2 Burst results for "Alan Gilbert Gilbert"

"alan gilbert gilbert" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

How To! With Charles Duhigg

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"alan gilbert gilbert" Discussed on How To! With Charles Duhigg

"Aw Mike I picked up the base when he was in the third grade. I love the fact that with the base one year. When you're just playing an open string or something you can feel the vibrations shirow it like not just not just where you contact the instrument but like throughout your whole body it's just such a surreal feeling to play the bass and I just love the sound of it too? It's really beautiful. When Mike was in junior high his class took a field trip to the New York Philharmonic in on the program the day was Gustav Mahler's Fifth Symphony? I remember almost everything about the concert. I remember the conductor. His name is Alan Gilbert Gilbert I remember who was playing principal bass at the time. I remember everything about the concert hall. And I'm sitting next to all my friends and I just thought it doesn't isn't really get any better than this. Mike is just a few years out of college. And he's currently a diversity fellow at the Cincinnati Symphony. It's a fellowship program so it's meant to give me a permanent job in an orchestra in the future so it's it's not a permanent position so I'm there for for the next two years and and I'll be taking auditions and and hopefully getting into a professional orchestra but so far it's been there have been ups and downs and it's it's a difficult process the the level playing is so incredibly high nowadays again to an orchestra so it's an inherently a very difficult thing to do so tell me about the last time you got knocked down like what was it an audition where you're trying out for something. The last last like difficult experience had auditioning was for the principal base of the Omaha Symphony. I worked for months. I worked really well really diligently and for every audition bass players have to play one movement of Solo Doc and. I thought I've got that in the bag. I've been playing that for the last ten or eleven years and I just feel super confident. It's it's a piece that I know so well And then I I put the ball on the string and I played the I know and it it just made an awful like squeaking sound. It wasn't tune and it really got to my head and all all the thoughts that I had I had done really well at putting out of my head before that all came rushing back and I just felt like maybe not good enough for this and eventually I recovered but I. I got got disqualified after that round. So and and look. How many hours a day are you practicing right now? Currently I'm practicing between four and a half to five hours a day. Okay and then the the rest of the time are you thinking about the the music incessantly I think to some degree. You can't help but think about it incessantly. Because you're you either thinking about what what it will mean for your life. If you can get it or you're thinking about what could I do to make it better. And that's why we turn to this guy. My Name is Dr Don Green Peak peak performance psychologist. What does that mean well? It means that I help. Elite performers musicians singers actors or athletes needs to do their best under pressure has it. How did you get into that line of work? I grew up as a competitive athlete. I was a gymnast. I am a diver and I dove it division one level I was pretty good but I was very erratic I could either be dazzling amazing and hit the toughest dives toughest looking dives and then missed the easiest of dies and it was due to my not understanding about pressuring pressuring how to handle nerves or anxiety in competition or under pressure so I was in the army for five years after I got out I went back to graduate school and got my PhD In sports psychology to understand what happened to me. And what I found out happens to a lot of people under pressure and I I did that for about ten years. Working with lead. Athletes Springboard Divers Formula One race car drivers police SWAT officers professional golfers and and tennis players. And I happen to me a classical musician. He happened to be a bass player and he wanted my help with his golf game and I saw that he just over thought his parts like stood over them for ever and Finally Jab at department ten go l.. I started talking to him about focused wasted quiet as mind ways to focus and he said that you know everything that we had done with him and his party and pretend taint him as principal bass player and would I be interested in working with classmate musicians. I thought yeah. That's really really interesting. I'd love to Don. It was incredibly successful working with musicians. Any went on to teach for nearly a decade at Juilliard and then he helped coach traders on Wall Street and after that he started working with runners and shot putters and other Olympians many of whom have gone on to win gold medals. I don't know anything about that or about Wall Street. It's not important. I don't know how to play the Bass. It's not important that I know it's it's understanding the mind behind movement because all of these things involve complicated coordinated movement mint and the mine either helps not process where it gets away and is what Yogi Yogi Berra said that ninety percent of sports is mental and the other half this physical because the heart starts racing. Blood pressure goes up breathing. Changes People Start perspiring. People start shaking. The ice starts scanning moving around looking for a danger. That's a distraction and those are just a few of the physical symptoms news and this Mental Simpson is people get very critical self conscious Down themselves and musicians get out of touch with their bodies and if fingers finger and their Boeing and they're vibrato athletes get out of touch with the body and start acting clumsy and then this emotional thing it's just fear so it comes down to not whether the pressure is going to be there. It's gotta be that's what you do with it whether you make use of it or whether it abuses you what Olympic athletes have learned. I'm from sports. Psychologist is how to use that energy to jump higher run faster that's fascinating so your job isn't isn't to teach them to avoid the pressure or to deal with the pressure that's counterproductive. It's GONNA be there. They can deny push away. Learn how to use it. Okay I WANNA to learn how to do that but before I do let s Mike One Question Mike Win Don was describing that like deer in the headlights. The the anxiety your heart rate is going. What up D did that? Did that. Sound familiar to what you experience. Oh yeah definitely yeah. That's the same exact sensation you know you just kind of like freeze up you. You start questioning like don't even know how to hold my instrument anymore. That definitely rings true every aspect of it when we come back. We'll learn how to use that panic to your advantage..

"alan gilbert gilbert" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"alan gilbert gilbert" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"They were, it'll be fine. I'll be fine. They were so shocked when the reviews came out. It's also interesting the Beatles new there onions, I mean, they knew who Lester was. Yes, they. Jumping standing still something they knew they knew the sellers stuff. They knew the, you know they, they knew they knew the guns. Oh, yeah. Yeah, they weren't novice left. Have you met less than your travels? I wish I had because I've certainly stolen enough stuff for. Welcome McDowell for some information. I think we did talk about it because it certainly talked about Royal flash and the Kubrick. Yeah, yeah, yeah. We talked a lot about Kubrick and Lindsay Anderson who I'm admire tremendously. We'll ask you about Lindsay Anderson, and how did you, well, how did you start getting into the business? Actually, I, I didn't go to film school right away. I was high school is not a great school, and I was like a b. student with good college boards and a bad attitude. Yes, yes. And you know, I was against the war in Vietnam. I was trouble Baker and I didn't get great recommendation. So I ended up in a Franklin and Marshall college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, which was at that point all men an Amish country. And so now the sixties are in full force and I'm in Amish. And I, I went to the newsstand one day and there was Herald Tribune and a front page story written by a writer that I Meyer tremendously Tom Wolfe, and was about Ken Keesey and people taking LSD. It was the first chapter of what became running cereal, which we eventually became electric acid Kool-Aid. And so I read this thing and I'm going, okay, that's it. The world is moving and I am in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. So I sat down with my parents and I begged and they let me apply to schools to transfer ended up at NYU and lived in the east village. My down the block neighbor was Allen Ginsberg at SAS. And at that time there were three political parties. There was the Democrats, there was the Republicans, and there was the motherfuckers and the motherfuckers lived in my building, and they had a very simple platform. Everything should be free and it was a wild building. What part is this? Alan Gilbert Gilbert lived in these village. Second avenue, ten street one fifty. Nine second intensity. Where were you? I I used to live on avenue a, yeah. Oh my God, you're there? Oh, yeah. Well, what I it's so weird to think now, like when we first moved in there people saying, are you out of your mind living on avenue way? 'cause it was horrible being see words like the death penalty. Oh, yeah. And and now it's like, oh, yeah, now you can't afford. Do you wanna vnc. Yeah, there you go down there for a nice dinner. Yeah. So you knew Ginsburg and digital ABBIE Hoffman to? Well, I I saw him in the data. We didn't really know. Was ugly fucking one of the motherfuckers, and so he was in and out of our building. And so I was at NYU and in my junior year of NYU teacher got fired and they needed to substitute, and I hit the jackpot. They hired someone who had graduated two or three years earlier who was now looking for work, and that was Marty Scorsese about that and mardi became my film history teacher. And then my film production teacher took a summer workshop and he was my faculty adviser and all that kind of stuff..

NYU Lindsay Anderson Ken Keesey Lancaster Ginsburg Pennsylvania Kubrick Alan Gilbert Gilbert Allen Ginsberg Lester McDowell Herald Tribune ABBIE Hoffman Vietnam mardi Marshall college Tom Wolfe Marty Scorsese Baker LSD