3 Burst results for "Alan Chews"

"alan chews" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:11 min | 4 months ago

"alan chews" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Have to say that I'm sitting here with an old friend. It's hard to believe how long it's been. I'm sitting here with James Howard kunstler, who lets me call him Jimbo. Jimbo or Jim, you and I have not been in the same room since probably Christmas 91. Well, we veered into very different kind of intellectual trenches. And digging ourselves deeper into them. So we can't see over the top. But it's still crazy to me because I mean, you've been on the program before by a Skype or whatever. But I met you when I was at yaddo in 1986. Yeah, originally, with Alan shoes, I think Alan, we were watching the 1986 World Series at my house. That's right. A tragic death series. That's exactly right. It wasn't tragic for mets fans. Right, not for them. But I was born in Queens a mile from Shea stadium. So it was not tragic for me. But the point is, that was 1986. I was 23. And I was at yaddo, which was a huge deal for me because obviously I want to be a literary writer and I got to go to yaddle where Cheever was so it meant so much to me. But I met this guy named Alan chews. And Alan says, now, how do you describe him? Alan Woods? Well, he was a big kind of bear of a guy. He was a book critic and a professor. And he had an NPR bookshelf. And he was a sweet fellow. Oh, yeah, very sweet. And he was very kind to me because he said, hey, you want to come with me? I know somebody who lives near here a writer named Jim kunstler. And so he drags me along the 23 year old version of me along with him to meet you. And I instantly loved you and started reading your books. That's totally true. I got a funny auto story for you though. I never went to the place as a guest because there was no point to it. I lived in Saratoga Springs where the place was. And I had no problem working at home. So there was no point in me moving a mile and a half down the road to an arts colony. But I did fill in for a friend of mine as the chef during the winter season when she went on vacation. And they had a much reduced number of that's when I was there. I was expecting to go to the fall. I was expecting to go to the big House, but they said, no, no, no, we're just doing, this is the winter season. So there was only about, I don't know, 18 people or 16 people, at the time, and so you actually cooked for those artists. Yeah, and we can get kind of dismal there at that time of year, especially if you have a bad crew of artists. Cranky bunch of antisocial people. So the some of the writers used to come in late in the afternoon when the sun was going down in November, December. To talk to me. And I got a note in my employee box that said, don't consort with the guests. You're the riff raff. Keep away. But the ironic thing was, I had published more books at that time than most of the people who were coming in to talk.

Jimbo James Howard kunstler Alan Alan chews Alan Woods Shea stadium Cheever Skype mets Jim Queens NPR Saratoga Springs
Eric Reunites With Old Friend James Howard Kunstler

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | 4 months ago

Eric Reunites With Old Friend James Howard Kunstler

"To say that I'm sitting here with an old friend. It's hard to believe how long it's been. I'm sitting here with James Howard kunstler, who lets me call him Jimbo. Jimbo or Jim, you and I have not been in the same room since probably Christmas 91. Well, we veered into very different kind of intellectual trenches. And digging ourselves deeper into them. So we can't see over the top. But it's still crazy to me because I mean, you've been on the program before by a Skype or whatever. But I met you when I was at yaddo in 1986. Yeah, originally, with Alan shoes, I think Alan, we were watching the 1986 World Series at my house. That's right. A tragic death series. That's exactly right. It wasn't tragic for mets fans. Right, not for them. But I was born in Queens a mile from Shea stadium. So it was not tragic for me. But the point is, that was 1986. I was 23. And I was at yaddo, which was a huge deal for me because obviously I want to be a literary writer and I got to go to yaddle where Cheever was so it meant so much to me. But I met this guy named Alan chews. And Alan says, now, how do you describe him? Alan Woods? Well, he was a big kind of bear of a guy. He was a book critic and a professor. And he had an NPR bookshelf. And he was a sweet fellow. Oh, yeah, very sweet. And he was very kind to me because he said, hey, you want to come with me? I know somebody who lives near here a writer named Jim kunstler. And so he drags me along the 23 year old version of me along with him to meet you. And I instantly loved you and started reading your books. That's

Jimbo Jim Kunstler Alan Alan Chews Shea Stadium JIM Skype Alan Woods Mets Cheever Queens NPR
"alan chews" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:49 min | 9 months ago

"alan chews" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Dot com, go there. When you look over your show yowza yells a yowza, the only words sufficient to begin my conversation with an old friend, my gosh, we met in 1985, that's not possible. Yeah, almost 40 years ago. Jim, how James Howard kunstler or as you let me call you Jim, welcome to the program. It's a pleasure to be here. Listen, I said this before, you. You're just one of these people that you just, you just make me happy. When I read your stuff, when I talk to you, I remember when our old friend now deceased Alan chews, brought me over. I was 22, I guess. And he brought me over to meet you and Saratoga Springs, and I immediately thought, who the heck is this guy? You had just finished your novel an embarrassment of riches. Oh, dear. Which is one of the funniest long way back. I know, but it's like one of the funniest things ever. And I've been following you over the years when I was working with rabbit ears productions in 1991. I think I got you involved, and you wrote the Davy Crockett book for rabbit ears. And then after that, I got married in one day, came across your book, the geography of nowhere, which changed my wife's and my thinking on many things. It gave us a vocabulary to think about America and the ugly highway scapes and things like that. So I'm just thrilled to have you, and I want to talk to you about the geography of nowhere. I want to talk to you about you have a blog, which people look up your name, James Howard kunstler, kunstler, which is German for artists. They can find it. But why don't we start with current events, Jim? You, you've written a few pieces recently about Ukraine about everything. If somebody just says to you, hey, hey, I'm confused. What's going on in the world? What do you say to somebody like that? Well, what's going on in the world is a tremendous difficult readjustment to the new mandates of reality. Reality sends us these signals and we can either behave accordingly or try to confound them. And right now we're trying to confound them and life is kind of going sideways in western civilization. Correct. That's a little bit general. I'm correct. I haven't been that specific, but one of the manifestations is this current conflict over Ukraine, I think that it's not quite what it appears to be. I do think that the Russian invasion or incursion and Ukraine is what it is, basically a cleanup of a territory within Russia's sphere of influence, historically. But for the west and particularly the United States, it's an opportunity to avoid facing some of the more difficult problems in our polity. Okay, so it's a wag the dog opportunity for the, I don't know if he's incompetent or nefarious or both. So we'll just use neither of those terms. We'll just refer to him as Joe Biden, but it's an opportunity for him and his administration to say, oh, oh, look over there. But when you're talking about the Ukraine, we also have to say that whatever is happening, it seems clear. I mean, it seems astonishingly clear that by projecting weakness on the global stage, we've effectively invited every tyrant or bully or bad actor or semi bad actor to take action now before it's too late. Well, there certainly seizing opportunity. Apropos of our situation, we have several very, very difficult problems to confront. One is what's turned out to be a absolute medical fiasco in which the government appears to have harmed and injured and possibly killed an awful lot of its citizens. Through vaccines and not dealing with the pandemic correctly, I guess that's what you mean. Absolutely, through terrible misconduct, maladministration and official misbehavior. And we haven't begun to process how we're going to account for all that. And I know where war weather or whether we will or not. And there's an excellent possibility that we'll just try to skate through it. But that's a huge problem. The other thing is, you know, we're going through an event in world history that I have called in the title of one of my books, the long emergency, which is kind of the unraveling of modern industrial techno industrial civilization. And the terms for it, which are most basically a high energy input civilization. And when the cost of running that civilization becomes marginally unaffordable, all of a sudden, the many systems that we depend on start to get into trouble. And those systems, when they start to fail, ramify each other's failures. Okay, and that's.

James Howard kunstler Alan chews Jim Ukraine Davy Crockett Saratoga Springs kunstler United States Joe Biden Russia