even more than that, you really gave depth to each character. Each one, I'm saying eight, oh was the the privileged wife who instead of having to worry about things could just do her botany, you know, but she didn't even recognize a she was being used in so many different ways. I feel sorry for actually women in the nineteen twenties. That's the way they were treated and they expected to be treated. Well, it wasn't bad to be the wife of a multimillionaire. Of course, she ended up being a little bit. That's the thing. You know, people aren't all good or all bad. I'm actually a sociologist of PHD in. So. In sociology because all writers need a PHD in sociology. But I taught us to teach at Tufts University in Boston, and I taught a class called deviance, and it was about groups of people who were considered deviant at different times. And and basically even the serial murderer ninety five percent of the time is doing the same things. We do he's brushing his teeth. And maybe he's playing with his nephews and calling his mother on Sundays. And so nobody's all good or bad. So I like to put a piece of the bad, and the people who appear good and piece of the good and the people who appear bad because that's who we are human. It was interesting too though to have the different backdrops. So you have Paris you have Philadelphia. Everybody's like well, Philadelphia can't be much of an art thing. But of course, there are people every. Where who have a love for other things those intangibles that really make us human. When we I mean, I have I can have a moment when I'm going through say certain airports that have artwork. I'm trying to miss my flight because I'm so intrigued by what the artist was trying to convey. And that is a Bill Stewart Gardner who who I wrote a book about called the art forger, and she was a great collector in the late nineteenth century, and she said art makes cultures immortal, and that's what is our heart. And our our soul is the art that we create and it can touch people so many different ways. Well, I know that this book is amazing. And I hope that everyone reads it because I mean, you don't have to be someone who loves. To have an appreciation for what's in there. And if you never thought about it, you should want to stop to go look for things or even if you wanna know about the nineteen twenties you talk about prohibition, you talk about Speakeasy. And even though I thought I was a little bit. Learn it to know that speak easy means really be quiet about. That was that was really interesting. So you put all sorts of very interesting touches it was like, oh, okay. Okay. That or the fact that you have to sail across and we're so instantaneous their ability to go from we can go from here to London in seven hours, where they're you had weeks aboard ship or so it was it was amazing in cancer diagnoses and not telling people same things we're doing with every day, and it was, you know, less than a hundred years ago, and in so many ways the world is so different, but people are still human beings. And we're still that same good bad mix, and you know. So that's what's really fun about historical fiction is playing with human nature in a different period of time and space now, I know I definitely love your works. So in those you don't know they're more took them to go just go look her up. So. What do you? What do you want people to to do to get in touch with you to learn more about what you're doing? Because I love the backdrop of why you did it. And how you art wasn't your thing. But you wanted to become an appreciator of art, but how can people get in touch with you? Whether they want to know more about your writings or they want to connect with you, perhaps we're interview or have you come speak. How would they do that? I have a website be a Shapiro books dot com, and there are contacts on there for any reason to talk to me to get in touch with my publicist my agent. If you happen to want to make a film about the book. When it's all there. Yes. Oh, wow. I could just truly characters would just be. I don't know. I don't know. I I would love to see this in in the film version to watch it over and over again, I can do my like just veg out watching and each time. See oh, gosh. I didn't see that in the last time. Oh, I didn't think about that. But yes, I love it. And thank you for bringing such a a vivid historical slash fiction together to make it into such an amazing read. I loved it. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I'll come talk to you anytime. You heard it here you heard it here. All right. So Finally, I wanted to say when you when you're looking at when you're looking at Vivian of Holland what made you take someone like her who started off with so much went to so little came back and forth. I mean, you could have started with someone who had nothing was there. Any particular reason why you want her to start off at such a high place in the fall, so hard? Well, as sociologist, I am very interested in social class. And how it affects who you are. And what you do. So she got to do all of these things when she was a wealthy little daddy's girl. And then suddenly she's thrown out and has nothing and all of that is gone. She has left no money. No status. She's basically invisible and has to pull herself up. So it's the interaction. Of class and gumption. And. 'cause we always ask how how do people who are very poor manage to pull themselves out of these horrible backgrounds in wire people who are very privileged manage to fall. And so I think it's the combination of these things, you know, class and gumption. Beautiful job of taking Edwin who hit nothing pulling him up to the top taking Pauline who had everything and. Steal hundred rise up and to show how strong women could be even in a time where women were considered to be bits of love. That's exactly true. Thank you for understanding that thank you. And it's been my pleasure. My pleasure. My way. All right. Thank you. Thank you so much.

Edwin Bradley George George swindler Philadelphia Paris Pauline Albert Barnes United States Shapiro Knicks Barnes foundation Ford Matisse Cezanne Picasso Lia Mazia Georgia Matisse Barnes Bill Stewart Gardner Kim Jackson
"albert barnes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Sculpture you won't forget it everybody april 15th uh two thousand eighteen it will be up until then go see it at the university of michigan museum of art boy that's that's really kind of out there um one that is coming to an end which i am very very sorry to see it this is an exhibition i just simply wish that dr also it's simply say this is staying within our walls i'm sorry but don't bother to bring your trucks now this is your commandeering this one in that is matisse drawings curator by ellsworth kelly from the pierre and tana matisse foundation collection everybody i talk to you a couple of weeks about the three weeks ago and urge you to go to this exhibition take anyone in your family or circle of friends who is an artist or enjoy always line and the whole that that balance between what you put in and what you leave out this is the kind of exhibition that could be a life changer for a person of any age and i'm thinking particularly of young people because they can see my gosh just with lined with charcoal with uh with with with ink what can be done on a piece of paper i am going to be very sorry when this exhibition lease what will which are which are take away from this i i i think it's a really fascinating model on the images on view are by andrei matisse but they were curated and selected by the artist ellsworth kelley and he has prints in a in a room that are adjacent to the larger room with a matisse shrines and to have an artist select works by another artist is a really interesting model because it allows of course as an art historian raza curator you bring certain expectations and sort of rules to the table and to have an hurt is take more time or take select things that perhaps are not the quote unquote master and put those on view reveal something about the artistic process that i think the careers of this exhibition were necessarily expecting a not really refreshing are you sort of like like it as as a curator you probably didn't go in there and say i would have done this did not i mean it's it's is it some were akin to albert barnes in marion pennsylvania where he's going to put a favor painting here is going to hang a.

ellsworth kelly andrei matisse ellsworth kelley marion pennsylvania university of michigan museum tana matisse foundation albert barnes three weeks
"albert barnes" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"Week i was not a an every day in the office as a matter of fact i i don't think i even hung out in the office of the free press i would submitted one i would write a piece and i were taken over and spinoff solid today where you can send the email but i would just dropping off and so i i decided to write something that would in fury age the feminists the angry feminist editor the paper i wrote a letter to the editor and i used a pseudonym a used one of the founding fathers of my fraternity who was born in like eighteen eighty or something like i don't have the right year but it was eating hundreds this guy was born and i wrote in and i talked about barefoot in pregnant it was the most offensive piece of pat that you could possibly right but it was intended to try to stoke a reaction from the feminist editor of the paper and boy did it ever i write this letter to the center and the printed in the paper but what they did was they couldn't just printed and let it go because anybody would read of even the most masculine guy on campus would have read it and thought is rubbish that she's foolishness and a but the ladies were so upset there was all staff of these angry hands worked at the paper they were so upset that what they did was they started to try to find out who albert barge wasn't think about this if you write a letter to the editor at eu college paper you ought to be able to express your opinion period but what they did is they went to student life they wanted to know who this albert barnes was they were going to investigate m and i thought wild just because he had a different opinion and there's they were at when they discovered there was no albert s barnes on campus this was a scandal and so literally the next week they wrote a big headline story that said albert barnes not a student they checked with the they they may wrote a complete article about the editorial that i had written under a pseudonym and they were angry all this the swarm of ladies was angry that there was this crazy masculine opinion floated out there and rather than just either a investigating that before they published it they gave it extra attention by writing.

editor albert barnes albert barge eu college
"albert barnes" Discussed on KMJNow Radio

KMJNow Radio

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"albert barnes" Discussed on KMJNow Radio

"That was that was on usual i know a lot of catholic struggle with that but nevertheless needed to be done a bit become a pick your to follow says i'm at least pep the dog with the cubs behind it trying to appeal to a gattis stuckey leading the liberal vice president bennett he's got to play the role of spiritual not religious but still capital got easter guys yeah because you can't turn your back on it but there's no way that you're going to win the progress of vote trying to inject religious dog meant a public policy and that's exactly have a look at it but a poor ball one fifth there's one thing that came out of last night's debate joe bogdan is no longer the worst of the produce candidate ever to of run i actually albert barnes or sport quail with the hell is monday was running mate why subban stuff mvp it into theirs i just eyes myself you don't have to go tonight i'm sure did to myself right now i'm sure he's going to scourge he keeps on a steal well i do gerald again now will that that had its own meaning that's i fell on picking up front and it was here are four two running mate know he never were you never picked already made it a good nomination heat assume the president you're never got the nomination that's under no it's not not so sure forgot running mate already was running mate bob odd goal that's right away they did eluded out there for consideration spoken holy cow look at and i like yeah but i thought regina to see a new name their here's the trump wins the election spend the whole next debates current country by pillars health than reminded that came as president of should eyes.

cubs joe bogdan mvp president stuckey vice president albert barnes gerald regina one fifth