17 Burst results for "Alan Lomax"

"alan lomax" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:02 min | 6 months ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Mohr radio dot com has something for everyone and news junkies in sports fanatics. Find your local stations and podcasts covering your local Community and your favorite teams. Check out the explore button on the bottom of the APP trivia. This is one of the most celebrated influential musicians of the 20th century. He was the best selling solo artist in the history of recorded music. He recorded over 600 songs, but you'd be surprised to learn how many of them he wrote any guesses. Number zero Elvis Road zero songs In his later career, However, he co wrote some songs, only four to be exact, none of which were hit. Celebrating 35 years of broadcasting. I'm Jim Messner. And this is the pulse of the planet or listening to recordings made by Alan Lomax. Even along Alan Lomax was one of the first people to take a sound recorder into the field to document the world's music. When I met him in New York in 1985 he spoke about Kanta metrics. A system he had developed to understand the relationship between the culture and the music it produces. One way we believe that culture and music had something to do with each other. Question was, How does music represent culture? I found the answer was in the way music is performed, and not what was performed. The howl rather than the thought is always more general. And when I began to contrast musical style from one country to another, I for the first time began to make progress in my life as a scientist of music. Well, I want Bag along. Well in a regular there will no thank you. You are to me. A song recording is like a spiral storehouse in which a treasure of information about the past is often contained. It's an audible cultural icon ready to be uncoiled to reveal a treasure of information not only about cultures past potential for future growth. Because the culture can be reasoned, defied by being recorded celebrating 35 years of broadcasting. I'm Jim Messner. And this is the pulse of the planet. This is Southern California's only 24 hour local news in traffic station KO next 10 70 news radio. Good evening. I'm Brian Ping. Our top local story at 7 30 confirmed covert 19 cases in L. A county top 162,000 and hospitalizations were still at their highest level since the crisis began. Public health.

Alan Lomax Jim Messner Brian Ping scientist New York California
"alan lomax" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Visit caliber garage doors dot com caliber garage doors dot com. Next report to 35 I'm Desmond Shaw, with more traffic reports more often. Hey, an extent. 70 NewsRadio. Nice day here in Southern California temperatures slightly below average for this time of year, but comfortable Nonetheless, we're looking at Sunshine and highs. Lower seventies the beaches mid seventies England upper eighties in the valleys with overnight lows tonight in the sixties tomorrow, clouds and fog to start followed by sunshine temperatures much the same as today, seventies and eighties. The warmup coming this weekend with Valley High's getting back. Into the nineties. Right now 76 downtown Los Angeles some guidance from scientists and educators on safely re opening schools more in three minutes It's 2 27 Celebrating 35 years of broadcasting. I'm Jim Misener. And this is the pulse of the planet. We're listening to recordings made by Alan Lomax. Even though Alan Lomax was one of the first people to take a sound recorder into the field to document the world's music. When I met him in New York in 1985 he spoke about Kanta metrics. A system he had developed to understand the relationship between the culture and the music it produces. One way we believe that culture and music had something to do with each other. Question was, How does music represent culture? I found the answer was in the way music is performed, and not what was performed. The howl rather than the thought is always more general. And when I began to contrast musical style from one country to another, I for the first time began to make progress in my life as a scientist of music. Well, I want Good bye long..

Alan Lomax Desmond Shaw scientist Jim Misener Los Angeles California Valley High New York
"alan lomax" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:16 min | 9 months ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on KCRW

"Convicts after the civil war right folklorist Alan Lomax made these field recordings of prisoners working in the fields of the nineteen forty democratic state representative Robert Johnson of Natchez is the minority leader in the Mississippi house misinterpreted always had history of the existing on the backs of human capital he remembers when parchment operated as its own entity with industries and a working farm somebody was making a ton of money on people working for nothing for every American is status feels like a continuation of slavery really you lock people up put him up and he put him to work for nothing that's what it feels like there are no chain gangs at Parchman today critics say the bondage is now in the form of gang leaders and the corrupt guard to help them on January twenty sixth the Mississippi department of corrections sent out a news release the twenty six year old Joshua one Norman had been found dead on a Sunday morning hanging in his one man cell at Parchman supposedly he committed suicide you know I don't believe that happened to him Janet Sherman is Joshua was aunt she says he'd been running from violence and brutality since he first entered the Mississippi department of corrections at age sixteen yeah no idea you know the trauma that awaited him it's just a very sad story he wrote to her that a gang was pressuring him to stab another inmate but he was resisting and had been beat and then we gather some text messages even a few months ago saying that you know you get being pretty bad and they were after him and so if he did commit suicide he may have been under duress to do it so you know there's just answer questions she's looking for accountability you know we can't do anything to bring him back but lots of people's you know sons and grandsons that are still in there I'd love to see it be a little bit more safe you know it's like that you can't live every day knowing that you might die the same day Sherman says a prison sentence should not be a death sentence.

Alan Lomax Robert Johnson Natchez Parchman Janet Sherman Joshua state representative Mississippi
"alan lomax" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

01:53 min | 10 months ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on World Cafe

"The Pos back in Nineteen eighty-five so revisiting. That song with a Cajun band. What was that like? It's been really beautiful and it's the songs actually lived with me since nine thousand nine hundred eighty five just like anywhere. I've ever gone a met. Any person is aware of the pokes at some point in evening that they want to hear it. They'll start singing it all. They want me to sing it. And I don't know why that song resonates with people so much but it does. It matters a lot to people and anytime I get asked a singer. I feel very blessed and lucky. You your man. Tony Bennett said an amazing thing. I I love Tony Benn. I used to go and see him any chance I any. He gave a little speech. One day. About I left my heart in San Francisco and he goes. I think he must have sung that. How it how many thousands of times and he came out and he said before you even ask you know. I love this song if I've Sung at ten thousand times. I won't sing another ten thousand times. It's been my passport to people's he says I'm in a bit American people's hearts around the world but you know sincerely and I just my own little level anywhere got like if if if people know man you don't meet every day it's it's a great way to just connect with people and I got blessed Jeannie Robertson the creedon among the head who I learnt from she was a traveller lady from Aberdeen and she was recorded by Alan Lomax back in the fifties and her version just lives on every time. Somebody's things that song. Now it lives on. We're GONNA hear you saying I'm a man you don't meet every day. This is poetry.

Tony Benn Tony Bennett Jeannie Robertson Alan Lomax San Francisco Aberdeen
"alan lomax" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You're not familiar millions. These are knit hats that my mom made and they have basic folk label on the front of them and again you can check them out on my website. Cindy House Dot net net or you can go to my instagram. There are several pictures today on the podcast. Very happy to have amethyst Kia who who is an extremely talented Banjo player and Guitar Player Originally from Chattanooga Tennessee now lives in Johnson City Tennessee. A really cool person Immediately liked her right away And we talk about a number of different things Coming of age in the early two thousands although having like really tremendous taste from the ninety s like Nirvana and Tori Amos. The most percents her favorites and then later on she combined the love of those types of bands with old time and kind of saw. Aw Similarities between them in your own style which is a pretty cool. We also talk about being a loner when she was a kid And how how that affects her musicality. In interesting ways we talked about her collaboration with Rian Giddens Alison Russell and Layla McCallum in our our native dot we really cover it all here with 'em this Kia who. I'm very pleased to have on the PODCAST and would love to share a clip of her version of trouble so hard which is from her album. AMETHYST KIA and her chest of glass which is a little bit more like alternative rock sounding but you'll probably recognize the phrase but Originally recorded by Alan Lomax and it was very award hall singing the songs. So let's hear it and then we'll get into our conversation sation with Amethyst Kia on basic.

AMETHYST KIA Tori Amos Alan Lomax Johnson City Tennessee Rian Giddens Tennessee Layla McCallum Alison Russell
"alan lomax" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Find. He is translated a series of something Scotland's never really had written down epic poem by a an ancient blind Bard named Ossetian. ASEAN is the son of a Scottish warrior king called fingal and his writings. These these songs ballads whatever you wanna call them are sagas of of. Fingle time in his people an epic of fingal. Eagles heroic battles and conquering and romances with swooning maidens and it's a, it's a big big deal at the time because there really is no record of written Gaelic poetry from the dark ages. It was assumed that it was all an oral tradition. So he's like the Alan Lomax of Scotland. Exactly tell us about Alan Lomax and his love of folk songs and whatnot. Alan Lomax actually had tape-recording requirement and in the early middle twentieth century would drive around all of Appalachia and throughout the south and make recordings of these of people playing their songs on their front porches and compiled like a tremendous repository of all the great folk music of the United States, his son carried on his work. It's how we, I mean, it's how we know what we would not have lead belly. We would not have muddy waters or what he got three without what he go through. You don't get one twentieth century folk late twentieth century folk music, a lot of the rock and roll. A lot of what we call rock and roll is a product of people who have been exposed to that music by by the recordings of Alan Lomax. So it's all kinds of blues and roots music. And yeah, and he just wanted around. This is exactly what mixture was doing. He was wandering around and getting these oral traditions and trans. Leading them for English into for the first time. And if you look at it today, it's not. It's not rhyming verses. It looks like pros if you read it today and it's very florid and melodramatic by our standards. It all reads, here's here's an excerpt to typical excerpted. I'll read something like this. Connell lay by the sound of the mountain stream beneath the age at tree, a stone with its moss support his head shrill through the heat of Leinna. He heard the voice of night at distance from the heroes. He lay the son of the sword, feared no fo the hero beheld in his rest, dark red stream of fire, rushing down from the hill Krugel sat upon the beam chief who fell in fight. He fell by the hand of Swaran striving in the battle of heroes. His face is like the beam of the setting moon his robes are of the clouds of the hill. His eyes are to decaying flames. Dodig is the wound of his breast and not for the first time. Bilbo thought back to his kitchen and wondered how long would be before he returned to Underhill. You cannot read it without thinking about toki in doing this kind of pastiche of ancient sagas and Norse and Celtic epics. That's exactly what I read it because we have nothing else like this right tokens. The only person in the twentieth century to even try something like this. And then of course, all of his image senators. And that'll I'll of the bookstore where you don't really go. Right? Did you ever go to the end of it where they have the d. books so far as you went? Well, you know, there were always kids in my school who wanted me to read elf quest. Tended to be a certain kind of girl in a sweater who had migrated over to elf quest, but I always thought that they were a little pony..

Alan Lomax ASEAN Scotland Connell Eagles Underhill Appalachia Dodig United States Swaran Leinna
"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That is the bell fem- from David embrose. I wildlife TV shows zoo quest. So David the reason I'm playing that is that I had no idea you were like a fewer folklorist. You were fieldworker you're like Alan Lomax on these trips. You right. You recorded music from the places, right? Oh, yeah. Very much. I. Alan Lomax, great folk music collector for North America came over here. And I actually did a number pregnant. I persuaded the BBC's let him do a natural folk music programmes on British television, which was which was great, and I got to name user remarkable mountain. And course, one of the first people to record the the the original jazz players on the library of congress. When did you first realize that making nature programming? Could also be entertaining. Well, I took a degree in zoology just because I find animals fascinating. And I'm sure that other people would to an but best boy, I could persuade people to do those programs that I could get myself to Africa or indeed to Paraguay from where those those musicians and every year, I used to go abroad and film animals in the wild. And then make a series of six programs, which is great fun. So this is how I know you, sir. David. I know you as as the nature documentarian is is the narrator as the filmmaker I want to play another clip of music for you right now. Because this I didn't know you were as responsible for this. It wasn't an unusual animal. It wasn't folk music. Take take a listen to this. David director of BBC.

David embrose I. Alan Lomax BBC congress North America Paraguay Africa director
"alan lomax" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The pavilion impact sill in sussex and i've got the pro stiff from that that says the voters in court it just back from the nationwide tour but we think they just come down from hull and shirley collins britain's versatile young instrumentalists which i wasn't i could hardly play my sting benji and then the bottle bill was pulled simon it's the first anybody ever heard of him and of course you know bob dylan turned up at the troubadour club in the coffee bar in earth's court and nobody's reckon jim march at the time because it was the first time he'd sung and he's saying to the two sons is seeing just dive after the lose and smoked dope for the rest of the evening so we didn't didn't recognise very hi little the little but a lot of people that will set people off to it said years later i recognize his genius straightaway i think because it wasn't very apparent than i'm curious has your view of him changed over the years now or do you still think very much about the i like in well enough i mean not the christmas carol album the recent thing but you know he used a lot of good english traditional tunes and set i mean he's good pro you know don't actually listen to him by choice is not my favorite but you can't dismiss him can you is true and i didn't like it when the sing ego comes through which the singers do if they're professional sings in it so that them first and then the song second and i think it's always should be the stone i traveled around the southern us with alan lomax tell me a little bit about that trip because that really fascinates me because a lot of those singers i'm that was a time when you of catching a lot before they passed away and they were very bygone era you know very racially segregated i guess some of them may be stretched back to the nineteenth century without be correct some of them stretch longer than that but in the mountains the relations.

bob dylan alan lomax shirley collins britain simon
"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

"Well i studied piano with my mother and then with several other piano teachers and i got really good on the piano but i didn't have been nerves for classical playing i just the minute i made one little mistake i was lost i just didn't know that but i sang naturally most children sing naturally if they're encouraged and i learned to play the ban the guitar when i was about ten banjul when i was about fourteen or fifteen and then i learned the auto harp dulcimer concertina by the time i got to be twenty eight or twenty nine i had six instruments under my belt so i with osmosis music the way i did my brother mike the same or the mike branched out into other folk instruments like the mandolin and fiddle in the pan pipes and became part of the southern american scene i moved over to england when i was twenty twenty twenty one and became part of the music scene over here the music scene i took the folk music because i absolutely loved the song i do i love them i'm not a folk singer i'm a singer folk songs and to me there's a big difference you know i wasn't brought up with parents who sang it in the community who sang sang it i was brought up in a in a musically intelligencia family and i learned it through listening to to to to records when i was from before i couldn't even remember right you mentioned earlier you're you're living in england now you move there when you were twenty move back and forth several times how do you make the decision to to come there where you met your your husband of for thirty years you and mccall who was a singer songwriter and in his own right i was when i was twenty so this be we're talking about early nineteen fifty six i was racketeering around europe and alan lomax tracked me down because due to mccarthyism he had fled the.

banjul mike england europe mccall racketeering alan lomax thirty years
"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

"Well i studied piano with my mother and then with several other download teachers and i got really good on the piano but i didn't have the nerves for classical playing i just the minute i made one little mistake i was lost i just didn't know that but i sang naturally most children sing naturally if they're encouraged and i learned to play the band the guitar when i was about ten banjul when i was about fourteen or fifteen and then i learned the auto hop and miguel samara and the concertina by the time i got to be twenty eight or twenty nine i had six instruments under my belt so i with osmosis music the way i did my brother mike the same or the mike branched out into other folk instruments like the mandolin fiddle in the pan pipes and became part of the southern american scene i moved over to england when i was twenty twenty twenty one and became part of the music scene over here the folk music scene i took the folk music because i absolutely loved the song i do i love them i'm not a folk singer i'm a singer a folk songs and to me there's a big difference you know i wasn't brought up with parents who sang it in the community who sang sang it i was brought up in a in a musically intelligentsia family and i learned it through listening to to to records when i was from before i can even remember right you mentioned earlier you're you're living in england now you you move there when you were twenty move back and forth several times how did you make the decision to to to come there where you met your your husband of for thirty years you and mccall who was a singer songwriter and in his own right i was when i was twenty so this'll be we're talking about early nineteen fifty six i was rocketing around europe and alan lomax tracked me down because due to mccarthyism he had fled the.

banjul mike england europe miguel samara mccall alan lomax thirty years
"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WCHS

"I grew up listening to my mother transcribing songs that had been collected songs like appeared in the brother where art thou films china now in lomax collected so many of those songs i was brought up listening to those while she transcribed them for the lomax books and then at night she'd play classical piano that was my childhood quite extraordinary well i studied piano with my mother and then with several other dano teachers and i got really good on the piano but i didn't have the nerves for classical playing i just the minute i made one little mistake i was lost i just didn't have that but i sang naturally most children sing naturally if they're encouraged and i learned to play the band the guitar when i was about ten banjo when i was about fourteen or fifteen and then i learned the auto hop in the dulcimer concertina by the time i got to be twenty eight or twenty nine i had six instruments under my belt so i with osmosis music the way i did a my brother mike the same although mike branched out into other folk instruments like the mandolin fiddle in the pan pipes and became part of the southern american scene i moved over to england when i was twenty twenty twenty one and became part of the music scene over here the music scene i took the folk music because i absolutely loved the song i do i love them i'm not a folk singer i'm a singer folk songs and to me there's a big difference you know i wasn't brought up with parents who sang it in the community who sang sang it i was brought up in a in a musically intelligence your family and i learned that through listening to to to to records when i was from before i can even remember right as you mentioned earlier you're you're living in england now you move there when you were twenty move back and forth several times how do you make the decision to to to come there where you met your your husband of for thirty years you and mccall who was a singer songwriter and in his own right i was when i was twenty so this'll be we're talking about early nineteen fifty six i was racketeering around europe and alan lomax tracked me down because due to mccarthyism he had fled the.

mike england europe mccall racketeering alan lomax thirty years
"alan lomax" Discussed on Maxamoo Theater

Maxamoo Theater

16:34 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on Maxamoo Theater

"The train, I project have expanded the meaning of opera have taken place in warehouses. Museums status Boisture. He takes a look at folk music, archivist Alan Lomax, and how he developed a system that grandfather Pandora Spotify and other music services joy, the show, we are here today with Joe deeds. Joe thank you for guarding story. I'm very well. Thank you for having me, my pleasure. So I'm very curious about the idea of or Stor because it's an opera about Alan Lomax. Right. Right. And I really interesting that Allen was, you know, John Lomax on, so he's from a family of USA colleges, and people think thought he music in a way. Would you say that you had been bringing similar to, to Allen's not at? All parents are certainly not musicians or composers. Certainly, they're definitely not folk song collectors. So I came at this from from. My own direction where you're interested in what you do then. Well, I came to New York about twenty years ago, and I ride here as a composer. But as a composer, that wanted to collaborate with other artists. So I began to work with a our collective guilt..

Alan Lomax Joe deeds John Lomax Allen Pandora Spotify Boisture New York USA twenty years
"alan lomax" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The moby makes use of several lomax recordings on his album play which went multiplatinum play eventually became one of the most commercially licensed albums ever recorded at the time and then was there as an intermediary step before that and then hearing on the cd where he said hey by the way thanks now i said this is amazing thing lacks thing i heard it's on the radio i said hey i get that box setback and then years of not being france and according to gregor that was wholly wanted to get his cds back he was looking for neither riches nor credit just the cds which he claims were only alone and so this is how it went he began leaving moby voice messages by gregor's count about a dozen that all went unanswered then in a final act of desperation gregor penned a song called moby give me back my cds which he sang into mobis answering machine with accompanying kariuki music to the tune of bryan adams heaven after much cajoling gregor dug up his lyrics which i will now perform for you moby give me back my cds the recordings from the field the alan lomax box said cds i think there were seven those desks are all that i need the ones i gave you from my house i think you'll be short to see there were seven and that message gregor says was met with over a decade of silence that was an excerpt from gregor produced by jonathan goldstein with coproducers wendy door khalil a halt and chris neary for the podcast heavyweight from can let media it won the 2017 sky lurking award the judges said with the political climate dragging so many souls down jonathan goldstein's incisive writing buoyant wit and production prowess relieved our judges from.

gregor bryan adams jonathan goldstein khalil france moby alan lomax chris neary
"alan lomax" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think without her foresight in will and drive to record in document a lot of these song she made a book with alan lomax his wife that uh called stepped down which is an amazing book that illustrates a lot of these games in this is where we've revived in been inspired and gotten a lot of these songs directly from this book and this next one is like that these are two different little the point i guess and it's cool because they say that you you almost key see hear how these are like from celtic routes almas um and the kind of gaelic almost a gaelic kind of language and you can hear the direct a pollination of cultures which is african west african rhythmic culture and like up of british colonial life in that's what's really i think one of the union most unique things about go a culture is that pure mix of cultures one we do read dick arri seven halidou crack a boon any eleven p poll must be done twinkle triangle 21 once sought to south ziglar's also bobtail damanik alito doutriaux halo scale um birgen mary i to mali town bug great i don't know if you'd hear quite that way like is kids are singing it we can amid a little harmony will it yeah i think i think probably the best one is um is actually the ranki tank he so good now just with the lyrics on that and actually there are a few recordings out there of kids doing that and you know as the game aspect and the musicality from our side was taking that game and uh building some music around it in order to present it you know as the ranki tinky song that you here on the recording yeah so let's here rank a tank either tunnel track of the new album ranked tank he is also the name of the band to hear the members of the banned her make gas klay ross who will hear singing lead vocal he's also the guitarist cana parlor has actually the main singer with the group and charlton singleton his featured on trump and also vocals who is the greatest weight loss all right all right and police gone broncos style and then ruled staff rose omega garnered only the.

alan lomax ziglar cana parlor broncos
"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And document a lot of these song she made a book with alan lomax his wife that uh called stepped down which is an amazing book that illustrates a lot of these games and this is where we've revived and been inspired and getting a lot of these songs directly from this book and this next one is like that these are two different little the point i guess and it's called because they say that you're you almost can see hear how these are like from celtic roots almas and the kind of gaelic almost gaelic kind of language and you can hear the direct a pollination of cultures which is you know african west african rhythmic culture and like up of british colonial life and that's what's really i think one of the union most unique things about goal a culture is that pure mix of cultures what we do we dick said halibut crack abhu any led p poll must be done twinkle triangle to anyone want sawtooth to south ziglar's also bobtail dominico alito doutriaux hail on scale umberto jane mary i to mali town barrack great i don't viewed here quite that way like is kids are sitting in it we can't have made a little harmony with it yeah i think i think probably the best one is is actually the ranki tank he saw that's good now just with the lyrics on that and actually there are a few recordings out there of kids doing that you know as the game aspect and the musicality from our side was taking that game and building some music around it in order to present it you know as the ranki tank song that you here on the recording so that's your rank a tank either title track of the new album ranked tank he is also the name of the band theor the members of the banned her may gas klay ross who will hear singing lead vocal he's also the guitarist cana parlor who's actually the main singer with the group and charlton singleton his featured on trump and awesome vocals who is greatest lyod laid off avaaz all right all right.

alan lomax cana parlor dick ziglar
"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is a really good will and actually just to preface this because our i want to make sure that our honour someone who really did a lot to make this ban possible from a previous generation who is vesey jones and i think without her foresight and will drive to record and document a lot of these song she made a book with alan lomax his wife that uh called stepped down which is an amazing book that illustrates a lot of these games and this is where we've revived and been inspired and getting a lot of these songs directly from this book and this next one is like that these are two different little the point i guess and it's called because they say that you you almost could see here how these are like from celtic routes almas and a kind of gaelic almost a gaelic kind of language and you can hear the direct a pollination of cultures which is you know african west african rhythmic culture and like up of british colonial life and that's what's really i think one of the union's most unique things about goal a culture is that pure mix of cultures one we do we dick resettling halibut sackable any eleven p paul must be done twinkle triangle to anyone once to south is also bobtail damanik leonardo hail and scale umberto jin mary i to mali town barak great i don't know if you'd hear quite that way like is kids are singing it but we can't have made a little harmony will it yeah i think i think probably the best one is um is actually the ranking tank he saw yeah that's good now just with the lyrics on that and actually there are a few recordings out there of kids doing that you know as the game aspect and the musicality from our side was taking that game and building some music around it in order to present it you know as the ranki tank he song that you here on the recording sorts here rank a tank either title track of the new album rank a tank he is also the name of the band to hear the members of the banned are may gas klay ross who will hear singing lead vocal he's also the guitarist cana parlor has actually the main singer with the group and.

vesey jones alan lomax cana parlor
"alan lomax" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"alan lomax" Discussed on WREK

"Of their mandates was to go out and find other artists in other parts of this country they felt very strongly because alan lomax was around at that time and other people who were really interested in other cultures in america through its music so newport would get these incredible black blues musicians up from mississippi louisiana could go on but but the fact of the matter is they got to stay with us because the club was stopping off players gave them a little bit of extra money because in the old days the newport folk festival paid fifty dollars an artist that was it no matter who you were no matter if you're at the top of the chain or the bottom of the chain you got fifty bucks and room and board so we would have people coming into the square who we had never encountered that incredible side of american history and music and segregate none of us really had experience that at all and when black musicians came to k cambridge they could not stay in hotels they could not eat in restaurants so it became a happy happy thing for those of us who put those musicians up regularly in our houses there was nothing likes sitting at the feet of many of those people who had never been north who came with a cardboard guitar case and there sunday gotomeeting close and nothing else but the stories when the when they realize they were with friends people who were really really interested in them those stories opened up and they became another another lifeline for us in the work that we then became on we found important the work to do i mean is joan would say we had the women's movement the vietnam war women's equality the draft it's just that it all fell in our lives than we had a choice we could not pay attention to it although joan probably would not have allowed that means shake my life.

alan lomax america newport mississippi louisiana cambridge joan vietnam war fifty dollars