11 Burst results for "Alaska Yukon"

"alaska yukon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 4 months ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Correct housing. With access to medical and mental healthcare. Matt Katz, WNYC news. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Jones day and integrated partnership collaboratively providing legal services for more than a century, 43 offices, 5 continents, serving clients as one firm worldwide, learn more at Jones day dot com and the lemelson foundation, dedicated to inspiring and enabling the next generation of inventors to improve lives around the world, more information is available at lemelson dot org. It's wanting edition from NPR news. I'm Steven's keep. And I'm Leila faulted. There are too few salmon right now in Alaska's Yukon river. That's making it hard for indigenous residents to feed their families, and it's all made worse by skyrocketing prices at the grocery store. From member station KY UK, Olivia ebert's reports. Maggie westlock is an a grocery store in a monarch, a small village near the mouth of the Yukon river in western Alaska. She's picking up a few things for dinner. Great. Oh, slash sandwich. These are not the foods she and her family of 8 prefer to eat. Normally, she'd be filling her freezer with wild salmon. The same staple food her ubi ancestors ate for thousands

"alaska yukon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning addition on WNYC and Michael hill, transgender people are systematically mistreated in New York City jails. That's the finding of a new report, issued today by a task force of attorneys and advocates convened by the city's jail oversight board. WNYC's Matt Katz explains. Incarcerated people who are transgender experience sexual assault, slurs hurled by fellow detainees and officers, the use of incorrect pronouns, and according to the task force, placement in housing units that don't match their gender. As of March, most trans women and all trans men and city custody were in housing units that did not align with their gender identity. I was sent to the minister. And I'm like, what am I doing here? After Naomi waters was arrested. She was identified in court documents as female, but she nonetheless ended up in a male facility. She said officers looked at her in just decided she belonged with the men. When she asked for a sports bra, a female correction officer made a snide remark about her breasts, not being real. I feel like as if they felt like I was trying to trick the system in some way. And it wasn't that I'm just trying to live my truth and walk in my truth. I would like to be treated as such. Being misgendered can follow you through the system and be difficult to reverse. That's according to Deborah laloy, an attorney with The Bronx defenders who serves on the task force. They found that living in a housing unit that doesn't match gender identity not only violates city rules, it's a threat to public safety. What often happens is that in those few hours or days or weeks before a trans person is transferred to the correct facility, they are often assaulted. They are often raped and there's no accountability when those things happen. Today, the task force is releasing a detailed report with recommendations for improving treatment of transgender and gender nonconforming detainees. Including better training staff to ensure that people are placing the correct housing. With access to medical and mental healthcare. Matt Katz, WNYC news. Now you can tune into WNYC without the tuning. All you need is your voice and a smart speaker. Just say play WNYC and you'll hear your favorite radio shows. Learn how at WNYC dot org slash smart speaker. From NPR news, I'm Stevens keep. And I'm Leila faulted. There are two few salmon right now in Alaska's Yukon river. That's making it hard for indigenous residents to feed their families, and it's all made worse by skyrocketing prices at the grocery store. From member station KY UK, Olivia ebert's reports. Maggie westlock is an a grocery store any mono, a small village near the mouth of the Yukon river in western Alaska. She's picking up a few things for dinner. Great. Phone slash sandwich. These are not the foods she and her family of 8 prefer to eat. Normally, she'd be filling her freezer with wild salmon. The same staple food her cubic ancestors ate for thousands of years. Now, because of a sudden and severe salmon crash, her family's forced to rely on store bought food

Matt Katz WNYC Naomi waters Michael hill Deborah laloy New York City WNYC news NPR news Bronx Yukon river Olivia ebert Maggie westlock Leila Alaska Stevens KY UK
"alaska yukon" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. Alaska native leaders are concerned about climate and environmental issues. Those were among discussions last week at the National Congress of American Indians, midyear gathering, and anchorage. As Emily schwing reports, leaders in Alaska and other states are seeing wildfires having an impact on their communities. Earlier this month, a wildfire burning in western Alaska forced the evacuation of more than a hundred residents who live in saint Mary's. A small yupik village located more than 400 miles west of anchorage, near the Yukon river. George beans is the president of Andrew ski, one of two tribes in the village. As you know ahead of dealing with the fire, a pretty big fire at home and I think that climate change has a lot to do with these fires that are popping up in the towel over it. It's too dry. Beans said it was tough for him to decide if he should leave the village for the NCA I conference in anchorage. Well, first of all, we're at pre registered show and we invested a lot of our finances into coming to this meeting. We sent three tribal council members. I'm the address ladies here and there's a lot of intercommunication between each other's and that's why I think it's important we get to add information and we can seek some help when we do need in different areas that we need help. At more than 160,000 acres, the east fork fire is the largest ever to burn in Alaska's Yukon Cusco quim delta region. It's also the largest tundra fire the state is seen in decades. As of Sunday, fire officials said they'd reached their objectives to contain the blaze. For national native news, I'm Emily schwing. A new art installation in Eugene Oregon has visitors gazing at art that in turn gazes right back. KL sisi's Brian bull reports on the culture raising installation and how it recognizes the regions indigenous people. Flashback to August 2021 and I am on a stretch of sidewalk between a couple utility buildings and construction projects. Charlie swing, director of art city, points out what at first looks like an ordinary fence. 100 feet long, 8 feet high, and with individual faces. Actually, two faces, each is a youth in an elder of Native American and indigenous people who live in our community. A growing awareness of the land's original inhabitants has helped argonians relate the past with the present. Tanapa brainard, who goes by TJ, is the conceptual artist behind the culture raising project. She is of coos Apache heritage and a student of the institute of American Indian arts and Santa Fe. She coordinated photography of the subjects whose images were transferred to the fence slats. I thought, okay, maybe let's do like half the face and eyes but then after a while I realized that for me it was kind of like doing the American people just as people that are like full on tech gear and regalia just see that we're here and this is us and how we look very different and how we look like everyone else. The culture raising installation is now up for several months and will be on display during the world track and field championships in Eugene. The slants will eventually be taken down and woven into a new form, which will be auctioned to help support new art pieces by Native Americans. For national native news, I'm Brian bull. The U.S. Senate committee on Indian affairs is gathering written comments on cannabis and Indian country through July 8th, the input will help inform the committee's work on tribal cannabis and for future use on national cannabis reform legislation..

Emily schwing Alaska anchorage Antonio Gonzalez George beans Andrew ski National Congress of American Yukon Cusco Brian bull Yukon river KL sisi saint Mary Charlie swing art city NCA east fork Tanapa brainard
"alaska yukon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:01 min | 6 months ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"To hear now 90.1 W ADE Atlanta I'm Jim burris and you're listening to here and now Support for WAB comes from Atlanta ram Jack ram Jack specializes only in foundation repair and delivers foundation repair solutions for residential homes and commercial buildings with ram Jack patented foundation technology more at Atlanta ram Jack dot com and from Georgia power committed to protecting George's parks and lakes by volunteering over 55,000 hours in local communities last year learn more at Georgia power dot com slash sustainability Keeping you informed hi I'm rose Scott Closer look is about community and quality of life We cover health and wellness education housing transit and mobility and workforce development Join us weekdays at one and 7 p.m. on 90.1 amplifying Atlanta Funding for here and now comes from the listeners of WBUR Boston and your NPR station and from better help connecting people with a therapist in a private online environment for issues like depression and anxiety 20,000 therapists are available through better help using a computer or smartphone better help dot com slash public And indeed a hiring platform designed to streamline how businesses can attract interview and higher candidates more at indeed dot com slash NPR It's here and now A historically large wildfire is threatening four indigenous villages in southwestern Alaska's Yukon river region The east fork fire is now burning three and a half miles from one of those villages And many people have evacuated as KY UK's Olivia ebert's reports residents who chose to stay are pitching in to keep their community safe Pamela Thai is standing over the stove cooking meatballs in the home she shares with 11 family members They've all chosen to stay here in saint Mary's despite the fire's proximity to the village Outside the kitchen window smoke.

"alaska yukon" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"You're listening to ted-talks daily, I'm Elise hue. We have to talk about permafrost, because what's happening to permafrost in the Arctic, threatens all of us. In our talk from Ted 2022, Arctic ecologist soon Italy shares the urgent problem presented by thawing permafrost. And her plan to tackle it with the urgency it deserves. Her work is part of Ted's audacious project to hear more about this initiative which supports groundbreaking ideas across the world. Stick around after Sue's talk. I'll be joined by the project's executive director Anna verghese. To hear how they catalyzed $900 million this year, and the impact of the ideas that were chosen. Hates ted-talks daily listeners. I'm Adam grant. I hosted another podcast from the Ted audio collected. It's called work life. And it's about the science of making work, not suck. Next time, on work life. The way that affection is built, it makes us a very sensitive and vulnerable to those setbacks affairs which occur all the time and of course that creates a lot of worry and stops us taking risks such as pushing ourselves forward. How perfectionism holds us back and how to overcome it. Find work life on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Support comes from the University of Texas at San Antonio, one of only 20 Hispanic serving institutions in the nation with a prestigious tier one Carnegie classification for research excellence. As a recognized national leader in advancing Latino student success, is modeling the public research university of tomorrow. Creating bold futures, more at bold futures dot EDU. Support for ted-talks daily comes from progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget these days? Drivers who save by switching to progressives save over $700 on average and customers can qualify for an average of 6 discounts when they sign up. A little off your rate each month goes a long way, get a quote today that progressive dot com. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. National annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive between June 2020 and May 2021, potential savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations. So whenever I tell people I'm an Arctic scientist, the first thing that they always ask me is how cold is it up there? And yeah, the Arctic can get pretty cold. Trust me when I tell you that working outside at -40° is really, really challenging. But in the summer of 2019, it was anything but cold. So that summer I was working with my research team and Alaska's Yukon Costco klem delta on the traditional lands of the yupik and chuck people. And we were up there hauling hundreds of pounds of equipment across the tundra and the middle of a record breaking heat wave. It was 90°F. There was no breeze, nowhere to go for shade and seemingly endless miles of tundra as far as my eyes can see. To make matters worse, the land had drastically changed since we had been here, just one year before. The ground was sinking. And it was cracking and places it was literally collapsing beneath my feet. I've been working in the Arctic for more than a decade and I had never seen changes happening this rapidly ever before. The changes we saw were remarkable. And they were also really concerning. But we were there to measure changes that we couldn't see. We were there to fill a major gap in our understanding of how the changing Arctic is impacting the earth's climate. So we were installing what's called an eddy covariance tower, which is a series of instruments that measures the exchange of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane between the land and the atmosphere. It's essentially like measuring the earth's breath. And so the reason the land around us was collapsing is because the ones permanently frozen ground called permafrost was starting to thaw. And once it thaws that collapsing ground can drastically alter the vast expanse of the Arctic's tundra and boreal forest. And it can also threaten the homes and life ways of Arctic residents. Just imagine if the ground beneath your home suddenly started to sink. That's what's happening across the Arctic. But thawing permafrost also threatens everyone on the planet because it stores a massive amount of ancient frozen carbon. And when that carbon thaws, it can be released into the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, leading to more warming and more thaw. So let me place the magnitude of this problem in perspective for you. By the end of this century, greenhouse gas emissions from thawing permafrost may be on par with some of the world's leading greenhouse gas emitting nations. Perhaps as large as or larger than emissions from the United States. The second largest greenhouse gas emitting country in the world. And you know, I want to point out this is not a new phenomena. Arctic residents and scientists have been observing permafrost though now for decades. But the scale, the research hasn't been sufficient to meet this enormous challenge. Because no one country is directly responsible for permafrost thaw, no single nation has taken responsibility for fully monitoring and tracking its impact across the Arctic. And this is not a case where ignorance is bliss because what doesn't get measured doesn't get accounted for. Because we can't put a precise number on permafrost emissions, policymakers are essentially excluding them, setting global emissions targets that are wholly and sufficient to protect us from catastrophic climate change. Ignoring permafrost is essentially like leaving a major greenhouse gas emitting country like the United States at a global climate negotiations, which is not a good idea. What we need to know is where permafrost is thawing across the Arctic and how fast what that means in terms of greenhouse gas emissions and how that will impact our climate in ten 50 or a hundred years from now. Answering these questions requires a massive and integrated effort at a scale.

Arctic ted Elise hue Anna verghese Adam grant Carnegie classification for re public research university of University of Texas Ted Sue Italy San Antonio Apple Alaska United States
"alaska yukon" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This summer saw some of the worst runs on alaska's yukon river but bristol bay processors have been enjoying great runs and donated fish to alaska native tribes along the yukon river kyi. Uk's olivia egberts reports. You're going to write the number of fish on this label. that's tanya ives. She's packing up chum. And kim salmon to be distributed to villages along the lower yukon river bristol. Bay processors sent the salmon too. Quick pack the only fish processing plant on the yukon. This donation is about twelve thousand. Pounds of salmon. Quick pack is splitting it up. Between ten lower yukon river villages the yukon river has seen its. Worst summer chum. Salmon run on record that means the commercial. Fishery is closed and puck can't sell salmon this year subsistence. Fishing for chum. Shook is also closed and many people along. The river have not had a taste of the fish yet. This season with puck voted the salmon community to community we down thousands of pounds of frozen fish a tender boats lowly motors up the cold rainy yukon. At the helm stands captain darren jennings saving delivering salmon to the villages is new to him in previous years. It'd be picking up commercial. Fisherman's fresh catch and taking it. Back to quick. Look we dock in saint. Mary's workers from all gotcha and undressed ski. Tribes the fish into their pickups and then drive them to households all evening a woman inge bay from saint. Mary's is grateful to have at least a bit of fish. We got to right now. I have them dying out. So i can can them with little opportunity for subsistence salmon. Fishing her grocery bill has gone out. her husband. walkie says they'll have to try for other species of fish to get them through the winter in saint. Mary's i'm olivia egberts.

yukon river darren jennings Mary olivia egberts alaska wyoming florida department of interior yukon walkie abella saint fort federal government aviv foundation nebraska
When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

Native America Calling

02:00 min | 1 year ago

When Yukon River Chum Stocks Collapsed, Donated Fish Came in From Bristol Bay

"This summer saw some of the worst runs on alaska's yukon river but bristol bay processors have been enjoying great runs and donated fish to alaska native tribes along the yukon river kyi. Uk's olivia egberts reports. You're going to write the number of fish on this label. that's tanya ives. She's packing up chum. And kim salmon to be distributed to villages along the lower yukon river bristol. Bay processors sent the salmon too. Quick pack the only fish processing plant on the yukon. This donation is about twelve thousand. Pounds of salmon. Quick pack is splitting it up. Between ten lower yukon river villages the yukon river has seen its. Worst summer chum. Salmon run on record that means the commercial. Fishery is closed and puck can't sell salmon this year subsistence. Fishing for chum. Shook is also closed and many people along. The river have not had a taste of the fish yet. This season with puck voted the salmon community to community we down thousands of pounds of frozen fish a tender boats lowly motors up the cold rainy yukon. At the helm stands captain darren jennings saving delivering salmon to the villages is new to him in previous years. It'd be picking up commercial. Fisherman's fresh catch and taking it. Back to quick. Look we dock in saint. Mary's workers from all gotcha and undressed ski. Tribes the fish into their pickups and then drive them to households all evening a woman inge bay from saint. Mary's is grateful to have at least a bit of fish. We got to right now. I have them dying out. So i can can them with little opportunity for subsistence salmon. Fishing her grocery bill has gone out. her husband. walkie says they'll have to try for other species of fish to get them through the winter in saint. Mary's i'm olivia egberts.

Yukon River Olivia Egberts Tanya Ives Kim Salmon Yukon River Bristol Alaska Bristol Bay Darren Jennings UK Yukon Mary Walkie Saint
"alaska yukon" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on Talk Is Sheep - Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia

"The people in la couldn't believe i worked in alaska. The people in alaska couldn't believe that i've worked in entertainment industry so that went on for a few years. And then i just. I had this epiphany twenty years ago. Twenty one years ago that really hunting and dealing with my customers and clients and spending quality time with people having those intimate really intense experiences. You know sheep and moose and bears and miserable weather. It it it really. It was more fulfilling for me than pursuing what is doing in the entertainment industry. So i kind of just went full board towards the guide side of the business and expanded on opportunities there got involved with a safari company in south africa produced some videos for them pro. Promotional videos did a bunch of hunting in africa. Got involved guidance or mexico guided for eleven years Down there at her maceo great time. It's wonderful experience for me and Yeah it just became a thing and then around two thousand four. I decided i really wanted to get in the sheep game. I thought that was gonna be. That was the the best way to take. My career to the next level was to expand into mountain game Because i had really built a reputation on brown bears and moose. And so. When i made that commit i really didn't know what kind of commitment i was making but You know changed my life. I i killed my killed. Dall sheep for myself. I was able to guide a few people in the alaska range. And in the meantime I did some video work on on a series called cub driver All about super cubs and light sport aircraft produced. A couple of dvd's were very popular and my business partner lonnie habur setzer arguably one of the finest. Both pilots in the world had developed a working relationship with paul clause ultimate ultimately and and he had recommended me to paul and paul invited me out for a probationary season at ultimately. This is ten years ago. And that was a dynamic dramatic change for me to leave she. Putting in the alaska range and guiding in the mid minimal china region for bears and moose and going to the complete eastern side of alaska yukon border. Right up against the kalani now. I'm suddenly in the world's best concession for doll sheet again life changing experience because of a recommendation of a friend line ever setzer and Yeah that was that was that was kind of a catalyst for all the dominoes that fell afterward that subsequently really expanded people's knowledge of me and a gross expansion of clients especially in the sheep community started knocking down some big sheep and and then all of a sudden a few years go by and and one guy to the year again life changing opportunity. And and now here we are. I'm will try to leverage the reputation that had built over last twenty six years in the business to do good for wildlife and conservation and to entertain people and Help people along make him a better. Hunter make them laugh along the way and And just have fun with it and and now it's pretty much all i do. Guide full time gig anymore Outside of fish guiding. I fish a few tournaments. But there's no money in it for me. Because i'm just not that good but but i have a lotta fun doing it because that was my real passion and and you know there was a time when i thought i was going to be a professional bass angler but i grew up at a time when there was not a high school national championship or a collegiate national champion..

alaska eleven years africa twenty years ago lonnie habur setzer south africa Twenty one years ago ten years ago paul Both pilots one one guy mexico china region around two thousand four yukon border couple of dvd mid minimal twenty six years last
"alaska yukon" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"It opened. I didn't know this feelings before it opened. The 62 world's fair was dismissed by some people as the Mercer Street Carnival. It will mark its 60th birthday next year. But Felix is not going toe Wait for that he convened a group of surviving world's fair staffers. Talk about what the diamond anniversary of the century 21 fair might look like Felix has brought to us by Lake Washington Windows and doors. Good Morning. Morning. Yes, The 60 years is a long time ago, I remain a little obsessed with Seattle World's Fair history for a couple of reasons. One is that it's still so present Seattle Center of Space Needle, the monorail, the fountain, Even your climate pledge arena. The basic layout of the fairgrounds is still in place. Second reasons that Seattle center is physical evidence of a watershed moment in local history. When the city in the region dramatically changed. There's not much in the way of other artifacts of other watershed moments. Anything about the conduct Gold rush in World War two. Those major events, you'll really abstract to me by comparison. Now. The third reason is that people who pulled it off who made it much more than that Carnival on Mercer Street, and you kept on doing cool things. I got four of them together through the magic of Zoom a few days ago to talk about the past in the future, With an eye to next year 60th Anniversary Junior's Rochester's a writer and historian. His father, City councilman Al Rochester, actually had the idea for the 62 fair. To mark the 50th anniversary of the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition held at the U. Dub campus. He has a ton of memories, of course, including opening night at the Opera House with Van Clyburn and Igor Stravinsky. Another musical memory really stands out Jackie Shooters bad that marched every single day almost every single day through the fairgrounds and changed his tunes and had people join him and stopped him to converse with people and the music was around us all. The time we developed was very, very exciting. It was a physical thing. An audio thing. But a memory that will never leave me. Let's hear a little bit of Jackie suitors. All right, here's Jackie Suitors, Ladies and gentlemen. So it imagine guys dressed in those band uniforms marching around the Seattle center, the fairgrounds playing music like that almost all day, really wonderful memory for Judas Rochester. Now. Albert Fisher was head of television and movies for the fair. He's the guy you got President Kennedy on the phone for the opening ceremonies. He escorted Elvis Presley all over while they were filming that famous movie, and he later worked on other affairs and had a long career and in television in Hollywood, Albert Fisher says that the more recent fares he's seen our farm or commercial He says Seattle of special in its focus. Seattle was really the one of the last Great fares that did showcase the achievements of of mangled lined in the arts and the sciences. And I remember by that opening night at the opera house with Prevents me and bang Clyburn and It was. It was an exciting event. But you know, every day at the fair was something exciting and different and unusual. And it went on for six months, and Louis Larson told us that every day at the fair was like New Year's Eve, Larson's now 96. He is the last surviving senior staff member of the fair. He managed advance ticket sales and then escorted VIPs around the fair, including Prince Philip and Adlai Stevenson. Not together. Of course, Before the fair, he barnstormed the country selling sponsorships and exhibit space. That was the money that kept the fair management going before the for the thing opened now, Louis Larson told us about one memorable visit in 1962, a Midwest manufacturing executive International Harvester vice president of I think market or something, and I make the pitch and Yes, it is. Big charity Turn front looks up the window and he turns back and he says down. Tell me says, says it's Seattle. You're smoking. That's on the ocean. I know I had a geography left for good stuff. So these guys all have great stories and great memories. But like the fair itself, with its century 21 theme, the anniversary conversation really turns the fair's legacy. The fourth guy in the group is see David Eubanks. He worked for Louis Larson during the fair producing events. And then, after the fair, he became assistant director of Seattle Center. He was there during the years when Bumbershoot in Northwest Folklife became institutions. See David Eubanks looks at modern downtown Seattle with places like Benaroya Hall in the Art Museum. He see Seattle center is the cultural incubator. If there hadn't been a place for it, those things to grow Never would have happened. And yet she Alistair's still filled with performing arts. And visual arts of some of them are different than what started. But you know, and then you look downtown your Symphony Hall's new art museums. They would never have gotten there. If there had not been a Seattle center to start with. Where they could touch and talk about being in the downtown world. But that doesn't mean that Dale Center lost anything looking all that stuff that's still there. It's amazing. Felix banal every Wednesday on Seattle's morning news and traffic is coming today on news forward for we're working for you an inside look at the local Cupid vaccine trial for kids What Children reported days after getting the shot and how it could impact the timeline.

David Eubanks Igor Stravinsky Albert Fisher Van Clyburn Elvis Presley Louis Larson Adlai Stevenson today Mercer Street Felix 1962 six months Prince Philip Seattle Center Seattle World's Fair Mercer Street Carnival next year Benaroya Hall International Harvester World War two
"alaska yukon" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"alaska yukon" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Two thirty. Pm a fire broke out in seattle. Started when a glue pot. The carpentry shop was knocked over and caught fire. It was initially spread when the owner of the shop attempted to put it out with water which only spread it by the morning of june seventh. The fire had burned twenty five city blocks including the entire business district for the city's wars and its railroad terminals. Unfortunately ill preparedness contributed to the great fire. So many fire hydrants. Were in use at the water. Pressure was too weak to fight such an infernal but despite the massive loss of property it was reported that no one was killed. The total losses were estimated at nearly twenty million dollars which would be about six hundred eighty one million in today's dollars. Despite the magnitude of the destruction the rebuilding effort began quickly but it was decided to rebuild seattle on its original site and not move the city to new city. Ordinances were created. I that all buildings be constructed of brick or stone rather than wood s seattle rebuilt. The population grew by nearly twenty thousand to reach forty thousand inhabitants. At this created a new problem in eighteen fifty one seattle was founded on the low mudflats puget sound and when they rebuilt it. Roughly on the same location problems arose originally. There was little plumbing residents used outhouses or privies in water was hauled in from nearby elliott bay for washington cooking purposes. Sometime after the great fire. Thomas crapper no kidding. That was his name. Thomas crapper brought the crapper to seattle impacting people's everyday lives. As opposed to an outhouse the crapper required a connection to a central sewage system which seattle lapped thus seattle's first central sewage system was developed a single wooden box pipe due to the tide cycle and the flawed sewage drainage situation. The pressure caused a reversal of the wastewater direction. Forceful enough to blow you off. The crapper cities were water. I didn't write this folks. The cities were water pressure. Issue brought about the second city ordinance. It was decided to raise the city and take care of the pressure problem. Concrete walls were erected along curbs at rose from eight to thirty feet and what had been the street between was filled in. This meant that some sidewalks and storefronts were as deep as thirty six feet beneath a newer higher version of the neighborhood in nineteen o seven and with the alaska yukon pacific exposition looming in their future. The city condemned what had become underground businesses today at the corner of first avenue and yellow is the historic pergola delta shelter for people visiting. What for a moment in history was believed to be the world's most luxurious underground toilet at the time it was referred to as a comfort station today. The term public restroom evokes images of green stalls concrete floors little toilet paper but in nineteen six julian ever designed per goal to shelter to descending stairways and ventilate restrooms via a hollow columns. The underground comfort station consisted of anti rooms for men and women were users were greeted by attendance. The rooms featured armchairs white tile walls and floors brass foot rest. They accommodated five thousand flushes a day except for sunday when they were flushed. Eight thousand times in one thousand nine hundred magazine. Article stated that nowhere in the eastern hemisphere. Was there an underground comfort station. Equal in character. Initially public restrooms in the united states were created to curb growing concern over sanitation and disease overcrowded urban areas following the industrial revolution in the mid nineteenth century by the early twentieth century. Public restrooms have become common but as more and more building codes required businesses to include indoor restrooms as roads and transportation expanded. Urban public facilities began declining today. Seattle's famed underground restroom. Closed in the nineteen fifties. This story was written by ryland anderson and his team of urban legend writers and speak of the devil. Get in here ryland anderson. Wrote this story about thomas crapper. What do you have to say for yourself. Well kit you know we just we just give you the facts. Just the facts man who l. Give me a hint. Next time on. I'm getting into aren't get ans- good to have you back royal and really how many how many members of your urban legend riders returned with you well kit By started out with three. And now we're up to six and very consistent. A lot of them are out on the road. Doing research for various doors. Got in receipts story coming up tomorrow. Anything i should know about you should put parentheses. Parentheses are highlight No not really gonna make a big price for your kid. All right folks out was ryan anderson and thank goodness. He didn't have his team of writers here with him. This crumb thanks for listening..

ryan anderson ryland anderson mid nineteenth century thirty six feet thomas crapper eight Eight thousand times early twentieth century tomorrow Seattle thirty feet three twenty five city blocks forty thousand inhabitants nineteen fifties about six hundred eighty one m today morning of june seventh five thousand flushes a day elliott bay
Like January in November: Much of US braces for record lows

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Like January in November: Much of US braces for record lows

"National Weather Service meteorologist Brian Jackson says brace yourself and bundle up Minnesota Iowa Wisconsin Michigan and across the plains liking including Candice thirty temperatures in the single digits it's not just the Midwest he says three hundred records could be broken all the way south to the Gulf coast there could be some locations that are called for two days in a row in the set a record will take the cold front started in Russia basis dome of cold air came from eastern Siberia across the Arctic Ocean down Alaska Yukon and while the cold air is already here the worst is yet to come I'm Julie Walker

Brian Jackson Minnesota Michigan Midwest Siberia Arctic Ocean Alaska Yukon Julie Walker National Weather Service Iowa Wisconsin Candice Gulf Russia Two Days