37 Burst results for "Alan"

Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:54 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Presidential candidate. Eric Zimmer embracing a 28 year old assistant on the French Riviera zamora is furious and threatened to sue, but one wonders whether this is all a bit of an act from him, it doesn't seem to have done him any harm. But there was some suggestions that, in fact, he was quite keen on having himself portrayed as virile and active. Yes, exactly. It does kind of remind one of the Donald Trump playbook of looking being outraged at being caught doing something that reflects rather well in certain lights on his virility and his manliness. Is that unusual for France to get so up in arms about a story like that and actually sack the editor? It has actually happened before with Paris match. In 2006 the editor Alan Guinness star was sacked after a photo he published that angered Sarkozy greatly. He published a photo of. A color Bruni. With her former lover. Right. And that was the end of him. Well, here's somebody that's kind of going the other way. He's trying to tamper down his sex drive. This is a great story about the former Spanish king Juan Carlos. Yes, it's been alleged by a former police chief Juan Carlos was injected with female hormones because his sex drive was considered a state problem, which is incredible to think of. But Juan Carlos was notorious is notorious for his many affairs and outraged the Spanish public in 2011 when it emerged he was elephant hunting with a mistress while the country was in financial crisis. And now this form of police chief who is himself a slightly dodgy character has made this rather sensational claim. Extraordinary. And finally we go back to the times and a new entry for the Oxford English dictionary. Yes, they've added an entry for global heating, because they say that global warming does not capture the gravity of climate change. This is part of a special update of the dictionary to mark 26. So it's not just the British state that has focused on cop 26, but even the Oxford English dictionary. But they feel that global warming doesn't account for the severity of what's happening right now. Robbie, thank you very much, indeed. That was Robbie Smith and this.

Eric Zimmer Riviera Zamora Juan Carlos Alan Guinness Donald Trump Bruni Sarkozy France Paris Robbie Robbie Smith
Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Why Watch That Radio

Why Watch That Radio

00:43 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alan" discussed on Why Watch That Radio

"Four episodes per season. It's ten so if you have paramount plus you can go back and watch it And get right you know and catch up. It's not a huge commitment but you can't watch Oh season what. I'm hearing plus all. You're not talk about that. I know i'm not me. I was like. I wonder if it's on hulu. Gosh how can you you know what you definitely can do. Is you can go on amazon. You could or out apple and you can buy it so if if you really desperate. Can you watch season two without watching season one. I mean you could but it wouldn't be as good you know all of that back story it's a procedural but proceed right now all cereals as well so oh okay so it's not a clean procedural sorry misinformation. I really thought you could go and watch it on fairmont. i went into paramount. Plus i was like wait a minute. Hang it all. We'll have to do something about that but let's not hang our hat on that because what are the most anticipated seasons of the show is it is back and when i tell you The advertisement you got this guy saying my father is the devil and i need to take him down your park up because succession is back and are trying to get what's bears or maybe not. Even what's there. I don't know what they're trying to do but Danny apparently is the devil. And he's trying to hold onto what he's got now this is on. Hbo we all know this. It season three now. It's only nine episodes this season. I know some of you are going to be like all isn't usually ten episodes. No it's nine but that's not necessarily a bad thing. It could be a good thing to get that story moving. Because when i tell you you were talking about dopes it and you were talking about a family. That's cutthroat I don't think i would like to attend thanksgiving with this family. I'm just saying while in the first episode of this third season. I mean look. Y'all let me tell you something. We know from the end of season two that well. The second oldest son is oh. You always have to remember the stuff. The second oldest son played by jeremy strong kindle. He was supposed to go take a bullet for the family. Did he decide to do that. In the press conference he called no so as back to him versus dad. Play by brian. Cox logan roy. And you know they're the head of this major media conglomerate and you can think of real major media families now if you like now of course. Kendall has a younger brother and a younger sister now. This younger brothers played by kieran. Culkin the younger sister by sarah snook so it's roman in ships and they all the three of them to take over the business and they wanna to be now. The oldest child and son hasn't been a part of the business. But he's there by alan ruck connor roy and you know he has his life forever she is and she must be an actor in you know she had this one woman show or whatever but you know they have money so as that whole but can he be taken seriously and does he want to be. The ceo doesn't matter if he wants to be in there also all of the executives in the company who are they signing with logan kindle is the question and one of them play by a favorite of ours. J. smith cameron jerry. Jerry is quiet. She knows what's going on. She's the general counsel as she just waits she waiting for her turn. So and in the aftermath of what kindle did now logan is in trouble and buy it could mean like a main justice trouble. Oh he's calling the president to see what the deal is. What are they tell him. He's got a lawyer up. He's got to have a play if he goes. Oh wait a minute. I can step back as ceo public. Who's going to go over now. You still had to answer the me. And why all of that's going on what's can't kindle doing the same thing he's lowering notch is figuring out who's loyal to him so he's finding out how to communicate with the media who's going to win is the question and the real question. Is this for logan. The father as he kinda like what kindles do is because he don't like no week children a while he may hate would kindles doing. Does he kind of respect it. is he scared. A little even and the question for kindle is can you keep them together because we know he has passed his problem with drugs and all other kinds stuff now thing about succession is this. I mean if you look at the medicine course like ninety something. I'd be much goodness. Yeah everybody's ceremony. I mean he's critics can't get enough in the first season. Was i liked it. But y'all a crazy second season. I think when kindle was on i thought the show just work it really is a kindle logan show when they keep them as the drivers of the plot. It's great and i enjoyed season two more than season. One watching the first episode of season three. I said to myself it's flawless but you cannot find a problem in the show. It's written beautifully. It's nut now. It's not beautiful writing but like the writing is really good. Because i was like i mean my attention voice. Yes there's a moment with kyrie culkin's character you know. They're all traveled to the plane. And they have a little van going there logan's and he's like should i get it with you. Logos spots to have not beautiful. But it's great okay and acting. I mean the task is is perfect. It's just it's just a well oiled machine. You can't find a flaw. I could watch this all the time but is it is. It's not. I'm not watching going. Ooh like it's drawing the in. It's more like oh let me stand back and watch these ants as kind of like that so i mean if you haven't started succession what are you waiting for. If you have an hbo subscription this is what billions wants to be Dang it all. Well let's talk about something we're going to say goodbye to four the season and it is on fairmount plus in. It's called a easel you you've talked about it. It's hard renewed for season three. So don't worry if you're a huge fan.

Cox Logan Roy Sarah Snook Alan Ruck Connor Roy Logan Logan Kindle J. Smith Cameron Jerry Hulu Paramount Culkin HBO Amazon Danny Kieran Apple Kendall Jeremy Brian Jerry Kyrie Culkin
Allen, Bills beat Chiefs 38-20 in AFC title game rematch

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Allen, Bills beat Chiefs 38-20 in AFC title game rematch

"Buffalo quarterback Josh Allen passed for three touchdowns and ran for another in the bills thirty eight twenty victory over the Kansas City Chiefs I know we didn't have a lot of plays we don't have really a lot of third downs really a lot of first downs but we had a lot of explosive plays guys got open and made some unbelievable plays Alan lifted the bills to a foreign one record this season and avenged a loss to the chiefs in last season's AFC championship game the bills who lead the NFL in takeaways forced four turnovers one of them was an interception by bills safety Michael Hyde returned for a touchdown regalcoin Kansas city

Josh Allen Kansas City Chiefs Buffalo Alan AFC Bills NFL Michael Hyde Kansas City
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

"Okay. I want to read to you. And i'm gonna try to take jim in scranton by the way just for the record and i want to read to you. A letter sent to the members of one of the leading orchestras of the country. The san francisco symphony orchestra. I have friends in many of the top orchestras of the country because of my interest in involvement in classical music dear. All i won't read the whole letter as we start the twenty twenty one twenty two season allen when i say alan on the air you know it's serious. I wanted to take a moment to address some questions about the nature and future of our d. e. I work together. i will note after many sentences. Something the assumption is the members of the orchestra. No what the diversity equity and inclusion so there have been some questions will. Who is the person here. The person who wrote it is matthew. Spivey interim ceo of the san francisco symphony orchestra. 2-0 one van ness avenue san francisco over the last three years. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change. The entire letter is pablum the entire letter it is unworthy of adults. It is or william pablum. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change The journey there the symphony orchestra is on a journey and of lot learning self reflection and change. All of that is a euphemism for over the last three years we have made the san francisco symphony orchestra. More and more awoke.

San Francisco Symphony Orchest Scranton San Francisco JIM Spivey Allen Alan William Pablum Matthew
Reflecting on the 1987 Book 'The Closing of the American Mind'

Mark Levin

01:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Reflecting on the 1987 Book 'The Closing of the American Mind'

"1987 my older brother Doug gave me a book It was a book called the closing of the American mind Is by philosopher professor Alan bloom And I was doing my research for American Marxism among other things I reread that book And he has some very brilliant things to say And so on page 40 to 41 of the book I point out that he wrote that every quote every educational system has a moral goal That it tries to attain and that informs its curriculum It wants to produce a certain kind of human being This intention is more or less explicit or less the result of reflection But even the neutral subjects like reading and writing and arithmetic take their place in a vision of the educated person Democratic education wants and needs to produce men and women who are supportive of a democratic regime In Bloomberg excuse me bloom went on to warn that we have a culture in which to root education But we have begun to undermine it The idealism of the American founding has been explained away as mythical selfless selfishly motivated and racist So our culture has been devalued Nobody believes that the old books do or even could contain the truth Tradition has become superfluous 1987

Alan Bloom Doug Bloomberg
FBI: 2020 homicides up nearly 30%, largest 1-year jump ever

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

FBI: 2020 homicides up nearly 30%, largest 1-year jump ever

"The FBI says homicides rose sharply in the U. S. in twenty twenty nearly thirty percent over the prior year the FBI says it's the largest one year increase since they started keeping records nearly twenty one thousand six hundred people dying at the hands of others while other violent crimes increased slightly property crimes continue to fall down nearly eight percent over last year a criminologist at Northeastern University James Alan fox says with the pandemic keeping people home and the racial and political divide in the country twenty twenty should be looked at as a unique year and not necessarily part of a long term trend in increasing violence Jackie Quinn Washington

FBI James Alan Fox Northeastern University Jackie Quinn Washington
The Trump Organization Is Back in Court to Fight Tax Fraud Charges in New York

NPR's Business Story of the Day

00:52 sec | Last month

The Trump Organization Is Back in Court to Fight Tax Fraud Charges in New York

"Trump's longtime business partner. Alan weisselberg is back in court. Today he served as the trump corporation's chief financial officer and he is accused of fifteen year scheme to defraud taxpayers journalist. Andrea bernstein is covering the case for npr news. and she's online good morning joining. I guess you'd better remind us because there have been so many investigations of trump. Which of the various investigations is this. So this is the criminal indictment. That was unsealed back in july. And what's significant about this case is that despite thousands of civil lawsuits for donald trump or his business and to impeachment trials for the former president. This is the first time. The trump corporation has been charged with a crime. The same goes for alan weisselberg that she financial officer who's worked with the trump family for nearly half a century which is the entire span of donald trump's business career.

Alan Weisselberg Andrea Bernstein Npr News Donald Trump
GOP Prosecutors Threaten Lawsuits Over Biden's Vaccine Requirement

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

GOP Prosecutors Threaten Lawsuits Over Biden's Vaccine Requirement

"Two dozen Republican attorneys general are threatening to sue the blighted ministration over its plan to impose a covert vaccine mandate on government and private sector workers the opposition is led by South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson who called the biting vaccination plan quote disastrous and counterproductive Wilson says he and two dozen of his counterparts will seek every available legal option to hold the president accountable the letter blasts the plan for sweeping new federal vaccine requirements to be enacted by OSHA for healthcare workers federal contractors and nearly two thirds of the private sector work force aimed at slowing the spread of the delta variant Republican leaders and even some union bosses are accusing president Biden of going too far in trying to muscle private companies and workers Jackie Quinn Washington

Attorney General Alan Wilson South Carolina Wilson Osha President Biden Jackie Quinn Washington
Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:13 min | Last month

Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

"How do you think about driving. Growth within marketing. And what do you feel like has changed over the years And the businesses that you've worked in can i. It's a really really complicated place to be right now to be a marketa it not only. Do you need the traditional side of marketing. But you really need to be technology forward and data the line. I think i think of them in three buckets like the way i look at these. Three levers are just kind of poke into a minute. And i looked at them in every job that i've had but it's just gotten much worse. Not only is is in enough growth to be had but you'll losing resource is having to just become more and more efficient and those three things i tend to focus on. Everything is moving so foster and humans can't keep up with it. I mean you need to be able to mock it and deliver personalized experiences at i. Cool at the speed over tick-tock swipe if you get to the consumer that quickly especially five years from now the relevance of you being around is just is just going to get northern and then with talking about like things like ticked off. The media. Landscape is so fragmented right. Keep her on instagram. In their own take talkin will watching. Tv they're watching multiple devices. And so you warm often channels than we've ever had before people are all over the place and they need to get to them quick us. So that's a challenge at roku the way we're trying to handle these things is we've really started to invest into a crm. And so all go. But before i got here we have channels. You know what they call multichannel marketing. We did that. Everyone's trying to do that and everyone's trying to do on me channel marketing but the way we're focusing about is really trying to now and get the power about platform out and one of my roles here at here. At roku is becoming hyper focused on really building tools automations so that the marches can actually be feeding the systems and and making the systems v. The brains of what we do is all this manual curation and execution that needs to happen.

Roku
TripWire CEO Steps Down After Supporting Texas Abortion Law

Giant Bombcast

01:49 min | Last month

TripWire CEO Steps Down After Supporting Texas Abortion Law

"Ceo of tripwire interactive got out on twitter and tweeted his support for the antiabortion laws and bounty stuff in texas which seems like a pretty grotesque law in a lot of ways and said he was proud of the supreme court for affirming the texas law banning abortion for babies with harvey bubble This lead to immediate Like whoa whoa. What from ship right studios. Which is another georgia based developer That appears to be like a developer for higher that does do some contract work for a number different companies trip wire was one of those companies they got out there and said like with this is not us. We are looking to cancel contracts immediately because we do not want to do business with with someone out there and then yesterday's sixth one day later Tripwire officially got out there and said the comments given by john gibson are of his own opinion and do not reflect those of tripwire interactive as a company. His comments disregarded the values of our whole team our partners and much of our broader community. Our leadership team tripwire are deeply sorry and our unified in our commitment to take swift action and to foster a more positive environment effective immediately. John gibson step down a ceo of tripwire interactive co founding member and current. Vice president alan wilson will take over as interim ceo and then there's some ongoing stuff about you know alan having been with the company for a good long time And that they are taking steps to with employees and partners to address their concerns including executing company-wide townhall meeting and promoting open dialogue with leadership and all employees. His understanding of both the company's culture and the creative vision of our games will carry the team through this transition with full support from other tripwire. The other tripwire

Tripwire Interactive Texas Harvey John Gibson Supreme Court Tripwire Interactive Co Twitter Vice President Alan Wilson Georgia Alan
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

05:11 min | Last month

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"That's when you sort of marry the intellect to the to the image mair intellect to the art. And i thought well i'm coming to the end of my life. I'm in the clips years of my life. And there's this moon rising over the sea and shedding its Gorgeous glow waves etcetera. What is important to me. What is important to me that i have learned and came to three simple things. Life love and responsibility. And so i wrote cold moon on life love and responsibility. How did you get from the image of the moon to what is life mean to me. It seems like a leap huck commuting right about an astronaut it. 'cause i don't know anything about lila never has before you're quite right and it's cruel to butte. Imagine how it happens. But i know that if you allow yourself to sort of give yourself to the mystery you allow yourself to give yourself to the mystery in front of you. This beautiful moon rising over the c shedding its light on the sea in reflected in the waves and the waves almost look like an audience applauding. The moon and i live in the mystery. What what is this this overwhelming overwhelming site. And where little people doing little things and suddenly there's this bigness in front of us and you think well. If i am writing about the end of my life i must have learned something. That's worth giving to others. Most of most of writing one way or another is a work of generosity whether the writer admits it at the moment or not He wants to give something to somebody. And i wanted to give what. I picked up about the importance of life. The absolute necessity of love and the power of an necessity of responsibility of how life is full of instances where one thing is responsible for their welfare but another and we are always we that people are always responsible for the welfare of one another and so the these three things life love and responsibility they during the season. Utah with scott small. He's a physician specializing impatience with memory. Problems many.

lila butte scott small Utah
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:56 min | Last month

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Yeah i really thought that. I enjoyed a research. Professor was what i thought i would do. You know i had. I had been teaching for years as a as a graduate student I i was enjoying a relatively kind of quiet anonymous life. Nobody cared what i looked like. Or you know if i wanted to put some streaks in my hair that we're a crazy color. No one was telling me i couldn't and you know to be honest. The world of academia is not without complexity ego and a lot of the things that we have in the industry but Yeah i i was really enjoying my life and it was very excited to have children and be home with them. I actually left academia to be home with my children. Meaning i got my doctorate And then did not take a post doc position and eventually that led to me returning to acting because i was running out of health insurance truth ironic that show businesses what you fall back on the sag after health plan is pretty darn good couple jobs here and there i i had a you know. I had an infant and toddler. No and i was teaching to make ends meet i. I did not have a fortune waiting for me. People did not make a lot of money like they do now in the nineties especially teenage actors you know it was a very different world. Didn't have endorsements and publicity stuff. And you know i was living my life.

A Masterclass in Agile Master Brand With Lippincott's Nital Patel

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:08 min | Last month

A Masterclass in Agile Master Brand With Lippincott's Nital Patel

"It. We were gonna talk quite a bit about this notion of agile master brand and this new model. That you've developed a lippincott. Where did the notion begin for an agile master brand and maybe before we get there like what is an agile master grant at its highest level. In algebra master brand is a brand architecture framework that companies can use to really support growth but at the same time continue to support their master. So sort of the big idea in a nutshell. It's the balance between master brands. Being very efficient companies. Most many companies have really strong master brands that they want to continue to reinforce but sometimes master brands aren't as conducive to growth as companies wanted to winded. This notion of a new model emerged for you. The wind is is a good question of mature. Exactly when it's been can have batting around in the back of my mind her a little album. It's really f- premise. Offer just working with a number of clients in client after client. They're all chasing growth. Something that can be done for years but now it's much more focused on disruptive growth. So it's it's no longer in huckabee grow a couple of percentage points this year. What are we going to do to to make our numbers. It's more like how can we actually grow by twenty or thirty percent next year and it's it's driven by innovation so it's really groundbreaking innovation technology eight experiences a really just kinda rethink game. The approach to growth is is where it all started and as we look at some of those innovations like they really begged for new brad. They were so different so groundbreaking that putting them under the existing nassar bandits would have been a disservice to some extent would potentially hurt doesn't ovation's in there wasn't really a model in terms of how to deal with that other than to create a new brand but then you are going against the whole idea of a master bradman so this is a way to try to support that growth but at the same time supporting the master brand.

Huckabee
‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Reunites Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum and Sam Neill

The Fantasmagorium Show

02:00 min | 2 months ago

‘Jurassic World: Dominion’ Reunites Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum and Sam Neill

"Jurassic world dominion reunites. Laura dern jeff goldblum and sam neill in the some new cinema con footage universal pictures unlocked cage. On the first new footage from jurassic world dominion on wednesday night in las vegas presenting it in mikan the annual convention and movie theater owners. The studio offered up it behind the scenes. Look at the Returning cast of the original jurassic park. Laura dern as dr elliott sadler Sam neill alan grant and jeff. Goldblum is ian malcolm It was previously reported that the iconic trio would join Would join franchise stars. Chris pratt and bryce dallas howard in the third installment of call intra varos Run of the films While understanding well under. But i'm sorry undeniably tra- varas baby. The footage kicked off with an unseen. Home movie real starring. The world's the world's the world's creator and original. I'm sorry. I thought you said creature creator and original director steven spielberg. He is talent. I'm thinking to myself. Why is steven nobrega creature now. Technically the grainy clip should spielberg In safari gear on the set of the nineteen ninety-three film Explaining a film prop to a child actor. The problem of course was the cane. Used by a richard attenborough topped with a globe of amber housing a petrified mosquito inside and the cain was the first building block in engineering dinosaurs for the fictional park. That's cool so they said that was cool. They showed that kind of grainy. Home movie footage for that At an inner will interwoven with behind the scenes and a trailer. I think or or what they would probably not trailer behind the scenes

Laura Dern Jeff Goldblum Jurassic World Dominion Mikan Dr Elliott Sadler Sam Neill Ian Malcolm Sam Neill Alan Grant Laura Dern Chris Pratt Goldblum Bryce Dallas Howard Steven Nobrega Las Vegas Jeff Steven Spielberg Richard Attenborough
How Paul Cain Passed on His Prophetic Mantle to Chris Reed

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | 2 months ago

How Paul Cain Passed on His Prophetic Mantle to Chris Reed

"Chris read lot that. I want to ask you first of all paul kane. Paul kane is a figure again. Most people probably don't know who he was but boy oh boy I heard about him. I don't know thirty years ago. And he was this man with prophetic gift. That was just astonishing He would say things like come from gonna fly to this town to meet you. I'll be there that day. In the day that i land they'll be an earthquake and then there was an earthquake. I mean that kind of thing. That just is chilling. Gets everybody's attention You knew him. And i guess the story was that everybody would go up to him and say you know paul pray that the lord would give me your mantle quote unquote and he got annoyed by it but in fact he did pray at the end of his life that his mantle would rest on you. Can you talk about that. Yeah the video. That is actually owned my youtube channel where he lays hands on me and and and praise that the very thing. I don't think use the word mantle but he did say however the lord you have used me whatever was there i pass onto my brother so yeah i knew poll. The last year his life he he died in february of twenty nine thousand nine hundred eighty nine years old. He was involved back in the voice of healing era. Even or roberts. William brenham alan those guys and then he went after a number of years after the fifties. He kind of went silent for a number of years then. He reemerged in the eighties with john. Wayne mike big on those guys and People saw at a number of times in places that the gift was real and you know sadly many people only want to know the things the difficult things in bad situations in people's lives. But i want you to know all did have a real gift. I saw in action myself sitting at a dinner table and he was authentic and in his prophetic gift. There's no doubt about it.

Paul Kane Earthquake Chris William Brenham Alan Wayne Mike Paul Youtube Roberts John
The Me Too Movement is Gendering Justice

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:50 min | 2 months ago

The Me Too Movement is Gendering Justice

"Professor dershowitz. Can we talk just a moment about the strange cuomo scandal. My understanding is that things have just gotten so nasty and so political in america that were more concerned with whether he has touched women inappropriately than what he's done with his policies. I mean a lot of people are genuinely upset. that he that he sent a covert patients into these nursing homes. That's of course infinitely more horrifying as a concept than Whether somebody would Be doing what. He's alleged to have been doing d. Do you have any sense of why that is. Do you have any opinion on that or her. We have our priorities. If you see a doctor dressed in a doctor's white and you say to her boy you make those doctors whites look good. That is regarded as a worst sin than what happened in the nursing homes. Because there's nobody there fighting for the nursing home patients but the me too movement is on top of any deviation One of the things charged in this outrageous report done by letitia. James is that cuomo looked women up and down and he looked at parts of their body. My god if that becomes an impeachable offense or a crime Many many men and women will be in trouble. Forget remember that letitia. James who's now probably going to run for governor started it basically her report by saying believe women Essentially don't believe man that there should be a thumb gender on the scale of justice. And if you have two witnesses one man one woman in their equally credible she says believed the woman because she's a woman that reminds me of what happened in the south in the nineteen twenties. Believe whites don't believe blacks. You cannot generalize like

Professor Dershowitz Cuomo Letitia America James
No President Cares About Free Speech - Joe Biden Included

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 2 months ago

No President Cares About Free Speech - Joe Biden Included

"Do you think you believe biden was was actually elected and i'm i'm fairly certain we're going to see information to the contrary soon. Everybody will have to look at it. But let's say he was the question that i have because i know you have to go. Do you think that he and his administration genuinely care about free speech. Because i don't get the impression that he that that he in the office of the president who has this tremendous bully pulpit that he gives a fig about what we are talking about right now. I don't think it even crosses his mind with the minds of the people as administration. I think they're making it work for them. Which to me is the greater scandal. Well i know. Joe biden for now. It's forty years. I like him as a person. I think he the right man for the job at this point in time. He's helping the combination. But no president kicker free speech. Thomas jefferson before he became president said given a choice between a government without newspapers or newspaper without governments. I would surely pick newspapers without government. Then he was president and then he issued a different statement. He said if nobody read newspapers. We'd be better off in smarter and fairer than if people read newspapers. So no incumbents like the media particularly and joe biden himself. I think we'll support free speech. But they're going to be people in his administration. He's appointed some people who are radically on the left just the way Republicans have appointed. Sometimes people are radically on the right. We need to move more to the center. We need to move more to all the old debate between genuine liberals in genuine conservatives. Both of whom bull we freedom of speech. I used to debate bill buckley. All the time on his television she was a conservative. A liberal enjoyed each other. We ran for a drink after we got along. There was no cancelled culture. I crave for the days of bill. Buckley versus alan dershowitz. Instead of the kind of cancel culture we're experiencing

Joe Biden Biden Thomas Jefferson Bill Buckley Alan Dershowitz Buckley
Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

"I mean though a is simply that the people that are animated whether on the left or on the right or any of these issues there at least paying attention even if they're on the wrong side but but it strikes me that the moneyed classes don't seem to think that this affects them in other words. The reason we are where we are is because those people typically have stepped back. They think that everything's fine. There isn't a battle for fundamental freedoms in america. They're wrong because their children are going to college and college. Today has become a propaganda mill for the hard left. And today you cannot your mind in a class or if you're a faculty member many american universities if you express views that are not politically correct. You are threatened. You won't be promoted. You won't be giving classes to teach. You won't be hired by other universities. I've written a new book called the case against new sensors five censorship by big corporations universities each and there are small never people in universities who want speech want to have a very very. Don't think speech codes. Who want to make sure that professors and students can't express users Their views and the administrators aren't doing very much about it. They talk about free speech but when it comes down to it they don't do very much to protect it on many college campuses so the rich and the elite who was sending their kids to princeton and yale and harvard in chicago and then they really do have something to worry about because they're sending them into place where they're not getting educated. They're getting propaganda is they're not being too how to think that being told what the

America Princeton Yale Harvard Chicago
Denis Prager on Free Speech in Hungary and the World

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Denis Prager on Free Speech in Hungary and the World

"Why was i in hungary. And why was i in czech republic. Is people young people all young. I didn't. I didn't meet anybody over thirty. I don't think all young people watching you content reading preview stuff. we were at in prague. we're at a table of about twenty twenty five people twenties again. And i said they came to hear me speak but they may have been invited by a friend to come i did. I did not know whether they were all acquainted with me. So i just said i promise i will not in any way be hurt by your response but raise your hand if if you are familiar with much prager you content. Every hand went up and my wife took a picture of the hands up. A good idea on her podcast to keep your hands up please. This is in prague. In hungary at this conference conservative conference of young people. I met people from about a dozen countries and everyone were treated me like a long lost brother. I called up. Alan from hungary and i told him how moved i was and he got moved. It's not easy to move the living murder. But i he was. He should be his idea. Prager you this is an interesting question if it were my idea. What i've said estrin new have. Never i've never grappled with that question. And i i was. I was deeply moved because the ideas that we enunciate that. I've devoted my life to our our universal

Hungary Prague Czech Republic Estrin Alan Prager
Codex, OpenAIs Automated Code Generation API With Greg Brockman

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:37 min | 2 months ago

Codex, OpenAIs Automated Code Generation API With Greg Brockman

"Why don't you reintroduce yourself to our audience and tell them how you came to work in the field of ai. Everyone i'm greg sam said and i one of the co founders of opening i for me i've read the alan turing nine hundred fifty paper computing machinery and intelligence paper back. Before i knew how to code. And i remember reading it you know. They thought the turing test. But then it says look. You're never going to be able to program a solution to this test. The only way to do it. Is you have to have a learning machine. And he doesn't quite some detail you know he says look like to have a little machine. That sounds like a child. Machine that you give rewards. When does good things punishment. What does bad things and from there. You can hope to build up a solution to this really visionary stuff honestly and for me. I was captivated by the idea that you could build. A machine could understand problems that you yourself could not and i just saw being able to build machines that could themselves help you solve problems outside of your reach. Be the thing. I wanted to do. So i went to professor and like hey do some some. Nlp research with you. And he's a great up. Here's these like parse trees and things like that and sadly it didn't look that was gonna gonna quite get you there so i got distracted by programming languages which i think kind of captures the same idea. Right of like if you can build a compiler can kind of understand this program can really amplify what a what a human can do and then start ups in. It was really twenty fifteen that i first encountered deep learning and for i was watching hacker news every day and it felt like there was a new deep learning for this deep learning for that but i didn't know what deep learning was was. Actually surprisingly difficult is google around and learn what deep learning actually meant

Greg Sam Google
Baton Rouge Hospital Says Nearly All Its ICU Patients Are Unvaccinated

Seattle's Morning News

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Baton Rouge Hospital Says Nearly All Its ICU Patients Are Unvaccinated

"Cases are spiking among unvaccinated populations as CBS's Omar VILLAFRANCA reports inside the ICU at Baton Rouge General Hospital. Doctors and nurses are treating more covid patients than ever before. Almost all of them unvaccinated like 61 year old Douglas, Alan, you don't have this story after nearly a month in a hospital bed We asked Allen if he changed his mind about getting the shot. Probably 90%. Yes, I still have that little bit of what the heck is going on? That kind of doubt is all too common. Even for people like nurse Jordan Miller. I have family members that refused to get vaccinated. I tell them that we're building new ice use every day and that we've gone from 24 beds. Almost 100. We have people in their twenties and thirties who are dying, and I have yet to convince Some of my family members. I'm

Omar Villafranca Baton Rouge General Hospital ICU CBS Jordan Miller Douglas Alan Allen
Versatile DB Charles Woodson Enters Hall of Fame

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Versatile DB Charles Woodson Enters Hall of Fame

"The eight member class of twenty twenty one was inducted into the pro football hall of fame one day after the class of twenty twenty was enshrined in canton former colts and Broncos quarterback Peyton manning helpline this year's class manning held the NFL record for career passing yards and touchdown passes when he retired after winning Super Bowl fifty manning was joined by two receivers Calvin Johnson Andrew Pearson as well as defensive backs Charles was that John Lynch guards Alan Faneca and Tom Flores who coached the raiders to two Super Bowl titles as well as the lights go to scout bill nine I'm John Merriam

Manning Peyton Manning Canton Colts Andrew Pearson Broncos Football Super Bowl NFL Calvin Johnson Tom Flores John Lynch Alan Faneca Charles Raiders John Merriam
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:21 min | 4 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"That acumen carried out in the early two thousands. Malaria was killing over a million Mostly kids around the world sumitomo. The japanese manufacturing company or chemical company had developed a Organic insecticide to impregnate a polyethylene based netting with thrim which would kill the mosquitoes that carried malaria. All of the production was done in asia and yet ninety five percent of malaria cases were in africa. And so we were very new but we were lucky enough to partner with unicef and Sumitomo and we found a an entrepreneur in tanzania a new shah to take this technology and build a company a big risk. We made the loan we worked with the company and and then i started to know that it was going to work. The first time i visited and i saw one machine to women making long lasting malaria bed nets. next time i come four machines. Next time i come ten machines a year later. A seventy thousand square foot factory two years later ten thousand women making thirty million nets a year ultimately producing fifteen percent of global production improving to the world that you could manufacturer ask officially inside factories in east africa as you could in asia and that was a real opportunity for african solutions to african problems if we approached solving the problems both with our heads as well as with our hearts and that for too long we'd seen either all heart or all head and it was time for a new game and that was really for me the beginning of what was possible. I loved that so much. What she said. I got when she said there was a real opportunity for african solutions to african problems. I had a real emotional reaction to that. I'd that sounds like extending more dignity as a people we want to help. And we have up until now and not seems to be the theme of of accurate and i love how she concluded revive the scene all heart or all had and it was time for a new game or a. We have one more guest. We're going to pretend you about. We have a altogether. But we're we're just telling you about a few of them on this. Next guest is a woman that you met many years ago about twenty twenty something years ago and amos cynthia kenyon and i'll always remember the scene a few sitting with her in front of a microscope and there were these two lazy looking worms undulating through the material on the the dish that they were in told me about that. It was an amazing experience. I don't think i'll ever forget that. Cynthia was showing me worms. That were old for microscopic worms sea elegance worms and they were all because they were two or three weeks old..

two africa fifteen percent asia tanzania ninety five percent Cynthia Sumitomo one machine unicef ten machines east africa first time four machines three weeks old over a million a year later sumitomo cynthia kenyon both
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

02:34 min | 4 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"I bet if you put an escalator in in the copper canyons where where my friend was or or in the kalahari desert you know people would take the escalator to you know to save energy. It's it's an instinct. You also got into the topic with dan of the evergreen subject of if you want to lose weight. What's more important diet or exercise. It is true that if you wanna lose weight. Dieting is way more effective than exercise And that's because for two reasons the first is if you You know like. I went for a five mile. Run this morning and i burn about five hundred calories and you know if i just a few pieces of akin. That's the same amount of calories right. It's it takes a lot of effort to to burn a lotta calories but it's much easier just not eat a few pieces of bacon right so so if you want to go you want to lose weight by by going into called negative energy balance. It's you can..

five mile two reasons first about five hundred calories kalahari desert this morning pieces
"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

"Welcome to our preview shows to come. These are coming attractions of clear and vivid to a device near you. Better be not too far from you or you won't hear it graham. Shed and i really delighted with the lineup. We have we have some wonderful people. Don't we graham. We certainly do and a nice dexter. Think we always try to make sure. The each season has a balance of different topics different sorts of people different conversations. And i think we've achieved at this time around and you know what i notice. Is that at the beginning of every show. I talk about how the conversations are about communicating and relating and sometimes the connection to communicating and relating is so tenuous that it may not seem to be about that for instance. When i talk with fellow actors there is the question of communicating the play to the audience but the way the actors communicate with each other is also interesting in and of itself and it's also a model for how we communicate with one another out in the real world i think and i think that's borne out by our our guest this season. Helen mirren who such a wonderful actress and she came from the stage. The same way. I did and i wondered when we spoke if she had the same problem adjusting to film that i had for a long time. Even though i was wearing a microphone on my costume even though is picking up every breath every sound i was making. If i talk to somebody a few feet away. I spoke in a voice loud enough to be heard in the back row. Even though there was no back-row and i didn't realize that there was essentially no rehearsal. I used to rely on rehearsals to learn my lines and in film they say okay. You stand here you stand here just run through at once so in the camera knows where you're gonna be gonna learn your lines that way and i was rude shock to me and just being surrounded by people on the set who are these people. What did they do just not used to that on the stage while you're acting there's you in the audience but in film there early stranger standing around who've made each one hundred movies each and they're all watching you act at his head can be unsettling until you get used to it so i wondered if helen had some of those same experiences coming from the stage. I had a hard time to act in front of a camera. Did you did you have to get yourself together and and be able to accept the challenges that you face in front of a camera for things like making sure you're in focus and in the light and accidentally i was so useless utterly useless because you know no idea about getting in the shot even or over the frame of the camera. All what to do. When you're in the frame i i felt when i started off in film acting. I called it a deer in the headlights acting. It's like love.

Helen mirren each season helen Shed one hundred movies each graham
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"And one of the things that we have done. A lot is to say. How do you make impactful change and how to address it. But at the same time how do you do in a way. That's right for everyone in the team so from educating to supporting like artists black authors. How do you support the business in a way. That helps them shine. How do you make changes in your team for the future. So it's not something where there's an easy one step solution. But it's something that for me is such an important part of who we are and what we should be doing differently. How we need to act together. That would be. The one that i would say is bar. None is so critical to greet one grew Effort to point out in ripples. To your point you're making it really ripples through everything but were environment the your personal life in the choices you made its own. Composting will last question for you is as a marketer. Would you feel like is the biggest opportunity or the largest threats that are facing marketers today. I think it's one that honestly is something. That's almost a constant which is don't be afraid of change. I think you see marketers. Uc agencies you see businesses that that wanna stick to what was and they refused to open their eyes and say okay. I need to evolve because maybe what they were doing was easy. They have a routine. I think that's the biggest threat to a marketer is if you kind of put your blinders on and to keep going the way i used to because the world is changing you have look at. What is the future normal. How do we continue to evolve with our consumers because if you don't evolve with the consumer you're gonna get left behind they're not gonna find you relevant anymore not going to connect to them so i think that's the biggest threat that you could have london's been great. Having you have enjoyed the conversation having i look at look forward to talking to you again in the future would love and we'll we'll have many other topics. I'm sure it's alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by being. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts dot com there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything. We talk about on any episode. You can also search. Archives elon heart. This is marketing..

Uc london alan
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

03:13 min | 11 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Brands that have been around a long time. You have so many upstarts in every vertical and we're all competing for consumer mind share. So even if you're not directly competitive with another brand because you don't even sell the same category it doesn't matter because you're competing for mind share and you're competing to build your company or product or service and effectively. Use your marketing dollars to me. The biggest challenge is standing out from competition and memory ability in an increasingly crowded just space generally and so again kind of going back to what we talked about earlier. The idea of constant innovation and constant sort of reinvention is really really important because that pace of change has been increasing so for example. Let's take third above if i look back to. Third love and twenty sixteen. The idea of speaking an inclusive brand was still radically different from what most players were doing and so when we showed inclusive at images when we talked about our size range we stood out from the competition and that impels our of our brand well flash forward to today and twenty twenty going into twenty twenty one. Inclusivity is table stakes. If you're not inclusive if you don't have a wide size range you're probably not going to be that successful as a company. So that means some of the pillars that we built at thurlow. We built our brand on need to evolve as well. And so i just think for. That's our story but we all face that challenge in our own ways that our companies and so to me. That's kind of the biggest focus area. No that's a interesting challenge. A lot of categories are going through that particular like things i think of to completely outside of clothing and fashion would be like banking and just how things have become commoditised and new entrance have monetize things further. Use this funny analogy. I don't know if it's helpful for you. You're going through. But as things become parody on the functional basis you start to enter the liquor category where all vodkas molecular lee probably pretty similar but on the packaging. And what you believe that it provides for you makes all the difference in the world that yeah and it a category. I love to watch. Not only because i like to participate in drinking but because the marketing is fascinating As well how they Twist and turn over the years and reinvent themselves over and over and over again but yet still big still are able to build a brand around anyway. Heidi has been great talking to you at thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing your thoughts and expertise awesome. Thank you so much for having me. I enjoyed it. It's alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by me. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review i tunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at today. Podcasts dot com there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything we talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm alan hart is marketing..

lee Heidi alan alan hart
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:55 min | 11 months ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"To those principles like it. You've been in the insights industry research in the street for longtime. Where do you feel like the future research and insights going. It's a great question alan. I hear a lot of words yet. Things around data things around ten obviously machine learning at a i- behavioral think that a lot of these things are not completely solved yet but they are surely becoming a greater opportunities within the inside space. I think that that the holy grail is how all these things sort of converged together and really create a dynamic for brands that allow them to understand consumer behavior as well as the opportunity to make decisions fast more accessible for them. And i actually think we're not that far off from there. I think there's always gonna be you need to do. Custom research is always gonna need to do. Primary research is always going to be a need to understand the why behind the data. And i actually love where we're positioned because i think the collection of information which is really where our businesses rooted ability to provide that information in whatever format clients looking at it whether it's data whether it's video whether it's in person interviews or it's something that's being done through a chat or a community all these things that they will always have relevance i think the key is hettie deliver faster to clients it ensured the quality is there and ensure that that the date is richest possible or the information is as richest possible. Yeah now that makes sense mean one of the things. I was thinking about your business in the chapters that you've gone through that. I don't know that you planned it. Necessarily this way but like as i thought about it. You know there's you started on the qunol side that have been much harder thing to figure out how to scale and make bigger because it's over simplification of it but it's a people business as level and it's nuanced by the geographies in the territories expand into versus the quant. Which is more recent addition. I believe your capabilities and so you don't have as much technical debt on the quant side as maybe some other of your competitors out in the market and so i don't know if you feel the freedom that may be that provides or maybe you don't feel that that's an accurate depiction at all so i'd love to get your thoughts on. It is interesting because we have wrestled with quality technology broad term but we've wrestled with technology for years are we. Developers are we users of we want to own. Do we want to borrow. Do we want wanna access in. How do we look at these things. I think if we go back about a decade ago this was a conversation that was happening every year numerous times during the year. We always took the approach of being a bit more agnostic. A bit more of a of a a user of versus a builder of and yeah now with acquiring mark. Cuban twenty twenty. We've got businesses that are actually much more rooted in technology much more rooted in product development. And it actually gives us an opportunity to sort of transform our business to be a bit different than we were prior. And that's exciting. I think it opens up a lot more opportunities for us. It allows us to think about how we develop the business for the future differently than we might have in the past an ultimate i. I think it gives us sort of excitement around the biz this both internally and externally that we haven't had in the past our excitement might've been more rooted as you say in geography or more offices or facilities were today. It's rooted in more variety of things that give us opportunities in how we service our clients. The one thing. I do want to comment on those. You use this word people and it's a funny word in our world today because you know you live so many industries new look at even within the inside space. Everybody's trying to get scale. Everybody's trying to figure out how to leverage act and how to create products and our belief system is that is all accurate in. That's all important. But there is a component of a world that is critical you the way that we manage projects the way that we in and support clients take service and we are big believers that there's a combination of both tech product capability along with service. And this really book clients desire. Yes of course everybody will mention diy and its importance of what we're finding is diy is is almost like diy plus plus will clients really want is they want to do a bunch of things themselves but they also wanna have the support that goes along with it in the service element because of the pressures that they they have on their own jobs in their businesses. So we're finding. There's a really interesting formula of this combination of the two. That we think is is the answer for today and probably well into the future. I figure if you're on the thing. And i love the emphasis on people as you make that transformation and trying to serve clients that diy plus plus the plus plus part in the people component becomes even more tricky tricky word but it takes a special kind of person to provide the right level of expertise and service in a rapper if you will of hybrid approach to do it getting the work done whether whether you're pushing the buttons or the client is a multi roles you have to play and i think that's the key is the multitude of roles in a multitude of asks the client world is probably more complex that ever. I think there's always going to be a bit of rinse repeat with types of work. But there's also incredible pressure on clients today in terms of servicing their internal clients whether it marketing or business development or as engineering design. There are so many pressures on the businesses today that the support that they're looking for from whether it's insights agencies or information providers like us filming it had become more and more critical as business decisions have to be made quicker and quicker and there's a great reliance on the information to make those decisions so our preparedness for this our ability to change and address. What clients these are today. And then how they're going to change for tomorrow it's imperative otherwise we're gonna find ourselves basically as diner source a really good point. One switch gears a little bit. Because i would hate myself i didn't ask you about your other side ventures so you get this huge successful business in the research and insights industry. But you've had some pretty successful ventures outside.

alan
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Right now i would say for me. It's less about one particular brand or company or cause and it's about a movement specifically in fashion and retail. That i think is about to change the game forever and it's good browns. It's those brands that empower people. Brandt do good for the planet and browns. That are solving a problem. And i think the rams will start to emerge and set a new standard moving forward. Goodman brand is one of those browns. Obviously we've been around for five years. But i think we have an opportunity to go even bigger starting now given the current landscape. No we've had of a number of folks on the show talking about that talking around that i don't think they've articulated. Exactly how you how you just did. But from purpose lead and moving organizations into tracking more than just shareholder return to some venture capital folks that are investing in brands. Like a good man brand trying to do good in the world as well as do it with business minds at the helm. So i agree with you. I think this something interesting to look there. And he's only going to accelerate as the world gets more and more complex than we have so much more frankly swirling around this. I mean who would have thought. I wouldn't have that like smoke. From fires on the western part of our country would make it all the way to europe. It's kind of amazing that we how connected we all are. It's a good reminder. I hope we can figure it out but Last question for you is what do you feel like is either the largest opportunity or largest threat that marketers are facing today. Well actually have. I can probably speak to both the largest. I'll start with the largest threat. The largest in my mind is spending too much time. Predicting an analyzing the past versus focusing on provoking the future and using data to make smart decisions is important as marketers but the confidence to challenge the status quo and create something. New is what makes winning strategies so predicting the past and spending too much time there i think is the largest threat. The largest opportunity is that this is a unique time where we get to question and we also get to speak to a new generation gen z. And this is the generation. That won't just buy our products. They're gonna change the world. And i think we have the opportunity to do this with them. I love the will nancy. I've really enjoyed having you on the program and you you've made me stop and think a number of times so thank you for coming on the show. Thanks for having me. Hi it's allen again. Marketing day was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review i tunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts dot com there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything. We talk about any episode. You can also search archives. i'm alan heart and this is marketing..

browns Goodman brand Brandt rams europe allen alan heart
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"It and the layers of management can only get in the way. Because it's kind of like telephone like a person. Doing it tells the person above what the information is and so on and so for the by the time is a CMO year it. I don't really understand it. And if I'm making judgments on what I heard in that last telephone call. I've made a huge mistake and so the way that I deal with it and I deal with partially because again it's just how I've approached leadership since Since we started doing this many years ago and it's worked for me is if I can find a way to put people in roles that are right for them that inspire them that they know they can do with stretch and then I give them the full support. I can to make them feel like. They're doing what they need to do. And champion them then. We ended up with sort of an inverted organizational struck where the person who has the most knowledge of what is being done. Is the person deciding what is being done and wet the role of the senior managers and the leaders myself becomes much more about understanding if the things that we are working on collectively are taking us down the path that we need to go so. I don't like to get myself involved in media buying or in paid search decisions or in the way that we optimize our our email campaign or any of the other litany of things that achieve marketers responsible for. Because if I were doing those things then I'm not allowing people who are best at it and who know the most about it to be applying themselves against that specific piece of work so I think that's really important heart to do as organizations have gotten larger and larger? But I think it's really important to great point and I don't hear many people use servant leadership but it actually. It's the thing I describe my own leadership style with as well so it's nice to hear somebody else that's out there using it because it it can be hugely empowering to the right individuals in it is to your point out. He said early on getting the right people in the right roles. It's not the cool leadership idea like definitely on cooled leadership idea but I think it's it's a great one. Yeah no it's definitely like I'd Old School but not too old school fifties. Maybe like seventies eighties. Will what advice would you give your younger self? If you're starting all over I think that when I was first came to the states and I started working. I think I always felt like I'm not ready for that. I've got to wait on something because I'm not ready. That's for people who have had more experience or whatever it may be and then recently I've been having the experience of the opposite side of saying well. That's too late for me I. I'm past that and I realized and this is the advice give by younger cells. Is the moment. Do Anything is the moment in front of you and you're never too late and you're never too are so that's what I would really say. That sounds like something a monk would say for Iota If that's great I like I really liked that advice. Because if you're thinking about it now is the time right. Now is indeed the time. This is kind of a silly question but I like sometimes where this goes with. People is curious if there's been impactful purchase of one hundred dollars or less in the last say six to twelve months that you'd like to share. Yeah this is again i. I'm not betting my answers on the basis of what sounds good but what is. That's that's what I want practical. Yeah I bought a Clay Baker. And it's changed my bread baking completely if you bake bread without a Klay Baker. You are missing out. What kind of bread do you bake and we just curious? You name the breakout. You know Y tweet Essentially yeah bread loaf of bread. Well not lows. Yeah I love bread. Yeah round or aura or overloads but when you put it in a clay baker and you shut it inside the Klay Baker. What ends up happening. Is that the bread. Actually Steen's inside and you get this crust and so anytime you're buying bread at a like a like a real bread maker. You know you see that you like how do you do that? Well they're putting it in a in something coolant Klay Baker and you can get that get that experienced by just using it yourself. Wow Okay you recommend a specific Klay Baker that you have. I think anyone would work. I have a rumor tossed but I think anyone would work rumor. Toss okay. I'm Jay because I love crusty bread. I mean to your point lake in the world. Is that like more sure. And she rest for sure. Get a play Baker. I mean you could also put it in any kind of pot but trust me on the climate I like it will To more marketing questions for you know wrap up but Just curious marketers tend to be students of the business things that are going on around them and so a love note there's any brands or companies or causes that you think others should be taking notice of or that you follow your. I had a thought on this but I've really changed my mind like right now. Everything for me is coming to the lens off. What does the future look like in a post Cova World? And that's just so that so meaningful to me that. I just have a hard time sort of sort of stepping back from that. A little bit. But that's that's what I'm sort of. I'm starting to look at not only the companies that have to imagine what it is to be retail business to re imagine what it is to be To have an office and how that works with a remote working how what it what it means to have community space and how that works in communities. I think all of those things are just so ripe for I am going to change and I just. I'm just really curious about it and I don't have any answers for people on this one. I just I just know it's something that I deeply interested in. It is interesting because I feel like as consumers will will likely I'm hopeful that this isn't going to last indefinitely was not on would collectively everyone listening but I hope I think if that's the case I think consumers will probably habituate back to the original habits but I do. I'm very interested in how this changes how we do work. Because I've I've noticed my colleagues as well adapting to work from home and there's definitely a lot of advantages. I mean there's a lot of disadvantages but there's a lot of advantages that people didn't realize I think until now for sure so we to have teams in our office and I never used it because I was always in the office and I didn't know what it was and now I've been using it at that and zoom really for the last month month and a half and I'm amazed how effective it is because with people they can. We can put up a little deck or put up a little design. Work that we're doing and that just edited on the fly. I'm finding it incredibly effective for a lot of things that would be as effective. You're in a room together. Which is surprising. But yeah you're right. I think there's definitely worked changed. That could happen and at least a on. I missed thinking that this is probably you know whenever we are are sort of out and about is still gonna be different for eighteen months so that differences where I think opportunity will be created for anyone a company. Our brand that finds a way to beat into it. Oh for sure for sure. And I'm sure folks like your like your own business. Has Locations has a interaction with people retailers hospitality establishments? It's going to be a Right now it's it's survival mode in many respects especially in the hospitality rural. Then it's GonNa be a communication challenge of how do communicate that it's safe to inhabit our hotels again and what are the cleaning processes that were putting in place and then at what point do we actually come back to sports. Arenas and that's a whole nother transition. What do you think is gonNA show replaced handshaking? What's the new Hachik? I think it's the elbow bump but I I don't know I will see dirty Americans. We have to touch each other like if we were smart. You know adapt eastern practices of bowing or something but no no. Americans are thirty for that drink. I say that with love as an American but I to do so. I have to say love as well. I think it'll be be some bump. I don't know what that'll be. Yeah we'll Last question for you. I was just curious if you have a take on and were you see as the largest opportunity or or largest threat ahead of us I mean. Obviously we spoke about covert but maybe maybe something in general related to marketing. I think marketing is a function in organizations that can be incredibly important or it can be really passe or gone by the wayside and what. I mean by. That is the import of marketing to me. And and what? I think is the biggest threat slash opportunity to marketing. Marketers is playing a material rule. In what is it that the business creates as a value proposition for clients. Whether it's the experience whether it's the product structure whether the pricing whatever it may be that you're serving the customer because the best marketing is gonNA come from the efficacy of that product or that service that experience and and the more that marketing sort of boxes itself into a space. That says whatever it is. I'll find a way to talk about it and get it to the right target audience at the right time. I think we really miss an opportunity to really imagine the real value and leverage that a marketing organization could bring him. So that's what I would say I would want all is district push on and that requires a level of marketing disciplined that connects marketing activities to business activities and leadership. That is more about enterprise leadership and less about organizational leadership. The new that was well said and I just wanted to say thank you for coming on the show. It's been fantastic Allen. Thanks for having me. Hi It's Allen again. Marketing today was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on I tunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts DOT COM. They're also find complete. Show notes links to anything. We talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart and this is marketing..

Klay Baker Clay Baker Old School point lake Allen Steen Alan Heart Jay
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

10:07 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Bit about you. The person behind the work in the behind the strategy on the business one of my favorite questions. I ask you know. Is there an experience of your past that defines or makes up who you are today so I think the easy answer would be to say like the company that helped co found? But I'll pass on that one. I'll actually go back to something a long time ago. I think I was in second grade. My teacher is named miscued. Vicky and I remember we were drying in class and the class twenty kids and stuff and it was something for Thanksgiving. I think we're joined place MATS FOR OUR FAMILY. Thanksgiving and I was drying a scene of these children's native American sitting at a table. Eating there's four isn't clouds and there was a sunset and the sunlight was hitting the clouds turning them. You know like a combination of orange and red and stuff and sort of romantic setting that second grader. Could draws good and I remember Miss Bixby. Picking up my artwork. I was so completely confused why she did that. And walking into the back of the room and showing it to what was our teacher and I was so confused why they were talking over this thing that drone and looking at me and pointing at me I actually thought I was in trouble or something and I later. I later came to learn that that was the first moment when not my parents had recognized my artistic ability and what ended up happening was the school ended up. Creating a special class essentially was just me with teacher than art teacher that they brought in to work with me on art and stuff like that and for some reason. That's always stuck with me because I think that was the first time that I really felt that I was talented at something in that somebody recognized that talent the end. It's always stuck with me like I still. I still remember the clouds and stuff and I so remember what the classroom look like and stuff. I think everybody has had or should have one of those moments where they feel like. They've been plucked out for having something or doing something special because other people have taken notice and want to help you with that. So it's one of those things that I think from a very early stage in my life getting a lot of confidence that I had something exciting ahead of me. I love the moment in the in the detail. That you you you you can almost see little leland sitting there in the classroom as you described. It will now that we're talking about your younger self. What advice would you give your younger self? Maybe NOT SECOND GRADE. But maybe if you're just starting your career again what would you do different or what would you say how man pardon me is like well? I'm very happy with how my career has progressed. Where I am and stuff so on one hand nothing but on the other hand trillions of the question. I think the thing that because of who I am. I love absorbing information and I love knowledge and I love learning and I love kind of building my brain as if it was a by stepped right instead. What I've learned over a period of time is that that's important and that should always be a lifelong thing. But when you over invest in your brain and you underinvested building relationships in a network around you your brain at a certain point in your life doesn't matter anymore no matter how much knowledge you have doesn't matter because you don't have networks to activate that knowledge so the advice that would have to my younger self is invest in building relationships in a network as much as you invested building. Your brain will on a personal note. Are there Brands or companies or causes the youth. Feel you follow or you think other people should be taking notice A. I don't really pay attention to my industry much to be honest with you. There certainly are brands and companies. Doing amazing stuff out there. No question but I and more fascinated by things that happened away from our industry and taking those learnings and those experiences and those references and drawing upon them when I'm trying to crack probably within my industry. That's what I get really excited about like. I'm I'm deeply fascinated with a more scholarly study of Greek mythology right now and the city of Athens from government and cultural standpoint. And I'm finding so much in those studies. That are fueling what I'm doing my professional life much more. So than if I were reading a trade obligation or case studies or anything like that the Example may have heard people say that before but not to that degree you know they. They may say well you know. I remember somebody early on in the in the podcast. You know working for a CPT company said you know really paying attention to entertainment brands. I thought yeah Outside category thinking what's with moving people to consume over and over on entertainment platform if you will but I've never. I don't think I've seen somebody take it to that level of going back in time and studying other civilizations or other other structures if you will so that's fascinating thanks for sharing that and it's not even that like in my career. I spent ten years deeply fascinated by systems dynamics and that has informed a lot a lot of how I think about designing departments designing businesses. Now that's fascinating will last question for you a little bit closer to marketing than the city of Athens. It just curious your top of mind. What do you feel like is either the largest opportunity or the biggest threat that's facing marketers today? The biggest threat is the diminishment of creativity. I think creativity is in many ways under attack. Because it's not measurable and if all marketers both client side and otherwise continue to move towards only things that are measurable we will exist in a world of just optimization and be stuck in paths and never be able to evolve out of them. There's a lot of people believe that when they find success you have to keep measuring it to optimize against it but what that doesn't do is it doesn't help you realize whether you've found success on small mountain or a big mountain and if you can get to the top of that success are you. Is that really? The tallest mountain you can be standing on and creativity is one of those things which helps you find the biggest and there needs to be much more emphasis not on the -sarily just disproving that performance marketing is filled with flaws transparency issues and trust issues and stuff though. I think that is an important realization that everybody needs to have but there needs to be more emphasis on the positive meaning putting into creativity and understanding of. How do you measure like? There's one thing that I'm a fascinated with right now. I have no idea where it's going. But there's a thing in mass called indirect proof the idea of proving something by proving disproving the contrarian or showing that the contrary the contradictory or that proof is false. I don't fully understand what I'm sort of learning about it right now. But what's interesting to me about it? Is that creativity is is very difficult to measure no question. I tend to think of creativity as a bit of a black hole in the sense that you know it's there and it's happening enormous impact on everything around it. But you can't see it so what you do is you measure everything around it to understand if the where the black holes are in a way. I think that's kind of the same thing with creativity. Tried to directly measure creativity the way you directly measure sales or you directly measure media efficiency. You'RE GONNA fail because it doesn't work that way and so. Is there a different approach to measuring creativity? That isn't the same paradigm that we've applied to measuring other direct things and so this idea of mathematics have an indirect proof is a way of measuring something or maybe not even measuring something proving the validity of something by without directly proving. And so. That's something that I've only recently begun my investigation just to try to understand how that works but there needs to be a very concerted effort to understanding the impact of the Roi of creativity in organizations and in a way that is unique to creativity as opposed to taking the metrics of sales which is transactional and applying that to creativity which is not transactional and saying did creativity have an Roi. Because it's not just about marketing. It's really about entrepreneurs it's really about value-creation it's really about innovation. It's really about building entrepreneurial resilient creative cultures which is whatever. Ceo Wants Right now so. I think if you unlock that measurement or that way of validating creativity. It's not just about did the campaign worker not or is bringing in creative smart strategic creative professional's enhancing our bottom line. It's really about much much more than that and so I think that's an opportunity that I wish. More people in the marketing industry would agree agree. We'll Leland thank you so much for coming on the show today. It's been fascinating thank you. It's been a lot of fun. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts DOT COM. They're also find complete. Show notes links to anything. We talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart that this is marketing..

Athens leland Alan Heart Vicky Miss Bixby Ceo
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Can get exponential returns on your career. Re-instill that in myself I would also tell myself you pick mentors pitt companies in. That's basically it. If you pick those things well and work very hard and do the best you can. You'll be successful. Those are a few of the key points that I I'd tell young sterling Are there brands or companies that you follow or or causes even Think other people should take notice so so company and it's just a fascinating case. Study for me on. Almost every front is wall tricks. They're out Utah got bought by SAP two years ago for like nine billion dollars after most people hadn't really heard of them with did from a marketing sales software category perspective. Just amazing I oftentimes refer back to some of the decisions that they made and I think that's that's pretty cool in there are other just accessible companies are looking into it. I look at Credit Karma so I am in the Fintech base a little bit and those those companies are special. What THEY BILL HOW? They market how the used channel how they do. Acquisition is just those three that I'd point out for people to go. Click on the great quarterbacks is a great one especially giving your role in scope. 'cause they're having been aquatics customer in the past You know the great customer service and just the on boarding experiences well so very cultured doesn't do accept or well. Yeah Yeah no. I agree so I'm having a little fun with this. New is a new question for me. I think other podcasters have used it. Just curious if what's been the most impactful purchase of one hundred dollars or less than the last six to twelve months impactful purchase under a hundred bucks last six months. Well I'll be honest with year round It's it's been grown of time right in their Banya. Little bit of weirdness. So one thing that I went on one hundred bucks last was a big water tank and again it makes. No I completely illogical a pandemic does not shut off your water made like a logical just made me feel more prepared for Glitz if I go with that up being a drum of freshwater that I can drink out. I love that I love it. It's mental health is mental health. Turn exactly exactly well last question for you. What do you feel is either? You can go either direction here. What you feel is the largest opportunity or biggest threat for marketers today. Oh I think. The biggest threat is a lack of creativity. Also big opportunity is the same thing I think people aren't marketed in particular are challenging themselves enough rick completely new thoughts and ideas in normally. When you see someone do something special. They did it. Were like the first or second time within everyone's doing PPC okay. Everyone's doing paid social so tell me as a marketer what you are doing this ridiculously creative. That's a big drawback one other thing I'd add I think that if marketers art revenue focused so don't talk to me about into Al's don't talk to me about metrics. Don't matter talk to me deep in the funnel what are you doing as a marketer that makes you essential to your business and those are two areas of caution in opportunity for all of us is marketers. Awesome will sterling. Thank you so much for coming on the show. It's fascinating yeah me on. I really appreciate IT I. It's Alan again. Marketing Day was created and produced by me. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on I tunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts DOT COM there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything we talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart. This is marketing..

Alan Heart SAP Fintech Utah Banya rick Al
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"All of those things together. Help me I am today and I always joke. I don't believe we always joke. You know when you're out you're Kinda run away from where you came from it away always offers you WanNa you. WanNa create your own way but I myself more and more over the years right back to regain because when fighting as it's tax Has You L? Today whether it's going to work hard to get through school and worked my way through school whether it was grubbing environment where I saw all things in there wasn't anything that was exposed to up seeing living in a in a home that was that was very loving but we all had to work hard and to still have that close. Knit family is great. So all of those things shape today in it prepared me to be able to to really serve this organization. Well what advice would you give to your younger self that person just starting out if you will as a question because I was mentioned yesterday in this and I was telling this person the same thing and there's a lot of different things I would tell myself there's like anything there's always got the you got mad if I'd only known this back then but I think it all comes back to the power of you touched on it earlier? It's mentors and we all do this right? We all say it like mentors or at least all say pooches and you know your colleagues people that Nali were you were for actually worked for you. Can All be very powerful of their coaching advice? And my vice would be. Don't forget that be open about always and be more actively seek that out even more because I found myself at times where we get really busy right and we're already juries of stress in those periods stressing last for long time likely station news times. Don't always spend as much time with those individuals or those groups people. Maybe and maybe you're not always as open as you think you are to that advice get myself to always always be open to that advice and not just be open to the to the advice actively seek it out and leveraged out because it's so important and again I think we all say it but I think if we're being honest and we really look back there have been plenty of times where he kind of gone her whole. Maybe not great advice. Great Advice Two last questions for you. More marketing oriented if you will so thinking that marketers or people that lead marking functions in this business people in general kind of students of what's going on around them and Julius if there's any brands or companies or causes that you follow or you think other people should take notice. Oh yeah so. I won't mention specific brands because this so we don't like talking about specific brands and it's always tough for folks that have clients it is. It's why don't you mentioned this the matter what did you not? Yeah you have to. You have to be careful with that but so I would tell you. There's I think there's certainly if you look at the technology industry I stay on top of what's happened in all the concern as it particularly on emerging technologies because things that we might not be doing today might not be doing a couple of years. Those things will will eventually get cheer and we need to be. We really need to be paying attention to those trance. It's been a theme of what I said. I think that's true in marketing. Right hard those house that can impact is from a marketing perspective. I love to look at that many of the big brands particularly in consumer products. Because there anything even though we're a B. Two B. Brand. I would tell you the way that we have to approach. Our economic buyer is becoming more and more similar to the way that a large brand is having approach neck out with fire because mass advertising and things like that aren't as effective as eighties to ensure that we see all reality is is more targeted. How you're targeting a An inconsiderate how you're creating more personalized experiences. It's really starting to win the day. And that's very true in our industry as well. I'm always keenly interested in other industries particularly consumer products industries doing target individual eire's because there's a lot of noise out here honey get through them. How do you understand their behaviors? And how you really understand their needs in a way that you can target them almost down to the individual level. I'm really interested in that. So looking at those industries decidedly. As I mentioned I hang a lot of attention to the impact of climate and sustainability in words taking us. Because I think that's GONNA IMPACT. It already is impacting business. I think it is going to continue to impact business by the way. I just think it's really important right. I mean just just the right thing to do and I think we have to stay on top of the trends. I think those are things that are GonNa if you look at the My kids generation of. What's coming up? They are much more tuned with this. That means they're also going to be very in tune with the decisions that they make in the future whether it's buying audit or buying servers and they're gonNA look at that and they're going to expect all of us as organizations to to be able to demonstrate what we're doing sustainability standpoint what we're doing from a social stamp so the ESP space. Really important. And I think we all need to paying attention to that because it's going to fundamentally shaped Today but certainly the ones in the future and you know I am paying a lot of your like. I said a lot of attention to what we always do this. Or is it a social round around I also need to be something impacts our industry forward? Those are the big macro areas that I'm definitely paying. Yeah no it makes sense last question for you. Where do you see the future of marketing? I'm guessing more targeting and personalization based on your prior comments but would love to hear you said. I think that goes without saying I think most people would say yes. That's hopefully obvious to everyone because it is true and and the right thing about that is the technology that's out there. Today's enabling us to do that in more and better ways than we've ever done it before I also think the future marketing is the days of kind of looking at a broad can abroad vaas. Marketing in the deciding organization is are are long gone. I mean I think as marketers. We're going to have to continuously demonstrate the impact that we're making. We're going to have to continuously do that in very tangible economic terms if we run a marketing campaign highly result if we run a campaign in our brand can you show us where it really is was the return on investment on that. Spend that we're making it. How's IT really impacted. Only good news. Is that the technology that we're not using that ability really trapped effectiveness of campaigns that we ride activities that we Jayjay. It's better than it's ever been so as marketers. We all are going to have to continue to get better using that data. We're going to have to be much better at understanding the real economic impact that we're having to use that information to help justify asks that we have for budget around the things that we want to do and I know that it's been out there but I think it's becoming even more focused. Nowadays because more and more people begin to understand it and we got a better ability to do it so. I think that's a trend of marketing that we're going to have to continue to all of us to continue to get better. Better embarrassed that nine and green. Well Reggie thanks so much for coming on the show. It's been fascinating thank you. I really appreciate it and appreciate the question. I it's Alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. Podcasts DOT COM. They're also find complete show notes of links that anything we talk about any episode you can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart. This is marketing..

Alan Heart Nali Julius eire Reggie
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Of much. More focused on upset wasn't but much more focused on the people I'm working with. You never know if a company he's GonNa be successful or not. I mean look we work right like a year ago it was like he just never know and look at other companies that were nothing like that's really hard to predict in for any any given company. There's always folks that are sure it will be amazing. Sure that'll be terrible right. And especially from the outside especially as a young person you have no idea but will you can get a sense of through the interview process process especially if you like. Hey let's go to lunch thing is who are the folks who are GonNa be spending that fifty sixty hours a week with because that's just so important in terms of you just liking them In terms of you thinking they're good people kind of ethical and all that stuff so you know kind of really focusing on that would be the one thing the second thing on on a sort of much more personal note like a have like an amazing wife and two kids now. The latest one just showed up three months ago and I really love that and I do Occasionally get sad that I started that so late and I think it's weird to tell my former self like hey start a family earlier but I think you know that's a real huge the happiness that I didn't have until recently and I really wish I'd have done that earlier own. I think that's great advice. What drives you keeps you going? These days Globally I really. I really focused on enjoying my day. I think it's easy to get in this trap Of sort of thinking every every day is an investment to some future day. Whether that's a near-term thing like you know I don't like what I'm doing right now but there's GonNa be this great vacation in three months i. I don't really like this job but to great career move for the next job or actually I don't like these this job the next job or the next job after that. But if I play this right I'll get to retire and by the time you're done with all this you're like okay. I haven't enjoyed anything but like tomorrow is going to be better. And it's like you know what focus on making sure you're enjoying right now and and honestly maybe I'd be further along in my career if I'd been more feature thinking I think there's a case to be made for that but I really try to enjoy kind of the moment and really focus on on that. And that's that's a pretty big guide for kind of what I do. I think that's great advice. You can live much more rich fulfilling life thinking thinking about the world that way so at blood your efforts I I need to do better at that myself to more marketing questions for you or business. Questions I think most people tend to Kinda watch what's going on around them. Other brands companies causes even. Is there anything that you follow or using other people's should be taking taking notice so I do have a bit of a passion partly because we were for two sided markets so I spend a lot of time thinking about watching them talking to friends about them and one aspect is like what sort of whether you want to call them. Industries or business problems are best solved by sort of kind of two sided sided network market versus kind of the old way of doing it right like what are the conditions that need to be true for that I'm also related like the legislations around like Ab Five Live in California impacting Gig economy workers in kind of what that will mean for this market. The first thing that means is like my Uber Loyalty Program just got way less interesting to me. I got very sad email on a few days ago saying that my surge protection just went away but aside from that Yeah so the two side markets I find really really interesting. Another industry watches the reality one. And Look I think and maybe just getting older right because I think technology will be bad. It's going to bring amazing things In benefits vets. But I worry that it can create sort of that social isolation. You know twenty years from now when there's less and less reason to ever get off your couch because you don't need to go you don't need to go to work during your commute. You don't have that interaction with people like Oh happy hours. You don't actually go out anymore. You just all meet at some virtual bar right and you're all in your living room. And what will that do to our society right and I. I don't know again I feel like I'm getting older for worrying about these things but I I sometimes ponder the impact that will have the cartoon was but it was some cartoon that I'm envisioning my head of these like plumpy. People being carted around in their autonomous beds Ed's but it is. It's not a pretty sight. Let's put it that way but last question for you. What do you think the future of marketing look like? Yeah I think they'll be an increasing of tech automation driving arriving decisions on the performance marketing side. I think more and more they'll be sort of people setting the strategy and then kind of tweaking and monitoring lean but not actually building campaigns. It'll be more like a let me throw a bunch of kind of here's what my high. LTV customers look like. Here's a bunch bunch of creative assets that are all disjointed and I'm just going to put it into a big system in. Here's kind of how much I'm willing to spend how value throw all this into some massive you've seen and it will run campaigns. It'll pick what channels to do. It will pick what to show and things like that. I think you're GONNA be sort of increasing movement kind of around that so put more of a premium on kind of having that technical knowledge and some of the analytics staff as opposed to the more nuance things that even come with performance marketing side. I I I do think that will do less than be less than helpful. For Resolving Sir of the ever present tensions between the brand and the performance side because I think that means that performance side will even get more and more technical and yeah whatever customers. I don't really whatever that is right and so I think it'll. It'll pull those who things apart further and not not really helping that kind of ongoing dynamic will Kevin. It's been fascinating and I can't thank you enough for coming on the show. All right. Well thank you so much. I enjoyed it as well I. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created and produced by. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. PODCASTS DOT COM there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything we talk about on any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart. This is marketing..

Alan Heart social isolation California Ed Kevin
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Make sure that as marketers were thinking through because technology can be fun and some of these. His parents can be exciting. Make sure you've got that use case really defined use case of what you're trying to solve for and that it's solving a problem for the customer not that you want to throw some technology at it right right right well if you were in front of a bunch of marketers which you will be when this airs. What should marketers be doing? Or considering when they're trying to understand how to improve their customer experience where would you tell them the starter or think about and I think customer experience is going to change much over the next ten years in. How at a if you if you dream about like Gosh you know when when when you're sick are going to be delivering your medicines and when you go to a grocery store you're going to gauge the human or a machine and you know the world's going to change a the ten year so that's equal parts exciting sometimes overwhelming and so when I talk about with with marketers is there's five things you can do to future proof yourself and future-proof the the business right now and that first one is focused on on customer experience him make sure they're you're you're on the customer data so the first thing I would advise mortars orders to do is really understand your analytic maturity and I say that as a as a marketer at SAS and we provide industry-leading analytics? I'm constantly looking at my. I my teams analytic maturity. Do we have all the data first party third party data that we need. Do we know her. Data is that we broken down those data silos and then is the team empowered and trained. I'm to be able to really gain insights from data and apply it so really look at Jane Olympic maturity. The second recommendation I would have is is start small and find some wins and really celebrate. Those wins wins because this is the road to customer experience success. It's a journey. Until you gotta find those those short-term wins and and talked about the Chapada example we actually ended up that started as a pilot. That's now business as usual and our CEO highlighted that on main stage at one of our flagship conferences just last month and so what celebration really got to enjoy that success us. The third thing I'd say is be a customer experience champion within your organization and I do believe that customer experience is a whole company sport but marketers have a really uniquely positioned to move this forward and so be that champion but really think through champion of the customer experience the Voice of the customer and and as a marketer you have access to that data And if your moral compasses pointed towards what's right for the customer you're in a good place right. The fourth thing I would say is. Bill does cross divisional bridges. You can't do this alone. You need to have those partners just just like with GDP are. I made better friends with the legal and it team but all of us in an organization needs to be working on customer experience so team up with sales with with I certainly once again legal finance hr every group has their own view of customer experience. And if you can go at it as a group you're going to be more successful and then the last thing I'd say a Cliche we talk about embracing change. I think you need to instigate change when it comes to customer experience because if you're not if you're not disrupting yourself you're not disrupting your company. Your customers will and so. They have a different expectation. And if you're not you're not changing to meet that. Then then they're going to choose to do business elsewhere. I Love I love the instigate gate changed. Not just driving. Make it happen Last question for you. What do you think the future customer experience looks like? I know we talked about ten. Years is hard to predict anything. So I'm asking you potentially the thing. This hardest thing to do but where do you think it's going to end up. I mentioned we did this. Research study with Daniel Newman of future research. And we did that because we wanted to charter our own course but also help our customers and so the research really came up with Some bold predictions along the way on topics like how wearables are going to be much more embedded into our our day to day. Even envisions a world. Where you can buy with your is is because of the way wearables can be so imagine how much that changes for for those of us on the retail marketing side? Right I think something. We really didn't talk about it. All was blockchain and the impact blockchain is going to have even more broadly. The research imagined a future where maybe we can end fake news. Because we've got blockchain looking at where does the source of data coming from so. I think that par or is is really fascinating. I do believe that we are going to see augmented reality. And virtual reality be much more part of our day to day lives and and we see that with our kids with folkman go right but but I think retailers are in front of this this trend. You think of Laurie Al.. WHO's got APPs to help you? Choose the right lipstick and that struggles real meaningful in Utah has something where you're able to see what the close look like on you. I Kee- can bring the store to your home. I think we as marketers need to find ways to help our customers experience experience our technology in a more immersive way a little bit. Well Jen thank you for coming on the show today thank you. It's been a pleasure talking with you. It's Alan again. Marketing today was created created produced by me. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell all your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me marketing today. PODCASTS DOT COM. There you also find complete leaks show notes links to anything we talk about any episode. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart and this is marketing. I'm getting today. Today's podcast is brought to you by audible. You can get a free audio download and Thirty Day free trial at audible trial dot com slash. Alan and Alan Spelled A. L. A. N. for those that don't know again audible trial dot com slash Allen..

Alan SAS Alan Heart Daniel Newman CEO Bill Laurie Al Alan Spelled A. L. A. N. Utah Kee Jen Allen
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"It is who makes it ultimately. Let me me by it right now. They won't let the by it and thereby buttons Google's going to have their buy buttons so I think that's the future of search. It'll be much much more intelligent but also more useful we're going we see more. No click results Google. But that's a good thing when you have a no quick results like what's the weather today three years ago. You want to know what the weather was you google. What's the weather Raleigh? And then you had to click into like CBS News and you had to click today only and then it would tell you after you wash the video. Now you Google just tells you so. I think we're going to see more and more of that because it's useful and then from from there you'll do more searches because that's ultimately what we want so future of search. They'll just be more waste search. I don't think we've always putting devices in our houses route for us to search not to. They're putting devices sir houses not because they just want to give us another way to play music they want us to do more searches so landscape. A search will change the way we're going to do search change and things will get from search will change. You may be able to say okay. Google what's What's the price of laundry detergent and Google? Say It's going to be at your door in two hours so ultimately I think that's where they wanna go. Well thank you for coming on the show. Today it's great to be here. Thanks for having me It's Allen again. Marketing today was created and produced by me. If you're new to marketing today please feel free to write us a review on itunes or. Oh your baby listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe. Tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners. And you can contact me at marketing today. PODCASTS DOT COM there. You'll also find complete show notes links to anything we talk about on any up. You can also search archives. I'm Alan Heart and this is marketing. Today's podcast is brought to you by audible. You you can get a free audio download and Thirty Day free trial at audible trial dot com slash. Alan and Alan is spelled A.. L. A. and for those that don't know again audible trial dot com slash Allen..

Google Allen Alan Heart CBS News Raleigh L. A.
"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"alan" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"It from Peleton on. She's a head really. Yeah had a brand and it is amazing what they've been able. They create an avid of their user base. Frankly it's pretty amazing. But I've gotTA check out this Henry. The dentists guy the sounds amazing and progeny for sure. But I think I'm good on the kid front but I'm interested with a yeah. Yeah Yeah and to your point. Disrupting things that you wouldn't one of thought of otherwise dentistry. And how it's delivered or fertility in how how it's working with employers as benefit so that's cool so couple last remaining marketing questions and then we'll wrap up here but do you see any big you know just as a marketer DC any big opportunities or threats kinda staring us as has a function in the face. It could be an opportunity. Could be a threat. Go either way with Scopus. Yeah it's interesting. I believe it's both an opportunity at a threat and I I think the role of marketers is evolving. And I think just seem to recognize it because I don't know twenty years now we're not going to be wanting to be marketed tune the same way that we are today and we've got all these great tools right. I mean data and machine learning is going to help us drive Dr personalization beyond what we can ever imagine. Today this will also help us optimize funnels and really now. Some of does workflow issues that we're trying to fix every day on a more manual basis and all the Omni channel strategies that are being deployed by US and others today will only grow and allow us have more conversations with more customers and meet them where they are so. There's a lot of great developments that will make marketings thinks job easier and also allow us to focus on other things and and what I believe. Is that marketings role. Twenty years from now is going to be how to machine. Connect the dots among all those things to super serve customers and to help our customers find meaning and purpose gonNA get insights from their day to day lives and then connect that with what we do as a company to meet those needs right in many ways I believe that has other functions are so becoming so specialized but it'd be H. R. Finance or engineer. Production Marketers I. I believe are going to need a play that role of master orchestrator and the bridge and and among all the different functions within a company and really play that role as general manager. I think you're GONNA see more. And more general managers come from the Marketing Track and actually believed that twenty years from now the most this coveted members of corporate boards are going to be from the marketing function. I think it's a gap that exists today when you look at corporate boards and I think growth growth and customer centric city is something that all companies are always going to need. And it's up to us to champion the voice of customers and to be the visionaries visionaries of what's possible in terms of connecting our customer needs with what we as a company can provide us. Fantastic I think you answered my second question which is kind of painting a future for marketing in the process on your point about boards. I mean I've had the luxury of talking to individuals that do quite a bit of work and different different aspects of this one placing people on boards. Which is Greg well to Spencer Stuart an SEC? There's a huge crack beginning right where we're starting to see more marketers go on boards for good reason. I think that right now. A lot of marketers are also the most diverse number that gets placed whether it's a woman or a person from a minority background or or some other diversity inclusion initiative and they are also marketers which says something I think about marketing functions high corporations. They're probably the more verse which is Great in touch with the community that they serve. Yeah exactly and to your point. I think it is critically important to have marketing at the board level and the other person that I would point people to Kim littler. WHO's a academic at University of Virginia Darden's business school and she's done? She studied this in terms of people number number of marketers or having marketing experience at the board level and the performance of those companies over time and there is a direct correlation between outperformance and having marketing getting experience on the board. I did not know that that's excellent. Yeah so you're hot on now if we could just get every other white dude because it is white dudes in the boardroom. It's a realized that marketers. I have this untapped potential for them. We could flip the switch and we could live. You live your future much sooner. I guess yeah absolutely and and now that you have data from the professor. UVA that's a great thing though. I'm going to have to find out for sure for sure. We'll John Thank you so much for coming on the show. It's been a fascinating Allan thank you. Yeah absolutely anytime Ellen. Again Marketing today was created and produced. By if you're new to marketing today please feel free to write itis a review on Itunes or your favorite listening platform. Don't forget to subscribe and tell your friends and colleagues about the show. I love to hear from listeners and you can contact back me at marketing today. PODCAST DOT COM. There you'll also find complete show notes links anything we talk about on any episode. You can also surcharge archives. I'm Alan Hart is Marketing. Today's podcast is brought brought to you by audible. You can get a free audio download and Thirty Day free trial at audible trial dot com slash. Allan Alan is spelled A. L. A. N. for those that don't know again audible trial dot com slash Allen..

Allan Alan US marketings Alan Hart University of Virginia Darden Kim littler H. R. Finance general manager engineer Ellen professor Greg Allen Spencer Stuart A. L. A. N.