17 Burst results for "Alan Sir"

"alan sir" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:32 min | 3 weeks ago

"alan sir" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Can you buy near beer at the package store? Just not regular beer. What if I'm an alcoholic? And I'm experiencing some sort of withdrawals at 9:31 P.m. and I need I've run out at home. Yeah. Can you can you ask the virus for for, you know, give you the night off. Can you look the other way? Just look the other way while I go in and get some get a couple of nips. You have to get me through the night until because the fight you know the virus doesn't come out in the daytime. It's you're safe in the daytime. It's on ly at night, when the virus attacks and a different hours, depending on the day of the week in Rhode Island, anyway, in Massachusetts, always the same. All right, 844 542 42. Now they're saying that this glitch we were talking about it in the Michigan County at that cost Trump 7000 votes in one county and try and try more Antrim County. Big, big trump country country, and they switch the votes around today, and he picked up 13,000 votes. Apparently multiple other counties in Michigan have the same same system that produced this glitch that turned Trump votes in the Biden votes, and now it's being reported online. I don't know if it's true or not, but they're saying multiple states. Have been using the same system that converts trump votes and the Biden votes. What a coincidence. I hope it's you know, in a way. I hope it's true because it'll make it easier to just throw everything out the window. Alan, You're next with Howie Carr. Go ahead, Alan. Sir..

Biden Trump Alan Antrim County Michigan County Howie Carr Michigan Rhode Island Massachusetts
"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:25 min | 3 months ago

"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Across the tracks Coming out of that journeys. Fun. Once hit, the wall came to rest with the nose of number six. Right yellow? No. By here against the wall, he crashed on the second lap and finished Last the next year. I'm sir was caught up in the tragic accident that claimed the lives of Eddy Sacks and Dave MacDonald and finished 32nd Answer says while the no vies were fast He knew they weren't a threat to win. Votes were good days in my life. There wasn't any chance of my finishing the race, and I knew that I hope that it would finish. But the car would always go fast and Bobby answer that became the most important thing. The I used to have a theory that practiced fast. You're qualified fast on your lead the races or what, really fashion the races and everybody knew yet in life got a lot easier sponsorship. Any rides, You know cars. That drive was always a lot easier. While Bobby answer was taking part in his third Indianapolis 500 with granite Telly in 1965. He was joined by younger brother Al, who, like his siblings have been behind the wheel of a car from a young age. Even rolled a model. A Ford in the heart is a kid model. A pick up when I was running great kind of my brother Chata kind of a racetrack readout out here. They favor ground and super modified to my damn in Albuquerque in S O. I was out there one day and And rolled over and went back in the shop asked me out to get it back before my terms got back from downtown. They just laughed at me while they held me. My brother's help means the employees. My father had their help me, but soon is a My parents got back. It was in five minutes before my father called me and so you know, a new more than I thought he knew, you know, or my brothers or the employees told him you know that I just rolled the car model lady over. Al Unser tried several cars during practice in 1965, but it didn't appear. The rookie would have a shot at a ride capable of making the 500 Until surprise benefactor step forward, the defending champion and top driver on the circuit A J. Foyt By that time when I walked in, I thought I was through because it was Sunday. Unite, ma'am. You know when, when you missed that rage, your rookie year I always felt and I still do. That the car owners will have anything to do with you because you didn't have the talent to make the race. So when porn walked in the garage because I have a second car if you'd like to come out and try it, and, you know we'll get to try to get a qualified it. Think about it and come over to my Grubbs. Well when he walked out my garage I've followed, you know. I mean, you gotta be kidding. That was a break that you know, I never dreamed would happen. Alan sir, would start in the last role for the 1965 Indianapolis 500 joining one of the greatest rookie classes and the race is history. Which included future winners Mario Andretti and Gordon John Cock. Fans were excited about the new stars of the Brickyard. But Voight's chief mechanic, George Big, Naughty, a man, who would later figure prominently in Alan Sir's career wasn't nearly as enthused about Floyd's choice of teammates. George and I. When I came in, and 65 asked me to run a second car, George pick Noddy went bananas, I guess. Because he didn't want to have a roofie and you know in the other car. Even though I own the team, I get whatever I never did understand all of it, But George did not want me in the car. And then after the race, then you know he he then seemed to get along with me. Alan saw Randall Day in his rookie year, finishing ninth, four laps down. He got his first win on the IndyCar circuit later that year. Fittingly, at Pike's Peak, which had been added to the use actual peon Shit trail as appoints paying race because in those days like speak, represented a whole lot earlier, which the second coolest race and And when you want it, like, speak the world kind of knew about here. The following year, Both answers had new teams for the 500. Bobby moved to Bob Wilkie's leader card outfit and grabbed in eighth place finish while Al ended up 12th, driving as a teammate to world champion Jim Clark. 1967 was the year the answer. Brothers began to show the rest of the field. They were there to stay. Al finished second to his former teammate A. J. Foyt at the Brickyard while Bobby wound up ninth and later in 1967. Bobby swept a doubleheader at the Telegram trophy races at Moss Port Park in Canada. Bobby answer had his first IndyCar winds outside of Pikes Peak. But they wouldn't be his last, and the two brothers were about to begin a decade of dominance. And he's going to come.

Bobby answer Al Unser George Big Alan sir Brickyard Chata Pikes Peak Eddy Sacks J. Foyt A. J. Foyt Grubbs Albuquerque Mario Andretti IndyCar Canada Alan Sir Dave MacDonald Noddy Gordon John Cock Moss Port Park
"alan sir" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:14 min | 4 months ago

"alan sir" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Let's get to the rest of the program, Shall we So I have the last episode of how to get away with murder, and I haven't watched it because that means it will be over and I've been Doling out the last six episodes I've had, like one once a week, because I'd had, like six or seven from earlier this spring. That's how I felt about you Tread from the last bag bag just finished it last night and eyeball drag. That out is long is possible. Good, but there's going to be a Susan Five. Yeah. How much did you love it? That's Alan. Siri's You guys last kingdom. I would maybe even watch it again. Yeah. Oh, it's it's a Netflix. It was that was a delicious treat for me. Yeah, he is amazing Butts. Okay, so back to you so many things when you just drag out something I don't want to. And and I have loved how to get away with murder. I've been a fan for this. I came in and out. I just really because Violet Davis is everything in that show and that show Gave Viola Davis the money. And the status to be able to start her own production companies say yes or no to what she wanted to do. I mean, that really made her a household name, even though she's one to Tony's Thie, Emmy and Oscar Golden Globe, a BAFTA and like literally 90 other awards. But it's the how to get away with murder playing Annalise Keating. Yes, And so I have one more episode and everyone is said that this finale is just unbelievable that you if you were someone who watched how to get away with murder that this episode ties up everything is just a case of this last episode, so Last week. I think was last week I get my new Vanity fair. And it's the July August issue that by now, then I guess it's called the the dog Days of summer. The jog a CE issue on my Laura and Violet Davis is on the cover Holly postive for US and He just great, great photo, but a couple things that people are, you know, just saying about this Vanity Fair story. Is that the guy who took the photo? Yeah. Of all of the violence. Davis photos is that he's the first ever black photographer to shoot the vanity Fair cover. And boy I know red. He could Jones, who's a black woman. She's been the editor in chief of the magazine for, Like, At least you probably you know, like Annie Liebowitz was the chosen one for a long time. You kind of have a relationship. Maybe. And you just used a carrot. Yeah, but itjust anyway. Anyway, she She really is a great actor. Denzel Washington spoke in the piece he because they get fences together. They did. Frances That's exactly right. And He now that she's done with how to get away with murder. She and her husband have this production company. I feel like, you know, she's just zero in front of the twin cities because members celebrity property brothers highlighted her friend from acting school or Juilliard Roommate. Yeah, she's till she's We've seen her so many times. Sorry when she and her husband, Julian, and when he speaks, you listen and she saw articulate and eloquent and lovely. Absolutely lovely, she Ah, but she did talk to Vandy fear about her movie role in the help, she said she was trying to get into the film industry. Should she, of course, played. Abilene Clark, a maid working for socially wait family in the 19 sixties and activity made played the other maid who was very mistreated by the family she worked for, and Anyway. Davis was nominated for best actress and Spencer went on to win the best supporting and But anyway, neither viol or Octavia Spencer there there In hindsight, looking back on the movie, they're not really Ah. That they feel like that movie very much catered to a white audience, so she spoke out about that again, she said. There's a part of me that feels like you betrayed myself and my people because I was in a movie that I wasn't ready to tell the whole truth. But she did. Say she loved making the movie. He loved her co stars. Still, Jessica Castine, everybody's still Emma Stone and a dozen January I'll still really good friends, and she just said there weren't there aren't enough opportunities for black actor says Yeah, and telling stories that perspective in mind exactly. Anyway, Viola has you will change that with her production company, and because she can That money. She got money that TV money. Allowed her to be able to do that. So I'm caring. I'm excited about that looks very fabulous on the cover, and the inside photos were really amazing. And then And we have Oliver Stone giving interview. And he is not a fan of the current state of Hollywood, which I just say 90% of Hollywood has shut down. So who would be 1/4 eye like he thinks that hey criticizes Hollywood for turning into an Alice in Wonderland Tea Party. I just Rose. This is New York Times And so he just said Modern movie making is just ridiculous. Everything has become too fragile to sensitive Hollywood. Now you can't make a film without a covert advisor. Well, and I were in the middle of a pandemic. You can't make a film without a sensitivity counselor. Well, if you're going to be having sex on the set, you know you've got some things going on there. It's ridiculous. Academy changes its mind every 5 10 2 months what they're just trying to keep up with. I think he has a memoir out, and that's why he's doing this interview with Eric. I think its he's got a memoir out. It's probably we're getting it taken somewhat out of context. But I know when change happens in an industry that you've been in forever, you're busy. I'll never forget. When women started practicing law, my dad was ready to have a fit. I mean, I'm just saying when change big changes happen when it seems like so Dar women are going to become lawyers. My dad's like I'll let a gate letter get out. Never forget. I mean, my God loves women, but he was just they just lata gate. Everything and so change for people is always hard. It's stone is just like that funny these holly He's 73 73. So his old Hollywood he used to do whatever you wanted. Well, yeah, so I would I have to like is see this all in context of what they're talking about. Like I don't know that.

murder Hollywood Violet Davis Viola Davis Frances That Netflix Susan Five Siri Octavia Spencer Davis Alan lata gate Denzel Washington Oliver Stone Annie Liebowitz New York Times US Emma Stone Annalise Keating Tony
"alan sir" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:51 min | 6 months ago

"alan sir" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"For. You might Alan Sir on this around down. This st only got a is yeah All can't silence your body the Four Years La. I don't even know I see else would be so Choose stood out our so straw. Force me knowing what Lou. All the know you're welcome some s. See Your Face. Talk Pro Law Ladies and gentlemen please welcome back to the stage Adam.

"alan sir" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

Startups For the Rest of Us

10:16 min | 8 months ago

"alan sir" Discussed on Startups For the Rest of Us

"Welcome to this bonus episode to the rest of us. I'm your host rob walling several weeks ago along with producers Andor on the Microsoft team we started doing a livestream called Microsoft on air and I. It was every day and we transitioned to get twice a week and had some really good conversations with founders with copywriters like Leonid Patch came on and did live copy audits that were super valuable for the microcosm. F- audience the Microsoft community and last week at a really interesting conversation with Portland. Allan the founder of India hackers and we shape the conversation. Around what Cortlandt Allen has learned interviewing one hundred and fifty five startup founders but we also talked about what he's learned building a community from scratch and it was such a good conversation that I wanted to throw it here in this podcast feed because as I listen to it I was inspired and I felt like I took things away from it. And felt like it would make a great short startups in the rest of US episodes. So here it is hope you enjoy it. Cortlandt Alan Sir. Nice to see you. Thanks for joining me on micro-finance today thanks for having me rods. I see you as well absolutely so. I have my standard interest. I'M GONNA run through and then we're going to dig in to a pretty cool topic with Portland. Who has a lot of experience working with with developers India Hackers? Who ARE BUILDING THEIR COMPANIES? So welcome to today's episode. Microphone era as always. I'm your host ROB walling Portland. Alan and I as I said are going to dig through his experience building indie hackers. He's he's done something pretty unique that most people don't do which is to build a community site almost virtually from scratch which is a very hard thing to do and he's kept it up for years and they were acquired by stripes over years ago and he's interviewed one hundred and fifty hundred and sixty startup founders on his podcast. India hackers acres podcast. Many of you listen to and I know that when you talk to that many founders you start seeing patterns and that's the kind of stuff we're GONNA dig into. Today's just some lessons. He's learned thought processes you know. Po- A positive patterns anti patterns and that kind of stuff if you are not already in Microsoft connect which is Microsoft's slack Channel Online Community. We almost thousand founders and inspiring founders in there. That's where folks are. GonNa be able to ask questions of Portland and myself today. So head to Microsoft connect DOT COM and apply. If you'd like to be part of future conversations of course you can always just watch this livestream on Microsoft on Air Dot com as a reminder micro on air. Podcast is live as of a couple of weeks ago. So if you want to hear any of these episodes if you miss any of them in a synchronous Lee not have to log into youtube and watch video which is not something I do. My generation doesn't tend to do a lot of that. I personally have subscribed to my podcast and I`Ma kind of listening back to figure out what we can do to improve it. I think there's always room for improvement as always thanks to base camp and Stripe. There are headline partners and we do a lot of this with their help. So thank you so much so Portland Allen founder of India hackers. Are you. Hold up there in San Francisco. Everything going well I am. I haven't seen anybody that I know in the last month except for my local grocers who I guess I'm on a first name basis with but that's pretty much it hold up playing video games playing poker. Do a lot of work honestly. Haven't fun with it. Yeah yeah that's cool. I've been seeing you. Put out some articles and video interviews. You've been doing a lot Pretty pretty topical stuff. I think you were mentioning that the car. Your content is moving more towards maybe news or current events. Type stuff that right. Yeah that's exactly right. I think it's something I've always avoided in the past because it's a little bit harder. There's just a short turnaround time if you're doing things that are current basically have to plan for episodes record them and get them out the door extremely quickly evergreen become less relevant over time but there is some other advantages that. I think makes them sort of the news? Approach very attractive and also I think just with the way the global conversations going on you know had a really great episode lined up for the index. Podcast was sort of a debate between Natalie. Nagel while bid and Dha Trim base camp on work life balance. And I was so excited to release this thing and then a month past and I think the release date was supposed to be last week and email both of them and I was like I. Just don't feel right even tweeting about this just seems so off topic. So I think there's been a shift and it's harder to sort of do business as usual when everybody's talking about the facts of worldwide pandemic and. There's a huge global recession coming. Yeah the conversation has certainly changed. We've been you know we've Almo I would say it's unintentional but when we moved into the news stuff you know. We did a big lives. We about Kobe. Nineteen what really? Sba loan the paycheck protection program. And that was really the first time we had done something like that. You know and done something. That was super topical. We threw together in like two days but turned out really well. We had three hundred fifty four people on the livestream and again forty hours notice. It was pretty good and it's received Watches since then. So it's a trip. Their conversation is ever changing so I wanted prior to this unit emailed a little bit and I was. I was saying you know. This is the topic I love to cover. You have any bullet-point thoughts on things that you have learned whether it was going to. Hackers are from interviewing other founders. And you sent me this create outline. I figured you'd like six bullet points but it was like really well thought out things. Did you have that put together in advance? Is that a book outline. You have or is that agony mail is I missed your email about the stimulus thing and I felt really bad about it and so when I saw your email about the list I was like I need to put some effort into this miss females as I just started typing and it was very stream-of-consciousness which I think runs the risk that there might be a lot of reasons. He buys here. This might not be the one hundred and fifty five interviews might be the things that everyone from the last twenty interviews that have been on my mind lay right but the things I feel pretty strongly about and they might change their all opinions. They're all beliefs that wouldn't see any of them are vaccinated stone. Probably any time that you've asked me what I've learned from the people I've talked to and the things that I've done I would have given you completely different answers. So this is Portland April Twenty Twenty version of what I've learned from India. Hackers awesome one. One of the things he said. Is that the advice to start a BBC news rather than a BBC company is a bit like telling people to eat green vegetables and not eat a bunch of carbs. They'll probably be healthier if they listen but the advice itself misses the underlying principle of why an idea is actually good or bad talk through that a little bit because I when I. I'm not sure I'm not sure I understand the connection like when I say don't eat vegetables when I told my kids eat vegetables not carves the reason that vegetables because they don't taste good whereas French fries but is that what you're saying is like companies are really fun they taste good and that's fun to start whereas bbb or not or what. What's your father? Yeah I mean it's it's a lot of things number one. They are fun to start. A lot of. People want to start businesses. Even when I started Andy. Hackers one of my checklist. I wanted to start a business that I could tell my friends and family about that. They could use it. They will be excited about. It'd be interesting to them just because as consumers we mostly interact with BC. Businesses are of course of our lives like we very rarely see what's going on behind the scenes at businesses. And so I think they're very attractive to start but they have some unique challenges which is kind of why we end up giving the advice to go to be because it kind of goes against. What people's sort of intuitive sort of I guess almost automatic desire is when they first become founders. I think the advice is a little bit course. I think at an ex girlfriend who talked about the color diet and was literally eat foods that are these colors sort of shorthand and there really was a directive and they don't eat white foods eat green foods and I think if you do that like okay. Great you'll probably get a lot of vegetables. You probably won't eat a lot of carbs but it's just really course advice. It doesn't really get down to the nitty gritty of someone. Let's say who's looking at their macaroni. Bows and counting. Carbs and counting protein grams of protein and counting fat etc. Who's actually looking at sort of like the first principles and the underlying reasons why certain foods are bad or good and if you just sort of all the higher higher level advice you might still mess up right. You might just eat nothing but green jolly ranchers all the time. And then wonder why you know. You're not healthy so I think it's obviously more lucrative than BTC on average and then did an analysis a year ago and our product directory we have like thousands of peoples product. The revenue numbers. The ones that were to be we're making on average four times more revenue than the ones that would be to see but I do think there are some extremely lucrative businesses. You just have to be careful and follow the underlying principles that lead to people paying basically for something of value. Businesses make money generally more than consumers and they have a higher cap on how much money can make their also more concerned therefore with saving money that I think consumers are because it's just more money to be saved and so it's easier to pick a valuable problem that businesses care about and so generally speaking like B. Two B. is not a bad way to go but I think if you're actually looking at those principles you can ask okay. Well how do consumers make money? What a consumers care a lot about. What is the problem that if I have consumers are not going to get fickle and leave that they're not gonNA only be willing to pay me five dollars a month for it? Sarah look at those underlying principles. There's lots of areas for example. Probably the consumers see themselves making the most money is through their job and people imagine all sorts of avenues for how they can get a raise at their job or get a job in a better industry and usually that comes in the form of education and yeah maybe people only want to pay five or ten bucks a month for your to do list APP and maybe turn because it's not that important but people are willing to pay forty or fifty thousand dollars a year for the right education which is crazy about and so I think the same principles apply if you actually understand why businesses are consumer spend money. And you're like you know a little bit disciplined and making sure that your business focuses on solving valuable problems for people solving problems at high reach problems that people are unlikely to turn from because they're important then consumers can be just as lucrative of target market as any business. Nice love it. Thanks for that explanation for folks in Microcosm connection and microcomponent air channel..

Microsoft India Portland rob walling Alan Sir founder Stripe US Cortlandt Allen Portland April Twenty Twenty Allan BBC Portland Allen Leonid Patch youtube Andor BTC
"alan sir" Discussed on Pit Lane Parley

Pit Lane Parley

11:49 min | 1 year ago

"alan sir" Discussed on Pit Lane Parley

"A special episode of Pit Lane. KARLA WE'RE GONNA call this First Episode D. We lost track sedition. We're going to start with my home track in Netzer speedway and I enjoined by one of the guys from these. Save Nazareth's Group here with Tim Sullivan. Tim Thanks for joining me tonight. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate you reaching out to be from You know so for those who may not be familiar with is located near me about an hour and fifteen minutes north and Tim Tickets through Steve Founding in the real old school of What was then called Nazareth national speedway all right right So I'm not sure how many people actually no There was actually a horse. Track closer in the the middle of town back in the eighteen fifties Sounds like your old style you know. Of course I think it was like a mile milers half-mile but it was around. Like nine thousand. Nine hundred are so they moved out of town to where the site a where the track is right. Now in the bill a half mile track and that's currently like where the giant in in all those stores are a a on one ninety one and two forty eight so they didn't actually start Auto races until about nineteen ten so in those were like those like motor Polo. I don't know if you've seen some of those screen shots or they were the old like tractors. I guess if you will and it was like water polo or like a horse like the that we're used to seeing in booth polo stick and you're driving around in a car. You're smack balls around. I didn't last very long but the note that was. Actually yes. It's funny. I'm just reading my notes here wikipedia calls at Auto Polo Ended it actually drew a crowd of at the time which I guess is pretty big in ten thousand eleven thousand people which is pretty substantial for kind of a rural area in northeastern Pennsylvania. Yeah so gone. A bit further down The I like large raise was hosted after after world. War Two BY TRIPLE A. IF I'm not sure like a lot of younger people are of course saying younger. I'm not that old either either but a lot of folks that don't know about AAA and other things that they used to do like that back then and then and for a large race was about thirty cars or so in a crammed in with eleven thousand people or so. That was a pretty big that back then So a second track was built in nineteen sixty six. So that was the larger one mile BURTT was actually one one eighths the odd length. But you'll probably know that there was actually two dirt tracks there Jose oval at and. Then there's a smaller half mile. Sounds Bill Sixty six. which is the current ration- in early Exact location of that track So like during the during the a A one thousand nine hundred sixties. That's when the bigger track hosted like you sack events and whatnot and it was actually. I think it was in in sixty six. That Ellen Serbia Mario so like the big big time hero you know was beaten out out by someone. That's not from the area so I'm sure that was a for for a fun thing to watch. Yes it's funny Everybody a associated with the track with the ANDROID. Obviously since they will now pretty much all lives down the street or nearby but Alan Sir is actually the guy who on the first USAK race. They're big names like Alan like like a Was David rudiments. Dad buzzy rude. Yeah Yeah like you had this old school names that like l. a.. People think about it because they just go. Oh it's Nazar has got to be ready right We had the large oval Closed down around nineteen seventy-one but the smaller tracks stayed open. That hosted your weekly dirt nights stuff like your like your modifies in your life. Your legends sort of stops that went on on while that track was closed in it wasn't until nineteen eighty two where the were both tracks were purchased by a local businessman. Blendi Cardi already. A lot of people know that name but that was like a local up. PA Guy That he has attract promoter and whatnot so he he bought both tracks but sadly with running both tracks that gets quite expensive so in eighty seven a it was a seven that does purchased by Penske and then the large over was paved over was actually slightly shortened and and then paved over in the small oval was sold. Elaine Co which for those people that don't know about lane cotswold grocery store. Chain for as millennials. You may or may not be old enough to know about that but like after that was paved you handler like the the Nascar Busch series in the trucks will and modifies. They had carte Obviously so then I'll ran pretty much up until it closed in two thousand four and then you know the track was Paul also as Penske was getting out of the track game which they own which he own Michigan and auto club and so it's like Houston only get out of that and he was starting to sell those off so he actually sold at two. I C which is your your international speedway corporation bloomer. Hatim that's up up the US oppose so as like the big expansion was happy with Nascar. You have these. Bigger corporations is biology tracks. And what they would do they would go. Well there's a market somewhere else so as opposed to having somebody else owning compete. We'll just by encloses says he had to happen to tracks over across the US so they actually moved. The Nasdaq dates Watkins Glen. And I'm sure there's some people that may not know but those stands on the front stretch or actually the stands that I used to sit in when it was here. So so it's Kinda like kinda frustrating when you go Glenn like those stands don't belong here kind of like the general rundown of of like what transpired so you know there's a big tracks like Indianapolis that you know that's been open since nineteen fourteen or whatever. Yes there's always binny's track here will whether it was in town or smaller drove lord larger one lights lights There's always been something there as kind of you know. It's kind of sad to see when I was born in ninety one. So that's that's where my dad took me. I lived up the street so I could hear it like I was not even like a mile away as cart was there. I'd go outside like Michael's well here. Michael all excited and you know but we don't have that anymore sadly so yeah I'm sure people on the show of heard me say a abundance times. They used to run around the grandstands while my dad was still working for car but it was such a cool facility Some of my notes that I'm going to share with with everybody here attract when it was paved was actually advertised as a one point. One two five mile track again. Just like the track I'm sorry a one mile paved track but the actual measurement was a l. less than a mile so teams figured out how to really get good field strategy there and once it was officially measured it was actually point nine miles so and not really young not quite a mile although it's essentially the same thing and the I. R. L. In the last rests on two three years of the track Used a measurement of point. Nine three five for timing and scoring although NASCAR car kept it as you know one mile until two thousand four and I do always laugh. I don't particularly As everybody knows pay close attention to NASCAR but when you see Watkins Glen you see the standard really familiar. Remember before I first time they were up there. The grants were there. I feel a little sad. Dad was the first place. I saw any sort of racing in one of the first tracks in the northeastern area. Another track ET AL cover in the coming weeks is Trenton speedway which is also very unique. Very very unique he can vary early. Nineteen hundreds tracks of another one. That's kind of a forgotten area By both the open wheel and NASCAR standards in today's world. But obviously we have richmond coming back next year which is great Let's look at some of the winners here as pretty cool Danny soul than actually one in Iraq race. Here as you mentioned Al Unser won the first USAK racier. Mario Andretti won the second USAK. Zachary's here something no was the old Marlboro challenge us to run run. Their back was delay eighties. I think it was like the Big Lake is basically the all star race but cart. Yeah it was Those were those refund races to watch which If you can find them online they're they're definitely good Let me ask. Let me ask you a question here. I'm GonNa this is typically something I do to my co host but let mrs you can Guess here the only person to win the race here in back to back years would be. What driver would be nineteen eighty nine and nineteen ninety man? Dan I don't I don't WanNa say now for some reason I was GONNA say Little Al but that's that's not right you'd be incorrect on.

Nascar USAK US Alan Sir Michael Big Lake Nazareth national speedway Tim Sullivan Pit Lane Tim KARLA Mario Andretti Al Unser Netzer Penske NASCAR Tim Tickets Ellen Serbia Mario Blendi Cardi
"alan sir" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"alan sir" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And all these arguments of and let's just do something good all right we have rob Henderson on he is a gates Cambridge scholar and I know he's a gates Cambridge scholar because I had to look up the what the what the second word in the headline of his story the activism of cancel culture and I'm like aids activism job he and then I realize that it's no that's actually no that's it's act it's activism and I had to look it up so he went to Yale I went to Yale he graduated I didn't I think that's the difference welcome rob enters into the program how are you I Glenn great to be here so you sound like you almost believe that too rob the the activism of cancel cancel culture what you're saying is is this is something that is ancient inside of us it's tribal right right so the way I think about cancel culture is that it's rooted in Palm Beach primitive human drive to obtain social data and in group solidarity with their peers as well as to identify a our friends and our foes and we generally go into tribes when we're afraid I mean it is it's human nature and so when we're afraid of something we go into tribes and the deeper we go into the tribe the the more we don't listen anymore and then we lose all sense of proportion and and any sense of nuance right right well you know tribalism is inherently humans so whether we're in danger not would you like to be around you know sort of sort of our group you know people who is your doctor baller Alan Sir about when we are in danger we are more likely to be people who think like to behave like us and to sort of denigrate people who we're afraid of or who don't agree with us so tell me what happened to you in twenty sixteen while you're an undergrad at Yale yeah you're going I've been concerned about Campbell culture for a long time and know the actually the military before it and yell for undergrad and you know I've heard stories about you know extra sensitive college student and no flakes and so on and I thought a lot of it was probably just the media maybe blowing things out of proportion but then literally within my first two months they yelled that is with the fall semester two thousand fifteen faculty member named Erica Chris stockage wrote an email around Halloween telling students that they should communicate with each other more they're offended by the costumes that the you know other students choose to wear rather than relying on the university administration to give up guidelines of what costumes were allowed to wear or not and the student reaction to her was just pure outrage they targeted her they turned her into a pariah on campus for essentially defending freedom of expression and eventually he had to resign I'm in basically said that the climate on campus was not conducive to free speech coaching stepped down from her passion that the university and so okay cool I thought that was weird I thought okay so you know maybe this is just a quirk of American universities and that this is just unique to schools in the United States but then I wrote a ride to the university of Cambridge here in England last year and literally within a few first you mind center is probably the most famous academic in the world gets disinvited from the university because a bunch of students and faculty protesters that that you know him in being here would make them feel scared or on paper something and so you know there there is this problem in academia but then in culture more broadly out people getting canceled or you know things that they say can I ask you this rob what you know what the thing that happened at Yale here's here's a woman who's saying look talk to each other have personal responsibility that take this upon yourself to understand don't go to don't go to the man nobody expects the the college to do this this is the exact opposite kind of thinking from the sixties or any kind of of real movement with the youth they are they are holding up these it is the government and the administration in that case and saying yeah we we should have them do everything for us where does that come from yeah you know it's funny you say that if I'm not mistaken I think in an interview Erica Chris doctors but professor got enough to step down to yell Chesley kind of referred to herself as this kind of stick you liberal you know this person who sort of March with the students and believed in the whole freedom of speech because so it's sort of ironic that she's getting targeted now or simply defending freedom of expression and I think a lot of people from that generation now are sort of you will their dad at what's happening because oftentimes they're the ones being target now find it don't you find it the additionally strange that in an era where your voice can be heard you have the power to be heard and to be seen anywhere around the world that you have the power to start your own business unlike any other time in the world and you can become famous unlike any other time of the world that that generation is going back to like a nineteen fifties kind of structure well I think what's happening here glad is that the ideology and power are afraid of free speech so you know in in the fifties and the sixties there were there was a sort of perhaps more conservative ideology that held power in university even if this ID and the group that consider themselves the underdog maybe the sort of progress is that the time we're fighting for freedom of speech we're at today those students who protected back then now have the power and they're afraid of sort of uprising the Obama people who are challenging that and so I'm not entirely sure that freedom of speech itself is you know this bedrock principle but it's only you that the court of that as a weapon against the opposing ideologies right so then what happens Robert what we what what what is our future hold and how do we get our arms around this because if you point out in your article you know wait intell it's you you could be next you point out the article that's not enough that's theoretical to too many people even though we're seeing it happen in real time right now it's still not enough right I don't think that those words you know you could be knack which IP a lot on social media and in conversations about cancel culture I don't think it actually registers for most people because the social rewards so you know getting into a mob in trying to cancel someone in those rewards are true mediating gratifying and the dangers of cancel culture are pretty remote an abstract I mean it just is going to a sort of you know you rest for a lot of people so Kipling wrote in his poem the gods of the copybook headings that all these things will happen until terror and slaughter returned in what he was talking about was you're just going to go off the deep end but it will take terror and slaughter to return to common sense and we've seen this time and time again are we at that point to where the only thing that's going to stop this is just I mean people didn't understand in the nineteen twenties Hey you could be next but by nineteen thirty nine pretty much everybody was clear you know even those in Germany pretty clear all wow I could be next are we at that point to where that's the only thing that's going to stop this stuff is the world going into total madness you know I'm I'm a little bit more optimistic than that I don't think that we're sort of you know physically in danger but I do think there's a lot of refutation all danger at stake here you know people are necessarily fearing for their personal physical safety despite what what what on earth like total Justin's activists warriors will try to tell you you know it's not physical thank you our reputation Allstate do you know anyone of our reputation could be destroyed in the blink of an eye for something that that we might have said you know ten years ago you know you see a lot of people digging up old tweak their old a proposed by you you might have written in like two thousand nine so I think it's more the reputational destruction that's the real risk here but I think that as we continue to talk more about this and bringing their V. do you know the issue to light that people will slowly come to their senses but in the meantime I don't really see counsel culture going away I think that it's going to get quite a bit worse before we start to get better rob thank you so much and really appreciate you speaking out and and and risking your own reputation I'm sure you had pushed back have you not yeah yeah I mean I've had a had a few great here and there but I just brush them off yeah good for you rob thank you so much rob Henderson you can find him at rob K. Henderson follow him on Twitter thank you so much I appreciate like I feel like I'm in a Jason Bourne movie today they're everywhere man.

"alan sir" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"alan sir" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"He is the director of owners of the owner and director of thirty four thirty three north thank you let me ask you about Alan Sir Alan's work what was the inspiration or what what drew you to his work and having him in the gallery I know now and for twenty five years and I've always just really deeply respected in general is working in China we look at it now it's beautifully crafted always finds really astonishing moment but also that were expresses something about the westernization China okay and also personal ideas around he was born in Chicago clearly Chinese American he straddled his work for awhile right and then you know when they open the gallery he was among the first and the call there's a commonality in terms of the artists they represent that the a lot of them I represent to you exceptions lot of them you know the the works through an undergraduate degree in fine arts Alan's case got a master's from the school here they played the game a rogue grants several comes as brand's national down stored in they were in the shows they were exhausted by the system silliness of the system yes how much energy it takes way especially in Chicago for the drop but it doesn't mean they stop working they have the impulse to create Allen was one of the first people like yeah yeah let me ask you because the work the China work different it's a very different from from this series that he did right in Wilmette on the on.

director Alan Sir Alan China Chicago Allen Wilmette twenty five years
"alan sir" Discussed on Raceline Radio

Raceline Radio

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"alan sir" Discussed on Raceline Radio

"Sports because I think to be honest. It's biggest bickering racing. You're in the green room every year when they do this part of the pre race. But there's a real popular part where all the former winners. Go by in convertibles, and, you know, there's AJ Foyt and Mario Andretti and Alan sir Rick Mears, that's going to be you writing in a convertible when your career is over. So I mean when you think about it, you pretty much have this is something you're going to still be apart of even when you're near seventies. How does that feel? It was pretty cool. That's night. When I got Rick Mears was one of the first, you takes me, what come to the club, then halio obviously antique K, when I live for the parade lap at the end Tacoma will like what come to the club it really get it then? And then she'll defend nice night was loosely in tears. Coding sending me messages and what comes to the club in. And again, you know we'd power, it's just amazing. Diaphragm katie's morning sent me a message is just amazing. Because these guys, I looked up to saying come Come to. to the club is quite special when again you completion dream is phenomenal. So, yeah, big great. When I have kids to tell them, hey, I did this be great for them to tell their grandkids. Hey grandpa did that whatever just great to be able to think that quite frankly, bussum far from done was my career. I just didn't he five. So I stayed of almost today. Kate of head of me. So I be here for wide Simon MU sort of led the development on the team in the offseason. What direction they went does that did that have a big impact on, on how your season started to turn around. We found several direction Noah suiting everybody so, but certainly it differently Hekmat ton. It's just great to be part of this team. Because it's a speed lab, and it creates an amazing equipment on the race track in old product that give you as a driver is, is, is, is. It's it's like a luxury watch. It's just perfectly done. It's Bren you every time you use it, you know, it's going to be reliable. It's just phenomenal. So thanks to them again. I wouldn't be here without Tim the winner of the twenty nineteen one hundred third Indianapolis five hundred mile race from age pronouncing that right? Just south of France, at least Penske racing Simon paschel and the IndyCar media, they're the are on race line radio. If his Sita Penske was in jeopardy before the five hundred it is not likely now. All right, Donna, let's work if other prints Dafa still the com- the Subaru race on Email trivia contests than our f one Canadian Grand Prix preview with Montreal zone. Sean star, lots of those, don't you dare go anywhere. This is the race line radio network. Yeah. This is not Jerusalem. You're listening to.

Rick Mears Simon paschel Alan sir Rick Mears Sita Penske katie AJ Foyt Kate Penske Mario Andretti grandpa Tacoma Sean star Jerusalem Noah Indianapolis Montreal France Tim Donna
"alan sir" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"alan sir" Discussed on KTOK

"Real, honest opinion, a county executive New York state asking the White House where executive action help combat the measles outbreak. Oakland County executive Ed day sent a letter to President Trump asking for an executive order to be issued day. Cited, according to his letter two hundred thirty three confirmed cases of measles in Rockland county. He also said the outbreak began with infected travelers from overseas visiting the county. He seeks a White House order requiring foreign visitors present documented proof of up to date. Immunization. The centers for disease control and prevention says more than seven hundred of the nearly nine hundred total confirmed. Measles, cases are in Rockland county and New York City in New York, Grenell Scott Fox News, the care of the FCC in two other members of its board say they will support the proposed sprint t mobile merger, but they're still must be a full commission. Vote job cuts coming at four or says by August. It will have eliminated seven thousand jobs globally, making up ten percent of its workforce. It's cutting Twenty-three hundred US jobs through buyouts, and layoffs. Approximately fifteen hundred of the cuts have already happened. CEO Jim Hackett says at a memo to employees the restructuring starts Tuesday, and most of it will be finished by may twenty fourth. Ford says it's nearly finished with its major global restructuring approximately five hundred workers will be let go this week Genucel, Fox News. Retired two-time Indy five hundred winner. Alan, sir junior arrested early this morning. Central Indiana charged with. Operating a vehicle while intoxicated, a police officer in the town of Avon pulled his vehicle over shortly after one AM clocking going fifty nine and a forty five mile per hour zone under said he hadn't been drinking. But he staggered to the rear of his vehicle after exiting the car lost his balance fell to the ground and rolled down an embankment after he refused to field sobriety tests blood was.

Rockland county measles executive President Trump White House Oakland County Fox News New York CEO Jim Hackett New York City Indiana FCC Ford Avon officer Alan ten percent
"alan sir" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"It just problematic is he clearly is milking it and taking advantage of these nice ladies her keeping them employed. Yeah, he's just trying to trying to milk them of all their their money. He's definitely breaking stuff off camera. You can go back. It's just a nice tale of a guy moving in with a family, and I also was disturbed by Alice on the Brady bunch because you know, like a one way normal, nine thousand nine hundred eleven servant. A live in servant is weird and they made her wear the same thing every day. Does Alice have any life or does she? She just retired to the room over the garage and put on her blue dress every day and make lunch for those six brats and cousin. Oliver later things I learned yesterday at SeaWorld as you don't, but human emotions on Wales and another thing he don't put is humid is forced emotions on housekeepers. You don't know if she was made aware that outfit, or if you chose that outfitted. We know I think we know it's called empathy. You try to have it. What do you wanna wear the same? Would you choose to where the same percent? I would wear the exact same thing every day. His family, like Tony Dana's says, says the fences broke again, so he's gonna be working on that this week. Like at some point he's done. All right. Well, there's more feedback where that came from. You can go check it out online. Okay. It's time for this week's. He'll the league. Early on the show. We were talking about the power team lot and how you know that was a seminal outreach device that untouchable that you know shaped a generation. You know, they'd go into the schools during the day and do the feats of strength and safe. You wanna see us do the big feats of strength used to come to this church tonight, and then they would do the big pizza strength shot the bible verses and will get saved. We wanna know for this week's costly. What are some of the more maybe unusual evangelistic or gossiping, outreach, things that you experienced maybe participated in growing up. You know, we all had the power team experience, but you know, I'm sure there maybe a magician came here charge, maybe Carmen himself. With the flag team. We don't know. Alan, sir balanced crazy stuff on his hands on his head on his chin, and then tied into like how we all be balanced on our own by, you know, you can. He had one trick and it was seen things he balanced like a ladder on his head. When you find out one of the one of the vendors only is EROs good head. It's like that's the only power he's shooting arrows. It's like he, you're doing a whole hour, long entertainment thing about balancing stuff. Like I feel like that's an opener balanced Glades like with Hawkeye if it works, it works man. Like the guy was booking gigs. I don't know if Italy. I know I know one time at my jerk. I was them booze alled into dressing as the devil as part of a youth groups cash. Also, they now guy. I told you Sorry, I I did did. the housemates ads the devil from his perfect like the wicked. Live screw tape letters. It's like Dante's inferno. Com. Gatien don't go to the big. Yeah, yeah. It was like, hey, vacation, bible school. My want to keep them home this weekend. Harry Potter books. Hitting just over the other after the other. And I got suspended from announcements for that. Concept. That time of year where churches do that Halloween. Yeah, this party's Holy Ghost winning roast. Yeah. Heaven's gates hell's flames. Not so haunted, hey rights, they're just really lame, slow rights. Well, it's it's one of two directions either going like trunk or treat, you know, holy goes wiener roast, say for the little ears type family friendly, or you're going to scare people outta hell you know, you're gonna. Car accident scenes on stuff. This is so much scary as awful. The goal is to terrify you and it wasn't so much terrifying life. That's not good..

Alice Tony Dana SeaWorld Oliver Carmen bible school Hawkeye Alan Harry Potter Dante Wales Italy milk
"alan sir" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Five hundred willpower. Is eighty seven back and forth there are fourteen drivers as, they still still map medically eligible but we talked about. It Anderson Scott Dixon's to lose it really is at all he. Needs to do is stay consistent he really does need a top five today because you have to that Alexander Rossi much like he, was at the at the Indianapolis five hundred. And some of these other ovals he's. Absolutely on fire in these races you know he's going to be aggressive and Scott Dixon. Certainly can't rest on his laurels so he needs to work. As we, continuously through, the field but I I think again much like we saw with him earlier this this weekend or qualifying rather He's just going, to have a measured approach. He's not going to, be desperate for anything and I think that's that's the most the most sort of dangerous part about Scott Dixon as he never takes any any more, risk than he absolutely has to. An end but I still think, that there's a lot to play for here in with willpower just new garden they have to. Be super aggressive to get their way back, in the championship battle so I think we're gonna, say some great battles up bottom line is this. Scott Dixon Alexander Rossi will power Joseph do Gardner whomever you, went races the points take care of themselves don't they. They absolutely do I mean look at Alexander Rossi forty six points. Behind Scott Dixon it's not too far fetched the way to think that if he wins another racer to that economy within ten fifteen, points Scott Dixon so nothing is concluded at. All and then we come into snowman. What double points weekend anything can happen there as well fascinating close to the championship in. Terms of the venue here a short track like gateway Portland. And unknown, to most, and then of course all the elevated changes in the toughness of Saddam and Obviously the Team Penske have had a big advantage at Sonoma in years past. And part of that was probably down to that Chevy aero kit but I think now. It's going to be a clean slate and just a question, of do they still have that, big advantage? With their dampers. Which they've, had in the past a, bit of a gap at. The open-wheel history brand consistently here from nineteen seventy one to nineteen eighty nine it the car was turned in thirteen some of the. Legends who have one here include. Mark Donohue HA Foyt lonestar JR Alan Sir Bobby Unser. And Rick Mears doubt let's go. Trackside for pre race festivities here at Pocono ladies and gentlemen, at this time please rise, or move your hats as. The United States army, recruiting service for Wilkes Barre Pennsylvania presents our nation's colors.

Scott Dixon Alexander Rossi Scott Dixon Alexander Rossi Rick Mears Alan Sir Bobby Unser Mark Donohue United States army Wilkes Barre Pennsylvania Pocono Chevy Indianapolis Portland Penske Sonoma Saddam Gardner Joseph
"alan sir" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Alan sir or the position there in but as long as it doesn't mean that someone is in a position whether stifling the ileife outcomes of another i think it's a nonexploitative abc difference kfi we're sitting at a table in there is a bunch of uh lab oranges and an apples and i have three oranges into apples and you have uh a three apples and to oranges and you would rather have an extra um a orange you don't ha i don't think that's quite the same as a it's a disparity but i don't think it's quite the same as um exportation or oppression or a tremendous injustice and it seems like an easier uh uh thing to solve and so it's up to me than the core of the of the exploitation there is something you talked about earlier the the worker making a starved choice that somebody who is a libertarian might say well this choice all throughout the system mom you can choose to work you can choose whether or not to take the job you could just walk off the job you can choose whether to yell at your boss is all kinds of things you can choose to do i think he'd said that i've heard you say in indicates have reason and others that no no no that's not that's not choice you you would starve view you gotta feed your family is the is the fixed to the worker starved choice just a sufficient safety net i mean if we if we put into place tomorrow universal basic income is though the workerstarved choice gone or or is something more fundamental need it what what is what is the line at which he would say these choices were no longer being made from a space of exploitation but from a place of genuine choice so yeah i think we've seen that even in conditions of uh relative unim worst if someone's in a tradition of uh unim uh where there's a low levels of unemployment in society and there's a safety net they uh often been more militant in their demands at their workplaces uh so we've seen this sam so the leninist peso bear the 1920s 1930s might have kind of thought the worst the debts the better anna the welfare state were just ways to buy off workers but what we saw in the late '60s nearly.

Alan sir
"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Look at dan gurney look at that big money i would i would go on one side of the st albert on the other side during the week we with we were totally brothers in family in good brothers in good family did snowmobile meet together road dirt bikes together then everything together and just a good good healthy close family but we didn't drill each other like alhaji hideous secrets i had mined the two brothers have very different personalities but author bob gates says they're passion for racing is the same externally there are different but i think internally they had the same passion and the same fire it was a similar situation with deal the faran and illegal caster nevus when they were teammates you know eagerly oh you could compared him with bobby outs her and probably probably jail with with foul senior me is quiet and reserved but he told me once the ferrand did that his fire burden side just as brightly as intensely as caster nevis as did he just kept it in side and i think that was the same with al i'll senior in comparison comparison with the bobby but al unser also has a distinction that he's the only fourtime winner who not only raised with his brother but also competed with his own son alan sir jr came on the scene when he made his indycar debut in 1982 little al immediately made it then back in his rookie brickyard what in nineteen the three he played a little bit of a jam car for his dad paul little al may help helping as comps vebacom's alongside tries forget by little alba slams that are on our money he slams he bigger dawns we will have to spare the kurds bracelets silvercolored there's word on the tail of his fellow dhs or senior the young jews weren't able to hold off tom shneebly that day but big al grab second place with little al coming home th as a rookie two years later the answers were the biggest story in the indycar again during the final race of the 1985 season bother son would battle with the indycar championship on the line junior was leading the title chase during the final race with senior in second with a lapse winding down it appeared that little allah grabez worse title but a big out could find a way past roberta merano you would grab one more point and steel championship unser was presented with a choice stay behind.

bob gates nevus al unser alan sir jr dhs roberta merano dan gurney bobby paul tom shneebly two years
"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"A b c regular programming will return following the post game show we appreciate your understanding now we continue with this special program from wibc news thanks for listening this is heroes of the five hundred john waters addition i'm greg straw we wrap up our profile of these three fourtime winners of the indianapolis 500 with initial thoughts from those who have covered them for years racer dotcoms robyn miller spent the better part of the last four decades writing about indycar racing and he says we may never see the likes of these three icons again though the icons they are because they were glad used in the day in the most dangerous and the most probably the most dangerous unglamorous period of indycar racing in the '60s and '70s because it was so it was so violent and to to to make it through is no cages and in oh fuel cells were finally invented in all things that happen but i think with alan sir and aj in an and miers they have a have an our about him and people are you know they wanted their picture taken with them they want to throw autograph and there and y'all they always stop oh my gosh out of those i get to see alan surrogacy rick mears and i think i don't know will ever see that again and i think that's that that that's the things kinda cool about it they can still they still make an appearance and and people were are still you know lineup to see him miller says in his later years the tough jackson foyt has mellowed quite a bit i think is he's gotten older i really think this i've told him his to his face i said you can't believe you made it to fifty sixty seventy and now you're almost eight you can't believe you didn't diane race car and and i think he starting to kinda get i think he's taken the adulation better i think he understands how much he means to people which may be and that maybe a maybe i'm reading too much into it but just watching how he interact with people 'cause one time we were elkhart lake when cart was initate aaa and the biggest autograph mindless avoid and i said now that outta some that make you feel good and i think.

greg straw indianapolis robyn miller rick mears jackson foyt race car elkhart lake alan aj miers four decades
"alan sir" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

105.3 The Fan

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on 105.3 The Fan

"Better than me on never met you yes paolo di up w griffith kevin heroin boy from monday night footfall on westwood one uh government i better than that it no i said the german after what happened with me on facebook last week i'm very nervous about new for requests now less we go yeah and as usual if you i have one mutual friend and its cory majors that does not get you and accept says it i used to accept everybody in now like oh man when my doing so it'll to be a little zamin you got a hot if people you and other requests if people are sitting requests in it's taken me time friend you it's like sent me a message or something i don't know like to let me know your reply hold on an hour i don't know if that's right now does work isn't that usually the way you instantly on friend someone is if you push accepted it goes hello are how're you like writer that's what i immediately think you're not real but you need that like i'm not going to accept it until i know i gotta so got now i have to do research every single time or and the reason is just click on the profile do they have more than seventeen friends and did they post eight different pictures that same day i had one today was to pictures early was bunch of different picture but it was all like the different girl lee and he's picture you can get a whole bunch of different picture all polling on the same day delete if they got a whole bunch of things in their profile that how they started this there were born that the to earn not real gdp could have most of the stuff is in english i mean that's up to you personally i delete okay unless it's in the language that you speak it's not english i feel like you do not speak any other languages fluently so ideally delete might come up later in tonight's list oh maybe i don't know this is that several we ask him if he thinks he'd better than everybody born today if you think you're better all you got to do is text in greece it alan sir paul ryan i have it'll be so mad there are seven points.

facebook writer lee paul ryan heroin westwood
"alan sir" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"alan sir" Discussed on CarCast

"You had three or four those wedge cars dipped in twenty forty sixty and seventy four of a sitting sitting over there on off olympic hip on the website and then they went eventually where do they go i mean a one maybe to the smithsonian or indy how did that work out the sixty seven turban to smithsonian the sixty eight car twenty went to richard petty car forty richard petty just later on just bought it he bought it for his own collection and then car forty went to al unser sr which is in the alan sir museum in albuquerque car seventy is at the chicago institute of science and right to chicago sure it's okay and then the other car is uh the dude with the i dunno is now forgot his name might guy sounded a corvette was signing it yeah he has that one as a pair very interesting stuff and you drove the syncs up and down vic really jackson tried to buy it he didn't couldn't come up with it and then soda dick clark originally the first time we built the corvette everybody wanted the corvette so you wonder whether the vet has value is probably because it was a granted tally turban runs there was another guy that was putting turbine engines transamazon camaros and it never made it oh i didn't even i didn't even know that that's exactly what it's worth anything and why it's not worth promotion iran and charlie name yeah so now uh what are you guys let's talk about the the present what the grain of telly motor sport.

alan sir museum jackson dick clark iran richard petty albuquerque chicago institute of science chicago charlie