36 Burst results for "Alan"

Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Sword and Scale

Sword and Scale

01:11 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Sword and Scale

"Despite the abusive nature of their relationship. And even though they had only known each other for less than four months, Margaret and Allen decided to get married. At least in their own particular. Eccentric way. He recently took the nanny Sanchez. Yes. Can you tell me about that? You know, I think he had had a mock wedding where they just put on wedding bands and told everyone where they were married and he took her last name. As the last two people seen with murdered and dismembered exotic dancer geron Lockhart, Margaret and Allen became suspects, and were both taken into police custody. Soon after that, Margaret was informed that her so called husband Alan rice wasn't Alan rice, and that he had been lying to her about who he was this entire time that they were together. Tonight he was with an individual, correct? Who was the individual that you were with? As far as I know, his name is Leslie Allen rice. And do you call him Leslie or do you call him out? I call him Ellen. How long have you known Alan? I've known Alan since the middle of February, I guess. What kind of relationship do you have with Alan? He's supposed to be my husband, but I guess he's not my husband because I'm being told it out and isn't even really. Not interested in the shock and trauma that Margaret was experienced from having learned that her husband wasn't who he said he was, detectives began questioning her about the night she left the strip club, with Jaron Lockhart. Have you ever worked in the French Quarter? Yeah, we're going bourbon street throwing it off for almost ten years. Yes, ma'am. What about Allen? Did he ever work in the quarter? That's where I met him. When was the last time that he was in the French Quarter? Last week I guess it was Tuesday. And was you with anyone? And who was you with? Alan? According to Margaret, she and Allen had a dog, and the rental terms of the house they were sharing didn't allow pets. Margaret claimed that the reason she and Allen went to the French Quarter that night was to find Allen's old boss, who was interested in adopting the animal. The reason why we went to the quarter was to try to talk to somebody and to take in them because we had two days to get rid of them. He had parvo, we nursed him back from parvo. Parvo is a potentially deadly virus that can be transmitted from dog to dog. At the time, this small detail that Margaret mentioned about nursing a dog back from parvo seemed insignificant. But it does come into play later, so just remember, parvo. We had a few drinks that stilettos. When did you all leave there? I don't know. Did y'all leave by yourself? I think so, yeah. You think so? I'm pretty sure I know I talked to a girl who wanted me to find her something and I went to this one girl at stilettos that I knew from around her boyfriend's math dealer. What is she wanted to find one of you falling for? Drugs? Directly adjacent to temptations. Was another strip club called stilettos. And Margaret claimed that she left temptations to talk to someone in stilettos about drugs. The surveillance footage backed up her story. As it showed Margaret leaving temptations and walking directly into the adjacent strip club. But then, Jaron and Allen walked out of temptations together. Met up with Margaret outside stilettos and the three of them walked off together. Into the night. So where'd y'all go when you left a little? Home. You went home? Yeah, 'cause I wasn't feeling good. Do you want feeling good? How'd you get home? In the car. Where'd you pop the car? At home. No, when you were downtown. I don't know. Okay, listen. Margaret. It's very important. That you tell the truth because this will be your one opportunity, what we know took place, we don't think that you're the particularly responsible party. That you own those problems. Well, number one, one, one. We just started this interview and you telling me a fib, because I know who you left to place with. I love with Alan. And someone else. Also, another dancer had previously told police that Margaret inquired with her about hiring a stripper to have a threesome with. Margaret and Allen were celebrating Allen's birthday, after all. And they offered to pay 500 bucks for anyone willing to partake. In their celebration. Meanwhile, another dancer had been propositioned by Allen to perform at a private party. And Allen was willing to pay $700. Margaret struck out, but Alan was directed to an attractive young dancer who might be interested. 23 year old Jaron Lockhart. After geron was approached by Allen, surveillance camera footage showed Jaron going into a locker room packing up a bag and leaving temptations with Margaret and Allen. On her way out, Jaron spoke to a waitress and said that she was leaving to work a party because she needed to pay her rent. The surveillance footage clearly showed Margaret Allen and Jaron all leaving together. But that wasn't all. Surveillance cameras throughout the French Quarter also captured the three of them walking together for several blocks. Here's what we know. Margaret, and you're probably already aware of the all of the businesses or most of the businesses down there in the French quarter have video cameras. We know when you laughed, you was with Alan and you were with another girl. I don't remember leaving with anybody. I was feeling really sick. I had to drive because Alan doesn't have a driver's license. So you're driving, who else is in the view? It's me and Allen. So you're saying that there's nobody else in the vehicle with you. Not that I can remember I was feeling really sick and I remember that I wanted to throw up. Okay. So you go home. Yeah. What do you do when you go home? I threw up in all night. What is Alan doing? Taking care of me. So there was no plan for Alan to take this girl to a private party. I don't know of no. Now look, it's time. It's time to quiz with the not all remember and this and that because I'm telling you what I know. I don't know anything. And you say that the. We're not harassing you. We're trying to get to the truth. Margaret claimed that she simply couldn't remember leaving the strip club with anyone. And that she also had no recollection of anyone other than Allen being with her as she drove home. Or when they arrived there. I didn't get any sleep. I threw up and shit all night that night. Okay. So where's the girl? What girl? The girl that you left the club with. You and Alan

Margaret Allen Alan Rice Alan Jaron Lockhart Geron Lockhart Leslie Allen Rice Jaron Adjacent Strip Club Sanchez Leslie Ellen Stilettos Geron Margaret Allen French Quarter
How is Harvey Weinstein's Los Angeles trial different from New York prosecution?

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 d ago

How is Harvey Weinstein's Los Angeles trial different from New York prosecution?

"The legal team for movie mogul Harvey Weinstein is presenting closing arguments in his rape and sexual assault trial in Los Angeles. I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest. Defense attorney Alan Jackson told a Los Angeles jury that fury from witnesses does not make fact and tears do not make truth. Weinstein is charged with raping and sexually assaulting two women and committing sexual battery against two others. Jackson says with two of the women, the encounters were consensual, and with the other two it never happened. Prosecutors said in their closing arguments, it's time for Weinstein's reign of terror to end

Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles Alan Jackson Archie Weinstein Jackson
At Trump Org. fraud trial, defense rests and deflects blame

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 6 d ago

At Trump Org. fraud trial, defense rests and deflects blame

"The defense has rested its case as the tax fraud trial against the Trump organization reaches its final stages. Closing arguments are slated for later this week in the criminal tax fraud trial against Donald Trump's real estate empire. Defense lawyers say prosecutors are seeking to punish the entire company for one person's scheme to avoid personal income taxes, on company perks like apartments and luxury cars. Finance chief Alan weisselberg has already pleaded guilty to taking $1.7 million in unreported compensation and he testified against the Trump organization. But defense lawyers blame weisselberg and longtime accountant Donald bender. Suggesting bander should bear the blame for not catching the fraud. There are no allegations against the former president nor members of his family. I'm Jackie Quinn

Trump Organization Alan Weisselberg Donald Trump Weisselberg Donald Bender Bander Jackie Quinn
Allen Weisselberg Testifies Trump Family Not Involved in Tax Fraud

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Allen Weisselberg Testifies Trump Family Not Involved in Tax Fraud

"Don't want to pass up on this There was testimony today in a courtroom in New York City How about the Trump organization And Alan weisselberg a senior adviser former chief financial officer at former president Trump's organization He said he conspired with a subordinate to hide more than a decade's worth of extras from his taxable income Ready And I quote but that neither Trump nor the family were involved Excuse me But neither Trump nor the family were involved Can you tell me why that's not the leading story on every single cable news show I haven't even seen it once Can you tell me why that's not the lead story the headline at the New York Post front page Let's see if it is tomorrow Can you see if this is going to be the headline on one of the editorials from the office nerds at The Wall Street Journal Maybe it'll be a headline at the national review legal analyst Andy McCarthy He'll jump into this no question about that Let's just see Ladies and gentlemen how much the media how much the media focus on this

Alan Weisselberg Donald Trump Trump Organization New York City New York Post Andy Mccarthy The Wall Street Journal
 Snoop Dogg biopic is in development with Universal Pictures

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Snoop Dogg biopic is in development with Universal Pictures

"Father is now getting the big screen treatment Universal Pictures developing a biographical film about the life of rap star Snoop Dogg and you can say snoop's poor prince will be all over it He will be producing his own biopic the film will be written by John Robert Cole who co wrote the two Black Panther movies and directed by Alan Hughes the filmmaker behind menace to society In a statement snoop says teeming with universal will make it easier to put his vision of himself on the big screen it was universal that did straight out of Compton the movie story of the rap group NWA and 8 mile which featured Eminem A Moscow els Gabriel

Snoop's Poor Prince John Robert Cole Alan Hughes Snoop Dogg Compton Moscow
Allen Moro: Big Issues Faced by Gen Zers

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Allen Moro: Big Issues Faced by Gen Zers

"About Gen Z voters. The big question is, will they actually come out and vote today? That's been the big question. Alan, I'm curious, Liberty University. What are some of the big issues facing students there? So a liberty where Christian university and a lot of the things that really get people interested and excited about politics are the social issues pro life issues, family issues, education issues. But what I'm finding now, you know, I'm about to graduate college in May, and a lot of my peers are doing the same. And we're thinking about money really for the first time practically, and we see inflation and we see rising costs. We see rent and we see what it's gonna take for us to buy a house one day. And I think people my age are really starting to realize that elections are consequential for their wallet and their pocketbook and their futures. You see,

Liberty University Christian University Alan
 Woman says Weinstein sexually assaulted her in 1991 and 2008

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Woman says Weinstein sexually assaulted her in 1991 and 2008

"A woman has testified that Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted her not just once but twice Killy cipher does total Los Angeles jury that disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted her in a hotel room during the Toronto film festival in 1991 and that he did it again when she tried to confront him about it in the same hotel 17 years later As you might expect Weinstein's attorneys had a field day on this during cross examination Alan Jackson noted that the person that seifert described to the jury seemed

Harvey Weinstein Killy Cipher Los Angeles Hollywood Toronto Weinstein Alan Jackson Seifert
Woman says Weinstein sexually assaulted her in 1991 and 2008

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Woman says Weinstein sexually assaulted her in 1991 and 2008

"A woman has testified that Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted her not just once but twice Killy cipher does total Los Angeles jury that disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted her in a hotel room during the Toronto film festival in 1991 and that he did it again when she tried to confront him about it in the same hotel 17 years later As you might expect Weinstein's attorneys had a field day on this during cross examination Alan Jackson noted that the person that seifert described to the jury seemed like someone she would avoid at all cost But in steady note she took his calls and even visited him a second time in New York once is not charged with the exit seifert alleges prosecutors put her on to show jurors Weinstein's propensity for the crimes he is charged with I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Harvey Weinstein Killy Cipher Seifert Weinstein Hollywood Los Angeles Alan Jackson Toronto New York Oscar Wells Gabriel
Weinstein lawyer presses woman over absence of rape evidence

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Weinstein lawyer presses woman over absence of rape evidence

"A tough day on the witness stand for the first accuser in the Harvey Weinstein rape trial in Los Angeles the previous two days Jane Doe one got to tell the jury her side of the story what bit by bit that account was picked apart by an attorney for Harvey Weinstein the main thrust of the cross examination there is no forensic evidence that proves the movie mogul returned 2013 as Weinstein attorney Alan Jackson or their photos no documentation of injuries no A rape kit No Video No but this time the accuser at it you think somebody have to rate makes a video the defense is seeking to convince the jury that the claims by Jane Doe one were all made up I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Harvey Weinstein Jane Doe Los Angeles Alan Jackson Weinstein Oscar Wells Gabriel
Revisiting the Conservative Cause

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:49 min | Last month

Revisiting the Conservative Cause

"Allen, I just want to cut straight into it and talk about these 5 minute videos. We put out our 500th this morning. You are the man behind the camera, working this out, making this happen. And Alan, I'm curious, where did this concept of the 5 minute video come from? That in itself is a great question. I actually, I don't say this very often, but I'll say it now since we're celebrating the 500th video. I really believe I'm taking as Dennis would say a risk here being very personal. I really believe God dropped the idea into my head. I don't know where it came from. I can give you a secular, a more secular explanation in that when originally researching the idea behind PragerU, it occurred to me that the Internet works in a certain way and the only way this was going to work is that if we took the best ideas, this was the original concept, the best ideas from the best thinkers and distilled them down to their essence. Because there were a lot of at the time we are now talking about ten 11 years ago, there were a lot of universe that had gone online in the sense that they. Put their professors in front of a camera and talk the professor would talk for 45 minutes. But I knew that no one was using the Internet that way, not in a significant number. So that we couldn't use that model wasn't going to work for us. It

Allen Alan Dennis
Bills rally to beat Chiefs 24-20 in playoff rematch

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Bills rally to beat Chiefs 24-20 in playoff rematch

"Buffalo quarterback Josh Allen true three touchdown passes in the bill's 24 to 20 win over the Kansas City Chiefs In this game there would be no miraculous comeback led by a chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes You can make an argue he's got the best start to any quarterback to ever play this game in the history of the league He's a special player so anytime he's got the ball in the hands you never know what can happen But again credit to our defense for stepping up and making his place Alan completed the game winning touchdown pass with 6 to 9 seconds left in the game to tight end Dawson Knox In the remaining minute the bills forced mahomes to throw in interception and secure the game Greg eklund Kansas City

Josh Allen Kansas City Chiefs Patrick Mahomes Buffalo Dawson Knox Alan Bills Greg Eklund Kansas City
LA Rams rally in 2nd half to beat Wilks, Panthers 24-10

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

LA Rams rally in 2nd half to beat Wilks, Panthers 24-10

"After losing their previous two games the rams got back in the win column by beating the Panthers 24 to ten Alan Robinson scored LA's first point of the game with a 5 yard touchdown catch When is it hard to combine this league You know again you know being able to come back today you know again was good for us Matthew Stafford threw for 243 yards and that one touchdown Ben scarron and Daryl Henderson each ran for scores Carolina's only touchdown came on a Dante Jackson picked 6 Mark Myers englewood California

Alan Robinson Rams Panthers Ben Scarron LA Matthew Stafford Daryl Henderson Dante Jackson Carolina Mark Myers Englewood California
What's the Difference Between a Leftist and a Liberal?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | Last month

What's the Difference Between a Leftist and a Liberal?

"Now liberals are different than leftists. They have a lot in common, by the way, a liberals will see things similarly, but they'll stop short of how willing they're actually how willing they are to actually use government power. A great example is like one of the last liberals in America, Alan Dershowitz, right? Alan Dershowitz is pro abortion. He's generally very relaxed than immigration, but he still has an honest, you know, kind of, I would say moral fiber where he'll go and defend people for their right to speech to speak. Now that's a very important distinction between leftists and liberals is the issue of speech. If you think speech can be hostile because you say something offensive, you're a leftist. If you think speech is necessary towards a free society and you say, get over it, because you hear something offensive, you're not a leftist. You might be one of the other three categories. The other three categories have at least a higher than not value on believing that we as human beings are the speaking beings and from a Christian biblical worldview were made in the image of God. God spoken to existence in the beginning was the word the word was God and the word became flesh that word logos, rational speech, what makes us different than the beasts of the wild were able to reason were able to tell the just from the unjust not just pain from pleasure. Speech is who we are. It's not just some indifferent thing and what differentiates us from dogs or animals or the beasts of the wild. Okay, so a leftist still believes and you see this playing out all in society, that if you say something wrong, that if you say something offensive, you could actually be making the world more hostile and dangerous. They would call this hate speech. You see that kind of spreading all across America today. A liberal wouldn't go that far. A true honest liberal would say, boy, I believe there's systemic injustices. I believe there's issues here, but I'll still kind of rely on freedom of speech and classical liberal values to solve some of the issues.

Alan Dershowitz America
Allen picks apart Steelers secondary in Bills' 38-3 win

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Allen picks apart Steelers secondary in Bills' 38-3 win

"Quarterback Josh Allen threw for 424 yards and four touchdowns 38 to three the bills beat the visiting Pittsburgh Steelers two of Allen's touchdowns one to wide receiver Gabe Davis one for 98 yards the other for 62 Alan wanted to get Davis the ball He's coming off a little bit of a couple of weeks of an ankle and I just wanted him to know that I trust him implicitly you know I'm going to give him these opportunities and when you continue to make them and makes it that much easier to trust a guy In his first pro start Kenny Pickett won 34 52 for 327 yards he did throw it interception Jean battaglia Orchard park New York

Josh Allen Gabe Davis Pittsburgh Steelers Allen Alan Davis Kenny Pickett Jean Battaglia New York
Mariners erase 7-run deficit, sweep Blue Jays with 10-9 win

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Mariners erase 7-run deficit, sweep Blue Jays with 10-9 win

"Alan freezers RBI double in the 9th score Cal rally to give the Mariners an improbable ten 9 comeback win and the two game sweep of the Blue Jays Frazier's hit off Jordan Romano count the biggest road comeback in baseball postseason history which saw Seattle down 8 one after 5 innings The kind of moments you picture yourself in in the backyard and when you're a kid so that was trying to get some over the pipe focus swing on one Incredible Santana had a three run home run for the Mariners who scored four each in the 6th and 8th innings The Oscar Hernandez had two home runs of the loss as Seattle will play Houston in the American League division series John leathery Toronto

Jordan Romano Mariners Blue Jays Frazier Alan Seattle Baseball Oscar Hernandez Santana American League Division Houston John Leathery Toronto
Ian evacuees return to mud, rubble as death toll hits 101

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Ian evacuees return to mud, rubble as death toll hits 101

"Residents in Florida who evacuated because of hurricane Ian go home to mud rubble and other devastation as the death toll from the storm surpasses 100 Some residents of Florida's barrier island starting to return Alan bickford dealing with a thick layer of stinky muck covering the floors of his pine island home Outpouring of health is just amazing Joe Cusco says it's just him and his elderly parents so he's doing all the cleanup and it's heartbreaking The 30 years of my life gone The national alliance on mental illness is Beth hatch says the emotional toll is immense People don't really know where to begin So we need that We need that hand holding and to help get people through that process Temporary repairs to the causeway connecting pine island were done Wednesday fixing the sanibel island causeway could take until late October I'm Julie Walker

Hurricane Ian Alan Bickford Joe Cusco Florida Beth Hatch National Alliance Pine Island Sanibel Island Julie Walker
3 physicists share Nobel Prize for work on quantum science

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

3 physicists share Nobel Prize for work on quantum science

"Three scientists jointly won this year's Nobel Prize in physics for their work on quantum information science that has significant applications for example in the field of encryption David haverland chair of the Nobel committee for physics says Alan asper John F clauser an Anton zelinger have discovered the way that particles known as photons can be linked or entangled with each other even when they're separated by large distances It has to do with taking these two photons and then measuring one over here and knowing immediately that something about the other one over here And if we have this property of entanglement between the two photons we can establish a common information between two different people two different observers of these quantum objects Well physicists often tackle problems that appear at first glance to be far removed from everyday concerns the trio's research provides the foundations for many practical uses for science I'm Charles De Ledesma

David Haverland Nobel Committee For Physics Alan Asper John F Clauser Anton Zelinger Charles De Ledesma
McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

The Officer Tatum Show

01:57 min | 2 months ago

McDonald’s to Face $10B Race Discrimination Suit From Byron Allen

"It says McDonald's will face a $10 billion lawsuit against them for not advertising enough on black owned media. Now, let me just explain who this helps in who this hurts. The fact that the plaintiff are the fact that and I believe it was a black man that did the suing. The fact that we're suing people because you're not advertising junk food enough on black networks. It's asinine to me. Now the people who are making money from advertisement who wants to sell out the black community because they don't care nothing about your health, you know, one of the leading cause of deaths for black people in America is heart disease and diabetes, hypertension, I mean, literally obesity is rampant amongst the black community. However, you get people who want to sue McDonald's because they don't spend enough advertising to black people. That's like saying, why don't you sell us more stuff to kill us? How dare you, not sell things that's going to destroy our community on our network. Why won't you sell destructive things in our community on our network? Why you just sell it on a white people network where black people ain't listening to? But no, it's about money. Says the federal courts this week ruled that McDonald's will have to face a $10 billion lawsuit allegation that is discrimination or discriminates against black owned media channels by refusing to advertise on them. It says media tycoon, Bryant Byron Allen, a company Alan media group, we're bringing the suit against the fast food retailer with the U.S. district judge for Nando, outgoing, all going, I think it's how you say his name. Clearing the way for Allen to attempt to prove his claim in court. So they're

Mcdonald Hypertension Heart Disease Obesity Diabetes U.S. Bryant Byron Allen Alan Media Group Nando Allen
Alabama halts execution because of time, IV access concerns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Alabama halts execution because of time, IV access concerns

"Alabama has called off the execution of a convicted killer just three hours after a divided U.S. Supreme Court gave the okay prison officials had until midnight Thursday to give convicted killer Alan Miller a lethal injection but corrections commissioner John Hamm says the team administering the drugs had trouble accessing a vein and didn't say how long the team tried but he says Miller was returned to his cell the 57 year old was sentenced to death for a 1999 workplace rampage in which he killed two coworkers and a former supervisor I'm Donna water

John Hamm Alan Miller U.S. Supreme Court Alabama Miller Donna
"alan" Discussed on Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend

"It's all context or it was eight context. There was a piece the other day in the new york times. That really stunned me. Because the I think headline was in. the arts. section was which classic classical paintings or paintings from the renaissance era should get a pass. And i said i thought what yeah that i don't know that. Let me out but to be fair most things. I didn't read it. You read this ahead. You're like you know what it's worth bringing up with allen. No and look maybe. It goes on to say really. Brilliant things and i wasn't paying attention. I just want people to know i read the headlines of the new york times pieces but who has time to read. All that stuff i guess the takeaway as conan doesn't want you to look jelly anymore. You can't look at it. i just don't over. i just think it's offensive. It's over venus. Objective is venus. Put clothes that shell up. Close that shell up. You have the misfortune slash fortune of being the writer. Who wrote the conic. Treat yourself episode of parks and rag doll. Yeah and i remember that episode. And i remembered also feeling like oh yeah that's going to be catch and then it became a catchphrase and it's a mixed blessing. Probably not as much for you but for z's walking around and again when when you say i wrote i put in quote and wrote in quotes. Because they might be on that episode but everyone pitches for every episode. And i don't even know who came up with. Treat yourself like i credit. I attribute that to the room. So but i will say. It is wild to walk around like trader joe's and it says trees and then i'm sure read it when they walk around and move through the world they get it a lot because it's like what what was that. Not even. it wasn't a thing before the show right. It wasn't really a thing you know. I i don't even. I just read the headlines of the newspaper so i thought before joe. The new york times has a headline about it that explains itself completely in the headline. I can't help you know. But i do think that's there's an interesting thing for there to become like a catchphrase out but i talked about with rob a little bit where his character had literally right so like his people would say literally to him now. So it's like okay. Well that's his. It's a it's a gift and a curse right. it's it can be a burden on you. Hey blind i know when i said this but when i walk around people say you suck guess that was my catch phrase it when when you gotta own it. It's a legendary. I know you mainly for you. Suck masturbating bear. The legendary you suck. Why don't you talk. Souverain masturbated baron usa and those were good times. This was really fun. i i admire. You think you're a really nice talented guy. And i'm i'm happy that you're out there Making good stuff it just It fills me with the light. So thanks for hanging with me and thanks for you know many of us. Don't wanna sit next to rob lowe because we just look like those plastic turds that you could buy a practical joke. Yeah you're a good man. You're a good man. Taking the bullet guys man. Taking shoes shot. Normally let's get alan yang and rob lowe and its who shot and see which way the camera goes actually cleaned up pretty nice so thank you all right. I'm alright i'm alright. Yeah right just tricked you into compliment yourself. Thank you so much for having me you. We'll see we'll see if we'll still remain friends..

The new york times conan joe allen rob lowe rob alan yang usa
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Apparently there are five tropes that all science deniers have in common. They all follow the same basic strategy. They cherry pick facts. They believe in conspiracy theories they rely on fake experts while denigrating real experts. They engage in illogical reasoning. And here's my favorite. They expect science to be perfect. so meaning what. how does that. Meaning that in lestat. Definitive study has been done to prove a result. They won't believe it puts you of course reveals that they don't understand how science works because it's not deductive logic. There are still waiting for that. Last scrap of evidence on climate change. You know or they they want to have the vaccines proven to be even aspirin. I can't be proven to be safe. I mean it's just it's an impossible standard and it insulates them from really having to accept anything that they don't want to accept what was the experience like at the flatter convention it was. It was like nothing i'd ever experienced before i was incognito. The first day. I had on the lanyard i blend tried to blend in. Because i didn't want it. I was afraid that if they knew who i was nobody would talk to me. I was very wrong about that. And it's the whole program started and it was Watched show business. It was not like an academic conference was music lights clapping exhorting and the media were there and they were from the stage begging the media stay you know all to forty eight hours. You know really learn. Don't just to hit and run and go home and write your story. Well of course after the first half hour all the media left and then somebody shut the doors and said it's just us now what's gonna happen to happen homage but because i they still didn't know who i was they they went ahead and got to see what this was all really about and it was only later that i started to understand the pattern. The repetition at salata slogans and different things that they memorized from different people. And then i would ask when a speaker would just come down off the stage. I would ask them. What do you have a few minutes. And they thought it was a fan so of course. They've got a few minutes but then after a few questions they figured out. Wait a minute but but that that was. That was where. I started to feel my confidence. That was where i started to feel. You know that i could do this. But it was still intimidating because we would gather a crowd and i was surrounded by people who either thought i was in cahoots with the devil or crazy or dangerous but none of that. But the overriding thing. That happened was that they wanted to convert me They just in the same way that i was there to look at them. They regarded me as kind of a subject. I if you're already here you're already halfway in the door if we tell you You know we can work on you for two days. We can get you to convert and that that was. That was fascinating..

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Where is it arriving. What's the emotional Disposition of every section. Those things of course are a really important. But i would say on a very fundamental level. I'm acting as a conduit for are trying. Connect everyone now. What about you working with different orchestras not not an orchestra working with different conductors. When you when you go from baltimore chicago. Are you going to get a different response from them. That you have to work with the orchestra have a different personality. Absolutely every orchestra has a very distinct personality. A very distinct Attitude and it's really fascinating because how can one hundred people have a personality. How do they show well. You know it manifests in different different ways. Of course some musicians never look at you. They're afraid to connect and or or maybe they don't feel the need to connect that's a reflection of the personality. Also you know the the methodology of of the work Has to change depending where. I'm working if i'm working in japan. It's a very very different work ethic from saint london. You know london the orchestras there. They work With very little rehearsal time. They're extremely quick and Very resourceful in in germany japan similar. There's a real. There's a real slow trajectory you follow and it meets with their sort of bio clocks. You know what i mean used to that and you go with not Baltimore i would describe baltimore symphony as very much a reflection of the city of baltimore. It's not without problems it's a. It's a tough city you know. It's a fighting city. Everybody roll up their sleeves. And says how can i help this. The baltimore symphony is a scrappy orchestra. And i say that with the the most admiration and love. I can you know they are musical. And they're gonna tell you about it and they're gonna show you how they play and and i really feel. It's a reflection of the city and the.

baltimore japan chicago london baltimore symphony germany Baltimore
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"That's when you sort of marry the intellect to the to the image mair intellect to the art. And i thought well i'm coming to the end of my life. I'm in the clips years of my life. And there's this moon rising over the sea and shedding its Gorgeous glow waves etcetera. What is important to me. What is important to me that i have learned and came to three simple things. Life love and responsibility. And so i wrote cold moon on life love and responsibility. How did you get from the image of the moon to what is life mean to me. It seems like a leap huck commuting right about an astronaut it. 'cause i don't know anything about lila never has before you're quite right and it's cruel to butte. Imagine how it happens. But i know that if you allow yourself to sort of give yourself to the mystery you allow yourself to give yourself to the mystery in front of you. This beautiful moon rising over the c shedding its light on the sea in reflected in the waves and the waves almost look like an audience applauding. The moon and i live in the mystery. What what is this this overwhelming overwhelming site. And where little people doing little things and suddenly there's this bigness in front of us and you think well. If i am writing about the end of my life i must have learned something. That's worth giving to others. Most of most of writing one way or another is a work of generosity whether the writer admits it at the moment or not He wants to give something to somebody. And i wanted to give what. I picked up about the importance of life. The absolute necessity of love and the power of an necessity of responsibility of how life is full of instances where one thing is responsible for their welfare but another and we are always we that people are always responsible for the welfare of one another and so the these three things life love and responsibility they during the season. Utah with scott small. He's a physician specializing impatience with memory. Problems many.

lila butte scott small Utah
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Welcome to a preview of season. Fourteen of clear and vivid. We have a great lineup. Don't we graham we do. We have a fascinating group of people. We have actors we have scientists. We have actors who are scientists. We have actors who musicians. We have musicians. We have writers and we even have a supreme court justice eleven fascinating people starting with kevin bacon the the wonderful actor. Who's been in so many movies entertained this so many times. And who became the subject of me mm-hmm and then a game that he wasn't really happy about even even though he was the center of the whole thing. Which is the six degrees of kevin bacon. I don't know if everybody knows how that works. The idea is based on the idea that Mathematicians had figured out that i believe everybody in the world is connected to everybody else by six degrees of separation in other words. I i know you graham and you know bill so you and i are one degree apart and bill and i are two degrees apart. Would you say that out goes. That's exactly right yes And i know my dog so you know my old three degrees apart. And he knows the cat next door and so it goes but i guess it only applies to people well. Kevin bacon thing applies only to actors the ideas. Every actor in that you see in the movie is no greater than six degrees. Apart from skip from kevin bacon by by virtue of the fact that kevin bacon has been in a movie with one actor. Who's been in the movie with another actor and so on you know. I didn't know that. I didn't know it was specifically connected through The acting chain in the case of kevin bacon he. I'm pretty sure. But then kevin bacon like all of us is supposed to be six degrees from everybody regardless of what they do for a living right so i i wondered how that whole thing came about because it certainly wasn't generated by him..

kevin bacon graham supreme court
"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Walking back. Alan dershowitz has left the building. Alan dershowitz is an amazing mind. Amazing thinker principled person. Lot to say about what we just talked about. First of all we are both astonished. Yeah that it's possible that that he's convinced that biden won fair and square. I mean i would think the most sober-minded person would have to at least say that it's not clear there's a lot of Reason to believe that the election was was messed with. The question is would it be. Would it affect the outcome. But the idea that he's just sort of mouthing. The party line is a little surprising. I guess for him but also he says i think biden's the right man for the job this time i think. Can you imagine these bringing peace or something. He's bringing calm to the nation that's biden first of all biden is at the at best incompetent at best Anyway that's another story but what he was just talking about in case. People aren't getting the references. He mentioned chilmark. I mentioned edgar town. He summers on martha's vineyard an island off the coast of massachusetts Nantucket is another one. Martha's vineyard of the two is is famous for being liberal Walter cronkite lived there and he mentioned lillian hellman. I mean lillian hellman. It doesn't get more liberal than lillian. Hellman the famous Writer and i went there in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. I guess it was. This is all in my book. This is for me to plug my book. Fish out of water in fish out of water. I talk about when. I'm talking about right now but basically When i was at yale my writing teacher was john hersi. John hersi is famous for. He got a pulitzer prize for his book. A bell for a donohoe written right after the war. He wrote hiroshima which was The kind of the new report. Taj about what happened in hiroshima hiroshima and It was published published as a small book About what happened after the bomb horrifying obviously but beautiful journalism and so he was one of those liberal artists who lived on. Martha's minute he was my professor. So i i went to visit him. I guess the year or so after. I graduated and he was the kind of person who have dinner with lillian hellman They would have dinner with ralph ellison another stalwarts of the artists The the left. And it's so interesting because i really do believe. Even though they were left lefties they believed in what alan dershowitz talking about. They believed in these principles. And i think that all of that has devolved to you know where we are today which is to say A kind of fascism a kind of big state ism the fundamental principles of america. They they have left the building so interesting to hear. Somebody like twits. Talk about being snubbed. at the country club people won't talk to his wife. He's on invited to these things because they think it's unconscionable that he would stand for these things in Contravention of what they believe has to be right. And that's where we are folks. And i say this because i think that those of us who are more on the conservative side we have a responsibility not to go down that path ourselves. In other words when cuomo was resigned. I was the first one To post my shod and freud on social media and to to say you know one down one to go and p- p- post a picture of him newsome so that's kind of the fun part but then you have to think. Are we applauding things that are wrong and just as islanders which was talking about people that believe the woman. What a filthy. why when. An anti biblical anti-american concept that forget about due process. We're going to believe these people because they're better. We're gonna believe blacks over whites we're gonna believe women are what an offensive racist sexist idea but again it comes down to power in other words if you believe in principles and are willing to let the principals adjudicate situations or you just say i want to win and i don't care how i win. I don't care if we have to use dirty politics. It's poetic justice if If cuomo goes to jail for this but not for sending people to their deaths who cares. It's poetic justice. I would say we should be careful about that. I think we have to care about what is actually right. And so that's why it's important to talk to to liberals like alan dershowitz or naomi wolf. Anyone we can so that we remind ourselves that it's not about winning it's about justice it's about fairness it's about freedom and these kinds of things don't love what he talked about. Buckley and himself debating then going out and having a beer because they both were in different sized but they both respected the law and rule and order. And just well. It's like you have a principled opponent to you know that you can actually get someplace and you're not hating each other. I i hate you. And i hate your ideas. It's like i wanna. I wanna talk to you about those ideas because i think they're wrong but you can have them. It's all right and actually I mentioned mike lindell. There is no question that there's a chilling affect a lot of people. I know have been sued by dominion and the fact is that it's my idea right. I'm pretty sure this is the whole thing behind. It is that they have a lot of money and they're spending their money to quiet. People silence people to send out a chilling effect. Like the careful. Don't talk about this. don't talk about that. So you have fox news refusing to air. Mike lindell's commercial for the cyber symposium. Because they you know they've got a different corporate culture. They're not in it for what they believe in. They're in it for the corporate culture so they become part of the problem. And i just think it's important for us to talk about that on this program. I just wanted to take a minute here since we had the time. We didn't normally do this but it just really really It is important We on this program as you all know have been attacked. We've been knocked off of youtube. That's a big deal. I'll keep saying it because it is a big deal that they did that What did we do. What did we say on this program. it's obvious that we didn't do anything or say anything that innumerable people haven't done and they were not off youtube so it's become very political Okay before we go. I want to remind you We have a campaign on with food for the poor one of the project managers managers. Marcus frisch when we come back. I wanna play a quote because Well before we go to break let me just remind you go to metaxas. Talk dot com. You'll see.

alan dershowitz biden lillian hellman hiroshima chilmark john hersi John hersi Martha Walter cronkite cuomo Hellman ralph ellison Nantucket lillian edgar martha Taj massachusetts newsome mike lindell
"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I mean when the columbia faculty administration did not have the guts to stand up to the students who were just thugs spoiled thugs who took over the president's office in other words this goes back fifty plus years where you have a a leading class. That simply doesn't have on. Somebody called it the cultural confidence to say no get out this. It's a privilege to be here. It seems to me that that the leadership class in america whether it's university presidents or whether it's people who own sports teams or any of that stuff they don't seem right understand these fundamentals. No you're absolutely right. I look the free speech movement. Berkeley i was there when it happened. It was not free. Speech is free speech for me. Not for the free speech for the left. A look. what's going on now with ben and jerry They're boycotting israel. But they're they're the company that owns them. Unilever sells to iraq to cuba to china to belarus. They have a a company in belarus. They are among the worst human rights enablers and focusing on only on israel. It's a it's a corporate disgrace. I will never again eat that. Fat filled cholesterol well. I haven't forgiving. We're gonna break folks are going to be right back with alan dershowitz copay get off. Did not folks and talking to alan.

columbia faculty administratio belarus Berkeley america israel Unilever jerry ben cuba iraq china alan dershowitz alan
"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Keep my christian faith strong and for entertaining me in my car but please can you please suggest a different podcast for me to try because my wife is getting tired of me coming home and saying i heard this great guest on the eric metaxas show. And where's my check book. We need to free a slave or feed some children. Thank you well. You know That's what we do on this program. We pray guests and often we ask for your help which we just did a few minutes ago because they really are while. We're joking around their kids in this world. Who don't have food Their slaves in the sudan who need freeing so obviously We will always do that. And it's a privilege to do that. Which i didn't expect to end here but and i won't end here but i want to remind you please go to metaxas talk dot com today or if you prefer to use your phone call one eight hundred eight four four eight six three eight four four eight six three. Hope we really do. Need your help seriously And i'll keep reminding you. But i just wanna say regarding suss quashes in this wonderful letter that we got We're a pro sasquatch podcast so we may not be an all sasquatch all the time podcast right toward were a pro sasquatch. Podcast and i would. I would interview assess squash. I mean any day. You bring him here and it's always him because the the lady suss quashes I don't have a very strict rules. Just the guys can do media. But they They're old fashioned. I wanna tell you that we did About four years ago we did a sasquatch week. We did bigfoot week on the erc. Metaxas show. I remember that. And i don't know if that's still in the archives but we didn't. We need to do it where we might have not. We might. how all right well anyway. Thanks for the letter. Love your letters. And i and i do want to say people always say to me. You have such great guests on so this reminds me to remind you. Please go to Follow us on social media. Follow me on social media please. but Sign up for my newsletter. Because i know that if you're hunting around for a guest if you get the newsletter it comes to your inbox your email and you can see all of the videos and we even put some from past weeks so you don't have to go hunting for them We do that because when we got cancelled from youtube. It's much tougher for people to find us. And so we need you to step up. Go to eric. Metaxas dot com and. Please do sign up the newsletter. Sign up your friends. sign up your family sunup. Up your book club. Maybe if your church director you have all those emails. Put them in there. You'll be blessing them. Yeah and soupy sales when he says please go and go into your mother's purse and you see some corinne paper mail that to me at this address. Yeah anyway okay. Where the time we were the day alan dershowitz will be on. It's going.

eric metaxas Metaxas sudan erc squash youtube eric alan dershowitz
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"How she breaks it down so i hope you enjoy this conversation with lorraine barber miller lorraine welcome to the show. Thanks alan. i'm delighted to be with you. We'll start off with something fun with everybody. That comes on if we if we can find something and i hear you lived on a man-made island. That's the first time. I think that's been on the show so tell me about the manmade island so During my time in dubai. I lived on the palm jumeirah which i think most people have heard quite a bit about.

lorraine barber miller lorraine alan dubai
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Has been clear and vivid. at least i hope so my. Thanks to the sponsor of this podcast and to wall of you who support our show on patriot. You keep clear and vivid up and running and after we pay. Expenses whatever's leftover goes to the all the center for communicating science at stony brook university. So your support is contributing to the better communication of science. Were very grateful. Chaco nova grads is book. The blue sweater bridging the gap between rich and poor in an interconnected world was first published in two thousand and ten. Her latest book is manifesto for moral revolution practices to build a better world. You can find out more about accurate at ackerman dot org. This episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. Graham shed with help from our associate producer. Jean chamois are sound engineers. Eric wan and our publicist. Is sarah hill. You can subscribe to our podcast for free at apple. Podcasts stitcher wherever you like to listen next in our series of conversations. I talk with hank. Greely is a well known expert on the ethics of biomedicine and his new book. Crisper people delve into the murky story of howard. Chinese scientists created. The world's first gene edited babies. He thought he was going to be famous. He thought he was going to be claimed. When the nobel prize and astound the world and he was only right in terms of astounding the world. He was wrong and everything else to me. The worst thing he did was doing experiments on people that assad people on every that we're going to become babies where the risks were enormously greater than the benefits hank greely and the tangled tale of the scientists. The world who got caught up in an experiment that in his opinion should never have happened. Meanwhile on our other podcast. Science clear and vivid. I talk with marcellus or santos. She played a major role in building. The camera that was used to spot of massive cosmic explosion. The first of its kind ever recorded these events. They are really violent events so you can imagine to objects of approximately the mass of the sun being accelerated against each other with an incredible incredible speed and because of that the neutral star material cannot hold itself together anymore and so in the very final moments before the collision there is a disruption of the neutron star and that is what creates the fireworks so to say that we observe marcella source santos and what this collision of two neutron stars revealed about the expansion of the universe next time on science clear and vivid for more details about clear and vivid. Sign up for my newsletter. Please visit alanon dot com and you can also find us on facebook and instagram at clear and vivid and i'm on twitter at alan old. Thanks for listening bye bye..

center for communicating scien stony brook university Jean chamois Eric wan sarah hill hank greely Greely Graham hank santos howard apple marcellus marcella alanon facebook twitter alan
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"This has been clear and vivid. At least i hope so. My thanks to the sponsor of this podcast and to wall of you. Who support our show on patriot. You keep clear and vivid up and running. And after we pay expenses whatever's leftover goes to the all the santa for communicating science at stony brook university. So your support is contributing to the better communication of science. Were very grateful. Paul right is getting back in shape and brushing up on quantum mechanics to film the third and men movie later this year. It's subtitled quantum mania. Meanwhile he's co starring with will ferrell in an apple. Tv original series premiering in november called the shrink next door. This episode was edited and produced by our executive producer. Graham shed with help from our associate producer. Jeanne shaheen are sound engineers. Erica and our publicist. Is sarah hill. You can subscribe to our podcast for free at apple. Podcasts stitcher wherever you like to listen Next in our series of conversations. I talk with cynthia. Kenyon she made a major breakthrough twenty years ago. When she discovered a gene that dramatically slowed aging in a miniscule worm. Since then she's been working to see if her discovery could slow ageing and other animals. Like you and me first of all have to just say and i always say this because it's very true. We don't know that the drug that we could make to hit. These genes will have an effect at all in humans. But let's suppose do it would be as though it would take you two days to ages much as you now age in one day. Okay so you would spend a lot more time being young but then you would also spend more time being old on the other hand wait. There's one more thing that's good. That is good. Which is that enamels. These drugs seem to have very beneficial effects on diseases. There's less cancer of the heart is much better. It seems like the brain is more is better so it's not really clear what will happen. But at least if we go by what we see an animal's the diseases of aging seemed to be pushed out and they that is later in time and if anything. They seem less severe. Cynthia canyon next time on clear and vivid. Meanwhile on our other podcasts. Science clear and vivid. I talk with polina and akiva. She's making breakthroughs in communicating with the sales of the brain and spinal cord using ultra thin electrodes and even tiny magnetic particles. Gues- are very much at the frontier of technology. A lot of things that we do are strange and wild and of very far away from the clinic because there's a lot of Safety and efficacy studies that need to be conducted before we can apply this to treat human condition but in terms of providing information to understand how the brain works. The nervous system works. That's what our device is ready to be used right now. Polina anna kifah. Next time on science clear and vivid for more details about clear and vivid and to sign up for my newsletter. Please visit alan alda dot com. And you can also find us on facebook and instagram at clear and vivid and i'm on twitter at alan alda. Thanks for listening bye bye..

stony brook university sarah hill Jeanne shaheen apple ferrell Kenyon Erica Cynthia canyon cynthia Graham Paul polina akiva cancer Polina anna kifah alan alda facebook twitter
"alan" Discussed on Launch Left

Launch Left

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Launch Left

"Phoenix don't forget to rate and subscribe follow us and also shows at launched left. Today's very special guest is liz. Lammari on behalf of alan vega will be talking about his posthumous record. That was just released. Mutated alan vega is timeless time bandit of rock and roll and you may know from suicide but he so much more. We're going to really dig into the record and his art career and all good things music. Welcome to the show. So you co produced an unearthed. This record is outright. Alan and i met in the mid eighties after he was coming electric. Just a million dreams actually saturn strip which was an awesome album by rick. Okay sick but he was coming off of that. Mainstream major record label stint but he never let go of his roots. And when i met him he was still he guitar. Pedals and rhythm olivia machines. All jury raped on the floor at the gramercy park hotel and I was working as a lawyer on wall street but had always played drums in punk bands growing up in boston. Nazi into the rat back. The drinking age was eighteen. I'm like sixteen flying drones and vans and whatnot. But i didn't know suicide. Or alan vega one of the women that i worked with the law firm. Her brother was marked kocinscki. Coot who played guitar in the alan vega ban so she just said one day knowing that i was into music. Were picking up. Alan vega grammercy. We're going to the playdium. This big record release party for his latest albums that great so that night we met it was just an instant connection but fast forward in the interest of time roundabout eighty eight. I had been listening to alan with. Experimenting with sound is coming off electric. He's getting back to his roots. These kind of this whole deconstructing deconstructing music theory of notes and this kind of put it in context. He had gone to brooklyn college for art. Instead under ad reinhardt in tuesday he was amazing. Minimalist abstract painter who did a series of very famous black on black so to alan. It was the music equivalent of stripped down so there are no chord progressions. There are no keys everything is is based on what you feel and here and the idea of sound move it moving it movement of sound through rhythm and so he eventually said to me. Hey you're driver. Why don't we go into the studio together. And we can. Start working with some dissolve. These new affects machines Coming on the market and we could just start using those machines in the same way he was using the very stripped down old guitar pedals. So we went in and i had been recording and rehearsing with my band snub at a small Rehearsal studio in the east village called six eighth studio and the engineer there was super chill laid. Back guy herpin. Barnes energy and alan's would be a really good combination. Plus he was so chill that we came in and allen's whole ethos was you don't you really don't want to know how these machines are intended to be because we're not gonna use them that way anyway. These are not to affect acoustic instruments. These are these are generators of sound in of themselves and we're going to be pushing buttons and turning on and that's basically what we did starting juice avenue in the late eighties. How did that lead to mutate exactly or yes okay so we did a couple of additional power on and raytheon by this time. We were developing a following in europe. But we didn't have any. Us released but henry rollins was over on tour. Gets a copy of deuce avenues. Like this is so unique. Why is it not why you the people in the us are not getting exposed so he in one thousand nine hundred four came over to new york started a record label. He had already been doing this book publishing company. He had reached that he actually reached out to alan ninety two because he wanted listening to his lyrics on the suicide albums that he was familiar with this man must right. He must keep journals which showed up in their stacks and stacks. He wrote every night. So henry ended up doing the book. Critical nation do in like ninety four and from there. We started working with him on an album called. Do jiang prang. And in that instance perkin had some personal business. He was not in the studio. So we went to dessau recording studios and that was the first time that going into the studio was about recording a discreet album up until that point was really about just creating sound and every year or so i would say the allen. Let's pull you know. Like ten of these things. Cluster of a of a cohesive coal and put out a record so that we can go on tour and just kind of that was for me. That was part of the fun of it for allan. He would have been perfectly happy. Just keep creating tracks did not even releasing so there was a little push full so new. Tater had point in time. We are back at six studio recording the songs that would be communicator. And we actually had them. All done allen's process was also once we decided that we were gonna pull ten songs or however many would be fernanda. He would go into his notebooks and he would look through all his lyric. They weren't really lyrics his words and go into the recording studio and over like maybe one or two sessions literally record the entire album and would often be one. Performance was all in the performance. Sometimes i would say the son is into junk back into it again and it would do a completely different performance different lyrics i mean just as he never performed even with suicide. The never really performed the same songs the same way twice or even with the same lyrics. He was very much in the moment and really understand allen as creative being an artist He was he studied some existential philosophy. And and you know he was. He was a brilliant scientist and he was at brooklyn college to study astrophysics. But it was always drawing and the head of the art department happened to walk past a monday noodling in the library and said what is your major artists. That physics The art so he started taking our history and paint interesting. Really absorbed with the whole history of arkansas was always very interested in the history of music as well and in the depths of his his interest in knowledge of what kane before was pretty incredible. I considered myself to be fairly well. Educated person has been listening to talking to allen which he loved to do for hours about art history politics the world the universe so mutated so we had actually likely usually did finished all.

alan vega Lammari Alan vega grammercy alan brooklyn college for art gramercy park hotel herpin Barnes energy Coot allen alan ninety liz reinhardt Phoenix jiang prang dessau recording studios Alan rick east village henry rollins
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"That acumen carried out in the early two thousands. Malaria was killing over a million Mostly kids around the world sumitomo. The japanese manufacturing company or chemical company had developed a Organic insecticide to impregnate a polyethylene based netting with thrim which would kill the mosquitoes that carried malaria. All of the production was done in asia and yet ninety five percent of malaria cases were in africa. And so we were very new but we were lucky enough to partner with unicef and Sumitomo and we found a an entrepreneur in tanzania a new shah to take this technology and build a company a big risk. We made the loan we worked with the company and and then i started to know that it was going to work. The first time i visited and i saw one machine to women making long lasting malaria bed nets. next time i come four machines. Next time i come ten machines a year later. A seventy thousand square foot factory two years later ten thousand women making thirty million nets a year ultimately producing fifteen percent of global production improving to the world that you could manufacturer ask officially inside factories in east africa as you could in asia and that was a real opportunity for african solutions to african problems if we approached solving the problems both with our heads as well as with our hearts and that for too long we'd seen either all heart or all head and it was time for a new game and that was really for me the beginning of what was possible. I loved that so much. What she said. I got when she said there was a real opportunity for african solutions to african problems. I had a real emotional reaction to that. I'd that sounds like extending more dignity as a people we want to help. And we have up until now and not seems to be the theme of of accurate and i love how she concluded revive the scene all heart or all had and it was time for a new game or a. We have one more guest. We're going to pretend you about. We have a altogether. But we're we're just telling you about a few of them on this. Next guest is a woman that you met many years ago about twenty twenty something years ago and amos cynthia kenyon and i'll always remember the scene a few sitting with her in front of a microscope and there were these two lazy looking worms undulating through the material on the the dish that they were in told me about that. It was an amazing experience. I don't think i'll ever forget that. Cynthia was showing me worms. That were old for microscopic worms sea elegance worms and they were all because they were two or three weeks old..

two africa fifteen percent asia tanzania ninety five percent Cynthia Sumitomo one machine unicef ten machines east africa first time four machines three weeks old over a million a year later sumitomo cynthia kenyon both
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Welcome to our preview shows to come. These are coming attractions of clear and vivid to a device near you. Better be not too far from you or you won't hear it graham. Shed and i really delighted with the lineup. We have we have some wonderful people. Don't we graham. We certainly do and a nice dexter. Think we always try to make sure. The each season has a balance of different topics different sorts of people different conversations. And i think we've achieved at this time around and you know what i notice. Is that at the beginning of every show. I talk about how the conversations are about communicating and relating and sometimes the connection to communicating and relating is so tenuous that it may not seem to be about that for instance. When i talk with fellow actors there is the question of communicating the play to the audience but the way the actors communicate with each other is also interesting in and of itself and it's also a model for how we communicate with one another out in the real world i think and i think that's borne out by our our guest this season. Helen mirren who such a wonderful actress and she came from the stage. The same way. I did and i wondered when we spoke if she had the same problem adjusting to film that i had for a long time. Even though i was wearing a microphone on my costume even though is picking up every breath every sound i was making. If i talk to somebody a few feet away. I spoke in a voice loud enough to be heard in the back row. Even though there was no back-row and i didn't realize that there was essentially no rehearsal. I used to rely on rehearsals to learn my lines and in film they say okay. You stand here you stand here just run through at once so in the camera knows where you're gonna be gonna learn your lines that way and i was rude shock to me and just being surrounded by people on the set who are these people. What did they do just not used to that on the stage while you're acting there's you in the audience but in film there early stranger standing around who've made each one hundred movies each and they're all watching you act at his head can be unsettling until you get used to it so i wondered if helen had some of those same experiences coming from the stage. I had a hard time to act in front of a camera. Did you did you have to get yourself together and and be able to accept the challenges that you face in front of a camera for things like making sure you're in focus and in the light and accidentally i was so useless utterly useless because you know no idea about getting in the shot even or over the frame of the camera. All what to do. When you're in the frame i i felt when i started off in film acting. I called it a deer in the headlights acting. It's like love.

Helen mirren each season helen Shed one hundred movies each graham
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"When we last spoke you described two approaches to solutions there being worked on one a browser approach and then a universal idea approach. Can you describe both of these. I mean because if we lose the cookie we tire lose targeting and personalization in marketing in the digital form anyway innocence. Yeah and one of the key thing to remember is it's not that all cookies are going away. I'm just third party cookies. So when you're on a website. Let's say you're on cnn dot com or new york times dot com when you're on some some major website and they drop cookies. Those are first party cookies so a domain that juror. That's indeed url bar of your browser. Cookies owned by that domain. Our first party cookies cookies that are dropped from other domains so you know it might be the publisher might be working with. Dsp or an ad server. You might see a domain like some t. s. p. or some ad server dot com and those would be third party cookies. And that's what's going to be blocked. So personalization will still be possible through cookies and through similar methods i party sense from a individual publisher. Or if you're on an advertiser website you'll still be able to to personalize their What you won't be able to do is personalize across sites based on an pages that you viewed or interactions that you've had on other sites so it's up completely going away but there's definitely going to be an impact to how personalization is done today in terms of the two methods right there's two camps like you said there's the browser camp which is being led more or less google and their their proposal of turtle dove and also flock and these are more where identification of audiences will happen in the browser. And then there are the user. Id based approaches unified ideas of major proposal in this space that there's a few others as well but these actually rely on logged in data from email addresses or other pi that similar and this will allow a hashed. Id's that personal. I'll get and then get shared around that way so this is somewhat similar to the way that that third party cookies functions then using a slightly different on to maintain that persistence of the id.

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"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with <hes>. College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career <hes>. At the same time my company was so gracious that <hes>. They paid for my mba. So <hes>. i went to <hes>. Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my <hes>. General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and <hes>. And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and <hes>. There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that <hes>. That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all <hes>. Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past <hes>. But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and <hes>. A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and <hes>. My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic <hes>. Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and <hes>. So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That <hes> definitely had <hes>. A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and <hes>. And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and <hes>. And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been <hes>. We've been pretty pretty successful doing that. How have you. You mentioned multicultural marketing. How you see you know multicultural marketing involved being. I mean you've gone. I guess a pepsico all the way to creating a entire business unit this kind of like got its measure of <unk>. Market success it's not. It's not the historical tack on her on. That might have happened in the past at different organizations. How do you think about the evolution of multicultural marketing. I guess it's related to. What is the current makeup of our population <hes>. Which is very multicultural <hes>. So in in a way like our everything. We do should be multicultural. Because that's the fabric of our country <hes>. But that's not always that embrace necessarily in that way so <hes>. So i think it's come. It's come a long way to recognize that you do need dedicated resources to unlock it to learn about that consumer really intimately in order to then figure out how to drive the right cultural relevance <hes>. You can't do one. Size fits all. You can't assume that. Okay well you know h-h-hispanics in this case writer are part of the general market. So general market stuff should work <hes>. Should you know resonate just as well right. The reality is that you know if you look like hispanic segmentation. There's different things going on depending on someone's <hes>. Background story you know. I gave you a little bit about what the narrative was for my family story behind every hispanic every multicultural consumer that is in this country and so understanding. That can help you then better. Connect to those emotional subconscious cues in their mind to then build your brand build relevancy so <hes>. One-size-fits-all is not is not gonna work. So how it's evolved. It is getting even more personalized. It's getting even more specific. So even saying multicultural. Marketings probably not correct because now it's hispanic marketing and within hispanic doubleclick. It's mexican from la versus mexican from el paso or ecuadorian. From new york. Cuban from miami which might be different from tampa like it's real localization. Now and that i think is the unlock to really building brands longer term.

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"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Let's talk about the professional path and <hes>. You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with <hes>. College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career <hes>. At the same time my company was so gracious that <hes>. They paid for my mba. So <hes>. i went to <hes>. Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my <hes>. General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and <hes>. And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and <hes>. There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that <hes>. That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all <hes>. Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past <hes>. But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and <hes>. A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and <hes>. My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic <hes>. Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and <hes>. So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That <hes> definitely had <hes>. A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and <hes>. And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and <hes>. And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been <hes>. We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

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