20 Episode results for "Alachua"

Aliquot #2: Q&A Mashup - Sauna

FoundMyFitness

18:27 min | 9 months ago

Aliquot #2: Q&A Mashup - Sauna

"Hi My friends today's episode is our Second Special Alachua Mash up episode, which features compile -ation of Sauna related topics taken from several cuny episodes over the last couple of years. This episode covers many topics related to sauna use including implications of Sauna bathing on risk of pneumonia and respiratory illnesses finish on humidity and the immune system, the effects of sauna and hot baths on heat. Shock. Proteins. Temperature and duration of sauna bathing to obtain the cardiovascular benefits my personal sauna practices for longevity. Comparing the efficacy and safety of infrared saunas versus traditional on us. Heat stress response from various types of heat stress modalities including hot baths. How whole body hyperthermia similar to sauna improves drug resistant depression have sauna use mimics cardiovascular exercise time temperature, and frequency to get longevity benefits and heat shock proteins. Sauna use while fasting it sounds stressful but someone asked about it so we talk about it Whether or not sauna use helpful for tension headaches and so much more. This is a special preview of the ALACHUA members only podcast for a time line with time codes for each topic and access to the entire episode head over to found my fitness dot com forward slash Alachua. That's a l I Q ot alachua. If, you are a premium member. You can also find this entire episode with a timeline on your private podcast feed. Now onto the Alachua hope you is enjoy. Some of the other things I'm trying to do our the. Sauna. Four to seven times a week twenty minutes at least one, hundred, seventy, four degrees Fahrenheit. I've shared the study on social media about the sauna reducing the risk for. Chronic acute respiratory illnesses including pneumonia. So many used the sauna times a week or twenty-seven percent less likely to develop pneumonia those who did this on us once a week and those that used it four four times four to seven times a week or forty one percent less likely to develop pneumonia, and this was after adjusting for like a million other potential confounding factors including. Asthma physical activity, socioeconomic status, ldl levels, hypertension smoking just a lot of other things that were that were could possibly influence the data. there's other studies that have shown that. The Sauna. Sauna bathing has been shown to reduce the incidence of common colds. Now, this was I'm writing a review article on the Sauna which hoping to submit in the next month or two. So I wrote a section on on the lungs and respiratory function So I was kind of diving back in the literature you know sometimes back into the eighties or even sometimes further but there's some interesting studies out there showing that intervention trials with Asana was able to reduce incidents of common colds and people that did this on up that once a week. And this was a trial that was done. It was a six month long trials. It was quite long. And it actually it actually took. Three months of doing this on a one to two times a week before there was a effect on reducing the incidence of common cold. So it wasn't sort of immediate thing it took some time. other studies have shown these again are older studies they've shown that that frequent sauna use may decrease pulmonary congestion lead to other improvements in lung function including vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation, and force expiratory volume. Another study using not typical Finnish sauna but way on therapy, which is infrared sauna was also shown to improve long function in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or CPI COPD. So it's sort of interesting thing is that many but not all of those studies were were out of Finland or were using a Finnish Donna which typically is humid on us. So they you know in Finland, they're often throwing water over these hot rocks and they're creating steam and they're they're increasing that humidity and the reason I find this interesting is because there have been some studies. So there's quite a few studies showing that viruses in general influenza particulars is is a virus that's let's studied quite often that influenza viruses. Transmit less effectively in humid conditions. In other words in dry conditions, they're able to better. They have a better transmission rate the are not But that's not what I found. Most interesting. That's that's sort of been known And it's it's it's thought that's one contributing factor among many other contributing factors as to why. Viruses like influenza virus and respiratory viruses seemed to circulate more during dry or. Winter Months Right as opposed to the summer months when when it's more humid. The other interesting factor comes from animal study and The animal study basically took two groups of animals and they changed the humidity within the animals cages and they expose them to influenza and what they found was that the animals that were in the low humidity cages there was there was pretty profound effects on the immune system. So lower humidity prevented Celia from removing Bhai viral particles and also mucus low humidity reduced the ability of airway cells to repair damage caused by the virus in the lungs and low humidity prevented signaling proteins like interferons that are released by cells that are by viruses. To basically alert nearby cells that viruses are here and to kind of. Up Their Immune response. So there was a variety of ways in which low humidity seem to give viruses and advantage not by you know allowing viruses to transmit better, but by literally affecting the host immune function, right. So I found that interesting particularly with the the Asana data where there's seems to be a pretty robust effect on preventing pneumonia pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses and effects on lungs and a lot of the Times it's on as used do have. A humid. In those studies they were they were finished on often times are humid. David. Peas asking the chat. would. Mold accumulate more and esteems on than a dry sauna. Probably, steam steam rooms have to be really clean quite frequently. I mean obviously that the. The problem with humidity having a humid how Sir Humid anything is is mold right? So, David also asking about the temperature of the sauna most gyms don't he says, most gyms don't go up to one hundred and seventy degrees Fahrenheit. Some of them go up to one, hundred, forty, one, hundred, and forty sounds like infrared. That's that's if it's only going up to one, hundred and forty this sounds like infrared sauna but regardless typically. Longer, durations are required if the temperature is lower, so there have been. So let's let's say for example, we're trying to look at the cardiovascular benefits of Sauna use of which there are many There have been studies in using a more finish type of on are even dry saunas where the temperature is one, hundred, seventy about one, hundred, seventy, four. Therese Fahrenheit and staying there for twenty minutes seems to be the key Whereas they're, they're also studies that have been done with infrared saunas get up to about one hundred forty but those studies people are staying in. There are staying under the heat stress for about forty five minutes so more than twice as long as a people that were in a hot hotter, Sauna. So. Typically. You can make up for lack of with long duration. And, there's some people mentioning the Sauna. I am I, am going into great great detail on this sauna in this upcoming kkob, Nineteen Q. and A.. I'm fortunate to have a home sauna and I realized many people don't have that luxury. And with Gym's closed right now, it's really impossible for people that don't have a sonnet home. To use the sauna and the good news is that. Hot. Baths have been shown to increase heat shock proteins. He checked protein seventy, for example, which he proteins play a major role in boosting. IMMUNES immunity. Innate, immune system and also in increasing immune cells. So I'm going to be talking about several studies where using the sauna not only protects against pneumonia. It protects against GOP T it actually even can help treat. COPD. And also some older studies showing. That it can. Protect against the common cold. Although those studies, it seemed as though frequency was very important and the protection wasn't shown until. Three months after three months of frequently using this on us. So there, it wasn't like an overnight thing And I'm going to be talking about some studies showing that that sauna use increases certain white blood cell and neutral numbers, as well as as well as the mechanisms he proteins so. I guess I guess Costco may still be selling sauna. So maybe you can still somehow get get get ASANA although I would I would be very cautious going into any sort of store at all certainly. Wearing some kind of some kind of mask any any kind of mass that you make at home or or if you have any other types of masks. is best I. Personally Am staying out of stores one hundred percent right now and. I think that the. The best thing that we can all do right now is is stay home. As much as we can. But. My point was is that I do think there's pretty convincing evidence that the sauna boost the immune system and Asana is really important for lung function I've been writing a review article on the Sauna and I had a whole section on immunity and lung function and so I sort of refined that section a little bit more and also. Added in some other modalities of heat stress like the hot baths which have been shown to increase each proteins and I think that. So one steady people that sat in a hot bath and I will cite the exact temperature numbers when I when I record this podcast next week I believe it was hundred and something to respond hype but they were sitting in that for from the waist down for an hour. Now, that's a long time to have to sit to sit in the hot water to have to have the the fifty percent increase in. Heat shock proteins, but and also elevations in core body temperature, which by the way happens during a fever response part of part of the fever response is to activate you know the immune system and part of the way does that is by activating heat shock proteins which become active during when you have a fever So those things also get get activated when you are going into Asana or in a hot bath. So I mentioned there people are sitting in the hot guy from the waist down the question is what if they are submerged from the shoulders and what if you lay down in the bath and more of the of the surface of your surface areas being? Exposed to the heat while anyone that sat in a Jacuzzi from the shoulders down versus just sitting in when you sit on the stairs and you sit in your from your waist down no, you get much more hot much quickly more quickly when you are more submerged in hot water. So do I think that you can cut that time in half possibly more by by by submerging from the shoulders down I think that is very, very likely. For someone that can That does not have access to a sauna. And can most people do have bathtubs at their house So I think that most people can at least you hop as personally right now I've been doing the sauna five days a week. It's been critical for. For my mental health also, I'm not getting as much aerobic activity as I. I. usually do I usually do a lot of outdoor running and I'm even I've even been having to kind of cut that down a little bit Just because I don't want to My my my encounters with people you know even outside I'm trying to kind of minimize all that So the sauna because it's on a mimics aerobic exercise. Is He's been just really key for for my for my overall health. And you know hot baths hot baths do a similar thing. Physiological mechanisms. Kick in. You can elevate your core body temperature you get increased blood flow heart rate increases many of the same things happen that happened with Asana that happened during aerobic exercise afterwards, similar and points Also happen where you have improved heart rate variability. You have improved lower blood pressure lower restaurant heart rate this. Has, been shown in a randomized studies that have compared martyr aerobic activity to twenty minutes on a session, and again, I. think that I think that there is a place for hot baths in this I'm steam showers as well. If you have one of those you know any any any more data modality that you have at home and have access to safe access to to To get that heat stress I think is something that is important to do now if you can, and as David is mentioning here in the Chad if you are using hot baths you may have to to sort of you know refill the water and make it make it warmer every you know ten or so minutes or fifteen minutes depending on I mean when you're when you're sitting in a really really hot bath I mean, you get really hot and you get uncomfortable So. So basically we. It's pretty it's pretty obvious. husker's is asking. If I'm still doing thirty minutes so. The Sauna I'm using now actually is much hotter than the the Sauna I was previously using at. My Gym. So right now, the sauna that I'm using is gets up to technically can get up to one ninety degree ninety, four degrees Fahrenheit when I get in A. One hundred eighty six is really hot Fahrenheit, and. I also have water that I pour over the hot rocks which increases the humidity. So according to my Hydra. Under my humidity detector. It's About forty percent humidity I can get it up to and when I when I keep doing that repeatedly I mean it is so hot and so I'm in there for like. Between Fifteen to twenty minutes depending on the temperature and humidity like sometimes I'm I've got a lot lock on and so I'm just making it really humid and it's really hot and I've been there for fifteen minutes and I'm telling you I'm wiped I mean I feel like I had just gone on a Three Mile Run you know doing doing you know eighty percent Max heart rate you know so so So. That's what I'm doing right now Someone's asking smell is asking shared sauna in my apartment apartment building Yay or Nay I would say right now you WANNA avoid anything shared any type of shared Jim or Sauna do not want to be a close place with other people So so I would say that that. That is an important fortunate. It's an unfortunate thing that I would bypass people are asking. The brand of Sauna I use I got my sauna through. Thanks for listening to this preview of the alachua episode featuring clips, covering some of the many health benefits associated with sauna use and briefly describing special considerations for children. If you enjoyed this preview and would like to listen to the full episode, please consider signing up to become a foundmyfitness premium member at foundmyfitness dot com forward slash Alachua A. L. I. Q. U. OT, Alachua. Not only will you get complete access to our private podcast fee delivering new episodes of the Alachua you'll also get access to live monthly QNA's with me lifetime genetic report updates, members, only emails and more. Finely, if you enjoy today's preview, we encourage you to share it with your family and your friends. Thank you so much. Hey One last thing guys I. Just WanNa make it clear these members QNA's that this content originated from are really meant to be a discussion of the science. It's definitely not meant to be diagnostic or as a treatment for any health condition. This podcast is not established a client patient relationship. So just keep that in mind. Talk to you guys soon.

pneumonia Alachua Jim or Sauna Asana colds David influenza COPD Sir Humid Finland cuny Therese Fahrenheit fever Costco Asthma Peas
Aliquot #3: Q&A Mashup - Fasting

FoundMyFitness

28:18 min | 8 months ago

Aliquot #3: Q&A Mashup - Fasting

"Hello Again, friends today's episode is our Third Special Alachua Mash up episode featuring a collection of clips on a range of topics related to fasting, including health benefits, associated mechanisms of health span longevity, and when and how to break a fast. This two hour episode covers many fasting related topics, including comparing and contrasting different types of fasting the effects of fasting on the Gut microbiome. The effects of fasting on the immune system caloric restriction mimetic such as resveratrol and sperm. Fasting and I. G. F.. One Fasting, mimicking diet the Ketogenic Diet for autoimmune diseases, sensitivity of biomarkers of inflammation and toffee. Aerobic exercise and Sauna use while fasting. The effects of fasting on muscle mass. What we know about the minimal fasting time, it takes to induce top AJI and a pop doses refunding after a prolonged fast thoughts on coffee and other calorie free substances and breaking a vast. Differences between a fasting mimicking diet versus a water only fast and much much more. This is a special preview of the ALACHUA members only podcast for a time line with time codes for each topic and access to the entire episode head over to foundmyfitness dot com forward slash Alachua. That's a L. I. Q. U. Ot Alachua If you were a premium member, you can also find this entire episode with a timeline on your private podcast feed. Now let's dive in. Hope you enjoy. There are other ways of changing the microbiome for one Actually, a pilot clinical trial found that intermittent fasting for fifteen days intermittent fasting. But on the days of their fasting in this pilot study, people could eat with up to five hundred calories sort of like a fasting mimicking diet almost in a way. They basically did this for fifteen days. So they were fasting for a total of seven days and then not fasting for total seven days, and there was an increase in bacterial richness in in the gut microbiome in certain types of bacteria that have been shown to promote the production of t regulatory cells. and basically there's This was including lactobacillus bacteria, which are which are commonly used in probiotics as well. Those those have been shown to play a role in promoting T regulatory cell numbers through the production short chain fatty acids. it also enriched other bacterial species like protozoa, which is another one that's also been shown to play a role in. T Regulatory Cell Production In the Gut. Interestingly, it was also shown that fasting induced is sort of its own. You know like kitone body metabolism was happening. That was regulating the micro basically was facilitating microbiome growth as well. So I thought that was a really interesting study was because fasting itself has been shown to also affect autumn unity through other mechanisms aside from the Gut microbiome. which that study I just cited really focused on but there have been other studies. A lot of lot of studies have been done. by Dr Vaulter Longo and colleagues that are found either fasting. Fasting mimicking diet or even a Ketogenic Diet. Has. Has Been Shown in animal studies and a very, very small pilot clinical study in patients with multiple sclerosis. An autoimmune disorder where individuals basically just just one week of the fasting mimicking diet or. or six months on the Keita. Genetic Diet so much longer period beyond the ketogenic diet versus the week of the fasting mimicking diet. They had an improvement in in clinical measures for a variety of clinical measures for for Multiple Sclerosis the animal studies sort of confirmed that. That the you know there was a lot a lot of effects on on t regulatory cells and a variety of different effects on autoimmune regulation from the fasting mimicking diet or also fasting. So other studies have found that fasting itself. Can Basically Lead to to preferential preferentially lead to the death of dysfunctional cells, and the seems to happen quite a bit in the immune system So as as a fast becomes more prolonged A tofte g starts to happen and a tough ogies basically clearing out damaged off with NFL. But as the as the stressor becomes stronger, if the entire cell is actually damaged enough the cell will die via pop toasties and this has been shown to occur in definitely occurred animal studies where basically if you if you take a mouse and fast for forty eight hours. About. Twenty. Eight percent of the immune cells in the mouse will die off and this activates stem cells in the blood system and. Then, he met a poetic system where they stem cells increased by six fold, and this causes stem cells then to make brand new. Immune cells, young brand, new healthy immune cells, and. Only it's. VAULTER has shown that they bake. Non they make they make functional immune cell. So you can clear out a number functional immune cell that perhaps would be was playing a role in auto immunity and replace it with a healthy functional immune cell that you know that basically is not having that autoimmune sort of defect But it's really you know the those animal studies were shown to be dependent on it jeff one levels just plummeting going going way down and it's important to to to realize translation of animals that he's like that to humans There's a lot of factors to consider. So for example, and mouse or rodent will lose twenty percent of their of their body weight after a forty eight hour fast whereas a human will only lose one to two percent. This a big difference and it's also been shown that within that two day period. Rodents can blower there one by fifty percent. whereas. It takes a human five days on a water on on. You know of basically not eating anything to to lower their levels by fifty percent. So big differences there and with respect to translating animal to to mouse studies but again. there has been some pilot studies looking at. Fasting and the effects on auto immune disease like multiple sclerosis when I just mentioned there's also been some pilot studies looking at a forty eight hour water fast in humans and there was a trend towards the adipose stem cell activation like I just mentioned with the Animal Studies. So, I think that You know without without giving any sort of recommendation I think that you know it would you know people people with me in diseases we may find physicians start to become more familiar with this research feel free to share that research please with with with your physician, and perhaps as the research becomes stronger, a lot of it's still in the preliminary phase. Perhaps as it becomes more established will start to find things like a fasting mimicking diet, low calorie diet or. Even just you know general fasting perhaps even ketogenic diets will start to be be used in in A. Clinical setting. That's the hope. I'm GonNa there's a related question that that I see people asking in the chat. So let me just skip down to that question real quick and that has to do with since we're talking about fasting and I was talking about a toffee. A little bit. I know there's been there's been quite a few questions one from. And another from J. I believe asking about. A few things one fasting duration required to activate a tougher gene humans as well as biomarkers, and also what are called these calorie restriction mathematics or sometimes referred to as fasting mimetic trawler sperm dean. During a fast to promote So So, let's start off a tougher. Gee I. Just I mentioned what a topic is. It's basically you know the the clearing out of damage Org anals like Andrea or other other organized inside of a cell even damage even bits of piece of DNA floating around. You know protein aggregates, things like that. Just crying around all that clearing out all that stuff that could be basically causing dysfunction. and. There are several things that can activated exercises, one of variety of plant polyphenols that are found in co- coffee and tea and also that are some that are the found in in fruits like the skins of blueberries and grapes a Rivera Trough, for example. fasting is definitely a major activator of G. There is very limited evidence looking at tougher gene humans There's one study that I like to refer to from Dr Guido Kramer who I've interviewed on the podcast a few years ago. He's one of the world's experts on a tough and he published a polemic clinical study. Where they're measuring biomarkers of fasting, which I'll talk about in a minute. That in humans to determine how. What was the soon as time point at which you know the biomarkers could be measured and that time point was to be twenty four hours in a human offering, a water fast that doesn't mean that a- toffee isn't occurring when you're overnight fasted for fourteen, sixteen, eighteen hours. You're biomarkers are only as good as the sensitivity of them and in order to really. Be Able to empirically measure when a tough g starts in humans you have to have a very very sensitive biomarker and that just hasn't been established I. Mean we we don't even have that you know those types of sensitivity biomarkers for inflammation I mean c reactive protein, high sensitivity C reactive protein. You know my my high sensitivity C reactive protein comes out as point one does that mean I have no inflammation going on my body? No, it just means that that. According to that biomarker you know that biomedical is very low for me and and it's only so sensitive. So. So. I don't I I tend to think that that a toffee, there's a continuum of it and you know enough of it if you have if you're having, you know if you measure, you know you need a certain amount or quantity of cells for a topic to be occurring in those cells in order to detect it. So what if it's occurring in you know fifty percent of those cells at you know twelve hours but but you can't detect that because it's not enough sells for your for your for your measurement to detect right doesn't mean that a tougher g doesn't happen after six or after a twelve hour fast it just means that you're not detecting it. So one of the major signals for Autophagy to happen is a decrease in what's called protein installation. And and not biomarker that I'm referring to you that was measured was a protein assimilation on allies, lysine residues in proteins, and so so basically that that was what was used to detect top fifty and and you know it is a biomarker there other biomarkers that are used conversion of you know at g one H G to. Elsie. Three, one, three, two. Conversion are is another biomarker, but those are not really readily used in a clinical setting. So those are still a lot of development there in terms of the biomarker sensitivity. The reason. The protein is at elation is important to realize is because That happens. Civilization You know is something that. Happens when you when you eat food. You Make Acetyl Coa, and some of that is. As get gets used. Converted and capitalized. Basically a CDL groups that are that are used in Proteins. As well as other things so. That for that decreased to occur there needs to be a caloric deficit. There needs to be a decrease in food intake. There are other things that can decrease protein assimilation as well. One of those things is spurting and another one is Rivera trawl and so that sort of. Was the question from from a couple of individuals. We've talked quite a bit about Rivera trout. Rivera trawl indirectly decreases protein assimilation because it activates. search a group of enzymes that are histone deacetylases. So essentially, these enzymes are removing acetyl groups from proteins. So so that's basically mimicking what happens when you are not eating food your protein installations going down while another way to do that to activate sir, two INNS, Sir twins, then remove. Remove. These these Seattle groups from from proteins as well. syringe Charleston Shows G in animal studies. As well as an in in culture studies as well. spurting directly. Lowers protein assimilation and Let's talk a little bit about Sperm Burma dating is a something. It's poly-amorous. It's it's found in very high concentrations in Natto, which is the the fermented soybeans that are commonly consumed in Asian countries. particularly. Japan. It basically inhibits protein assimilation and inhibited habits basically the direct transfer of acetyl groups to proteins. So whereas whereas to INS are taking this, it'll groups that have already been put on off spurting stop prevents that whole process from even happening. So the seal groups don't even ever get put on. It. Has. been. Shown in animal studies are in lower organisms, studies of yeast and. And also nematode warrants to extend life span it's extended lifespan in an autopsy g dependent manner So basically, you know it's been shown to increase the lifespan of these lower organisms by increasing a G. It's been shown permanent has been shown to to basically when you when you give dietary sperm being to to mouse strains that are short lived. So like accelerated aging mouse strains, it can prolong their lifespan. There's been some studies looking at the brain concentration of sperm meeting in flies, and that correlates with memory capacity. There's also been some studies in mice that have the engaged older animals that giving those older animals. Dietary sperm can improve their their heart function It actually has been shown to enhance a toffee and specifically might Fey G, which is clearing out of damaged Mitochondria within a cell It's been shown to do that within the hearts of mice that were given spurning and and you know so mighty conjure extremely important for heart function the heart. Is is basically primarily using what's called Beta oxidation as energy source meaning it's using fatty acids which require Beta oxidation occurs within the Mitochondria. So it's not using glucose. And Glucose, can be used outside of the Mitochondria and a process called glycolysis that doesn't happen in heart is using using Medicare Andrea. Solely as a source of energy. So. That's that's been shown in animal studies in mice and again, sperm and trial both been shown to to basically induce in in basically animal. Rodent, studies and cell cultures. So I. Think. That sort of in detail a detailed response to. Some of these fasting medics or Kellogg restriction medic SCISSOR, they're often referred to also the toffee. toffee start in the fasting duration. again, aerobic exercise in Hillary's mentioning or sorry Andrew, Bennett is mentioning in the chat about aerobic exercise being doing aerobics exercise fasted. Can reduce tough as you more easily than fed set state There's been many studies looking at a variety of adaptations that occur specifically in Macau. Andrea CH in response to exercise either in a fasted state and doing exercise in a fasted state does lead to better and more robust. adaptations in general, but most of the studies that were done looking at a fed state were really high Were were simple sugars mostly he so you know more more of like a refined type of carbohydrate lake like toast with jam on it and things like that. Jay's asking in the chat or are there any human studies with sperm and a Toffee g not that I'm aware of yet again We really have blunt. Blunt. Tools with respect to measuring tofte gene humans. And I really haven't even seen very many studies looking at that. So until we sort of improve those tools of measurement, it's hard to look at a top gene humans whether XYZ effects toffee. without the actual tools to detect it. And there was also a a related question, a with a tough gene fasting that had to do with fasting, mimicking diet promoting toffee as well as a basically. Doing doing the water only fast and You know again I think that. If. We if we look at. Even one levels that that go down It takes five days of a water fast to lower that by fifty percent you know the the. The twenty four hour fast that I referred to where we're after twenty four hours. A top G. was detectable in humans That was that was a you know after twenty four hours of full fasting. So it's not clear. It is my opinion that having some calories would basically slow that process but. You know it may still occur. it just may not occur as quickly and you know for some people some people. Fasting is not an option fasting mimicking diet is an option and so it's you know it's it's nice to have more than one option particularly for some people that can't do full fasting. But this is all still very. Preliminary work that is that needs much more. You know larger studies to confirm in order for this to really start to be translated into a clinical setting you know so I think that. As more data comes out. We'll start to have more of that translated into a clinical setting. But until that happens, it's still it's still It's still difficult to to to translate to a clinical setting and certainly getting the information out to physicians also is another challenge. which which hopefully that you know think. About my fitness is one of the, you know platforms trying to reach physicians in addition to to everyone. So hopefully that helps getting information out there with the podcasts and in the variety of episodes that we put out there. And by the way I guess also, there have been some studies looking at. A toffee in long-term caloric people that that are that have been practicing caloric restriction long-term. So for about six years and there are increased markers, toffee found in in those individuals and so. So that is that is. I would say evidence that. Even a low caloric restriction diet, which is what a fasting mimicking diet is a fasting mimicking diet even more than what a calorie restricted restriction diet would be but but basically You know. Topic markers measured in humans that happened practicing cal restriction for for six years or longer. With respect to exercise, there's quite a few questions in the chat about exercise. Increase in a tough G. and you know what type of exercises needed. You know there there's just look limited evidence in this in this field a lot of studies were done by the late Beth, Levine she had done a variety of studies in animals looking at a topic G, but I have yet to see to see really studies that have been done in humans looking at different types of exercise you know and and how that can. Promote toffee. So again, it's one of those things where we're sort of getting ahead. Of Ourselves by by making a statement like we'll talk she does increase Sorry. Exercise does increase toffee. But we just don't really know how much exercise? How much a topic g happening what types of exercise are there some that are better than others know that's the thing is, is that exercise is a a metabolic it's a type of metabolic stress like fasting. You know exercise you are. You're basically putting yourself in a you know your your your blood glucose levels are. Going down your your your sometimes shifting into GTO of exercise can sort of kick you into ketosis something that I have You know measured in myself I wear a continuous glucose monitor and You know exercise you know is very consistently. I mean that's the one thing that does know takes your blood glucose levels in plummets. And and that is something that. You know this has been another question that I've seen submitted on several occasions. Are there sort of indirect markers of toffee that we can use? You know. That are proxies of potentially some officials occurring and you know I think I think you know blood glucose levels going down and Key going into ketosis could potentially be be one of those markers because. Protein. Assimilation. A decrease in protein assimilation requires a decrease in glucose intake in food intake general also in fatty acids so. I'm not sure that it Kita genyk diet is going to induce because fatty acids can be used to make studio Koei and while that is being done when you are in a fasted state, your immobilizing fatty acids that are stored in adipose tissue in those are going to be used as energy sources. If you're giving yourself more and more and more of that, you know that's just more potential acetal away and more. Than groups that can be used to stimulate proteins so I'm not sure. You could make the direct comparison of fasting versus a Ketogenic. Diet. For example, where you're taking in fat, you're still taking in food because again, one of the strong signals that's needed to activate is decrease in protein installation and so that does happen when you are exercising because you are using your, you're using energy and so. There's less Koei unless acetyl groups going around. What do you think are the most important efficient protocols to adopt in order to prolong and expand your health span as we all age? That's a very big big question. I think some of the thanks for listening to this preview of our special alachua matchup. Featuring clips covering some of the many health benefits associated with fasting, including associated mechanisms of health span and longevity health benefits, and when and how to break a fast. Today's preview is the last of three previews of the Alachua that were sharing on our public podcast feed. Will be regularly releasing more alachua episodes much like the one you heard today on the foundmyfitness premium podcast feed to learn more and subscribe to our private podcast feed head over to found my fitness dot com for slash Alachua and sign up to become a foundmyfitness premium member that's found my fitness dot com for slash A. L. I. Q.. Alachua. That only if you get complete access to our private podcast feed delivering new episodes of the Alachua. But you'll also get access to live monthly QNA's with me lifetime updates to our genetic report, regular members, only emails and more. Thank you so much for listening and stay tuned for more new content soon. Hey One last thing guys. I. Just WanNa make it clear these members. QNA's this content originated from a really meant to be a discussion of the science it's definitely not meant to be diagnostic or as a treatment for any health condition this podcast is not established a client patient relationship. So just keep that in mind. Talk to you guys soon.

Animal Studies Alachua Gut microbiome Rivera Andrea CH ketosis Multiple Sclerosis QNA Dr Vaulter Longo Koei Ketogenic Seattle
Aliquot #1: Q&A Mashup - Pregnancy and child development

FoundMyFitness

24:05 min | 9 months ago

Aliquot #1: Q&A Mashup - Pregnancy and child development

"Hello friends. Today, we're excited to launch a new members only podcast the alachua. In Alachua is a sample taken from a larger hole that captures the essence of the entirety. Borrowing a term from the lab bench, that sample or Alachua is often going to be a personal allotment of agent that's being used potentially across multiple experiments, and for that reason kept near at hand are Alachua. However are members only podcast focused on single topics curated and remixed from the best of foundmyfitness. Some episodes are edited excerpts, highlights and informative moments taken from full interviews in the foundmyfitness podcast usually with just a little more context for me. Other episodes are mashups of highlights from my regular members only QNA's curated around themes and popular topics like pregnancy, sauna, fasting, and more. This. First alachua episode is a very special mash up highlight edition. It features a compilation of pregnancy and child development related topics taken from several QNA episodes. The last couple of years this episode covers a lot of topics including my prepregnancy regimen, including diet exercise vitamins in sleep. Omega three during pregnancy, fish consumption and mercury concerns which fish to avoid during pregnancy. Algae derived versus marine derived omega three fatty acids, extra precautions that I took during pregnancy coaling and the developing brain. My perspective on nutrition for a baby and toddler that may maximize brain development and growth the Diet and supplements I took or in some cases avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Duration of breastfeeding and the impact on mothers and child health. The introduction of solid foods, common toddler, nutritional deficiencies, and toddler foods. How exposure to soil in the first year of life may prevent food allergies and asthma and much more. This is a special preview of the ALACHUA members only podcast for a full time line with time codes for each topic and access to the entire episode head over to foundmyfitness.com. Ford Slash. alachua that's a L. I. Q. U. Ot Alachua. If you are a premium member. You can also find this entire episode with a timeline on your private podcast feed. Now. Let's dive in. Hope you enjoy. Can you tell us some of the things that you did to optimize your son's health or development since he was born I'm a new mom and I would love to know how you approach diet supplements routines. ETC thank you. And there are also some tag along questions here. That have to do with what the common deficiencies are in in toddlers. So I think Andrew Ask that question. So I'm going to talk about that right now I would say One of the main main things that I have done is Omega Three Dha high. Dha Supplementation. Both during breastfeeding during pregnancy, we'll starting in during pregnancy but pregnancy breastfeeding and then. Getting, preformed Dha, to my son. and. The Way I do that is I take one of my High Dha capsules and I cut it open and I put it in his oatmeal with lots of butter and he just. So, whereas during fetal growth, calories can help promote. You know growth they're not sufficient for brain development. brain development appropriate development requires a sufficient intake of protein zinc, iron, choline, full iodine, and the omega three fatty acids. As, well as vitamins ad B six and B twelve, and if you failure to provide those key nutrients during that critical period can actually result in long-term brain deficits. so the common. Toddler nutritional deficiencies. Omega three. So consumption of. EPA from foods contributes you know so. Mostly those are found in marine sources. it's a very small amount. You know children children are only getting about forty milligrams of the preformed Dha and EPA. And two, thousand, fifteen. There was a really big study about that. You know showed eating fish. Actually even fish. The fish that has particularly for high mega three and low in mercury. Still even protected against toxic effects of Mercury in a developing fetus, which is the most sensitive sensitive to mercury. And there was another study that was published. Huge huge Meta study looked at looked at not only. Prospective Studies. which are associated associated can't really establish causation, but they also looked at randomized controlled trials in children. So the studies looked at pregnant women and also young children and that that were either given fish or eating having a high intake of fish. Or not and it was found not the the mothers and children even randomized control trials that were given fish. I had improved intelligence scores like significantly improved even up to like nine points. And these children also had higher levels of Mercury as well. But they had higher levels of Dha which superseded whatever you know. Minor effects the mercury hat again, we talked about earlier conversation there a fish that are high mega three and lower number mercury at you can be you know things like Salmon While Alaskan salmon or like I mentioned the the farmed Atlantic at least that's the only one I know of that's farmed. Salmon. Sardines. Herring. Mackerel of this fish that are fatty also behind Omega, three and those ones are lower in mercury smaller Fisher mercury. So I try to give him I try to get my son to eat salmon in some form or another, and he'll eat little little amounts of it. And like I said, I also supplemented with fish oil. I was also taking. Drum, breastfeeding. I was I was taking three grams a day of of Dha and that you know is is was being delivered him in breast milk I'll get to that in just a minute though. Iron is another another one particularly infants between six six and eleven months they they have a low about ten percent of those infants have low intake of iron. of course, irons high in in in meets You know fish is another one that you can find iron in. I was actually giving my son when he was doing solid foods like when I when he was when I introduce solid foods at around six months. I would blend up some salmon cooked salmon blended up with either Cooked Cherries blueberries, and I would blended altogether. So it kind of gave the Sam sweet taste and really liked that. When he was young. Vitamin D is a really important one, only twenty one percent of infants and seventy four percent of toddlers. Sorry Twenty one percent of impotence actually met the the adequate intake vitamin D and seventy four percent of toddlers were below the estimated. Average requirement. So vitamin D drops or what I do. I, I use Carlson brand I have no affiliation with them, but I usually give him. So the Carlson brand is about four hundred. I use per drop and I usually put like three drops on my finger and stick it in his mouth. I do that daily. Vitamin E. is another one, eighty, two percent of toddlers are below the estimated average requirement for vitamin E. a really great source vitamin. e., R. Nuts particularly almonds almond butter is a great way to get it on. You know toddlers obviously my son eats nights I chop them up, I cut them but my my son is very, he's a very good. massification where he can chew things very well. So I think know it depends on what? Stage of development, your toddlers in. But that's obviously a choking hazard. So they need to be cut up and again almond butter is really high. If you're if you're a child has had nut allergy another great source of vitamin is. All, oil. Also, Fatty Fish. Magnesium. Only about thirty, six percent of children have Sorry thirty, six percent children have intakes below the. Average estimated average requirement for magnesium. Dark Leafy Greens spinach again, almonds are high. So almond butter is a great source Lima beans oats. Those are also great sources Those are things that I also get my son. Potassium. Is the big one so less than one percent of toddlers met or exceeded the average intake of potasium. So good sources of potassium that at least my son seems to like our baked potato with skin on it. That's a really good source potassium. Yogurt he likes yogurt that's also a good source of iodine fat protein calcium. Avocado is a great source bananas, Stash. IOS and. Lima beans again, pistachios. You know depending on what stage of development trials and you may have to cut them up smaller. Maybe they're still unable to even to small pieces. So you would have to either do episode show not butter or choosing alternative food like an avocado we're Lima beans the thing about the Lima beans that are great is fibers. Another big one that toddlers are really deficient in less than one percent met or exceeded the AI for fiber. Ai Being labral adequate intake. So I'm beans, lentils, navy beans. Lima, beans have the other micro insurance I mentioned like magnesium and potassium. Also a great source of fiber butternut squash a great source of fiber. It's also high One of the forms of vitamin A. Pears, raspberries. Those are great sources of fiber and almonds So in general fruits and veggies are pretty good. And then fat about one in four toddlers has lower than recommended fat intake and So you know most most toddlers are are reaching the their fat intake but again, nuts butter. Olive oil butter Avocado Fatty Fish Olives Those things are great sources of fat eggs, which also a great source of Choline, which is really important for brain development. So these are things that I try to give my son. My son does a lot of eating of nuts, nut butters and almond butter and. He's a lot of butter. Aches. Lewis asks. Any evidence that there supplementation for children that's been shown to be. Beneficial. And I will say that basically. If you were to ask you know, is there one supplement that's been shown like if you could only you know if if I could only get my son one supplement, what would it be? I would say hands down. It would be fish oil, it'd be on. The Marine. Omega three Fatty Acids Dha and EPA particularly Ha. So. There has been studies showing that you know. Omega three fatty acids may have long-term neuro developmental effects in children that ultimately can reduce antisocial and aggressive behavior. so maybe three fatty acids influenced cell membrane integrity. They influence the receptors that are bound to cells they were. which which you know you know in neurons, this is this is basically affecting how neuro transmitter. neurotransmitters, are. Communicating, and binding to those receptors, it affects blood clotting. If it affects you know bio synthesis of hormones, all sorts of things and so there have been randomized double blinded placebo controlled trials. One that involves two hundred school age children eight to sixteen years old. They were randomized either to a placebo or a treatment group and the children not that were given they were given one gram of mixed omega three fatty acids every day for six months. And that the Placebo group Pat drink that was sort of similar tasting to that the drink that was had the omega three fatty acids and at the end of this month month period both parents and children completed. You know a variety of of personality assessments and. Reports about behavior externalizing behavior of such as fighting or lying internalizing behaviors such as depression or anxiety or withdraw. assessed. The children who took the Omega three fatty acid beverage had significant reductions in negative behaviors that that actually persisted twelve months after. A persistent to the twelve month point. The externalizing behaviors were reduced by forty two percent and the internalizing behaviors were produced by almost seventy percent. and. So it's really kind of very significant and it was it's thought that This may be a consequence of the effects on Dha and EPA on rental health neurotransmitter production neurotransmitter function inflammation in in the brain as well. Another study has. showed that basically blood levels of omega three fatty acids. Can Affect Children's behavior and their ability to learn so higher levels of mega three fatty acids particularly ha have been associated with better reading memory fewer behavioral problems particularly when Dha supplementation was was done in these children there was improved reading and behavioral particularly in the children were under performing. So children that were not reading very well at baseline they you know seeing the the biggest improvement. More Double Blind randomized placebo controlled trials finding that Omega three supplementation reduces disruptive behavior. just. Know in this in this study, vitamin. D was also given along with Omega Three. This was three hundred milligrams of Dha, two hundred milligrams of EPA and four hundred milligrams of Alpha linoleic acid. And again, the children in the in the Omega three and Vitamin D group had improved. Their behavior, they're less aggressive behavior less disruptive. Just a really recurring theme. With many different randomized controlled trial showing that Omega three seems to really affect behavior. In a positive way and children. another small clinical trial showed that eating fatty fish such as salmon twice a week for six months reduced asthma symptoms and reduce bronchial inflammation by fourteen units and children. So children in the Omega three group that were eating fish twice a week also had a significant reduction. In their medication use compared to children in the control group. it's it's no not that EPA ha can inhibit the Cyclo Oxley psycho oxygen oxygen as which are and and the leipold oxygen as enzyme activity, which basically can affect inflammation. And particularly pro inflammatory mediators in that play a role in asthma. So saw that that may be how Omega threes helping with. Asthma. and another study that's really interesting. Was this study was done a few years ago basically showed that Omega three can prevent the May. Prevent the onset of schizophrenia. And other psychotic disorders long after being consumed a actually up to seven years later. So there was a study. That done in in young people that were at a high risk for four schizophrenia genetic for genetic reasons or there was a family member that that had you know psychosis or schizophrenia and so these young young people were given. The Omega three supplements for twelve weeks. and. Throughout that time they basically had. Less. PSYCHOTIC episodes but a follow up study was done almost seven years later, and it found that basically while only ten percent of the young people that were in the Omega three group. Developed psychosis seven years later, forty percent of people in the placebo. Group developed psychosis seven years later. So schizophrenia something that really emerges in young adulthood particularly during adolescence and it can happen quickly or sort of gradually. So I just think that's a really important study Particularly for you know families that do have you know a real that there is a relative that has psychosis or schizophrenia air genetic risk You know just the fact that you know supplementing with Omega Three Supplements for twelve weeks had such a profound effect on reducing the risk of psychosis years and years later is very compelling. Another study. Recently found that, basically, I was in a observational study looking at omega, three fatty acid levels, EPA DHA in the blood of children and adolescents, and those in those children and. At had higher levels of Omega Three EPA had lower levels of DNA damage You know DNA DNA is something that accumulates with age. It's you know involved with cancer and aging in general and you know if you can. If you're having high levels of. DNA damage. Early on in childhood what does that say for the way you're going to age? You know it's really not a good indicator that you're gonNA H. Well, if that DNA damage is already happening early in childhood. and. So in that was also shown that people the children and adolescents with low levels will make it. Three fatty acids were had higher levels of DNA, damage? You know so. I think that. Hands down. Omega, three particularly Dha and EPA are extremely beneficial for for children and adolescents, and generally for young people on many levels Ciccarelli I focused a lot on the brain You know behavior reading, and also you know for other reasons you know reducing inflammation you know particularly with respect to asthma but you know inflammation in general can have consequences that that you know affect many different processes including to function vitamin D is another one. That I think. So important you know not all children are. Going outside in you know spending a lot of time outside and they're certainly not you know in regions that you'd be radiation is. Being generated in the atmosphere you know. So like northern northern latitudes places, you know Washington state, you know the entire like east coast of the United States for example, So I think that's another beneficial one but. Definitely. Omega three. S. If, there are restrictions for women and fasting I've heard a lot of podcasts benefits for fasting, but I haven't heard many directed for women by is the frequency. is, different, does it affect women's hormones their cycle? Should it be done at a certain part of the cycle or anything else to be aware of? So just as a sort of opener and background that fasting is not recommended for women that have a history of an eating disorder, it's not recommended for women that are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant or breastfeeding It's also not recommended for women that are extremely lean or underweight. So Any of those you know any of those criteria would definitely disqualify a woman from or should disqualify a woman from fasting. It's a question from C. A.. Nelia. And she's asking about things I did to help with the development of. The baby while I was pregnant and before I got pregnant and what are my thoughts on being pregnant while on a shift schedule at least in the first trimester. So getting up multiple times during the night. So I did before pregnancy. Thanks for listening to this preview of the first episode of the Alachua. To listen to the full episode, you'll need to sign up to become a foundmyfitness premium member at foundmyfitness dot com forward slash alachua that's a l I Q ot Alec what. We launched our premium membership to help support our scholarly work and reinvest in producing more quality well, researched podcast videos and articles not only do foundmyfitness premium member support our particular flavor of health span focus podcast scholarship but members also receive exclusive content and access including access to live monthly QNA's with me and an archive of prior Cuny's an exclusive private podcast feed. delivering new episodes of the Alachua are recordings of our monthly Cuban as and early access to foundmyfitness podcast interviews science digest a twice monthly members only email curing the latest studies with notes, comments, and related leaks access to all updates to our genetic report and exclusive foundmyfitness shirt access to our members library of research summaries, background notes, presentation slides, and more exclusive content. To learn more and subscribe to our private podcast feed to hear the rest of this ferry episode head over to foundmyfitness dot com for slash Alachua and sign up today. Hey One last thing guys I, just WanNa make it clear. These members QNA's that this content originated from are really meant to be a discussion of the science. It's definitely not meant to be diagnostic or as a treatment for any health condition. This podcast is not established a client patient relationship. So just keep that in mind. Talk to you guys soon.

Omega Three EPA alachua Omega three group asthma psychosis Alachua Lima QNA Lima Ford DNA damage Carlson United States Andrew
240 | Plugins WordPress que usan inteligencia artificial

WordPress Semanal

22:20 min | 6 months ago

240 | Plugins WordPress que usan inteligencia artificial

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The Biology of Breast Milk

FoundMyFitness

38:20 min | 9 months ago

The Biology of Breast Milk

"Hello Friends I'm very excited to share today's episode with you as a mother. It covers a topic that is very near and dear to my heart a topic that has to do with infant and child development. That topic is the biology of breast milk and the enormous health benefits breastfeeding has for both the infant and mother. We're going to dive deep into science of breast milk on this one including breast milk, composition and production. How Human Milk Lusaka writes in breast milk established the infant gut microbiome and protect from bacterial infection. how will mega three fatty acids that find their way into breast milk as a result of the mother's Diet and supplementation may boost brain development which vitamins and minerals are robustly passed to the infant through breast milk and others that are poorly transferred. How breast milk contains stem cells that can help with infant development and may even integrate into intact organ systems in the infant's body. How harmful substances can be transferred to the infant breastmilk How breastfeeding improves the infants passive and active immune system and even forms a competent Tori immune system where infant infection generates a response that beneficially alters the mother's breast milk arming the infant to fight infection. How breastmilk improves infant brain development with special. Relevance to infants born prematurely how breastfeeding benefits mothers by reducing the risk of Ovarian and breast cancer and so much more. But before we get started I want to quickly mention a couple of things. I Co. released with this episode today is a sample of a brand new episode format we are calling Alachua. What is in? Alachua. You may ask allocates our special curated segments prepared and distributed to premium members via the premium members podcast feed. Alachua quads in ascends are all about curation where excited about allocates as just one more great benefit that we can bring to members while ultimately creating a useful format that is to the benefit of the public and supports the free content we produce like today's episode. With, that said our co released preview of the very first Alachua is in many ways extension of today's episode. It is focused on the many and I mean many questions I've taken on the topic of pregnancy and child development from members during the members only question and answer sessions just for a few examples it covers my prepregnancy regimen including diet exercise vitamins in sleep nutrition for babies and toddlers to maximize brain development and growth extra precautions that I took during my pregnancy and much much more. So. If you enjoyed this episode today and you're interested in my continued thoughts on pregnancy and child development topics, take a listen to a preview of our very first alachua episode now. You can also find more alachua episode previews and information about this new type of curated members content at found my fitness dot com for slash Alachua, A. L. I. Q. U. Ot Alachua. The other thing that I wanted to mention is this episode your about to listen to on breast milk is also an article and video my team and I literally spent several months combing over the scientific literature on breast milk. We read dozens of studies and published a fully referenced article that goes into great detail on breast milk and breastfeeding, and then went on to take the best parts and also put them on the screen during the actual video. These. Summaries and graphics can at times be a really big help. Find the article by going to found my fitness dot com and looking for breast milk under the topic section and find the video by heading over to foundmyfitness dot com for slash episodes now onto the podcast. Doctor Rhonda Patrick here. Today, we are going to discuss a topic that's been near and dear to my heart something you could say I've needed to get off my chest. That's subject is the science of breast milk nutrition in the first year of life is crucial to an infant's development and lifelong health with the power to impart a lasting legacy on mental growth physical growth, and even setting the barometer for our potential to fall prey to diseases like obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The Science of breast milk both in relation to its composition and its function put on full display. The myriad of ways that evolutionary forces have converged to create a special form of nutrition, interaction, immunological preparation, and more all subtle optimizations that broaden the scope of the place and role simple nourishment activities have in early life. In today's episode, we're going to talk about breast milk and a ton of interesting science on how breast milk contains complex indigestible sugars called human milk oligosaccharides, how it contains immune cells that respond to the infant mother immune status how breast milk contains stem cells? Yes. Stem cells and what this all means for the health and even brain development of the infant. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding, which means no formula or other foods for the first six months of an infant's life, and then continued breastfeeding while introducing age appropriate foods until an infant is twelve months old. Among babies born between two, thousand, ten and two, thousand and thirteen approximately eighty percent were breastfed initially. But only twenty percent of those children were breastfed exclusively at six months of age for all those reasons and more today's conversation is important. We're going to talk about a lot of the unique ways. breastmilk nourishes infants while also acting as an enormous boon to immunity in a two way type of biological communication between mother and infant, and indeed much more. Before, we start with all done so far we'll continue to do in this episode to emphasize the bounty of nourishment breast milk as well as its unique properties I'd like to say that none of this is to diminish the hard work of mothers with Formula Fed or partially Formula Fed infants, I think it's important to remark on the amazing power of the human organism to not only adapt but thrive and excel in sometimes broad ranges of optimally and vastly different conditions. Also sidestepped the popular refrain of Fed is best, which may be lyles some of the nuance we will hopefully enjoy during this conversation that does not highlight some of the important and utterly unique beneficial factors of breast milk and breastfeeding. Instead, we shall say fed fundamental and sometimes getting the fundamentals is what counts. Let's start with some of the basics, breast, milk, production, and composition. The first flu that another produces is colostrum a thick sticky fluid that typically is yellow orange or white in color. Since colostrum contains a slew of immune factors, its primary role is immunological rather than nutritional. Some. Women can express classroom in the last few months or weeks of pregnancy. Next comes transitional milk, which arrives during the first few days to two weeks after childbirth and is high in lactose by four to six weeks. After childbirth, the mother's milk is considered mature. Mature milk that is expressed during the early part of a single feeding session is called for Milk it's high and lactose and has a watery consistency. The Milk Express during the latter part of this feeding is called the high milk. It's high in fat and has a creamy consistency. Breast Milk is an incredibly dynamic substance. It changes in composition during a single feeding from day to night and throughout the lactation period in response to the growing influence needs. It's also influenced by Circadian Rhythms Breast Milk. Contains several components that transmit circadian signals to help the infant regulate its own sleep wake cycle with the nighttime breast milk containing higher levels of. Melatonin. and SAMNA genetic amino acids. Tryptophan. breastmilk nucleotides, which are important. Structural components of and Arnie also show circadian with Mississippi some of the nucleotides peak during the day while others peak at night suggesting potential rule for these nucleotides as sleep inducers. These data suggests that if an infamous fed expressed breath smell, the milk should be provided at the same time of day got. It was expressed to maintain the infants circadian rhythm. It's important to note that things you eat drink supplement, but even more importantly smoke can end up in your breast milk breast milk is species specific human breast milk contains, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals turn nourish a human infant. One of the biggest differences you'll see between human milk and other types of milk is the protein content. The total protein content in human breast milk is quite a bit lower than milk from other species. One of the reasons human infants grow slowly compared to say a calf. There are roughly four hundred, fifteen different proteins in human breast milk. These proteins provide nutrition, of course, but they also aid in the infants digestion and supply both anti microbial and immunological factors that compensate for deficiencies in the infant's immune system which talk about a little bit later. Breast milk contains a variety of complex carbohydrates the most abundant of which is lactose, which provides necessary energy for the infant's brain. The second largest concentration of carbohydrates in human breast milk are non nutritive components called human milk oligosaccharides or HMO's for short. So let's talk about HMO's a fascinating part of the story of breast milk. HMO's are complex indigestible sugars more than two hundred different HMO's happened identified in breast milk making them the third most abundant factor in human breast milk after lactose in fat, these things are super abundant but here's the surprising part. They aren't there to feed the baby. Instead HMO's have a very special purpose which is setting up and feeding, and ultimately creating the conditions to select for a strong population of commence oil and other words helpful bacteria in the infant, gut The origin story of HMO's is similar to those of other examples of neutralism. We find throughout the world of biology bacteria that benefit us such as bacteria get a boost from our own biology as function of breast milk whereas bacteria that harm US pathogenic bacteria are discouraged from establishing a foothold through a variety of mechanisms. These good bacteria then go on to help set up the immune system through the production of various signaling molecules such as short chain, fatty acids, which are metabolites produced from the gut bacteria after they metabolize the HMO's these substances prevent colonization of pathogenic bacteria in the Gut. I previously spoke with experts on the Gut microbiome doctors just an Erica Sonnenburg who spoke a little bit on the topic of HMO's. So babies that are fed formula their microbes looks very different than than breast milk, and actually what we see is breasts melk has a phone of at one of the major components of breast milk is this type of carbohydrate in human milk all rides are HMO's, and for a long time, it was really a mystery why those molecules were there because we knew that humans can't digest human male colleagues sacrilege. So why would a mother put so much? Effort into creating these compounds and putting them in her milk. It for baby can't even digest, it will come to find out. It's actually got microbes that are digesting these HMO's. So in breast milk, there's not just food for the baby in the form of lactose and fads but these HMO's that are food for the baby's growing microbiology. So the mothers feeding the baby and also her baby's growing microbiome, and these HMO's are very specific for human milk. And so far have not been able to be replicated in formula so that we think is a large reason why the communities are so different, and then of course antibiotics, the average American child is on a round antibiotics every year, and we know that that's a huge makes a huge impact on on that growing community. So all these things that happen early in life could really set a child on a trajectory potentially for having potentially A. Very good healthy robust microbiome or potentially one that that isn't as good and so I think as parents especially of new children, we need to be very mindful of the choices that we make early in a child's life because many of these microbes that we have by the time, we're say the age of five, any of these microbes will be with us throughout our entire lives. So we really want to get that community started in the best possible way. And Nature has come up with a way to get that microbial community started in the best possible way. Milk. But. That's not the end of the story of HMO's they also serve as decoys to protect the infant from gut infections in order for bad bacteria to cause infection, they must first target and bind to specific carbohydrates found on the cells that line that gut however, the overall structure and shape of HMO's mimics that of bacterial targets, the bad bacteria bind to the HMO's instead preventing them from establishing themselves in the gut. Another interesting quality of HMO's is their capacity to breakdown biofilms sticky slimy communities that the curious create to protect themselves from antimicrobials and antibiotics not only that they appear to enhance the activity of some antibiotics by increasing membrane permeability of pathogenic bacteria. So. To sum up. HMO's there the third most abundant factor in human breast milk after lactose in fat and they play roles in establishing infants gut microbial community, a key component of the immune system. They also protect the gut from harmful bacteria by serving as decoys and breaking down the communities in which these harmful bacteria live. Fats are the major source of energy provided in breast milk supplying roughly half of its total calories. Fats provide energy for growth aid in the maturation of the infant's gut in central nervous system and provide protection from pathogens including group B. Streptococcus bacteria. Nearly two hundred fatty acids have been identified in human breast milk. The structural configuration of these stats, which is not always replicated by many infant formulas enhances their absorption in the infant's gut. All of these fats are encapsulated in fat globules surrounded by a triple layered structure called milk fat globule membrane, or M. F.. GM. Components of the MGM exert bioactive properties that confer many of the antibacterial in anti inflammatory properties of breast milk. Unfortunately most infant formulas do not contain an F. GM however, a recent clinical trial found that bovine form of. Exert similar beneficial effects on human infants. When included in infant formula, the double blind randomized controlled trial involved four hundred and fifty one healthy full term infants who received either regular formula or formula containing MFG and lactoferrin an iron binding protein found in human and cow's milk at the end of the eighteen month. Long Study the infants who received formula with the M. F. and Lactoferrin scored higher on cognitive language and motor skills than infants who received ordinary formula. In fact, their scores were similar to those observed children who were breastfed suggesting that the addition of GM and Lactoferrin could narrow the gap and cognitive development commonly observed between Formula Fed infants and breastfed infants. The type of fatty acids present in breastmilk are strongly influenced by the mother's Diet especially when it comes to the all important omega three fatty acids. For example, when lactating women took a dietary supplement containing four hundred milligrams of the marine omega three fatty acid Dha, their breast milk contained one hundred and twenty three percent more Dha then the breast milk of women who took a placebo. Dha is crucial for proper brain development. The infants whose mothers took the DHA supplement also had lower plasma omega six to a mega three ratios. A lower omega six to a mega three fatty acid ratio is more desirable in reducing the risk of many chronic diseases. Smoking cigarettes reduces Omega three fatty acid uptake especially Dha into breast milk. Omega three fatty acids play key roles in infant brain development intake of Dha. In particular is associated with improved mental and psychomotor. Development Dha is the most abundant omega three fatty acid in newborn's brain maternal intake. Omega three fatty acids is associated with larger brain volumes in breastfed or mostly breastfed infants. One study involved ninety, two, one month old full term infants who were breastfed. Exclusively or most of the time MRI studies reveal the infants of women who consumed higher quantities of Omega three fatty acids had greater brain volumes and specific regions of the frontal cortex in Corpus callosum areas of the brain involved in consciousness communication, memory attention, and integration of motor sensory cognitive performance between the brain hemispheres. Breast Milk also contains vitamins and minerals, but these vary based on. A mother's Diet and tissue stores if the mother is undernourished or eats an unhealthy diet, her breast milk may be inadequate to supply sufficient quantities of essential micronutrients to her infant and supplementation for the mom infant or both may be necessary. However, some nutrients are low and breastmilk regardless of the MOMS Diet for example, vitamin K. One which is essential for normal blood clotting is very. Low in breast milk consequently, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all newborn infants receive an injection of vitamin. K One to prevent hemorrhaging shortly after birth iron is an essential nutrient that plays key roles in infant growth but breastmilk is incredibly low in iron, which might seem counterintuitive. However, microbes require iron for their growth to to prevent infection. The body restricts microbes access to iron. We think hours of birth the infant's serum iron levels dropped dramatically. This reduces the infant's risk of developing neonatal sepsis, a generalized life threatening bacterial infection that commonly occurs within the first days and weeks of life infants rely on their iron stores. But by the age of six months, infants can begin to develop Iron Deficiency Anemia Cepeda traditions recommend introducing iron rich complementary foods at that time. Breast milk contains very little vitamin. D, certainly not enough to prevent vitamin D deficiency exclusively breastfed infants but recent studies have shown that moms who take a daily high dose vitamin D supplement of six, thousand, four, hundred I. Use a day can increase vitamin D concentration of their breast milk to a level that provides sufficient vitamin D intake for their infant. And in more bad news about smoking maternal cigarette smoking impairs the uptake of nutrients into breast milk. For example, I dine concentrations in the breast milk of women who smoke are roughly half of those of nonsmoking women's breast milk I dine is critical for brain development and is also important for thyroid function. Rodent studies have found that maternal nicotine exposure impairs thyroid function in offspring and promotes resistance to the Hormone Leptin which is associated with obesity. Smokers. Breath smell has lower levels of antioxidant vitamins, vitamin C., and E., which could drive a pro oxidant state in the infant. This was demonstrated in a really interesting study where researchers measured levels of Ethin- are marker of oxidative stress in the exhaled air of infants. The breastfed infants of women who smoked held seven times more ethin- been the infants of women who do not smoke. Research. Indicates exposure to cigarette smoke influences breastfeeding duration a study of more than one thousand, two, hundred mother infant pairs found that women who were exposed to household secondhand smoke. We're thirty percent more likely to stop breastfeeding early compared to women who were in non-smoking. Household. Contrary to the belief that human milk is a sterile solution. breastmilk is teeming with hundreds of types of bacteria they arrive in the mother's milk from a variety of sources including the mother skin retrograde flow from the IMF in Saliva Aka backwash, and potentially other means. Exposure to this rich bacterial community by breastmilk may contribute to the differences observed in gut microbial populations between breastfed and Formula Fed infants and provides a rationale for the inclusion of probiotics in infant formulas. Another. Amazing Component of breast milk is stem cells human breast milk contains stem cells from the mother called memory stem cells. That preclinical research indicates may help establish organs like the liver kidneys, pancreas, and brain in a really cool study in mice in which memory stem cells were followed it was found that in the liver they form cells that make albumen and the pancreas they form insulin producing cells, and in the brain they formed neurons and Glendale sells. This phenomenon were cells from the mother are found in the offspring and remain there long term it's called Microcosm. With this data suggest that breast milk transmit stem cells from the mother to the infant where the cells potentially function to boost in infants development. Early in life other things can be transferred from the Mother's breast milk as well. A whole slew of harmful substances can transfer from the mother's blood into her breast milk. For example, heavy metal concentrations like cadmium are increased in breast milk cadmium impairs metabolism of nutrients essential to in free development, including selenium, zeke copper, and magnesium. If that's not bad enough cadmium is also a carcinogen. Cadmium levels in the transitional milk of women who smoke are approximately four times higher than the milk of women who don't smoke. Most drugs, can we take an APP into brass monk via passive diffusion but how much ends up in the breast milk depends on the drug sizing chemical characteristics but also factors that alter the MOMS drug metabolism. An infant's capacity to metabolize drugs is much lower than the adult especially in the early weeks of life. So most the adverse events related to maternal drug use occur in infants less than two months of age drugs I should absolutely not be taken during breastfeeding, include anticancer drugs, lithium oral retinoids, high dose, Iodine Amiodarone, and gold salts but even drugs considered social drugs including alcohol nicotine caffeine and cannabis can carry some risk to the infant. Alcohol also passes into breast milk, but the amount that an infant is exposed to as low due to the infant's high body water content. Unfortunately, infants detoxify alcohol less efficiently than adults do so high maternal hall intake could have negative effects on breastfed infants including altered sleep patterns, decreased milk intake, weight gain alcohol induced hypoglycemia, and impaired motor development. Alcohol metabolism occurs according to zero order kinetics. That means that it is broken down at a constant rate. So drinking water exercising or pumping and dumping won't speed up the process. Nicotine transfers into rest mel to and can have harmful effects on infant health nicotine concentrations in breast milk of women who smoke are three times higher than the MOMS plasma levels. But in infants capacity to eliminate nicotine is three to four times less than that of the adult. And study involving fifteen mother infant pairs found that infants slept approximately thirty minutes less when they were fed immediately after the mother smoked compared to when they were fed after the mother abstained from smoking and the baby's of women who smoke cigarettes are more susceptible to respiratory infections and colic, and typically exhibit poor respiratory function after breastfeeding not only does nicotine affect the infant, but it also impairs milk production by altering levels of maternal pro laxton, the principal hormone involved in the production of milk. Quitting smoking could be very difficult though nicotine patches might be a good option for women who are having problems quitting breastmilk concentrations of nicotine obtained from nicotine patches or approximately seventy percent lower than those obtained from smoking. On the other hand findings from a rodent studies show that even low levels of nicotine exposure during pregnancy or early in life can increase the risk of sudden infant death syndrome or sits by inhibiting the neonates ability to auto resuscitate. Of course, many women's favorite drug is caffeine it's found in a wide variety of foods and beverages. My favorite is coffee and it's founded other products as well such as gum. The amount of caffeine present in breastmilk varies according to differences in the mother's caffeine metabolism and is typically low approximately one percent of the maternal blood concentration, which usually peak one to two hours after ingestion but caffeine metabolism is very poor in infants. So infants of women who consume extremely high quantities of caffeine seven hundred and fifty milligrams per day or more, which is about six to eight cups of coffee could potentially achieve toxic concentrations have caffeine from breast milk. Cannabis is a broad term for the psychoactive components of the marijuana plant. Breast Milk samples from fifty lactating women who reported using marijuana showed that sixty three percent of the samples contained detectable levels of THC the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. These levels were present up to six days after the last reported use marijuana. Five breast milk during the first month of an infant's life is associated with decreased infant motor development at the age of twelve months. So just to summarize and slew of harmful substances can transfer to a mother's milk such as heavy metals and prescription drugs. especially, those used to treat cancer and several others. Babies don't metabolize drugs as well as adults. So women who require these drugs should discuss whether breastfeeding is a safe option but alcohol nicotine fien in cannabis all carry some risk to a breastfed infant. So caution is advised even when using these comments social drugs. Let's discuss some more benefits of breastfeeding starting with the immune system and infant's immune system is the last of the biological systems to develop taking months or even years to match that of an adult's capacity for defense breast milk contains a multitude of components work together synergistically to provide a competent immune system including anti microbial agents like Lactoferrin secretary g lactose ALBUMEN LICEU IN MONO Warren Anti inflammatory agents like, Interleukin. I'll ten lactoferrin in lysine in a modular. Tori factors like memory t cells. I'll four. I'll tend I'll. Twelve colony stimulating factor three tumor necrosis factor Alpha Interferon. Gamma and Luca sites among others. These varied components confer both passive and active immunity. A critical element of the infants active immunity is provided by maternal leukocyte living white blood cells provide protection from infection in the infants, gut and other tissues. Concentrations of Luca sites are highest in colostrum and taper off transitional milk eventually reaching a baseline level and mature milk but the infant mother or both develop an infection that level can increase up to ninety four percent above baseline. Although experts recommend exclusive breastfeeding for at least six months children who are breastfed for any length of time or sixty four percent less likely to develop nonspecific gut infections and effect that last as long as two months after the cessation of breastfeeding. Similarly, infants who are breastfed for at least three months have lower risk of developing a topic dermatitis also known as eggs Emma. Meta analyses of randomized controlled trials, prospective studies and case control studies demonstrate that infants exclusively breastfed for more than four months are seventy two percent less likely to be hospitalized due to lower respiratory tract infections in the first year of life compared to infants who were fed formula. And infants were breastfed for six months or longer had a twenty percent lower risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia and fifteen percent lower risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. That's not all emerging evidence suggests that some of the immune and health benefits that infants acquire during breastfeeding maybe lifelong for example, breastfeeding appears to confer long-term protection to the gut infants who were breastfed thirty one percent less likely to develop childhood inflammatory bowel disease and fifty two percent less likely to develop silly act disease if breastfed at the time of gluten exposure. Recent animal studies demonstrate that female mice are exposed to infection before pregnancy may pass on lifelong immunity to their offspring via the transfer of immune cells in their milk even after nursing stops. So just to recap, breast milk contains a multitude of components that work together synergistically to provide a compensator immune system that confers both passive and active immunity. This provides protection against repair Tori infections and certain types of cancer in childhood and might even contribute to lifelong immunity. Breastfeeding also has profound effects on an infant's brain greatly influencing their intellectual development, a Meta analysis of seventeen studies linking breastfeeding intelligence. That children and adolescents who were breastfed as infants scored nearly points higher on intelligence tests than those who were not breastfed even after taking maternal intelligence into consideration. Large clinical trial that followed up on more than thirteen thousand infants from around thirteen different hospitals found that total and exclusive breastfeeding lead to improved performance and intelligence test at the age of six with breastfed children averaging roughly seven point five points higher on tests and children who were not breastfed. Other research has found that by the age of two babies who were exclusively breastfed for at least. Three months had twenty to thirty percent more white matter in their brains especially in regions associated with language emotional regulation in cognition. The beneficial effects of breast milk on brain development may be particularly relevant for preterm infants born prior to thirty seven weeks gestation who have a significantly higher risk for white matter injury during birth approximately one in ten infants born in the United States is born prematurely. Data emerging evidence suggests that preterm infants who are fed breast milk have significantly improved micro-structural Organization of the white matter in their brains compared to preterm infants fed formula and preterm babies that received breast milk in the neonatal ICU or nick you have higher verbal intelligence, white matter total brain volumes especially in boys. So in summary, breastfeeding influences brain development and intelligence even after taking maternal intelligence into consideration breastfed babies tend to have higher amounts of white matter in their brains and later in life performed better on intelligence tests than non breastfed babies. Breast milk may also protect against cardiovascular complications. Premature babies are more likely to have cardiovascular complications including small ventricle, size, heart, muscle hypertrophy, and poor blood pressure control. Most of these complications are often manifested in adulthood as increased risk of esteem, heart, disease, hypertension, and poor metabolic function. Some evidence suggests that breath smell mitigates some of the cardiovascular related complications associated with preterm birth most. Of the day that I bought the Cardio Protective Effects of breast milk in preterm infants comes from follow up studies of a cohort of more than nine hundred preterm infants born in the UK the babies in this studies received either donor breast milk or a nutrient enriched preterm formula exclusively until their body weight reached two thousand grams when a subset of those babies reach adulthood. Twenty eight years of age their cardiovascular health was assessed those who had been fed breast milk exclusively as preterm infants had larger ventricle size and stroke volume compared to those just had been formula at a separate follow up study found that the inference that received breast milk exclusively had lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure at the age of thirteen to sixteen years. So it seems as though breastfeeding may mitigate some of the cardiovascular related complications associated with preterm birth, many of which can manifest later in life as schemic heart, disease, hypertension, and poor metabolic function. Breastfeeding also has benefits for mothers as well. A review of forty seven epidemiological studies found that for every twelve months of breastfeeding the risk of developing breast cancer was reduced by four point, three percent findings from a case control study of more than four hundred women with ovarian cancer suggests that even short term breastfeeding reduces the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Weight gain is a normal healthy part of pregnancy losing weight after pregnancy is difficult for many women but those who breastfeed are more likely to return to their prepregnancy weight and they typically do so sooner within the first three to six months after delivery than women do not breastfeed. When it comes to breastfeeding, there are practical aspects and challenges and important question that many mothers hab is how long should I breastfeed as mentioned before the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for about six months followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced with the continuation of breastfeeding for one year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant the World Health Organization also recommends. Breastfeeding up to six months of age with continued, breastfeeding along with appropriate complementary foods up to two years of age or beyond. The first few days and weeks at breastfeeding present many challenges to new mothers ranging from Sore nipples and plugged ducks to lack of family support and other concerns working with a lactation consultant during the first few weeks of breastfeeding may be helpful. If a woman's milk is insufficient to meet the needs of her infant or if she has a health concern prevents her from breastfeeding donor milk may be an option for healthy full term babies. One more thing. It's important to realize that talking about the benefits of Breast Milk and breastfeeding infants is not the same thing as criticizing mothers who for whatever reason cannot or choose not to breastfeed in summary Breastfeeding provides many benefits to both infants, mothers including intellectual and emotional development in the infant and protection against cancer and obesity in the mother. Breast milk provides a competent Tori immune system for the infant. Breast milk is a complex dynamic fluid that contains a multitude of nutritional and non nutritional components including immune cells, stem cells, and human milk oligosaccharides. Breast Milk also provides a mechanism for the transfer of substances or drugs at the mother may inhale ingest or absorb to the benefit or possible detriment of the infant. Although breastfeeding presents challenges to some women. Support is available I'm Dr Patrick and I'll catch you next time. Thank you so much for listening. We hope you enjoy today's episode just as a reminder if you're interested in learning more about this topic, we just released a free preview of our very first alachua episode available. Now on our podcast, it features a compile elation of pregnancy and child development related topics taken from my QNA episodes over the last couple of years. This episode covers things like my prepregnancy regiment including Diet exercise vitamins, and sleep nutrition for babies and toddlers to maximize brain development and growth and extra precautions that I took during my pregnancy and so much more. The first of three alachua episode previews will be releasing publicly over the next few weeks. So be sure to look out for those. Soon, if you're wanting full access to the Alachua today head over to foundmyfitness dot com forward slash Alachua you'll get instant access to full episodes and timelines time codes for each topic and much more. Thanks so much and talk to you I soon.

HMO Milk Express nicotine cancer American Academy of Pediatrics Alachua obesity caffeine Alachua Doctor Rhonda Patrick I Co. flu Fed Cannabis UK MGM
How to find a financial adviser, general election planning for your finances and the rise of the 40 year mortgage

FT Money Show

28:24 min | 1 year ago

How to find a financial adviser, general election planning for your finances and the rise of the 40 year mortgage

"Brought to you by capital one where you can open a savings account in about five minutes and earned five times. The national average. Just imagine five times more savings toward that overdue home addition and maybe even in addition on that addition this is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Capital one a member. FDIC how to find a financial adviser a relationship with an adviser you can trust and crucially afford is something that young. FT readers often tell us is hard to come by could the solution to the problem rest in our pockets with less than a month to go until the general election financial advisers Tennessee. They are getting calls from a lot of worry clients we look at. What's troubling the wealthy and crucially what steps they're advisers suggesting them to consider and the rise of if the forty year mortgage pool Lewis? AFC money columnist and presenter of BBC Moneybox is here to share his own worries about extra long loans. Welcome to the money I shea the FTC's weekly podcast about personal finance and investing enclave Barrett FD money at a SIP bringing. This week's money needs would you. I like to talk to a financial adviser. Goodness knows there are enough things to discuss the moment the election stock markets were an all time high devising a long things have investment plan. I could go them but rather than meet face to face. Would you be happy chatting to an adviser new joining me today to discuss Damien fantastic the deputy editor of Eddie Advisor. Welcome Damian Alachua. When you think of a financial advisor most people probably think of a of a middle age man in a suit but the person on the other end of your small fame will be one of those yes so only go to my vast show industry conferences and the audiences can often be Mail fat sometimes style I'm not who is And I think the There's been Longstanding attempting industry to address that I think they have Josiah if a financial advisor was about fifty five. It's new in the mid fifty s and the one of the ways that some companies are looking to address this is through technology through a chat bots and other of bird vice solutions. We'd actually have no human being involved in them at all and and this is actually regulated advice. Because there's no rules the FDA has set out that say advice has to be provided by a human being just has has to her be suitable. You have to get a fact. Find you have to have a suitability assessment and capacity for loss the UH assessment. But there's no actually. There's no rules that say it has to be going to human being say the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence but tell us about your Own Brush with. It's interesting advice or a couple of APPS available when you downloaded on tested out. Yes so it's not actually an avid so website this particular on the a couple of APPs on used my ego. which is the solution offered by Wealth Wizards which is part-owned by the ensure. Lv and it was interesting expense. Actually I sort of got involved with it by accident because I was scoping it out for for An article the hood thirty money over lunch. Just Oh let's have a look at this and see see what it's like and it was so simple all to sign up to it that I actually signed up to it and got going accidentally of my lunch break and it was interesting. Actually it was relatively. It was the literally simple lots of emojis. Either in the definitely yes leedle. leedle is a human well. Evo Is Is a character sort of talks and interacts with you through this Chat Bot function she asks you how you on encourages you to continue. She's still encouraging me to continue. Actually still occasionally email from either telling me why haven't my will And yeah she uses lots of emojis It slightly undercut when suddenly she artsy provides you with all the terms and conditions and all the various. FCA number. But she's ask you a few questions and this is the fact finder elements you ask you a few questions about. Are you married. Do you own your own home. How uh-huh chess you have in savings and then do you have debt? CRTV you have that as well And then she'll provide you with a list of things that you should do. And some of these are restrict forwards for people who might be involved in moines building that personal finances like building a cash buffer paying debt that you might have but some of them are maybe not so obvious the people so there's lighting a will as I mentioned than this finding out who gets your death and service benefits and Various other bits and pieces which I have to admit I wasn't entirely on top of. Yeah well I had another APP called multiply which hasn't been Lewisville. android is on apple and I mean again seems seems very simple to use. I didn't I didn't sign up completely but it basically starts with a long questionnaire about you your goals your financial position. It's quite easy ready to fill it. On in villain via your phone for younger people perhaps would prefer to interact and it was something like that. Rodman going to go and see an advisor in their office could be preferable. These things have taken an awful long time to be developed even in the early stages that are now all right. Yes so these companies take this sort of stuff quite seriously because providing regulated financial. Advice is a big deal If you provide violated financial advice than your clients get the benefits of being covered by the financial ombudsman service by the financial services. Compensation Scheme It's quite a big stamp of approval that the FCA is giving you if you will provider of regulating financial advice and a lot of these companies. Companies have put years into development of the services Certainly multiply the one that you use that you've executive said that was the case. And they've actually employed financial advisers to check that the financial advice that they're giving is up to scratch these financial advisers. I don't actually give financial advice but they just check. The financial advice is suitable. And just going back to to to Lever Lever They do have advance. Who who were there who you can be referred to if if if either herself com work out? What's the right thing to do? Yes and to a certain extent and this goes towards the limits of this technology at this particular moment in time because my decides if there are certain things that it it can't do for you without the intervention of human being then it will direct you towards the financial advisers that either employers And an example all of this is defined benefit transfers for example. We contentious The moment and if you want to do one of those then they will say please this way Sir and you'll talk to humans but realistically the people this product is aimed at they're not going to have a final sound. Region is aimed at young working professionals employed by companies who are looking to maybe boost pension savings a bit and find out more about that stocks stocks and shares. Eissa potentially can recommend range of low cost Tracker phones but in terms of how it's paid for at the moment with my favorite's the employers who are picking up the bill. Yes so the two who is of Paying for my Asia. Either your in the position where your company his decides to pay for it or you can pay it yourself which is through a two pound a month subscription and also other fees involved if you want to do as something more complicated so if you do actually want to speak to a human being then you have to pay for the privilege of doing so and I've gone to trump? I was geeking out. This morning fencing. I printed out some of the some of the menu a menu options. So if you want a a retirement advice report that will cost you. Five hundred pounds That's personalized report recommending for those within six months of Thailand On and there's an ongoing seasons charges for certain other things so for example if you want investment advice you have to pay zero point. Two five percent of the total market value of the Fund's management. It gives people options where they can see easily and transparently What they're paying for multiply? It's a little bit different at saying it's free advice but you yes well. That's is strictly speaking accurate. I suppose because of the actual advice is provided for food. But if you want to them to actually implement the advice then you have to pay so they will advise you to invest but in a Vanguards Stephen and they say would you like us to do this for you. Here's how much cost. And this is a commonly known as contingent charging in the industry And it's relatively popular for certain aspects of Financial advice unless phase if he didn't have very much money money absolutely turned to the to the more common charging structure. I advise and making a annual percentage fee from failure Damian. We've we love having you Royce about these issues for FT money but of course the audience who normally consume your journalism all the financial advisers themselves. What do they it make of either and Co they threatened by her Ping emojis? I don't necessarily think many of them are because a a lot of them. I think that as you said earlier this is aimed. People who find the law Jr have very simple needs the same people who are not saving anything at the moment or saving entirely in cash and they could probably benefit for me the setting up an ISO- or maybe putting some of their savings to work in the market in some sort of low-cost Traffic and these are people. Starting from absolutely Taylor was a financial advisor would see that role as being more involved in people who have more money to to to play around with. In fact I I would imagine that most financial advisers will not be remotely interested in serving the clients that naive and multiply interested in. Because it's just not canonical for them to do so financial vices much more interested in people who have got Slightly complicated tax issues. People who might might be worried about passing on that launch amount of assets to their children people who have got you know a lot more money to play with well. Thanks very much. That's Damian fantasy deputy editor of the FT specialist publication financial adviser. You can wreaked Damian's big feature pushing the AI into financial advice online now dot com slash money and as part of this feature. We've also published empty advises this annual list of the top one hundred human financial advisers which is worth consulting if you're ready to upgrade from Chat Bot to a more expensive old-fashioned form of of the service what my next guest is a financial adviser and he isn't a chat board or could even as part of F. T. money special issue on financial advice we wanted to find out what kind of conversations the wealthy clients are having with their advisers. Right now. A my word. There's a lot of chatting going on Alliston. Alliston is the CO founder of Lay's and Co wealth adviser based in the city of London conveniently stains rate from the office and he has come in. Join me in the studio. Welcome Alastair Analyst. Thanks for having me say I should say. We've talked a lot about advisors being men in suits. But you're wearing a very fetching jumper have say Damian and we were just speaking to wearing a Cardigan I mean. Is this the new era I think. So yeah it's it's more comfortable than the traditional seat Plus they're expensive but we would expect the national vises Vance off of the cost but thank you for breaking away from your busy phone lines coming through to us today but more to your clients wanting to talk to you about and your colleagues and the Mavens to be honest with you is more of the same that you'd probably will have guest. is brexit. It's the election And I think actually if you take a bit of a step back of of why people are still talking about that is. It's PABST over. The last few years has been a bit of a gradual gradual buildup of anticipation that people are waiting for a market crash or correction. And this has been lots of false peaks on that Jenny certainly with Brexit. Lots of deadlines and in which case each one of those peaks people have expected. Is this time for some clarity or it's time for market crash And at the moment there's another sort of deadline mockery the sandwich with the election in December. And I think people are just looking looking at that and saying is that the moment we will get some clarity or is that the moment web I will and pull off a cliff and there'll be a big market correction so we're having to answer a lot of questions like at the moment the unfortunately we on the wiser. We're in the same boat as everybody else who is difficult to give any clear. Answers for clients now at the time of recording of her. 'cause none none of the major parties have released four manifestos but they have all outlined very ambitious spending plans. The People Fair could spell tax rises in the near future now in advance of any policies being released. What kind of things your clients fearing could change? Yeah I think people instantly worried about an extreme Labor government and completely sort of ripping up the rules with income-tax with any pension legislation things things that are typically attacked when it comes to looking for public spending because it's no surprise that whereas no secret that the NHS The police force these these of public services need a boost in that money is going to come from somewhere. I think people are somewhat off. Lines are somewhat shell-shocked in many respects by the amount of attack on that pensions and surrounding pension legislation has been under the conservative gum. Yeah Yeah I think that's left them with a bit of a bit of an opinion. Anything goes from any government when it comes to their own personal savings so I think more so than ever. We're noticing people just feel vulnerable about their existing savings and what could happen to them in the future. And what kind of actions do your clients perhaps wants to take. And what are you trying to advise him. Entity meaning extreme sense people might be thinking well put money offshore in less extreme since they might be thinking in case only changes to inheritance tax rules. I should give give money away if I'm intending to sooner or later yeah exactly. It's it's our job to in that respect to try and really give a bit of perspective to everything So instead of worrying about things that are outside of their control where we try and turn clients had store things that they can control so now more than ever is a a really good sign if you've got a financial planner whether it be an adviser or with yourself to really go back and revisit. What your exposures? Also things that you're at issue to risk Your asset allocation the objectives of the financial plan and sometimes simple exercise Looking at revisiting the assumptions that your plan has been inbuilt on can be enough to give a bit of peace of mind in a short term volatility area so I think people Bouli speaking since about two thousand thousand and twelve should if they've got money invested has seen some fairly healthy returns so for instance if they revisit this options of a plan and they may be built on on full percentage growth. And that will that plan will see them through to their retirement goals and actually they looked back since two thousand and twelve. It's not beyond the realms of possibility they might may have been now fishing seven percents growth In which case the plans got some inbuilt pragmatism around it. What my times like this? When there's volatility when returns might be harder to come by? They're already ahead of the curve in some respects because of the previous performance now a separate investor survey from UBS best this week revealed that many wealthy investors upping the cash levels Even though most of the people eight hundred averaged of coulter if that put failure alien cash is this kind of a cash. Grab something that your clients are hitching. We we always tried to stress of the investment within a financial plan as a means to an end rather than the bill that end So we're long-term plan as as opposed to short term traders looking at opportunities We generally. I'm really advice to not make any short-term alterations to your financial plan in terms of converting your funds into cash because then you enter the realm of trying to time the market comes to reinvestment which is notoriously hard to For those thinking about adding to their saving pulse for instance maybe this year is allowance. The you've got the grace period of of having a until April the six to be able to make your your contribution And that will buy a bit of time. But also the specific techniques e can use when investing from cash into the market so something like phased investments is quite a good strategy at the moment whereby you feed did you set investment over the course of anywhere from six to twelve months typically to gain a little bit of pound cost averaging so you're you're less reliance on what might happen in the news tomorrow now as well as defensive actions taken to protect wealth many TV goes eager to trade on the uncertainty Sterling is one way or colleagues on the LEX team verson about the Boris Johnson trade which is buying unloved UK stocks in the hope of Tory majority Brexit deal which would cause markets to bounce allegedly addict Corbin trade where you would short shares in the large eternity. Companies that Labor's indicated it would nationalize or going long on footsie companies. That don't have much business in the UK because they could potentially go off enlist on a foreign exchange Labour's plans to give away ten percent of shack ups oil to to to work as come come into force me. And this is all pretty speculative stuff but nevertheless people are interested in having pumps. Yeah absolutely I think like I said. Our general approach to the of investment is long-term planning as a means to an end. But that's not to say that people they liked the idea of some short term gains short-term trading I guess the advice advice from us. If a client came to an asked about a specific short-term trade would be to ring-fence and amounts of money that would be happy to lease two percents of remortgage your house in order to fund it and once you've decided on the correct amount go ahead and place you trades and and keep an eye on how it pans out. We'll finally you've been here listening to our last about advice. Boy a Chat Bot do you. Fear Alastair being replaced by an emoji caught. Oh my Alastair in future. I think we've all got to looking over our shoulders in some respects because I think there is a lot of power within those technology tools I think in our industry as far as I can see at the moment. I think they'll was always big going to be a need for some form of human advice just because of the amount Nov you've complication The amount of inferences and judgements that sometimes a human advisor can make when looking at a case I as opposed to sort of simplistic implicit smaller. Smaller client for instance I think in our industry specifically with the human advice there's room for innovation so so there's room for both I think so there's room to for human devices to be able to use technology to help perhaps though the operational costs and pass those cost savings back onto onto clients to make advice more affordable as a whole. Well thanks very much. There's Mr Phyllis in the CO founder of lead and Co you can read the F. T. money feature about all of these issues now now on. FDA Dot com slash money and. Do you know young person who good with money or curious about how the financial world works. Then please tell them about out the FTC's competition to find the young personal finance journalist of the year. We've teamed up the London Institute of Banking and finance to run the contest and we're accepting entries from young people aged between fourteen and nineteen. All they need to do is write a short hospital on topics including what the Bank of the future be like. They'd say shot or line. What are the financial issues facing young people or personal data is the new gold? Discuss the winds will receive one hundred and fifty pounds in cold hard cash cash and we are hoping to publish the winning entries in. FT money next year if he wants a winter and view all of the terms and conditions go to f t dot com slash young young journalist that's empty dot com slash young journalist. lasko is in front of the FTP Walser. Anybody can read it and the competition itself is part of the F. T. schools goals program are squeeze in a quick plug for that. If you haven't heard of it is well worth knowing about all secondary schools around the world not just in the UK can get free access to the F. T. dot com website for people's a sixteen over and their teachers. So it's really worth telling your old school about this. All of the details are accessible from that. same aim link dot com slash young journalist. Those of us who've bought property dream of the day that we can pay off the mortgage and rid ourselves of what is usually the most significant monthly outgoing but the new generation of mortgage free wannabes hippie drawing a pension before that day arrives and is of grave concern to pull Louis this the anti money columnist and presented radio four's moneybox programme. Who joins me from the line? Now won't comport Hella as you wrote in your column this week. There's something something about the word mortgage. Listeners may not be aware of well yes I mean. It's about seven hundred years old this world. It comes from the French and of course the first half mort gives gives you the clue it means. Death and gauge means a debt basically obligation on the idea is that if you pay it off then then the debt is is dead if you don't pay it off. The property is dead. That's the use of dead but my concern is that the way the industry's going now. It could be used as dead before you pay off your mortgage because they are stretching mortgages used to be twenty five years them. I'll say in our day. It's say my data now mine now sixty percent nearly of mortgage offers can be up to forty years so the product sixty percent of products can lost up to forty years. Now forty years is just about the whole of your working life at least and if you consider as you say. The rising age of the average average first time is thirty three than the average buyer is going to be seventy three votes on Pale. Yes possibly at well into a pension and that's assuming that that is their only mortgage and one of the Lenders Yorkshire Building Society that's introduced forty mortgage recently. Says they hope it would encourage people not to treat their first home as a stepping stone but as a kind of a chair if you were they'll sit out the rest of their lives so they'll buy their first home and it it'll be the revenue home until they're tied. I'm not sure if that's practicable of course they'll never need to move. Have Children get divorced. No because if you look at the statistics Statistics or one thing human lives or another. But you know forty two percent of marriages end in divorce nearly two and a half more over a two and a half million people in the middle. I expect to leave their job to care for either older relatives all indeed grandchildren and the calculation. Done by the insurer. LV equals that after forty years. You Start Your mortgage. It's thirty ended. Seventy one in ten of couples will experience the death of of one partner or and others that we have the more in mortgage because and of course They will normally get it. Paid off by insurance. But you know I it's one in three or you'll be severely ill one in ten will actually die over forty years. Things really do change now. We should say mortgage lenders are stretching the life colognes like this law because of rising prices. Yes and this has happened a lot in the past as you will recall. Fte readers will recall the whenever they talk about having to boost affordability. They come up with a scheme. Well now it's forty mortgages in the past you'll remember it was interest only mortgages. You didn't even have to worry for a long time. How you're going to pay the loan off? Just paid the interest so it was almost like renting renting renting the money to buy it they were endowment mortgages. They were the first interest only Huntsville. They didn't do too well did they. And then of course there was self certificates. Sean which meant you say to the mortgage lender one hundred and twenty thousand year and they say okay. We'll work it out on that basis. That was not a good idea. And it's all to boost affordability when rising prices are cutting mortgage lenders business to keep their business going. They come up with these tweezers and in the past they have all led to catastrophes. I don't know what catastrophe they'll be for these forty year mortgages and I probably won't be doing your podcast at that time anyway. Clear to be honest but some people will she'll be around and they will experience themselves. I'm very worried. What about it and I think people should think very carefully about forty year mortgages twenty-five years I may be an old funny? Seems a much more sensible time in date. Eight ten or twenty years seems more sensible time to borrow the money over from the gives you more flexibility. Thanks very much support. Lewis freelance journalist and BBC money. Any books presents it. You can read pools call them. It will take a long time for forty year old mortgages to die online now eddie dot com slash money. And you never know I could still be presenting this podcast when eighty me. We'll still need to work. We pension doesn't work out but that is it from the money. Show this week. If you want to get in touch with US team of experts you can email us our address money at dot com or follow us on twitter for the latest news. UPDATES or handle is at F. T. money and you can also join Sunni group on linked in to search for T- personal finance. We'll be back next week at the usual time. Thanks very much goodbye. The capital one has a fresh take on banking. Now you can open a new savings account in about five minutes and earned five times. The national average the banking with capital one means five times the savings toward your dream honeymoon or five times the savings towards your family's ultimate vacation even five times the savings towards just feeling good about saving. It's time to make your savings goals come true. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Capital one and a member F._d._I._C..

advisor Damian Alachua UK F. T. Alastair Analyst FCA FTC deputy editor FDIC AFC Josiah CO founder Asia FDA Tennessee
386: The Demoscovery

Daily Sales Tips

06:07 min | 1 year ago

386: The Demoscovery

"You're listening to the daily sales tips. PODCAST I'm your host Scott Ingram in yesterday's tip from pornography Hindu Burnell called me out for not having featured any tips related to demos on the podcast. He was right and he did something about it by sharing his own tip which was fantastic. I thought I'd continue on the theme and turn this into a bit of a demo weekend and share one of my personal philosophies around on demos and a strategy that used to work really well for me now to be fair. I haven't really done demos the last few years as I've been working in the professional services space but before that when working with Alachua and then in the event technology space as much as possible I did my own Demos Mos- I always wanted to show my prospects that the solution was easy and intuitive enough for the sales guy to us because I always worried that bringing in some technical expert to run the demo just implied that it was difficult or complicated. It also put me in a position to control everything everything. I didn't have to stress so much about having a perfect mind meld with my sales engineer. Who May or may not take people down a path that I thought would be the most relevant what I really WanNa talk about. Though is a process. I developed called the demos discovery. This was driven by the idea that so often Vinh. Your potential new client just wants to see a demo. They WanNa get a sense of the solution. See what it's actually about and make a determination for themselves around around whether or not it might help them solve a particular problem or business issue instead of doing that demo for them. We of course want to do a bunch of discovery. We want to try to understand their needs. Their pain points how much that gap in their business might be costing them all of that so instead of doing what the customer Marwan's we try to force them into a discovery process. That for them is a time commitment that they often can't even tell is going to be worth it or not because we haven't showed them anything it creates friction and really goes against what the customer wants. So I put the two together I.. I built a demo. That was all about give and take and allowed me to run a really good discovery process while also demonstrating the solution and now. I totally get that. This might not even be possible for some solutions but where I did it. Most effectively was in that event technology. Space he's one of the primary things that my future clients wanted to see was a walk through a of the event registration process both the front end and the back end. Fortunately for me the software was easy to use and super customizable so I built a demo event whereas we walked through that registration example example I had embedded all the things I wanted to know some elements. I would have pre filled based on the research in prep had done for the call so at its most most basic have their name email address. Company and title prevailed this. Let me show off some of the marketing capabilities and demonstrate how we could set things up to show things that we already knew about their ten dis. Once they clicked or registration link in an email from there I could talk to. Ah them about the events they ran. How many what type. How complex were they. How many people attended all those kinds of things while they're telling me this. I'm actually chilly capturing the details inside the demo then I could start asking about different functionality. They might need. Would they need to manage hotel. Registrations distractions where they want a mobile APP all those types of details. This is what drove the rest of the demo. I wouldn't show them anything that wasn't relevant if they don't need to worry about hotel registrations why on Earth would I show that to them if they told me. A particular capability was really important. I could go into more depth and also learned from them why that specific capability was so important was done and after using the option to register multiple. Attendees Simultaneously Ashley. If there were multiple people on the call I would show them the confirmation email capabilities here. I was able to send them that email confirmation with with all the details that I had just captured throughout the process. It was the ultimate leave behind. Follow up and it just happened in real time and of course that confirmation email came from my email address and included my contact details. Then as we transitioned into the back end I was able to show them their own data. How it was used. And what else we could do with it. Based on additional discussion around how they were hoping to make use of all this information mation to drive sales deliver better experiences or whatever else was important now. I wanted to give the specifics of this example to make it more real. Oh and show that. This isn't just some theory. Sure had about the perfect product. Her run this demo discovery process inside of. But I've been able to do versions Asians of this with other solutions. The point is this. Try to find ways that you can do your demo earlier turn it into a conversation instead of having a one way discovery conversation where you're trying to get everything you need and then doing a demo where you're providing a one way pitch. Try to combine the two and have a conversation. It's a way better experience for everyone. It worked really well for me. See if it works for you. Thanks for listening. And Hey if you want to share this you can send your friends and colleagues to daily sales dot tips forward slash three eighty six. Then come on back tomorrow for another great sales tip.

sales engineer Hindu Burnell Scott Ingram Alachua Vinh professional services Marwan
How to Convert Marketing from a Cost to a Profit Center

OC Talk Radio

23:51 min | 2 years ago

How to Convert Marketing from a Cost to a Profit Center

"Introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit McDonald's. We don't need that music made with tender chicken. Let's lose the echo on a warm buttermilk biscuit perfect juicy simplicity of our buttermilk. Komo crispy chicken biscuits speaks for itself. Get it now for just three bucks and get a two dollars sausage mcmuffin with egg or one dollars small hot coffee all from the one two three dollar menu simply your breakfast at McDonald's crisis and participation may vary canopy combined with any other offer Combo meal. Welcome aboard again. You're not just surfing the web you are riding the pipeline the sales pipeline with that fail surfer himself Mannheim's from Heinz Marketing. Hey Matt the sale surfer. You're the silver surfer of sales sales. How many more S can we get? I am not a I._M.. Neither a surfer nor silver but we are GONNA be talking about sales sales pipeline radio. Thanks for joining in this again having a lot of fun with this show it is it is march people is crazy. I feel like I was just watching the Rosebowl parade and it is March. If you are in sales you are either two months down with tend to go or we're entering the stretch run of your Q.. One One and first quarter year so <hes> either. You're excited her terrified or probably a little bit of both of those here. We are can't believe how quickly this year's going by but hopefully you're out there executing selling making your buyers happy <hes>. We're having a lot of funding on the show. I have a very special guest is GonNa join us here the second <hes> Megan Eisenberg who's The C._M._o.. Of Mungo de being a very honored to have Megan here today. She's just on so many things in the B._B.. Marketing World I think we've been mostly featuring on as guests experts speakers the authors on the sale sides of finally we're gonNA spend a little time next couple episodes on the marketing side of the business talk particularly to marketers that are embracing revenue responsibility that are taking advantage of the opportunity to convert marketing a cost center into a profit center at so important to marketing these days to make picture that what you're doing is driving business results and I can't think of a better person to feature than Megan from Mongol DB Megan how you doing great. Thanks for having me on. Thanks again for joining us. If you don't know Megan Eisenberg in in your in the B._B._C. space you must be living under a rock. She's on most most of the events conferences she sees being featured onstage in for very good reason she spent years working at Doc. You sign really helping that business grow driving their demand Gen and she is literally advising half the startups in Silicon Valley. It looks like from Your Lincoln Profile Yeah. Thanks very much for joining us. One of the reasons why you've been deemed by many physicians visionary and marketing is give not only the results you generated for Docu sign and others but the work you've done on the marketing technology side. I'd love to start their given how important it's been to your success in how increasingly important it is to the success of beauty marketers how and win and why did you start putting a focus on marketing technology in your career happened about seven years ago eight years ago. I had joined a company that had failed team. We didn't have much we had failed for the not a huge down on it and I had just learned about Ella without implement Alachua and I really just started to understand the automation of email and nurturing and scoring and from there they learned the benefits that platform gave as they went to each company after I kept bringing L. Quebec in and the ecosystem grind and there's all the connectors Viru webinars and and start to learn more and more about the different technologies and seeing the benefit on driving the more qualified leads the pipeline and helping accelerate our deal. I became a heavy doctor of when you started doing that. Did you face any pushback internally either from management team or C._F._O.. This used to spend the money on media or from a sales organization even an I._T.. Organization that wasn't used to marketing so much I guess sort of focus on technology interesting I was at that try rigo which was eventually acquired by IBM and I had such a good in case together on why we need the by the technology and I think because I had started product marketing and how to put a value prop together and fell to other people. I had to do that same thing internally and actually received received an award from our C._E._o.. George on at the time and you recognize that I am not one that by technology news certainly not marketing technology but the results were seen out of this and so was rewarded for doing it an implementing it successfully and so yeah initially I did I I had to put my own product marketing deck together to buy it and so the return we would have how long it would take to make back the investment. It's amazing to me. There's still a lot of marketing organizations that are still there right where you know. The organization either is used to more traditional media marketing group. <hes> just not used to marketing making and driving those I._T.. Decisions isn't that same process. Can you talk about sort of your your ability to transform sort of marketing from from hey. How should we be spending on marketing because that's what mark companies due to really seeing marketing as a prophet independent of technology but just revisiting the way marketing is viewed and really the way that you perform execute on that function? I think the most important switch that happened in two things one understanding that it was a partnership with marketing and sales and understanding their targets and goal but to make sure that we were not looking at volume of leads that it didn't matter the quantity was really. The quality and understanding how to measure quality and I was introduced the theories decision and really fell in love with the waterfall and the different definition and then how do I go mark those through machines. It's very objective. It's on subjective than Failsworth Pauling M._Q._l.. Because it meets the criteria the failed team except that and marked it because it is qualified they create an actual opportunity in the opportune closes the really focused on what was influencing seen opportunity creation and close one for volume and when you start to track and so that then you become more of a revenue marketer than someone who's doing media buys completely changes the way the organization so it looks marketing and now's at a conference last week that it was talking about account based marketing and someone who had a flip it response in the audience about like a wouldn't it be awesome marketing had a blank check and in the more I think about that the more I think the way that you just described Ed marketing the way you just described how to justify marketings doing and to correlate activity in expense to R Y if that's a positive equation if you can spend a dollar and make five the kind of isn't open checkbook caches cash but doesn't that AH give an incredible amount of freedom license to marketers if you find something that works scale that helped when you go through your budget reviews for the next year and you can freedom yeah for sure but you obviously caches cash and there's always trade-offs but is you know there's still plenty of marketers that are thinking about their business and thinking about their budget is just activities right you know they're like we do the show him you have to do it again because we always do it and there's really no revenue responsible behind it. Talk a little bit about how that works. When you integrate with the sales organization right you know these these because I think you'll goner the days when marketing purely creates a lead even if it's a marketing qualified Lee with agreed upon definition and just shoves it over the fence and says we're done what have been your best practices for working with your sales counterparts to create a more integrated in successful funnel faith on building the model together so looking at their revenue targets looking at the average field five from the path year the historical looking at the conversion rate that each of the stages and backing into one of that look like if we wanna hit these targets and also putting the length of your cell cycle and they're from velocity sampling to understand what do we have to deliver at the top middle of funnel for them to make their target and then actually working with them who they want to talk to you know here at at Mommy? Devi developers are doing awesome things with it but the ones that are taking it into production our I._T.. Management and Devi advent an operation so while we have a lot out of developers ten million plus were working on longer to be the ones that really wants to talk to you are the ones that have the budget and our managing it and production and he's mission critical environment and truly understanding that definition and making sure we're delivering the people that we're GonNa pay not that the people using the open source software but those that have a need manage their to be secure it and optimize it can imagine a whole lot of marketers or sales people disagreeing and with that definition and I think strategically it makes a ton of sense what I found in some cases when the rubber meets the road and you end up delivering a smaller number of leads right when you end up generating leave the don't go to the sales team when you're up into the right chart of volume now all of a sudden gets a little more complicated. There's an executive team. There's there's board members. There's investors that don't always understand that so what have been some of your best practices or what have been some of your experiences. I guess of you know trying to communicate that more advanced vision of pipeline contribution for marketing getting beyond pure quantity of leaves if I look at Mama D._V._d.. And we send eighteen percent of all leads that come in to go in front of sales and are assigned fails so we only assign M._Q._l.. How we show from the quantity standpoint is every four that we're showing ties to influence on the opportunity and the deal clothing and agreed upon the process? We've got technology and plays called Full Circle C._R._M.. Which is agreed upon way of attributing swords and influence that we've made the decision of the Organization of marketing them sale and how do I sell it? I'm very aligned with our C._R._O.. Carlos we have to partner we agree where we see issues. We work together to solve them at the very much a partnership and if I didn't have that partnership I don't think we would be successful or I would be successful so and part of that makes sure I'm listening to what they need taking start showing them the result and that I can back up what we're doing and why we made the decision we made and when we do something wrong we have full disclosure. Hey we messed up here. We're not gonNA do that again. Learn from it. Move on we come back to the break. I WanNa talk a little more about so your current aren't marquette stack of what you're doing the across the mentioned full circle which are doing with other tools. You're prioritizing real quick before we get their. You know one group. We haven't talked a lot about is the I._T.. Team I think you know I think the last time I saw you want stage at the series decisions conference your Docu sign and you're you're up there. I think with your or someone from the upside you know how important is it to make sure that you're tied in coordinated from the operations that I._T.. Side as well to make sure all this stuff comes well our involvement with I._T.. Medically that were following the security guideline that were doing doing the right audit that they have certain security threshold certainly been involved people logging in making sure we have authentication and the sign on process goes through our standard process so and no partnering with them to bring bring that we manage the stack all twenty technology. We managed that within marketing systems and op but we made sure that we respectfully worked with our I._T.. Team when it involve you. Humanity men men when it involves security or any integrations at the major of the blank film were Ella Awesome. We are so blessed to have Megan Eisenberg on the show with us today a C._M._o.. Mongo DB I see literally a world traveler avelar. She is incredibly busy. Currently dementia happy to have a couple minutes with her. If you want to check out more for stuff she's on twitter at 'em Eisenberg literally do a search on slide share youtube and you're gonNA find a lot of stuff that she's talked about a lot of her presentations and content good stuff. We'll be right back sales pipeline radio the way we do business is advancing faster than ever before in amongst disruptions. There's one pillar that stays standing through it. All the power of a relationship relationships chips are the core of everything so our today's organizations developing nurturing and leveraging them to drive success join Matt Hines and Sisters V._p.. Of Marketing Justin Keller for the on-demand Webinar the state of relationship relationship marketing and learn how your team can bridge the gap between relationships and Revenue Listen now at Heinz Marketing Dot Com. That's H.. E. I. N. Z. Marketing Dot Com all right pick it back up with Matt and the second part of his interview. I'm not the silver surfer anyway. I was GONNA put some Surf Joke in there and I thought no. This is too serious conversation so I can't do that. We get serious when we need to. Hey sales sales pipeline radio. Thanks for joining us today cited to have Megan Eisenberg here C._M._o.. Of Mongo D._v. if you WANNA hear this president earlier this discussion again if you want more of your team. If you want your executives to here for Meghan directly you'll be able to check out a replay of this show show on sales pipeline radio DOT COM but you can catch megan you can catch them our past guests all the episodes of sales pipeline radio available for streaming radio DOT COM coming up in a couple of weeks our next episode. I am so excited. We've got trish per Tuesay coming but we're talking today with Megan Edinburgh from Mongo DB. WHO's been a marketing leader in BBC for many many years has been leading doing particularly innovative work on the marketing technology side Mega? Maybe have you talked a little bit about what your current martigues doc looks like I mentioned having gotten started centered around Alachua you mentioned full circle insights from attribution standpoint. I don't need to walk through the whole inventory but maybe highlight some of the key focus areas and maybe key tools and technologies have really been sort of driving your progress and execution currently I they are core and really Alachua and we've got demand bathed which is during the personalization and append on the back end from a social side. We've got we use the sprinkler and we use incite pool and so in cycles really been helping Albina nerdier through so he'll channel Dot from customer advocacy side and really customer focused got in fluid for our advocate hub and we have gained site and then we've got from a really reporting standpoint Dan Point now on on wasn't working. What's not we've got high nine and then we do a lot of work with tracking and web the visible Google analytics optimized -ly? We've been working with Capterra on on our S._E._O.. Work and at the end a lot of organic work being done. They're inside you help with some append work as well on the side of Gut gag lamp and of course we're big fan of video vineyard. I'm acting really cracked. They gave us a stat. Our customers really engaged with us over video. We had over one hundred fifty thousand view in minutes per month and their average customer has fourteen thousand so a lot of folks are hitting with Mambi over video the university videos that typically webinars customer testimonials and though I'm definitely excited to see what's going on video. That's amazing as you went through that list. I can literally here hands cramping ramping from people writing down. What Megan's secure data writing down what you're what your stack is? Currently I mean you've been doing this a long time. I think but I think for a lot of people thinking about that list intimidated right and so I think you know if you were to prioritize things if you were to sort of addressing people that maybe a need to start from square one if there are particularly tools that are important five that are there particular functional areas that are particular sort of needs or marketing objectives that you think are most important to address with technology first and foremost the similar backout it took over three years how we were able to do it in about eleven months here just because of experience and understanding understanding the value of what we wanted but you're right you gotta start. I think the fundamentally at the start with a marketing automated platform so you're picking Alachua or Marquette or whatever your platform is have bought and then building on what you need and so as we saw we needed a video platform. We need a way to engage with our customers. We have our Belfort community is extremely social and making sure we had the right tool to highlight focus engage with the social side. You know we picked a toll pretty pretty quickly and that was the sprinkler one and incite pool and so yeah I think it's dependent on your business and how your customer the prospect pin gauge and so you know get your core platform in place and then figure out the channel that what they're going to help radio and then I think everyone have to optimize their website and so half are back what we do to optimize and the experience our web properties Dot Com and not work nice. I mean you have years of null using but also evaluating. Valuating technology solutions speaking to vendors <hes>. I know that a lot of people that you know even if they have experienced. It's very easy to get intimidated and confused. Yeah you got to go to Marquette. Oh conference you go to serious summit you go to dream force and your everything sounds great like you're gonNa hear a Lotta great stories knowing that there is going to say you don't need this so what are some of your strategies for filtering for evaluating their particular questions you ask or things you're looking for to help you sort through everybody and find the tools that that are most likely most valuable to you a couple of things every week I probably meet with a minimum of two vendors at least thirty minutes on one hundred fanning and keeping on top of what technologies are out there that part of it is continuing talking about it. I also do a lot of talking with my peers. I Love Nikola drunk over at Twi- Leo and got her head over at elastic just like keeping up with my peers. Hey what are they that they love and that they're getting good return or non and resolve and say I try and really keep up with my peers and then of course having used it when I get good result taking that technology with me to the next job and so my advice would be take the time to evaluate rate do it on a regular basis and then network active conferences talk to your peers in Africa what they're using absolutely. We've got a couple minutes left before we're GONNA have to wrap up but curious stepping outside of the tech world. What is your marketing not look like now join Mondo Mungo? I believe about a year ago <hes> just curious what you've done as you've built it. What are the functions you've prioritized? What are the groups in? You know you get into as much details. You're comfortable giving what would love to hear sort of how you're prioritizing staff and resources sources you grow yeah. I've known we're about twenty eight folks on the team and we're now thirty six. Fortunately I came into a very strong team of needing the Technical Support Award and immigration guided guide so I really started out by bringing in marketing technologists who was awesome at the technology awesome at the website and awesome at operation and so he really came in and and we know Ryan who are built out the team brought in some fronted web developers and hadn't we had an obscene market operates in automated platform team and they were awesome and they learned eloquent very quickly that one made bogus and that was and that was really getting of the data we have today. What are what are we looking at what working not with the current systems and then the second piece of it was everyone job with kind of only social and digital? It wasn't really a a a clear leader on it so I brought in a leader to run social digital that really cleaned up all of our channels and properties broaden sprinkler. Ben Practices worked with H._R.. With University in engineering it does dominating job this past year and then also beefed up our creative team gave them more resources because I think as a marketer the things that you need to to be the vet and we need to be able to have the fifth of the KNOB. You need the confidently product marketing team with I was fortunate enough to have and then you need that. The market absolutely sounds like you've done a nice job of building a well rounded team as you mentioned you know Ryan shorts was key on your team at Docu signs does not surprised as he move over but you know Megan Megan Gill Sam and others on your teams have a good reputation so nice field jumping of that to know so what does this. I'll go right. I mean I think you know moving forward. What are some of the things that you see as as trends that will continue to sort of home how beat the B marketers focused on any front it can be technology? It can be on channels. It can be sort of on the sales integration side. Where do you think B.? Two B. Market Increasingly Delina next to to continue. That'd be successful. I mean for me. It's still content when we looked at what was the number one thing influencing deal with our online collateral so making sure we have a good content calendar rebuilding now relevant technical information for our are different audiences. Certainly that's important I think social channels and mobile still very important <hes> things that we can do to get through the noise and however we can boost customers and what they're talking talking about and get them out there for that social proof and the peer to peer network in just like I I find technology via Mike Peers. I know people that are decided you think thing think Megan Eisenberg work very much C._M._o.. Mongol DB joining us super-busy really really pushing you take some times when great insights and Best Practices here. Thanks for joining us today. Sales pipeline radio join US again in a couple of weeks on March seventeenth where we back live at our new you time eleven thirty Pacific to Thirty Eastern. We've got Trish <unk> Susie <hes> who is a inside sales longtime inside sales expert recent author of the sales development playbook check out in a couple of weeks have Megan's episode on E.. PLAY UP ON SALES PIPELINE RADIO DOT COM. She'll be joining Aaron Ross Joanne Black Mike Weinberg and many others. We've included a sales pipeline radio guests in the past if you're interested in joining sales pipeline radio if you have an idea for a guest idea for a topic please please check us out. Let us know sales pipeline radio DOT COM. Thanks very much is apparently the silver surfer sales time Yes indeed you've been surfing along with silver surfer of sales himself Mannheim's from marketing kidding we ride the wave sales technology and sales ideas. 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Megan Megan Gill Sam Megan Eisenberg Heinz Marketing marketing and sales Ella Awesome Mannheim McDonald Alachua Marquette Ryan Rosebowl IBM Matt Hines Silicon Valley Megan Edinburgh Africa Alachua Justin Keller Mike Peers BBC
Ep. 31: How Intent Data is Driving B2B Companies Towards Better and More Positive Growth - w/ Brian Giese

B2B Marketers on a Mission

58:38 min | 4 months ago

Ep. 31: How Intent Data is Driving B2B Companies Towards Better and More Positive Growth - w/ Brian Giese

"Hi welcome to the be marketers on a mission podcast. i'm your host christian and one of the founders of consulting our goal is to share inspirational stories tips and insights from either b. marketers digital entrepreneurs and industry experts. That will help you to think differently. Succeed and scale your business. All right ladies and gentlemen welcome to episode of the beetle b. marketers on a mission podcast. I'm your host christian club and today mbo thrilled and honored to welcome guest into the show. Who is a true influence or in his own right. He's the winner of the two thousand nineteen ninety innovator people's choice award and his business as well as the solutions they provide give fortune five hundred companies a competitive edge for demand generation. So without further. Ado mr brian guys. Welcome to the show. Thanks you'd kris jenner. Appreciate you having me yet. We're really thrilled to have you on the shell. So let's just get started and you know just talk listeners. A little bit about yourself. What motivated you to start your company true influence because there's definitely a great story there. Sure thing so Appreciate that in. We'd been in business since two thousand eight. I started it with our came on. Who is a friend Who had a marketing automation lack farm. He's our cto now In fact over twelve years and we had this dream of automating the internet to become like an mar automation for the entire world right so rather than using animation system for your just for your website. You're pulling signals from all over the world. That was the dream in the beginning. And it's actually happening today so You know we're we're twelve year old company about three hundred full time employees We're profitable for eight years in a row. Where a privately funded you know the company's doing fantastic and We're just we're just we're proud of what we've done and where we're very performance oriented so he carolina that our customers we've focused on that so But that's sort of the short story and wonderful tastic story brian. Every company can brag about like third doing well and that they're profitable especially under the current circumstances. The sun always get nine totally get it. Yeah and if i if i understood you correctly you were talking about automating. The internet before was actually a thing. I'm not rich. Say that i think it is. I mean it was Both are an icon for marketing automation chops and younger. We grow up with al glide marchetto. Those kind of products and now salesforce and the idea was at the time if we if we could see the footprints of the people all over the world and associate them to the topics of interest that they're actually looking While they while they walk across the internet if you will And we could push that data into a marketing automation platform whereby they would then be nurtured. That would be interesting Because part of what marketing automation does as you can see us on my website by name and it can tell you what their interests are right. That leads so we. We've we've actually done for the world so we can see People by company by name who are interested in a series of of seven thousand or so topics that we have categorized within our dana days. And we're using data to drive leads right so we can actually email the right person at the right time. Which is what marketing on is intended to be right So we're not a replacement for alachua we're an enhancement to it And and We call that intent. You've probably heard that word We we created that we've sort of invented that term and stuck his point. Okay well that you brought up a really interesting point about data which we're gonna talk about later on But bryan you know. You're you're in a very lucrative and continuously evolving space and you know as you as you've rightly alluded to in the past couple of minutes Beetle be marketing automation software. And also the business of providing customers with i believe it was Something you mentioned in a previous interview. It's qualified an accurate data. So talk to us about how you've seen the space evolve a sincere companies inception. Yeah well you know. Data's always the genesis of pretty much. Everything that marketers do says the inception the internet right. It's all about data and the data is critical path so We figured out ways of triple checking the data for accuracy. In fact i own the word. Triple check if i mean we actually a trade park that word right a bunch of years ago and it's so important to the core of our company to own that and to be able to do it properly so When you get data from us it's going to be you know hundred percent and when you get lead from us which is simply data to contact record than recall this guy. He's interested in your company. Your product your topic It has to be accurate and so getting that to accuracy with millions of leads. A year that were providing is no small task so it's a combination. Really three things social media. It's said it's technology behind the scenes and it's people that are actually tripled checking This information for accuracy the the key is processes can do it immediately so it's enabled if you order thousands of leads from us. We could do it overnight if you want us to do it that way or it can set up sweet over time So it's those those levers and buttons that that marketers need be able to get accurate data at the right time busy. Let's say let's say you have five sales reps in another five hundred. Your appetite for leads is going to be quite different so you have to be able to turn it on and turn it off and the right time. We we know exactly how to do that. We have developed technology that can do that In that that took a bunch years to figure out in the early days. Now we're scaling. You know urged literally in the garage and my garage was in bethesda. Maryland narc as was in banglore india. And by the way we didn't even need you know for for two years while he developed a system a while. Yeah i mean we talk over skype at the time that was the short method never. We never met a physically for two years until i visited into you started reading revenue two or three years in so You know all all that is to say that that data is key. Quality data is absolutely necessary. And and it's very hard to find. I mean there's only two companies that can even imagine to do this. Most data is about fifty percent inaccurate. Own number doesn't work with the email doesn't deliver. That's pretty common when you go to the big players you know and and those big players don't have the systems to be able to make them as accurate as we. Do you know what i'm saying. Big players you know. Some of these guys are public companies. You with your donna. Brazile streets info great companies but the quality of the data isn't going to be there. That's why they're charging twenty five cents for a contact record. It were for that same contact record. You know we'll show the antenna. That person will show. That person is ready to be called ready to be emailed me nurture and we're going to charge more for that that kindly so it's a. It's a different kind of data. It's all contact record. But the is that the data that comes across Is the phone number works. The email works and alerts interested. You know the whereas when you buy just pulls data from some of the suppliers there's no interest there it's raw data and just half of the data is accurate too. So that that that's we came to find and you know in two thousand nine and ten. We started developing. This is a big problem. I mean at the time the only company that had emailed ada actually with any accuracy was a company called jigsaw. Remember jigsaw they later Jim fowler's very great guy he he was the ceo of that company later became our dot com. You've probably heard our and he runs that business now and that's another great business. He's he's launched in doing great with But jigsaw had the date they were the only guys that actually had the email addresses that accuracy so started the company with that data did a partnership with jigsaw to bring their data and we ruptured to generate leads. And we were the only company at the time it was orig- original thinking idea to use data to drive leads. Previously was done through often emails if you remember them and companies always opted in and then they create newsletter. You opt in we. We change the county the the process on its ear. And it's able to scale because if you can triple checking create quality You know you can scale that data with millions of records right. The pool is available. You know if you can triple check right so so we have processes in place. We got hundreds of people were unseen technology that we built. We spent a lot of money back into the company to this technology and accuracy is quality and accuracy is the number one. That's the dna of our company. Yeah absolutely absolutely well first of all thank you for sharing that secondly top about humble beginnings and you know you were telling your story you know back in the day when you started the company and thirdly the the points you brought up about data and how important it is to have qualified inaccurate data totally resonates with me in a previous life. I was a product manager and we spent we spent copious amounts of time cleaning data before we were even able to analyze it. So i totally hear where you're coming from know i. It's a constant never ending thing. It's it's not. It's you know it requires those three pillars. I was talking about. Most companies are just not willing to go through that. You know That are that are customers of ours and they rely on to do that and and and they needed it scale you know. Our customers are companies like ibm and microsoft cisco staples and kpmg and cap gemini. You know the these are the type companies that appreciate what we're doing because they need scale. They've got lots and lots of sales people that are looking for you know canes and they're looking for nurturing stream their timed and we have the systems to be able to do that and keep up with their appetite right so it's typic- typically we do business with companies are fifty million in revenue or higher is typical and those kind of companies really appreciate the quality and they understand the roi the savings of what you're gonna get. I using accompanied. Do this on your behalf. So that's that's how we operate right. Okay so brian. You know we're we're not the start of twenty twenty one. A here comes the understatement of the year. We've doesn't come out of what has been a tumultuous year for the entire world talia. I mean talk to us about some of the changes that you've made your organization as a result of the pandemic. Yeah you know. The pandemic affect us dramatically a very way and i'm happy to talk about that And then talk about certainly what. We're doing to accelerate twenty twenty one bit In march early march of that year. My wife last year. My wife contracted caught cova nineteen. We didn't know well. It's never funding. Hear something like that and she survived. Obviously it was three weeks it took to heal her in. I'm sharon a cinematic in that process but we were sort of in the petri dish of guinea pigs this more with the pandemic but we were tested. We found out that she definitely had i. You know i had a that. I was a symptomatic around it so we declared a pandemic as you now on march eleven but on march twenty seventh. You know there are two things i think. People are very worried about in the early as one is. Am i going to catch this season. The second going to have a job because of the disease runs oh we we Our leadership team decided to do a ninety day. No layoff policy. And i think that was the beginning of a change acceleration in the company now. Of course. I didn't know what was going to happen. Nobody knew what was going to happen. the effects both health wise and financially on the marketplace or us as a company. We decided to do that. Because we could do we were able to do it. And of course is history now that the company has done very well through the pandemic. We've hired the gosh. Where a little over three hundred people. Now we hired one hundred people last year alone So we're accelerating l. y. Is that well because our customers see what we're doing how we're doing it. They piled on with larger providers like us and they expect us to keep up the pace with them so there was a risk adverse kind of program going on but a lot of our supply chain of custody shane. Thank that helped us. You know we did things like instead of doing company meetings on quarterly basis. We get the weekly and we still do. Every we do a town hall meeting with the company we. I wrote a manifesto howard omri during this time and after its page we you know we amped up a you know a lot of the We paid holiday bonuses. We did 401k's. We did a lot of things that were for the people in the company to to accelerate their their dependents. I think in their their Their feeling of trust really with the company. That's so important to us to me personally. But then as a leadership team and that's been very helpful. I think so. So these things happen and customers rallied around us. We were we were. We were instrumental in causing at least twenty thousand different people to secure their jobs by mike calling. Ceo's and asking them to pile on do the same thing that we were doing companies that it sure we'll do that and it was tens of thousands of jobs. I don't really know so today. You know the smoke is clearing the back here. And we see light at the end of the tunnel Good this year you know. We're we're focused on. You know not not so much. The health people's health will that's critical path. And it's very important the we're looking at you know accelerating Our quality service in our learning so during the pandemic say three we decided to use linked in learning which i think is a great tool used to be called linda. Do you remember lynda dot com. Yes they lend a couple of years ago. So we subscribe to linda slash linked in and we require all employees to self learn through this portal. It is very very powerful. Very powerful the other thing that we did during the process. And we're doing even now is we're piling into linked to right because linked in is our our pathway willing to in. Twitter are the two justices that marketers. Go to. if you're not there if you're listening to this you need to establish a presence there. it's very important. You know we we have lots and lots of of a post going on and information. We are learning machine. There's two things dna that. I totally the quality and learning things that are going to carry through at this learning Is doing these courses and they by team three hundred. They posted on din. What they're doing how they're doing And i mean in fact. We have a summit coming up. I think you probably christian know about it. All that's done through being promoted through linked. Dan is. That's the portal to to get the audience to understand what it is. You're doing And how you're doing so We've been you know we've been sort of about pounding that drum for quite a while. And the other interesting metric that has helped us are are followers exponentially. We're we now. We just passed this week. Twenty four thousand dollars and we're taking on like a thousand a week so it could absolutely go higher. We started in pandemic in march and five thousand and we decided to pile on like our twenty four thousand year. Voices becoming hurt now when that happens and we expect to get you know. Tens of thousands of wars quickly as we can. We have plans. You know to do that through really really good educational services right telling we do how we do it Trying to train them on. What the thing with these things are and how they improve it and so It's it's been very good for us. I mean the pandemic is not good for all companies. in fact we had a couple of customers. one was a company called trip actions. Who is a wonderful company out of you know those guys. They're beautiful company really. Well run and emma kinda hurt him a lot because they beat the travel services. You had the whole thing just kind of a stop. They had to do a lot of things there but You know in to to regroup in april but but i. i think that that. That's a very innovative company. They did Into a different kind is off already built focusing on something a little different than travel plans and and they're doing. I believe they're doing okay now but my point is is that dumb. We had customers like that who were pre large businesses that were dramatically affected in a negative way. And only for us. We're all digital everything do is online. We've been using zoom for years before that we use skype. We you know we were built for us so in fact we have. The hashtag like din are built for this. Because that's the way we we were. We didn't change at all from a from a disconnection perspective. Like oh my gosh. Where's my office. We've been offices forever young since the very very beginning we've been encouraging companies along to do that. I think there was disbelief. That it could be done at this level. You know when you have millions. Dozens of millions revenue How many hundreds of people having you orchestrate meetings properly how do you. How do you communicate. What is that guy really working questions. The fact is we've seen and now we now people actually work harder. I've been saying that for years. Worked harder when they can control their lifestyle in better. It's not worse and it's not about controlling people not unleashing them and once the leash is broken. It's going to be very hard for of these companies. Think to come back and twenty twenty. One light is there. It's it's at the end of this long tunnel that we've all been waiting for it's happening now and over the next coming months. Depending fast we can distribute the vaccine is going to occur so the question is. Are we going to go back to these offices. That's huge question. And i think that's one that people are really a lot of companies are faced with the real question you think about that is what's gonna happen to the commercial real estate industry while yeah. I've been asking that since Since april or may last year right so it is really something to think about right. I think it's a big deal us. But but it it you know it all work itself through and You know we're focused. Most of our customers are in the tech world. I mentioned a few of them. We have lots of customers in the consulting services business health care you know we have. We have dated the consumer financial services or operation support in a variety of marketplace's As opposed to other companies that do say opting optin targeting certain market. You know whatever mark. They built a website around. They're going to be stuck in that market. And we're not tendered like that so if you guys are listening and your whoever's listening to this if you have a marketplace where you're struggling i think every market struggles with lead generation ended. But if you're in a market where you wonder where to go get leads we probably can help you. it's not all markets but most markets we can cover and that causes a breadth and depth that that Is is wonderful for a lot of different companies. So while i mean first of all thanks for sharing that up you brought so many great points in the in the past couple of minutes conversation if i may say so like what. You guys did Year for me as a case study in exceptional leadership crisis management was really. It was really something to do. Re engage with the immigrant. We're sort of just cruising you know like we were making it in march yes. They changed everything because we moved into a daily. We were doing daily leadership meetings. We had task force around everything from messaging to operation support. And i was going from one group to another figuring out where the where the cracks in the armor are gonna be like this for months. Nothing we did by the way and this. I think this is anything by the way not that we did. But that all companies should do. It is stress relief program so our website. You'll see but we talk a lot about stress release. Finally but i did. I didn't email every single day. Seven days a week to the company. Yeah for about four months. And finally i just said oh my gosh my fingers. My fingertips had calluses. I'm not gonna do this anymore. And it was it but but it was fun it was it was sort of like this is what i'm looking at. You should look at it to nothing to reduce the stress is. We didn't know where this was going right now. All the the the department heads do it. Thank god i'm not. I don't have to do in every day anymore writing a blog every day. That's up and i'm not that guy you know what i mean. I'm not. I'm not gonna do that but but it It did help a lot. And i think i think if we do it weekly we do it by the department heads and i. I think employees really appreciate. I really do ask them. They respond to them and and they don't get the just. Don't get tired of reading kind of thing so so we continue to do that. We're gonna continue into two thousand twenty one doing that as a part of our dna sophomore. Most fantastic muscle tastic. Hey christine clip here. We'll get back to the episode in a second. But i is your brand struggling to cut through the noise. Are you trying to find more effective ways to reach your target audience and boost sales. Are you trying to pivot your business. If so boca call with i'm like consulting are experienced consultants will work with you to help your business to succeed and scale go to. Www dot dot co for more information. Let's let's switch gears and talk shop here So in your professional opinion What do you believe are some of the best practices in terms of be marketing. Sales data integration that served the modern marketer based on the requirements in terms. Yeah you know. I i think the thing that people talk a lot about is this acronym. Abm yup into account based marketing. We've been doing account based marketing envied of the since forty years right. I mean it's been going on long somehow. It's been packaged by the analyst called. Abm and i think it's normal marketing right. You marketed accountants. Within the accounts there are people. People buy stuff account stove. So you have to. You have to nurture a set of accounts and then you have to within those accounts are people so we've developed an identity graphs where we can see those people within those counts so a company will come to us and say look. Here's five hundred. Cats is what i'm going after. We've we've developed the personas of the types of people. Here are the titles of the people we need to go after. We'll take that and we'll see what their activity is. Company is on the internet. And then we'll show those people that have shown interest in the these topics yards. Look so mark again mark on mission for the internet. That's best practice. It's it's not about marketing to companies. Yes of course we do that. It's about people because the companies actually don't buy things that people i need to know who's doing it right. So so we have this concept that we worked out with forrester series decisions couple of years ago called buying groups now. This is their words but a buying rupe are the people you know in. Nbd rarely especially companies that are larger. The decisions are made by one person is made by a group of people called the binder. We can identify the buying group how they're situated together in what they're active interest is her for each person. And then we can we can. We can Nurture them by sending them emails based on their activity and interest that that is i think very interesting to customers. The does you think counts. The people really matter. So we're the first company in the business business marketplace to develop an identity graph that actually works and it's part of our trump plans marketing cloud which you know we. We launched the public about six or so months ago including the identity graph and the you can see who they are. It's right there. It's like a blueprint. So i think that's interesting. I think it's best practice. We're getting we're getting a tremendous amount of Activity around like the from the analysts. They knew they love the idea. Obviously it's it takes down the path of of you know we're helping them promote their concepts. Obviously innocent obvious concept is. Yeah so i think. Abm either way you know that whole idea is a good idea. But it's been around a long time. And i think i think calling it. That is gonna go away. I think it's gonna be it's gonna work into something else You know it just seems to me and it's been around for what three years we've been talking aiming is always a beginning middle and an end to all these things before that it was predictive analytics. You remember that. Yeah you're right. And there's a bunch of companies in on it because not that it's not a great idea it is but to do it in executed properly is insanely difficult and it's just so via. It's insanely difficult. If it's done well anybody do it and you can talk about it the to do it. Well requires the mechanics to do it. Well of thinking. So predictive analysts went by the wayside. I think i think abm likely will to And i don't. I don't think the trend has sort of you know it's sort of repackaged around an old you know it's it's new packaging around the lydia you know it just seems to me but You know that we'll see. We'll see how that can thinking foresters now own serious decisions you know. They're sort of setting the pace now with pretty much. Everything does and that's their job. They're they're I've had long talks with laurey massu and You know about. She's the head of the the Analyst team we've talked a lot about this she. She absolutely agrees with these concepts. I think you'll hear from her soon. Our summit just come up in january twenty first. She'll be speakers they're likely will talk about this sedan. Spent absolutely i mean like you know what you've been even talking about these past couple minutes almost seems like it's a an call it whatever you want like a natural progression or or a gradual evolution to a certain extent it's an evolution is what it is very intel. Now you're be. The graphing wasn't available. You could see the company that was developed out three or four three. Maybe four years ago dr insight base which could categorize the companies to in categorize the company to a topic. And that was that was difficult to do. And it's done. There's there's a handful a bunch of companies that do it now and it's getting better and better right gets better with with with more work applied to it. In the data. Dictionaries are getting much larger right. We we have sixty million contact records. In our database applied to intend to the company tad and their personal activity through our identity graph. Just in that's unique right. That is the unique selling proposition. Because you know the ability to get to the person at the right. Time is absolutely critical about sending a bunch of emails. I mean you can do that and people do that. It's really about senator writing notes. The right person. The right time with are interested at the end. They'll become a response right. They'll clip learning to learn more. That's what we've developed and we are we are we can do for our companies or they can buy it from us. They can do it themselves. We have something called intent base which is a data feed. So that you can do some of this yourself if you have managed to be able to plug it into the back end You can definitely do that. Allergic companies do that Or you know you can have us do it for you. And we'll just you know the context that the right people and we can do that as well. So but i think we've evolved here and You know another interesting point around. This very topic is the consumer world. This they're pretty far advanced compared to the business world. Yes they've already. Proven that the relevance engine the intent and the identity graphing works right now. They know it works. There's a few companies are developed. This in in the in the past few years ago we were the first one this year to come out with business business so we had the advantage of being able to understand what the consumer companies were doing and how they were doing and that really raised us forward. I think concept was already developed you can type in identity graefin. It will tell you what it is now i. We didn't have an identity rap. We invented the ability to get to groups of people to tie them together as buying groups. Because it's again. It's never an individual a group of people with insights around this this topic. That's what we've developed right so the business world that's how it works whereas with the consumer world. It's a person buying something right. It's an individual contributor decision. And so that that that it's it was a complication that we had to work out. It took us a couple of years to do it. Do we have some great so in your experience like what barriers do think there are that prevents sales marketing from creating a smarter engagement. And how intense date. I give them more better results. Well you know. I think you know arguably it's it's really about it's about the this is not for the apart. Just gdp plug it in. It works. It doesn't work that way. We'd like to say does a certain sophistication marketing which were happy to teach people. How do we have customer called. Improve can see them. Improvise dot com. There there are a few hundred million dollar. I believe their public health care company and they sell software to to to healthcare providers. He took our data in two thousand fifteen and with them. We will develop a system that moves the needle for them in other words Website and look at their case study of the law. It was tremendous. I mean they were able to plug this end and and change the the return of the ultimate opportunities in salesforce. Pretty quickly But it does. It took to these two ladies some time. You know months of time testing and measurement. So we know how to do that. They worked very specifically with our team to learn how to do this. And we learn from them as wealthy supreme airs And they were able to get to go to prove the roi to the ceo. Right which ultimately you have to do you just so but we have those formulas. We can tell you how to do that. So it's the barrier to entry is the sophistication of the marketer to to create to understand the concept and apply to actual a practice that that's that's sort of the that's sort of the challenge you get some providers that their data just isn't very good and not producing very much resolves near the slows people. Now right if you buy dirty janey you're gonna get not much resolved. Yeah that that's how it works. I encourage people or website. Look at our case. Study page and improviser key study. You'll be there. And i can't explain it on us like they do but it's very very impressive. It just a few minutes. But they'll give you their story and we have studies from other companies to but they stand out because i think without those two ladies in without their sophistication coming in their ability to do this right to think through it and map it to their process. that's what intent is able to. It's like a filtering system right so you have to be able to say okay when when this person reaches this this this Level of tat diff- now time to call them or it's now time to email but it's like a scoring system inside of marquette alachua a sophisticated marketer can set up beautifully and unsophisticated marketers. Can't and i think at this stage you know took years and years for marketers to figure out score any there was a time when two thousand ten twelve when nobody you score. It was a constant eloquent. But nobody uses it you know and and and i i think i think there are scoring systems. I think they're the we've evolved. Word into using scoring and intent is evolving as well. Maybe lots of customers using it. There are other companies are also there you know that are using you know that that are collecting the data. The keys though. How do you get to the person. I think that's ultimately what we all want. Selena's a person so we gotta get to that person in the groups of people buying groups So i think i think as i think marketers as they study intent. And it's a big deal. I mean you know as you may know probably the number one area that people are learning about likely why are followers her. You know her followers on dinner. Getting so You know we're bringing so many each month. Because they were learning about the topicality uses thing. You know the available You know what does it cost would. Would you know what i measure. Measure measure it. You know so. We know those things. If you come to us we're happy to share with you send formation and You know we can. We can have us are back and again you can do it yourself you do it. I mean i. I i was talking with a out of data at sap not long ago. And he's he's like walk this that we developed on my show. Is i on this like what could this. Great app that we developed on the iphone. It was after that showed the intent of of customers or companies. I'm sorry not of companies. How companies in and he had the metrics up so that so that of a salesperson could download this thing on the iphone. It'd be on the road and be able to see it and it was. It had engagement metrics in on it so it was a well built application. That used intent. We have another customer that uses it for employee information. You know they say look you know. We've got one hundred and fifty thousand employees. I wanna see what they're doing. And you could see what everybody's doing and their level of it's not about spying on people by the way. Okay but but you can. You can see what what they're interested in as a person within a company so you can train them if your hr certain way you can bring it. There is out looking for the topic of cloud computing. You may want to teach about that right rifle. So it can be used in a variety of we have hedge fund companies using using a us to show what you know what dell's interested you know hundred things that there are moving toward. So they can they can. They can get that information they can. You know predictably not predictably but they can. They can factually see what's about to happen because i always say this. We're we're not predicting anything. That's not wordell. We're really. we're like the six o'clock news christian. we're we're like walter cronkite. Right years and years ago happen. But walter where he came to the market and he would tell his story at six o'clock stories of our our united states. it was truthful and it was factual. That's a we do. That's how that's how are. Data is used. It's not predicting what could happen right. That was predictive analytics. Likely why didn't work in. You know you can try to predict and develop malls. You can do that with our data. But that's your job if you wanna do that really what we're telling you happening over the last six months time and so you can. You can build your own models right so so but that's how it works. I mean we're excited about it. It's a it's a learning space. It's a it's a space that marketers have great stories around. It's you know we're sort of the the end of the beginning. The beginning middle of granda. Everything of the end of the beginning people are really learning as much people to know about it And we're not. It's not in the mainstream white yet for so from those sales people and those markers one or go to the next level. This is a great place to be. You know tat because it's gonna fuel a variety of different systems. Not just sales leads a marketing leads. But it'll fuel entire company you know to do a variety of different applications exactly and it's it's something that you've alluded to in the past couple of minutes. I mean you know these the not just the technology but the processes systems. I mean this is all part of that evolution. You're going back to the concept of or the aim of creating smarter engagement and make smarter decisions. That will eventually we all hope the yield better results tackling today or so and. When do you think marketing and sales that age old conflict When do you think that they should be using a single point of or a single view of the customer to segment personalized connecting. Close the well. I mean we do that. I mean we we as sales forces are are engine right. We our our marketing cloud to fuel on the back end. We use for example marchetto as mark automation. but that marquel is is We only use it for for high-powered nurturing how we're using the tmc triplets mark in cloud For the gathering of of top end data for for the fuelling of marquette and then ultimately the fuelling of of salesforce. So we're really at the high end of the food chain in other words You know we're we're the at the top of the stack if you will And you know by the way. I see some marketers. Which is unfortunate. They'll take this data and they'll give it to sales in. It's really not for by sales. It's intended to be nurture bring in. Somebody's interested in the category. Accompany what are you going to do that. While you're going to send those type of topics those kind of emails to that company us. You can see. It's this person this buying group sonam nurturing those people but you're not calling them not yet they you know. The the the creation of india. You're familiar with the inbound versus outbound marketing ripe. Yes that hub. Bought tout's of joe so much you know. This can create that inbound action to occur right. Because you know they're interested in other third research. You start nurturing them with our keto or with salesforce suddenly. Now you're on your on their Radar screen but if you it's probably not gonna turn out very well. That's creepy probably not. It's the same with marketing automation. You now so we advise people not to use us that way and And i think larger companies companies of which i've mentioned in the past you know they understand these things and they're willing to make the time investment. Not that it's terribly expensive. But they're willing to plug it in the right place sophistications to understand that. Right right You know hedge fund. They're using as an analysis tool they're using it as an analytics engine right not calling people as a result of it but they can see that dell is interested in these topics therefore This could happen. And if that gives that predictive idea that happens that would be good for the company and if you know if if you see a lot of the people that dell are going to indeed dot com you know. There's probably a problem right right you know. There's something going on that. You probably should invest it so so you have to You know any unfair advantage. You can get this league all you should go after and this is definitely fair advantages that more and more people are taking advantage of because it absolutely does work right yeah But anyway that that's what we're doing that's how that's how the market is helped us. Well that's that's fantastic. There's there's a few commonly held beliefs and that goes for a any area of discipline. Any area of expertise and yours is clearly no exception so talk to us about one commonly held belief for conventional wisdom that you strongly disagree with and why there's probably a lot of mining. I just gotta meeting launcher you. Know and There's a commonly help it violate. We have fifty positions. So you know anybody could apply is tell you know we're hiring pretty fast right now But there's a commonly held belief that you hire resumes. And i we're looking for people to experience in the role in i- i- i vehemently disagree with that. I think i think if you hire somebody with a positive mental attitude number one. Yeah the and and somebody intelligent and somebody. That's ambitious combination of those three things. You've got a solid citizen their own now if you can find experience that's good you know and they're gonna make more money as a result But but i don't think that's the first thing you should look at at all in fact we've proven that out many times here at trump. That's that it's probably not the best thing to look for now. We do do Assessments if you miss that when we bring people in to see if they're actually this way you know food if they're the right fit for that role reversal based assessments. And we're looking for these three things they come. You can't hide. We're going to be able to see these things and we're pretty good at that. So that helps companies scale but hire small very small companies can hire a resume and probably get away with maybe not as you scale into larger business. The experiences much less interesting attitude is the number one thing. It is the number one thing especially when you're dealing with things like cova there be something you know. They'll always saying that you're rattling the door rattling your cage. That is difficult to do business with as a company you know. There's always now this one. This something was much larger than any other something by far. But if you focus on those things that that's that's one distinction that i think that we've we've been able to push forward very well in the company and we we are backing it up with systems to admire these three things we have met. We started a mentoring program last year. That just helps with ambition. You know we started learning program. You know that helps with positive mental attitude learners people that are very much to martin typically are much more successful. They're much more ambitious and they're just easier to do business with you know honestly And and we've had a couple of our people leave know recently to start their own businesses. And they should do that. You know i i. I think everybody should have should be ready to do that. Those are the kind of people looking for So i think you asked me at this time. I was just came out of a meeting where we were talking about that. But i think there's a lot of things honestly christian that people do it. You know. I was in a meeting a few weeks ago. Somebody said to me well. It's the way it's always been taught like we've been doing. It has way for ten years. I'm like that's completely what you shouldn't say. The seven words that will kill a company or any kind of organization. It's the way it's always been and so you constantly looking for ways to challenge the company to not do that right. That's that might be have government worse healthy commercial businesses going to work for and you have to bring you have to challenge the norm and you know we started during pandemic and we continue a weekly messaging a task force meeting start selected people from all over the company's nine of us that meet once a week and we talk about how to message these topics out to our boys internally out to the world so it's it's it's a group that's a lot of fun to be with these guys and they. It's very innovative conversation. Where everybody's kind of equal and Command and say their piece and this is also the company and it works for us. And i frankly have never been in a company or sina company. That does that sort of thing you know. It's a innovation should be rewarded. So we're try- we're really trying to figure out ways to do that in fact our company meetings tomorrow. We're giving away a ten awards. Peter ten awards to some of our best people over promotions and stuff like that. It's all virtual. It's going to be three hours. We probably spent forty nine hours planning this meeting At least in a three hour me probably a hundred even now but the people coming together to make sure this is the best experience for them and and this is something that we do. It's different you know we go into any meeting. Any our attitude is education and motivation and they're equal things so so the objective is to educate one another right in the meeting. Which pretty but how do you. How do i get you to do to to feel better about you than you did yourself you know. How do i make you feel better about yourself when you're with me right. If you get a person to say. I feel better about me when i'm with you. That's a very powerful statement. And that's all of our people to be able to do. And i want our sales people to be able to do that with customers. Ibm the best. at least. That's what i've seen in twelve years and these guys are artists that in that's really really important. Customers want that everybody wants it right exactly. Yeah i mean first of all that is such a powerful mindset and it's also at the same time really inspiring while we're on the topic of being inspiring you guys have been working tirelessly on upcoming summit on. That's being hosted on january the twentieth. I believe it is Around the topic of accelerating revenue in uncertain times. And i think you've got a strike through under the on an so talk to us a little bit about that and why this topic so relevant to everyone and be where people can go to register for that yeah. I think there's still a lot of things that are uncertain the world but we we hear a true leads are certain we very well plan company. We spent a lot of time planning things including this summit coming up we've got speakers and it's as you said january twenty first. We have speakers from open text and salesforce and far as In honeywell are the heads of groups in the marketing area. The sales area or coming to talk about it. Talk about what they do now. There will be no presentations from triplets. Telling product presentations or anything like that. Those are so our discussion amongst peers. Were were to be interviewed by professional interviewers to figure out what they're doing because the customer says it the best right. We can talk about it. But it's best when they tell you what they're doing how they're doing it this panel discussions. There's some Fireside chats cmo's to her ramos from forrester perfume minutes and then bryant. Solis is going to be there from salesforce user data. What brian's title is but he's remarkable guy is like an evangelist. Kinda talk about what they're doing with our products and services and then of course. The exciting part is that we have that comedian. Howie mandel is gonna come in at at a. I'm not sure when he's coming on. I think he's drop in few time because he's very very very spontaneous guy very cool i in and he's gonna do the keynote as well at the end and people will be able to ask him questions. Virtually now for me. I'm a technologist. So all that's great but we're able to find a platform that's actually three dimensional. Okay so you should come just to see that. It's amazing it's amazing. What this company is done with their technology to show off a zoom call. It's not it's not flat screen like we do. We use him. It's actually three dimensional. It's very cool. And so you know. We've hired a professional commentator from a program called me. The boss humor that the me too. So we've hired that team to come in and do this for us so it's going to be a really great show and And i think we've got some very interesting topics to cover around lead generation around data around how sales and marketing use this information. Around how to build apps that would be of interest to your company So you know if nothing else. Let's laugh right. You know these these seminars. The able do. They're so boring. And i mean they're good. Get me wrong. i'm just you're so dry. So how do you keep your eyes up. It will how he's going to help us. Do that preaching coming to help us that fantastic. That sounds like an action packed afternoon. folks if you haven't registered already please a goan register for accelerating revenue in uncertain times presents our twenty first and i think What what are they going to register. Just go to our website. I'm looking at our home page. It's they ended up on the home. Page click the registration by filling object. Fantastic brian. this has been such an amazing session. I'm thanks so much again for coming on it's sharing. What's the best way for people out there. Connect with you like damn perfect. Gabe best way to do it. Just come in can act. I accept the you know. I'm happy to linked him with you. That's the best way to start a conversation. Fantastic brian You know again. The session has been extremely informative thought-provoking Really appreciate you coming on and all the best for the upcoming summit and please continue to stay safe. Thank you sir. Appreciate the time or thanks for nari acres. Thank you for joining us on this episode of marketers on a mission podcasts. Learn more about what we do here. I'm like please visit our website at. Www dot time dot com and be sure to subscribe to the show on itunes or your favorite podcast player.

salesforce mr brian al glide marchetto banglore Jim fowler cisco staples cap gemini howard omri alachua linda slash emma kinda skype kris jenner brian laurey massu
05 - C' del MESSICO in questo peperoncino

E tu yalli

42:28 min | 7 months ago

05 - C' del MESSICO in questo peperoncino

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S7E20: He Proposed But Changed His Mind

Don't Blame Me!

1:09:06 hr | Last month

S7E20: He Proposed But Changed His Mind

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Never been done before throw it in a blender eat it should it out adviser. I need to learn the whole thing. I need to learn the references right. Yeah i need to. There are two things i need to memorize. I need to memorize that word for word. Any to memorize. Tricia paid us his apology to fill up the franco for calling him fat. And those are the two things i need to. I have never seen the latter. I'm sorry what where she literally says. Fill up franko. I got i know like a lot of it. I'm sorry that i called you fat. I was holding a grudge from at time in two thousand fourteen. When you're so this whole thing it's like she hates hold franco and it's like why does she have different go and like her co host ethan. This is on the front of means. Podcast her coat was. Ethan is constantly being like different. Like what is this. What is this. And she was like bull. Don't like him don't like them. Don't like him and so us the audience and even have no idea why. There's like all this animosity there. She then calls him. She technically doesn't call. I'm not going to get into the semantics of it. but she then Apologizes to him and then said she goes filtering go. I'm sorry for calling you fat. I was just holding on animosity for that time in twenty fourteen when your wife called me a whore he's like. Oh my god like this is why that makes sense. And then she's like you are not fat like i. Oh and then her previous apology from like a couple of episodes ago she goes to different. Golic i'm sorry. I called you like i haven't seen you in a while like you might be less fat now with mike because not an apology. But then she and then she says you're you're a skinny legend and i m like fat cow And was not and then he changed their name to fill up this guinea alleged different. Go and i need to memorize that whole apology. Because it is iconic and so just so quick Interesting so those are. That's my homework for myself. I should tell you the number to call in if you is some life changing amazing advice. It's three one zero six nine four zero seven six at international listeners. You can record an audio message on your phone and send it to us on our e mail meghan podcast g mail dot com. We ask that you are eighteen or over. have your parents permission. You let us know your pronouns in the call you give as much detail as possible. Write it down. Read out practice. You've got to keep it under three minutes or you will be cut off and yeah. Your hair looks great today. This is another plug to patriot. You can't you can't. There's something in your heart because it looks black. No i have a gray hair rate here and the people in the patriot video will be able to see it. What oh you see your finger. Now i was like. That's a truncated stay. Same landau right there. What do i do. Yeah how do the different slowly becoming a whiz might be very ignorant question but you know how grey hairs have a different kind of texture. It is a different picture. Yeah i looked it up because moss has summoned his beard and erica very different texture. I wasn't sure if it was the same bills. Kinda plastic. yeah well there we are. I mean you still like. You're not old by any means and if we wanna go based on like also like a your age you're not old but also like you don't even look your age which is also not an older age you're set. I'm also seeing my family. And i'm like yeah you're never never going to i on the other hand. Every time i do that old age filter on tiktok. I'm just reminded of. I feel like you've looked the same age for like the last ten. Thank you didn't know you. Ten years ago but i feel like you looked as long as i've known you you've looked the same. That is the nicest guy. That like. robbie yeah. She's mistakes that she was sixteen. I do i look. I look at myself in the mirror. And i don't see like a massive difference. I mean the nose of course. Yeah no i mean. I got my nose down. I don't see like a huge difference in my looks. But then i always wonder i'm like oh. Is this going to be like. I'm gonna be that old woman who thinks that it like seventy eight and nine still like dressing wearing the same stuff that i own you should. I should definitely should but you know where whatever the fuck one aware. Oh why will i plan on being. Oh god speaking wearing things. I had commented on a friend's video I mean instagram posts about something and somebody liked. Might being i was like who is this. I went to her page in. She makes your pajamas custom. Outdoor pajamas like custom. Like you have to send her her your measurements and she makes the brosseau. I can wear it open like everyone. Just be prepared. It's not expensive. It's like you're the whole set bra. We'll throw all it and the pants just be ready. Holy shit i love. We're to get back to eventually filming in person together and you're just going to be there with like may because you're not doubting you're going to get into drinking but maybe you'll play khumbu. Cia do you put a show or alachua in a martini glass. And you're like aamir like that whole pajamas thing. And this is how we each come out of quarantine you come out of quarantine like that like a little red housewife. Who just murdered her husband. And i am going to come in. No makeup sweatpants make. I haven't shot what all week and a half anybody how we each the things that stay with us guys. Just get ready hot girl. Summer is coming since we couldn't have a full hog girl summer last year. Oh sydney is sydney literally has with bullying her sister. And i being like you need to get your eye on the prize. It's a hot summer. I need us to plan things out. Like it's not an option and jerry. And i both i mean you know should never i need you to get your head in fucking game. We're not gonna messing around. So i was like okay so i'm i am with me. There's no talking around just dying. Your birthday is like in there too. I know i was looking at airbnb is like to see like ideally will all be vaccinated by august and like the one hundred percent. Yeah mop sent me an article about like the cbc saying that you can travel once you've been fully like on a plane. And i was like if i would feel come. I can't have that. yeah the same way. I don't feel comfortable with that yet. We'll i also wait. I don't feel comfortable. Because i don't know where i'm going. Everyone's been vaccinated exactly. That's what that's how it's not in league. That's the whole thing that i talk about this or explain to people. I'm like yeah. I'm not necessarily so worried. If i personally get sick but like i don't wanna go somewhere especially if you're going somewhere like so many of these like vacation destinations are like the locals are technically it's it's more impoverished communities. Mike i don't want to go there and potentially bring an eight like a symptom or thing to any of that. So ideally we were looking at places within california and Would just be so so nice. I gotta lose my mind. I'm gonna lose my fucking mind. I have put together. I mean put aside a fund for me as soon as i'm back to nate. I'm getting my nails. Done getting my hair done getting. I'm getting lashes. It's going to be getting a resilient to well. I'm gain a brazilian wax for sure. You're not going to try to yourself. You've been watching a tiktok videos on how to do. No ma'am it's who seen it. It's just been bush's. Oh i thought you might like shaving miserable with it. Not that get bumped. So i i haven't even been shaping so it's just the same thing Yeah it's it's gonna be a wild time Getting massage it's gonna be great. Can't wait. I think of shrunk two inches in the pandemic because my posture get. I'm constantly cracking my back. Because i need like a serious massage so i think of good fair and also. I'm already sure to doesn't matter. I mean i needed to go to a chiropractor last spring when my pilates instructor told me that my ribcage was out of place and i need to go get that sex. 'cause i was like i thought it was just born like this and they were like no no not no and krisher told you did both you and lily have been like. Yeah your body is fucked up. Go guys all right. Well let's get into the update. Hell yeah. I was on episode. Twenty four with joson davis and in that video. I asked for advice to coming up two roommates. I was a freshman in college. Was like two doesn't take very long time ago. And then i guess answered another call that was season five episode twenty four and that was advice about nursing school versus like a job actually walk. Because i'm type one diabetic and the good health insurance Yes i've updates for. Both of them are so for the first one. You guys are like oh your friends probably know they definitely did not take one joscelyn's like to make you feel better. They probably are he though like now we kind of knew something was up so it didn't help like my roommates. I have my best friend from high school. Lived in the same halt for me and she was like she knew i was and she was like. Are you gonna tell your roommates. And i was like let me wait and get the vibe. And she was like all help. Keep your secret. So we like the next day. She'd be like yeah. Tailor made out with a guy at a party last. You're like okay. it's college right. We care so funny she was. She tried to get their vibe when she played she like not a good actress. She'd be like yeah. How do you guys have you guys feel about gay people. You're just like anita. Leave the room. She she'd be like. I think they're going to be cool with it and i'm like okay. Thank you support. Who loves us beyond. So yeah they were fine with. It was like no problems. I did you guys. Because they were roommate's like gave a device till removed out. Which i did do but i think it would have been fine like either way and then for the more most recent episode. It was more talking to my mom about like what i should do. And stop and we had a conversation and she pretty much the same advice that you guys did. She was very proud of herself. And i told her that you guys save that was trying to get into nursing school so you can have health insurance and try to do both Because i was also nervous. I wasn't gonna get into nursing school because the programs are applying to. Oh wait i do just want clare. I promise i was not a mean girl in high school of because you're like got. It was a nerd. Had like curly. Hair didn't know how to take care. Read and wrote fan fiction like wasn't cooled made is what a clarify that i mean. Here's the thing like the nurse girl trope. I believe it but then there are people who go like you know there are the people who combat it and like who go in for good reasons and all of that to not like is. I don't have a cab feeling about nurses more just like a earlier. Ena but i'm like you know like all like all mean grossing heisler nurses but not all nurses are mean girls from high school exactly exactly as clarify that so i did get into the nursing program. I starting relations thank you. Yeah so Much update how yes. That's so exciting. Yeah i'm excited. And i was going to be like dreading it but once i got in. I was very excited and i've been excited like since then so appealing for i think a lot of the time are like nerves and like feeling like inadequate or like stealing like like that can manifest itself in so many different ways and so then when you get it and it's like oh maybe i'm not i don't have all of these hesitations. I was just like using the fact that i was worried. I wasn't gonna get in as like maybe like i fucking like regular college. I was like. I want to go to college my cabbage. Because you know you're not gonna get in where won't even care but you know like like i think that a lot. I totally understand totally totally totally understand. I love when people have had like multiple. We always love. People have had like multiple calls. Who have been around for a while. But it's always the it's always like the craziest to me like when people who've like come out before and it's like. Oh yeah this is like this many years ago and my god like that's because you have like a huge life thing but then also like a like a year's kind of thing that i'm like we've been doing his verse so hung idaho. Yeah 'cause yeah. That was my freshman year college now. I'm a senior Yeah ooh fuck. Congratulations on everything. We can add to a resume that were mom approved so offering also very excited that i was doing with you guys today card telling high for us. That is mommy issues so that religious speaks volumes for me. That's amazing. wow we'll thank you so much. This is such a great update. And i'm i'm also very impressed by people who are not still getting as a medical field after like the fucking like two year like a year. Plus that we've had and all of that i think that's i also do think that's kinda rule out the mean girls are gonna be like that you're here yet to good healthcare yes. Y'all hopefully chuck yes. Guess fuck guests. Congratulations and thank you for. Updates may ask no problem. Thank good one you too bye. We'd love to hear it. I cannot believe that some of our advice was your roommates. Probably already know. Oh my god who give us that. Audacity good joslin said in that case like something joslin with do. Yeah and in a way that's like very like not like just. Hey you just like that which you know comfort and but also yeah not necessarily something i we would say. Now you like i. Yeah that's not. It's not necessarily an encouraging thing you're joslin present per impression is very close jennifer aniston impression. One percent for amnesty. Did it one time when you're quoting something from. I mean maybe. I doubt it both go higher in the register when they're like as rachel if she's being rachel rachel does that i mean jocelyn and they've got some of that similar jocelyn makes between phoebe and rachel. You're getting the first call. Let's do it melissa So i am twenty years old and i m a salutary as an i. Are she her so my boyfriend or ex boyfriend broke up with me two months ago and i'm still not over at the only for about two months officially but we were also exclusive for four months For the entire time that we re talking so this was my first real relationship. I never really inter relationships. And i had told him that i love him. Because we have been friends for about a year and a half before we data And so it wasn't super hard to pay you out that i loved him very quickly. I still stand by the statement. I don't think that when. I thought it was wrong or it was only turn. It was very much. I love you and i'm letting you know. And he broke up with news the next day because he did not feel the he thought he wasn't in a place to do or you say that in that he really overwhelmed by everything that is going on. I am still very upset about this. And i'm having a hard time getting over it. I also really wants to be friends with him. But i also listen to the episode with mossberg. The caller called in The guy who was into this one girl he was eighteen. And you guys don't be friends with him not be friends with the girl that he's interested in only thought it was going to elite somewhere. And that's where. I not with my ex-boyfriend as i do not think that i could be friends with him without it leading somewhere. I so called out in my emotions and it's hard to move on. And i just want your advice on house move on from this Because it's just now. I'm just saying the same thing over. I know very gonna. I'm gonna cry but i just really think that he's just a long special person in the world and it's that i get you know in my life you know and i'm having a hard time with this and i'm probably gonna ask therapist on it in a week when we have another session Much you guys all right. It wasn't covered. I would give you a hug. This sucks really bad because this is something that I think something. We've all of gone through and i understand his point of view of being like. Oh i don't want to continue on with this like your feelings are here. My feelings aren't there. It's fair to you to move on and continue like this but that's pretty like the next day after you tell someone you love them and then they break up with you like. That's a pretty shitty thing to do and i think right now. What you're doing you broke up. Two months ago. The broke up two months ago They dated for two months there. Four months exclusive for all of that first and then you guys were friends for like a year and a half before that and dating your friends really hard and i think this is kind of the example like this is the the outcome that when people talk about it this really like what they mean is because it is fit doesn't work out you are losing your friend as well as a relationship and i think it's great that you honored your feelings and you told him that and i don't think that if there's a part of you that feels like if you hadn't said that things would have changed or whatever knows that it wouldn't have and i think it's shitty because you can usually tell when someone is like more to you than you are into them and he should have just ended it before you. There was that verbal confirmation. That's like hi. I'm in love with you and that but this is one of those things that just it sucks but it it is going to suck less and less and less and then you're not even going to think about this this guy anymore and like i think it's important to honor your feelings and being upset about this break up but i remember every age that i'd like had a break up or anything that hasn't worked out with some guy i've been so so so heartbroken. Never going to get over any of this and then after a while you're like so god that didn't work out. Yeah yeah agree I don't know if it's like him like breaking off before she said i love you might have been she said it. And then he kinda kinda put things in perspective for him and he might have seen like. This is going in the direction that i'm not ready for. I'm not he's not ready for. It's just not what he thought. The relationship would be and i don't. I don't think that's on you on him. It's not on anyone but what happened was that he did break off before you guys got to deepen the relationship so like i kind of i would count it as a blessing because you could have fallen even harder for him and this could have happened later down the road but it still happen pretty early in your relationship that i know that like things right now seem like they're like really difficult and you're clearly so hurt over this and you think that you know like he's a great person and he's he is a great person making might just not be that great person for you. I think you just need to take time. It's not going to be something that you can just get over. Just take time for yourself. You know i mean at this point. You've probably talk to your therapist about it And they've probably giving you like action plans and things to help you help mend your heart. Yes but i do think you're spot on yes. Don't be friends with him. Now because it is part of that. And i will say. And i don't mean this in like a patronizing or anything but as somebody who has been in love and like had really fallen for people in has it not worked out in all of that kind of stuff that kind of romanticizing an idolizing and having those really strong feelings on your side and have not being reciprocated can feel like earth shattering and it's like oh i love this person so much and they don't love me back bob you will never the kind of love you will feel when someone is reciprocated and someone. That's a different kind of cats. A different level like it is just a different experience in a different kind of relationship. And when it's not reciprocated like you said it's like think of it. Try as much as you can like honor your feelings but also think of it as like a this person. Let me know. it's this person. Let me know that they're not in the same page as me. This person let me know that they're not my person and that's and it's not about you not being there. It's they're not your person and once you are with the person who is right for you and you are. Those feelings are reciprocated. It is a complete like you're going to be so happy that everything else didn't work out because this is who it's supposed to be with but it is hard and it's definitely hard like losing a friend to and i. I went through this like my high school boyfriend. I were best. i mean. We've known each other since we were in sixth grade but like we dated. We weren't stephens. Grade broke up like ended up becoming like best best friends in high school and when we broke up it was and it was like a mutual break up but we it was earth shattering. Because it's a friend and break up to and it doesn't mean that you can still have loved him and like you know think about that fondly and like can look back on that like there but like it is a rough thing to get over and the biggest thing that i can say is just space and time will make and then the next relationships you are in. You'll be like okay. This is a switch reciprocated thing. Yeah this is the thing that was missing. And i'm so glad that i didn't stay with the other thing because now i know that this is out there but it's hard because like that only happens a handful of times and so it is kind of waiting for that and like holding out hope for like that time that will eventually come in knowing that it will but it is definitely. It's definitely a process and yeah eat some eat some whatever you can eat that i was gonna say ice cream. But if can't have dairy dairy free ice cream like like just yeah just really like honored those like sad feelings and all of that and then make a game plan with your therapist also on this kind of separation and space to move on from this and i also i think after awhile you might not you might realize you don't even necessarily really want to be his friends so so so badly. That was the thing that i was like all upset about. And then i was like wanna be your fucking what i might have been like. The friendship was building upon romantic filling. It wasn't an you romanticize what that friendship would be if you guys were together. Then you've got together and exactly what mine was Totally sending virtual hug and fucking suck and route. I do recommend watching the twilight movies. That was like my repeat anytime. I must say i love them to go onto the next her nigga melissa image twenty four year old labor a lot of postseason they chart and my boyfriend is aquarius. We've been together for three and a half years never lived together for the past year and a half a few months in our relationship. He has composed music not with a ring or anything but told me that he wanted me. He wanted me to be his life but i told him that because it was so early in our relationship. And i just turned twenty. But i love them in one of those things too but i wanted to wait and see relationship now. Three years later we've been talking remarriage starting a family. He says he's even shown his mom wing. He won't see any lately. Though when i brought it up and after the tiny oven he proposed. He don't know if he believes their marriage anymore. He says why. Do i need a ring piece of paper from the government to prove my love and loyalty to you and he doesn't have any like examples of successful marriages in his life His faith single mom and His grandparents bert avoiders. None of his aunts uncles are married and they all have kids so tennis like just her family. 'cause everybody in his life ahead But for me very traditional i love you know. I wanna have a letter when he married from his wife and i want to be married forty start having kids and so he and i both know that like we're person maybe want to her batali lies with but we just don't know what that's gonna look like moving forward and i kind of feel you know a little blind by appropriate and a half years into this. I'm thinking that it was all leading towards marriage and now three and a half years later. He's saying that's not what he wants but but he wants to be together forever and to start a family together that we don't need to get married so i just need sort of ice fun to. How'd you talk about this and how to move forward and how to make a relationship work moving anyways. Thank you so much have a great day. Basis is a hard because there's one of two auctions. He's throwing you off this sent and he's going to propose or he doesn't want to get married and he's like being like that is just honest and i don't get your hopes up like maybe he's gonna propose like maybe. This is him throwing off the sentence. I mean i'm gonna fuck in hope. That's what this is. Because i think three and a half years into a relationship where like you have talked about wanting to get married eventually to kind of just completely. Switch your tune and not in like a. Hey let's have a sit down conversation. I have realized that. I now don't want to get married. If this is something that like you are okay with like but like joining mean like it needs to be like if marriage is a deal breaker kind of conversation and so he's not bringing it up in that kind of space that that's odd to me. Yeah i agree. I would have a conversation with him. Sit him down and be like hey Three years ago you were ready to get married. Just tell me what has changed. Let's just have a conversation. Talk this out because there might be like just like some specific something specific that happened and it lake. It changed his thoughts on marriage. But if you don't know what that is that's just unfair you. I'm curious where you are at win this car. He started talking like this. Because if this has been three weeks. I would give it a couple of months because he might be this might be. You might then end up ruining. He's trying to throw you off his Tracks or proposal. And if you have a sit down talk you're just gonna have to figure out. Are you ok. Potentially spoiling nece. I think we're uk is the place. I want to get married. And if he's i don't wanna waste my time. Like i need to know if he's your oppose. Just let me know. If you're i don't wanna be. I don't want to be thrown off. I just want to know that. I'm not wasting my time because this is what i want like. I want to be married to you so those proposal can be a shopper. Is like i don't need to know win. That's happening but like are your intentions toward because that's a major conversation. Are you're in real intentions for mayors actually. Do not wanna get married anymore. That's not something that you should be playing around with. No and i think there's also this idea that you need to throw someone. This happened with one of his friends. He like was really trying to throw his girlfriend Finally like talking about. Hey let you know like she doesn't really care so like you're trying to throw her off so she'll be like super surprised. I'm like she doesn't really care about much about getting married. So like you need to check yourself before you get to a level of. You're trying to surprise her so much then. Just become a massive asshole. Because you're not getting kind of. We are pushing her. Yeah like you're not getting that kind of like reaction out of her because like marriages and like she's down to mary but like marriage isn't something that she really cares. That much about like just fucking do it and like she'll be surprised and excited but like you don't need to keep pushing this kind of like throwing her off the scent because it yeah like the proposal should be. This is not the marriage like not like knowing about the marriage itself at you. I don't think you should ever be surprised that you're going to get married bike to that person who your relationship that you should have those conversations like so yeah 'cause you need to have that sit down talk and look like you say l. That's like if this is a us trying to throw me off the scent that you are going to propose like i'm just letting you know now that like mrs not. I'm not enjoying this and like this being her. Yeah in the process of this if it's not and if this is something you really have changed your mind on like we need to have a conversation as to why because like i would like this is important between. This is a deal breaker for me. So let's figure out. I just don't so i would lose my mind if ostad that so the the the saying that taylor start a family. I in all of that like your priorities can change like that can change as you get older and something and like i have talked where we don't want a kid like now or whatever it like. We've talked about like the timing of things like oh we wanna get engaged or get married before we have kids or after an all of that and those kind of things do change but like their conversation to have with your partner to like. I would understand if he's like you know. I don't want to The maybe we have kids. I like i was thinking about that but then that becomes like a. What do you think not like. This is what i'm gonna like. There are two parties in this. So yeah just yeah. If if he's trying to throw off his son like both of the both of these instances. I'm annoyed me and i'm like come on. No one needs that emotional turmoil. Like if it's no it just to try and have a surprise. yeah. I don't think it's cool me there and if it's not that bad then it's also just like that's not cool to kind of consider you're like not really have any not treat this as serious as a conversation as it is. I'd like no. It's no regards for your feelings on either. You know well let us know what happens place. Because i'm i'm very curious. What his and if he proposes please send us like the picture the video and we can yell at him for putting you through this. We're gonna take a quick break and we'll be right back. This podcast is sponsored by better help. We love better help on our show they have been a longtime sponsor of. Don't blame me and that's because in this house. We live for therapy. I would love to have some sweatpants essay therapy on the. But i mean should we make some arch if you're feeling depressed or you're struggling with relationships. Maybe having difficulty sleeping meeting your goals dealing with anxiety anything like that better offers online professional counselors who can listen and help. We love therapy. I love therapy. Therapy has been such an integral part in me myself and really getting a you know grasping a handle and truly a more deeper understanding of my own mental health. Which as i always eight equipped with the tools to take on life and that is something that i think everybody should have to and sometimes it's really hard to find a therapist area that might specialize in what you need and what you are exactly looking for and come on. Let's let let's all stay inside. Focus on the those connections that we can have. That aren't necessarily in person so better help. We'll assess your needs match you with a licensed professional therapist and you can communicate with them and under forty eight hours wherever you are in the world which i love because again. It's fantastic fantastic fantastic. And it's not a crisis sign. It's professional counseling done. Securely online offering a broad range of expertise which may not be locally available in many areas. 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Okay let's focus on Suffer per wearing my hair wavy. I think this will be really great. And then i also i want to try their oil like there's so much i wanna try the shampoo and conditioner though it's fantastic my hair fields so clean but not the kind of clean where it just feels like dry in squeaky. Not like that. And it doesn't have any build up a residue. I love it. Pros is a healthy hair regiment. With your name all over it. Take your free in-depth quays and get fifty percent off your first order today. Go to pros dot com slash blame. That's p. r. o. s. e. dot com slash blamed for your free in-depth hair quiz and fifteen percent off. How low we are back from our break and it's time to get into the rest of the calls. Hi melissa i am. Nineteen clears my prononcer. She her. I am a freshman in college and university review has an in person classes and social distancing and massey I just wanted to clarify that story. 'cause it will kind of make sense a little bit later. I an art major and my join class in the fall I started getting to know this guy who that right across the name and this semester. We have another class together and offers it right across from each other. They like our desk. So we basically are like you know sharing a death but obviously very far away like six at least So last semester we kind of snapping and talking a lot and i started having ceilings for him but i didn't really wanna recognize them. Because i think that. I thought he was of too good for me like those so kind and sweet And i think. I really thought that he was too nice for me We've got a one time. But i think it i think it was a day but he didn't really clarify and we haven't really hung out outside of our our class which are two hours long and we're working so we pretty much just are able to talk the entire time. The problem is about a month ago. One of my friends to was still in a year long relationship at the time told me that she thought this friend was really cute and kind of liked him. she said it very nonchalantly and almost jokingly which i was immediately really like a little bit thrown off by because she wasn't a very monotonous relationship at the time the time that i witnessed that relationship she was like mainly and like. I'm not oversight manipulating them. The whole time that i was being together Which is really sad. 'cause he was also just a really sweet and quiet guy Well she broke up with that way friend and is now dating my guy friend who also wanted of the times people And i just. I just want to hear your thoughts on that and what i should do. Think much slept cast. My thoughts are my friends are but like did she know that you liked him His if she didn't know then you can't. You didn't mention that to us. So that's all i can. You know goff other. She didn't know but you light ten. Then that's not any. He didn't know that you liked him. Because you weren't forthcoming with his feelings so with your feeling so if they got together then you know. They're neither of them are at fault for this. Yeah i mean. I don't think they. I think that you think she's a shitty person. So i don't know why you're friends with her and i think like to decode this. I think part of you wants to like warren hammer. Like tell unit mean but like. This is what we talk about with ulterior motives. You have feelings for him and she's toxic. She's like a shitty person in relationships. And that like you should tell him that and like warn him but you have something to gain in this because you like him. And i'm not discrediting and saying that. She's not like should person. But i will say why have you had conversations with her about that. Is one of my friends. Just treating like with emotionally abusive to their partner. And all of that. With what the fucker you knowing like europe like what the fuck. This is awful like. Why are you treating this person like shit and benefits. There is no change and there is no like wow. I go to therapy riot. I'm dealing with all of this other shit like i would wouldn't be friends with that person anymore But yeah like you said like if they don't know especially her like if he if he had an indication or like in he just didn't reciprocate feelings and he didn't like outwardly. Like reject you and tell you. That like hey. I don't have that but like if she didn't know what she's supposed to do because she can't just assume yeah and you can find people cute while you're in a relationship with someone else in like again even if she cheated on her boyfriend with him that if she didn't know that you had feelings for him like it has nothing to do with you. Do what i mean like. As far as like from what you've told us like you know the only connection you have is being a mutual friend of both of them so if she was a shitty to her past partner and she is like dating this guy or whatever unless she knows that you have feelings for him like you're not in that story do they mean like you're not really involved in it to her knowledge and if she did know then like fuck. Both of these people freight you know kazan. Yeah i think it's easy if she didn't know there's nothing you can do about it. And she did know than she was in your friend to begin with. And this is one of those things like you would have to. You have to be explicit. It's not like oh well like. I think there were lots of signs. They're like i never outwardly. Said it but blah blah blah but like you really have with their you know if it was a date or not like it could have just been after class. You guys just went me. You really have to lay out those things kind of like explicitly and like because even if there's an indication you know you might things on students like my friend might like them but like i think he's scared. She said that to me and library. So but yeah regardless of how. This happened and what they knew. I just think that like you have too many. You have feelings for him so you need to pull away from your friendship with him to get over him. And i don't think you like her as a person or as a friend and she sounds kind of like a shitty person and so i would end that friendship too. Easy peasy next. Yes do it. Let's do it okay. Lysa i literally have been trying to call up this forever. years old the and moved to a new city is on my who is it virgo on facebook and we city we really so at least just like you know and just like after you're live And we have all kinds. And i thought she was still And they did have feeling about it. And i did follow it and then we moved and shortly i realize how It was not a good match. I felt there you suffocated like i have my own. Freedom began to tell her every single. Time where i was going where i was I was doing like that kind of stuff that i don't even do with my partner or family honestly and just like very controlling behavior. That was making me really. I don't know. Just and then. I was like going back and forth on this. I should move or not. You know the the other for bonk. I like all my other. You were consumed. I was not passive. Like i tried paying. And you're like don't please let yourself stated when you communicate not way like you know a couple of times like i need to be able to go on my own and like be around person but i definitely was not But not the move. The studio does not have a mush in natural leading studios are expensive. Anyways it didn't make a mistake. I'm going to move to a new city now living by myself. I made a friend gotten scared. Was i tr- abrupt. When you know that you have to move and leave behind. I don't know how. I'm feeling by talking to serial ghosts terms. I think you did the right thing. If it doesn't feel right in your gut thin your with your. And i feel like you're going to be happier down the road it might. It might feel like a little nerve wrecking right now like Like you might have like hurt somebody but you have to you have to do. What's best for you at the end of the day. If you didn't think it was the right situation being you're not going to be in that a now you're You're happy with where you are. So do you and doing the best thing for you in a situation is inherently doing the best thing for the other person tale. Yeah like they just don't know it and like you not wanting to be her roommate not working out. You weren't going to be a good roommate to her and her whole time. Yeah and it just like we've had you've heard that we've had so many fucking calls about like horrible roommate situations and all of that kind of stuff and my biggest regret with by college. That was not leaving sooner and like not getting out sooner. And like i'm so fucking. And i had some people will be like stick it outlookcom like i'm like so fucking didn't stick it out like are we should. I've fucking done all of that. Sooner and i think it's roommates stuff is hard and like your young and this was like that. Sounds like the first instance you've kind of had with that. A roommate drama will for the entire duration of having broom mates. There's always new things are going to rise. There's always going to be something like like it's dating. It's like you have to find that right match and it sucks because it's like it's like getting mayor it's like married at first sight and then having to get divorced but that's what being roommate is. It's like okay. Just sign a fucking contract moving together and then we realize oh shit. This isn't working. So i think we have to jump through more hoops to get there. But if you just take away like that roommate relationship and think of it as a friendship or dating or anything like that. It's completely normal that after x. Amount of time you realize. Hey we don't exactly match. And i think we can feel a little bit more responsible when their contracts involved in it is more of your living situation in your life and all of that but at the end of the day like those you have to. Yeah like you said you have to put yourself first and it ends up putting her first. But i wouldn't worry about it. I think it's there is something hard about like that balance of finding a new roommate of like nathan should there not a serial killer but then also not becoming like close friends with someone before you've met them in lived with them and then there is this like day field this kind of expectation or something it is. It's a very hard thing to deal with. But she said she's living alone. She's gonna live alone out ryan duty. Oh lots of bright light. You're going to be doing just fine. I think everybody who has the financial ability to live alone at some point totally should. It's a very one hundred percent of agree you learn so much about yourself. Learn more about myself living alone than like being single currency. I lived alone while being single. So i guess i actually can't make that claim goes for leisure but i will say that It's great not having to depend on other people and it's it's fucking awesome. Well you have our seal of approval granted you again. We goes so so. Don't blame them is our segment where we have a listeners. Call in with advice for previous. They've heard them. They're like hey we have personal experience or warm. They agree or they've got the different sort of insight to just give give another perspective for the same perspective and they just tell us. We're doing amazing So this season seven episode seventeen and And the original call. The hauler was Her roommates are like jealous that she thought that they might be jealous that they were Shoe spending so much timeless her boyfriend. He made a militia you she pronouns and i in calling a response to a dumpling. Then she didn't set it up in seventeen about the girls who has roommates. You're really pissed off the payer I ain't her voice so much. Well i don't have a few in question with one when the girl was Inner single out of the relationship. How many days where she spending her roommate. I know that that to me is personally show with with An ex friend of mine when i got into relationships have sunny seventy week with george and We start spending like three or four days together And then that caused a lot of resentment for her and she ended up being really jealous situation. And i mean all also my second question and all your roommates be wanting relationship when working on The goddess from they really wanna relationship. They you you know kinda bouncing around drought different relationships and fusion. Easy for you. I think it's really understand that my mom told me a lot is the misery loves company so if they are really stuff that they can't relationships and they you know it seems like you're always in one. They'll probably all binding factor. They're jealous of you whether or not that's what they're working at least eighty which is really difficult I really ambled is with you in that situation. Minocin really. there's an awful amount of time with him or buying and honestly i'm wondering if the predicament and problem as the roommate roles in prefer being with our friends you know because they don't have a partner Or if maybe you're just a relationship girl which doesn't mean you're not girls go just means that it became downswing comfortable or your broth comes to spend time with your boyfriend which. I don't necessarily think the thing. But i think that you and your heart pammy predicament. They're also looking for mission to just not go about that friendship whenever you got me with them by all means do it. I think that they're just severely new and don't know how to manage their new probably ordeal at our honestly professional insecurity about not being in a relationship or not finding a partner. That is what they are out. Okay i hope that helps. But i i disagree with everything but you know that's your opinion That's penn you have see. I know some real housewives quotes. I've just gonna say just to have like because like i. Your opinion is your opinion but because we don't have the original call in here. I want to like offer again my side of it because i think people will agree with both sides. I personally as someone in a long term relationship. I really don't believe in the idea that people single people's dream and like everything is revolved wanting to be in a relationship. That's like a jealousy. Kind of thing. Like i really hate that narrative because by just don't i don't buy it like who's had issues with friends who've been in relationships might issue was never jealous of you. I want to be in a relationship. It's like you're being a shitty friend. i don't give it like yeah. I i'm single. I do wanna be a relationship now. I am genuinely happy for my friends that are in relationships that are nice relationships that you know Add to their happiness. Not take away from everyone else's happiness ya. I just like toxic. People are toxic but like being single doesn't make you toxic or do shitty things or anything like that and yeah. I just don't like me. She might just be shitty people. But that doesn't mean that that is their shitty. Because she's in a relationship they just might be shitting people period. Yeah they just showed their true colors and like turns out there shitty like an. Yeah i just don't like that. Of like i don't know i don't really like the. Oh this person's jealous of me as a reason for anything. In general i just because it's not constructive or helpful to either party and like even people talk about like hate online like. Oh they're just jealous there. No that's not helpful to me. What's helped me. Oh this person probably going through a lot of stuff and they don't know how to deal with their own emotions and so they're projecting but like that whole jealousy thing. I think it just kind of into this. Like hetero normative Like nuclear family like getting married white picket fence like that kind of thing which is just super dated and you know fairy princess like we should that relationship stuff and then also being if you are choosing to hang out with your partner over your friends every time you need better friends that to me is not just like a personality. Trait like prefer hanging out with my partner. I'm more of like a boyfriend girlfriend kind of person that a friend person. That's just you don't have the right friends like and being a girls girl and all of that kind of stuff like is something that like we as women should all aspire to be and like not being girls girl is like. I'm not like other girls that kind of narrative of like internalized misogyny defeat. Triarc telling us like women aren't cool and like we shouldn't want to be friends with other women. That whole reason is because when women band to get like that like not to make it like super political. But it's like when you see what happens when women get together and people get like the metoo movement all of this kind of stuff like there's a reason why like the patriarchy has made women feel shitty about themselves for so long. It's because they don't want women to like captain. Marvel don't want you to tap into your own fucking power so i i'm glad that she. The caller caught herself and was like you can be both and all that but you can be like a girls girl and being a relationship. Those things aren't mutually exclusive. But if you are choosing to hang out with your partner over your friends every time you need better friends and also you are not a good friend. So you're not going to be treated well about your friends. If that's the case then your friends are essentially just place holders for a relationship and if your entire worth is resting on a relationship like that something to unpack your friends your own life and all of that and yeah you can be shitty people like you said it's on the if there should people there shitty people regardless if they're single or not there's nothing to do with it and i respect your opinion. I just feel like i needed to. I think we need all sides of the story. And that's the problem. Yeah we can give it by so for what we have. Yeah and i just don't want like we gave this perspective in like the original call and disney is and we knew this was coming like this is the alter alternate perspective. But i think if we're going to present that one we have to still present our opinion in the other. Because i think would really love an update from that original. Collartoo them with some more details. Well that is it for episode. hope you all enjoyed. We did it. We did it. We did it. Who may or the explore does doria. Okay if you'd like to call in for an upcoming episode you can leave us a voicemail at three one zero six nine four zero nine seven six and international listeners. You can send us an audio message at megan podcasts at gmail.com again. Let us know your pronouns. Keep it under free minutes. You got be eighteen or over. have your parents permission. Write it down practice. Melissa loves when you write it down and your concise clear move. Oh gives her kids on almost as good as cova. Tish you're so again we believe it. We follow us on instagram. Don't mean pod check us out on such a premium ad free. Leave us review on the apple. Podcast app and videos over on patriot. We also do livestreams twice a month for five dollars and the videos are only one dollars zero literally getting between three and four video versions of the podcasts. For only a dollar and it helps us continue to do this show and if you have listened. I don't remember what up what it was but will also help us. You know potentially expand the podcast universe. Our podcast universe. Not like the podcasts podcasting. As a whole but you know podcast featuring us so man you love the smooth. Susan sexy susan smooth meant soothing. But i was gonna skip over that in the you just had to l. I did anything That you wanna promote go to my instagram fall my instagram. That's what i would like to to promote following me. Instagram is wanted to get to ten k. So i can swipe up for that's it that's good. I would like people to follow me on instagram because app. Because after i came for little people who are upset about it is i. I don't know how those people were still left to though i don't either. I have a theory that like people who found me from like my hacking. That kind of stuff Just follow. I don't know but they still have been around the last few months and mean thoughts that you have weren't anything new that you haven't covered in the last year. You know it is a really good question. But it's also what happens when you have had an instagram account for. I've been on instagram for like over ten years right i think so. Yeah so i've been on for so long so it's also just a bunch of old accounts that essentially they just Like when you've been around for a long time you will naturally lose followers So i need to book a cw. Show host me back up or you can follow me if you have multiple phone me on your regular count. Andrew fiesta yeah i appreciate you follow me. I don't care. I just want to be able to for it is show. Yeah By my book by presets and wear a mask get vaccinated if you can and have a blessed day. Don't blame me as a production by me. Executive produced by melissa demons edited by heading and music by ryan. Hunter and giacomo picasso.

joslin melissa Starring nagin Golic franco brosseau krisher joson davis joscelyn jocelyn rachel rachel sydney franko university of northern iowa rachel airbnb alachua landau Tricia
How to Measure Event Performance

OC Talk Radio

20:18 min | 1 year ago

How to Measure Event Performance

"Here comes again lunch. Lippi the same old same old or you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs APP firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery <music> <music> welcome back. Everybody's time once again for another episode of S.. L. M. A. Radio Brockton behalf the thousands and thousands of members of the Sales Lead Management Association the has to do it was sales. Lead management sales marketing probably starts here with the S. l. m. a radio show. Today is always privileged at least with us the original founder man behind the Movement G._M.. Obermeier Hitching Hello Paul this is Jim Alber. Mary Heroes Today on S._L._A.. Radio is our engineer Paul Robert. Thank you all for getting our program them up and running today. Who'd you bring with us <hes>? We've got a special guests. He's been a guest on the program in the past Belda or C._E._o.. Victor Cafes and Victor is GonNa talk about how to measure event performance now then trade shows corporate showcases says and user events have grown dramatically in the last five years and and yet the need to measure of that performance beyond the ego boost of having the event is often evasive teeth. We'd wants to measure the are alive for events that are into the mid high six figures in beyond bond and yet many people in marketing can't really do it. Victor is promised today. He's going to solve that problem now. Victor is the C._e._O.. Of Alydar B._B.. Lead Management Company that specializes in events belet ours proposition is based victor's experience as a receiver. He's been in a sales role for over twenty years. He's a consummate sales manager and see you both as a direct contributor and as a leader of a large enterprise sales team. I'm Victor Welcome today. How can people measure event performance? Thanks for inviting me. I always enjoy having this conversation with you. Jim and I appreciate in love this topic I think about it every day of the week even even on Saturdays and Sundays. I don't know if I can solve the problem. I do know that it's a challenge for pretty much every company out there measuring performance and really the way that focus on this is start with your event intent. Why are you doing in the event? If the intent is to generate demand then your goal should be to measure your performance against that intent in other words. I am producing an event. I'm going to have these twenty presentations or breaking sessions. Those twenty presentations are breakout sessions are unique in and of itself and they're all intended to incent excite and get my attendees interested in learning more or buying accelerating the buying cycle. If you're producing it event with the sole purpose of generating demand you you need to measure your performance against that who listened to that presentation of those that listen to that presentation who in the room is interested in learning more on wants to speak to a sales rep you really need to start focusing on measuring your performance against those goals and if you do that and make that data actual then you probably accomplished something that majority of the companies out there are struggling with today now when you're talking voted in an event in this case might simply be not simply might be private event the company has having for customers and prospects they invite them in there at a hotel they probably have a small display of their products and yet they've got these rooms where there speakers and and you're able to register people your age able to tell <music> who goes to each one of those those breakout sessions and then you're able to ask questions of the people in those breakout sessions to find out their interest in so you're not only talking about numbers of attendees which would also talking about interest level. That's for private. Events correct was kind of like the big salesforce events every year really got thousands of people coming in yeah I mean to us. Valid are doesn't matter what kind of event we're talking about. You could be exhibiting at a trade show and renting space and putting up a booth or you could be producing large users conference with ten thousand twenty thousand attendees or buying a steak dinner for twenty key accounts at Ruth's Chris Steak House most cases you're a- corporation each of those have similar intent. I'm doing this to get people excited about everything. Anything we're doing so they buy stuff so we're great fit for those types of events and what we do track attend you behavior if you're gonNA produce an event at Ruth's Chris Steak House if one hundred people say they're going to come the first question you'll have in your mind is who showed showed up the next question you'll have your mind is did they stay for the presentation. In the third one is what did they think of the content and are they interested in learning more so we try to simplify a very complex problem and segment the audiences is any of those examples in a manner such that we can tell you who is there. We can tell you what they saw and we can tell you of those that saw that WHO's interested in learning more you may know that people that are registered to attend the show event but you don't always no who comes in your booth unless they go ahead and ask for information at the booth themselves but so many event managers after the show somebody says well. How does this show oh well? <hes> you know the ten thousand visitors <hes> they had ten thousand people at the show and <hes> we got one hundred fifty leads and we were really busy and it was really nice little different approach to that you know like vanish leads but you try to give people information about who attended the profiles and whether they're interested tested for a trade show we have a great offering that is essentially a lead retrieval solution that you can use your booth and there's different shapes sizes and flavors of how we can enable exhibitors at large events especially those that go big big to capture and segment their leads and that's essentially what we do is we can enable from lead retrieval perspective. We can enable you to categorize the value of your leads who stopped by because you're giving away popcorn or squishy ball and and of those that walked away with popcorn or squish ball who of those are interested in learning more and have a genuine need so our lead retrieval solution enables exhibitors to segment their leads based upon value and as you know Jim any B. Two B. Event when you exhibit if you walk away with five hundred leads you'll be lucky of ten percent of those have a genuine need right away. There's a large percentage that may be an a different segment of the buying cycle they may be influencers and there's even a larger percentage that were just there because you're giving away incentive squishy ball drying painting whatever right so it's good for you to know out of all those folks have visited your booth where they fall within those segment if if you go large and if you're outta trade show and you have a theater in your booth you're speaking out of session you have dinner party and you're capturing leads as well. We can give you the ability to track what we call content consumption who visited your booth booth and saw a product demo who listened to a theater presentation who went to the breakout session just someone do all three of those and what did they think of each of those so we can enable you to track what I call content consumption and impressions of that that content and more importantly are the interested in learning more every time we capture data on behalf and attendee or lead we allow that attendee to opt into learn more or to opt out to not be called based upon where they are on the buying cycle the opt in and the opt-out is very very important with regards to the valid our technology and it's important to our clients because it allows them to make sure they're focusing their follow up in the right areas and that they're treating their attendees the way they're attendees want to be treated. No one wants to be called five times if all they did a stop by for popcorn lead management trade shows a certainly dramatically improve now what happens if somebody's at the three and they ask her literature. Does it take a couple of weeks a week week and a half to get the literature out. No we're not just talking about literal printed literature that doesn't happen as much anymore but wasn't your through their emails and P._d._F.'s etcetera etcetera. How do you handle that for clients while we have spent a lot of time money and effort investing in is integration within marketing stacks right salesforce in particular? You'll know every event eighty percent of the sponsors are probably using south forces their senior. I'm system. I don't foresee that changing anytime what we've done as we built L. Technology dental take data we capture at an event in automatically import that data into that marketing stack and then we work with the companies to prepare their marketing stack for immediate treatment whether it'd be with an Alachua Marquel hubs spot <hes> or salesforce what have you so we're all about taking and scoring leads or segmenting audiences and attendees based upon contact consumption and automating the process of putting it into the marketing stack for treatment. I would leave it upon the marketing stack to make sure that literature is being sent out to the right person and appropriate means if it goes directly into the marketing stack it gets judged valued the information. The person's escort goes out almost. Immediately so it's just one two three goes directly through the system. Doesn't it yeah it does and one thing that I take great pride in with our company is we can make a marketing automation system way more effective for companies that invest in events meaning gene prior to deploy valid are I may produce an event with one thousand attendees and then I'll give Alachua one thousand names and I'll say hey Alachua tell me of these one thousand who's interested in who isn't based upon how they respond to content content. That's before valid are after valid are we can tell our quite hey eloquent. Here's a thousand people that attended the event. These two hundred fifty are interested in that product these three hundred are interested in these two products and we can make the assist much much more effective and accelerate the buying their incubation and they're they're follow up could be a little more effective if they use US versus their standard means. We're a big fans of integrating with these systems. We know them well. We like to make them more effective for our clients because I wish I would have went back in the day. I bet you do well. We're going to take a break here to pay some bills and then when we come back let's talk a little bit about is their size difference in the clients that you have. How small can they be to be effective? Actively use this kind of technology and also a little bit about the cost of people might have counter to use this kind of technology polera queued up ready to go whether you're producing a seminar series users conference lunch and learn or exhibiting at a trade show valid are has a solution from capturing leads at trade shows to managing onside registration tracking session attendance gathering information and providing sponsors has lead retrieval. We have a full suite of solutions for you. Since two thousand five valid are has been training corporate events and trade shows into better business call eight seven eight four twenty nine twenty nine or visit us and valid Dr Dot Com <music> and now back to Jim and his guest. Thank you all nice to hear I think was expecting that commercial for. We like to do that as a convenience for guests bitter when we left we talked about the kinds of events in the technology being used in how valid our product can enhance the marketing automation systems in place and drive accountability and information into the C._R._M.. Systems and eventually into the forecast. Let's talk about private events. A little bit are private. Events increasing or decreasing infrequency are more companies using private events or less than a few years ago. I definitely think they are increasing. Our Growth House has banned astronomical in the proprietary event space and less so in the trade show space. It doesn't mean trade shows are bad investment or on per investment. I just think you have more control in a proprietary private event. We don't care what size it is. We do events with less than fifty attendees and we do events in excess of twenty thousand attendees by the technology applied as a marketing manager and I want to have an event with fifty to one hundred people. What am I going to need you? Give me a roadmap. Let's say the C._E._O.. Said Jim I want you to go ahead and let's have a user's conference next year. You go put it on. I WanNa have as many people there as possible. I WANNA have at least two days. What can you do for wars? And how much is it gonNA cost now. What kind of services will an event like that require in order to be successful? That's a great question and from a an event producers perspective I would start off with the questions nations that I would want to answer or the data that I would need and it goes back to what I stated. Previously if I'm planning to produce an event with a thousand attendees meeting <hes> I have a large segment of customers that I want to send to Seattle or Vegas and I'm going to get them. I'm super excited. One is I'M GONNA launch out an invitation to get my sales team on board to drive that traffic so if I can get fifteen hundred or two thousand people to register say they're going to come. The first question is I need to track attendance attendance against that list valid will enable you to track attendance of those that are registered who showed up and we can't even go a step further and explained you why they showed up by doing serving at check it so that's the first question that we would enable our clients to answer. Are you mentioned cheque's when they check in. They get badges cracked a you know who comes in and so you've got the software to create the badges cracked. Yes we do onsite registration and on demand batch printing in my opinion. Obviously I'm vice when they say this better than anybody in the world that's a strength of ours and our badges and our credential that we print is a conduit for our true value meaning once that badges printed we track everything that that badge does and everything. I think that badge wear things specific Jira event very good so you know what sessions that they've attended generally because there are a lot of breakout sessions crack and then you correctness back from them I notice you've got something on your side called. Although VENTA mobile feedback can explain it to me yes that's one of my favorite product so essentially I use the term tracking content consumption often when I produce an event as an event producer I'm gonNA spend and a large amount of time and effort on the agenda that I put together and that agenda is going to be rock Saad with some amazing content that I want my attendees to watch and I want them to be excited. I want them to be incented to buy. I want them to be able to get questions is answered and educated so they're more comfortable with what they purchase. There's so many goals associated with an event when you go through that process one thing that we can help you understand is of those that have showed up which one of those sessions or presentations did did they watch are that they attend and based upon that content. What did they think of it? Do they think the speaker was effective. Are they interested in learning more and do they wanna meet with a sales rep so we use event hub as a means to allow the Attendee Wendy to communicate back to the show producer what they thought of that content. It's an H._t._M._l.. Five application that we can integrate into any mobile APP if it's done right and done well the speaker should say to the audience. Hey listen. I'm about to drop some serious various knowledge on you and if you're super excited about this go to your mobile APP Click on the survey button. Tell me what you think of this presentation and more importantly if you WanNa meet with me after this go into the survey and you can schedule a meeting their cavanna provides you all of that functionality integrated with any mobile APP and if it's deployed right and deployed well when these sessions are broken up you could literally be driving meetings at the event face to face meetings between individuals session attendees Wendy's and sales reps are subject matter experts event hub is a large part of our value proposition because it's the toll that attendees us to allow the show producer to know what they thought of each of those individual breakouts Bob is the core for information but during the event if I wanted to find out how many people are attending this event versus that event I is out of an I can get real time data during the show to know what's going on. Yes yes and you know if I am responsible responsible for two of the breakout sessions as an event producer. One of the questions I would want to know is how many folks are in my breakout live right after I'm done scanning so all that data is made available to whomever's responsible for that particular session unusually. It's the product manager someone like that. That's one question we can enable. Customers and companies have access to WHO's listening to this content and who's in the room by demographic. How many sea level folks are there director level folks? How many developers are there? The next thing that we want that person to know is of those that are in the room who is interested in extending the conversations when we do in evaluation we always incorporate into that email. What we call a call to action question meaning we allow the attended to opt in to learn more? Are you interested in learning more about this topic or do you WanNa meet with subject matter experts. It's typically a yes or no question and if they answer yes to that question we can do some amazing things like queue up technology to coordinate a meeting automatically integrate that into Marquette or Alachua ourselves force and tell those systems you had one hundred people in the room these twenty five one a coordinator meeting right now we can do a lot of amazing things with that call to action questions so it's all intended to enable the attendees to accelerate unlearn based upon the information. You're consuming so it's in my opinion of great way to deploy technology at an event well. I wish we had a little bit more time to talk a little bit more about this but I can definitely see why the the private events are dramatically increasing because my experiences over showing if I get customers and prospects together at an event sales always increase the increase from the existing customers. The people that are prospects close at a much higher rate because they've spent time with customers in the money is is actually better spent than trade shows and I think that's a great investment to begin with Victor. We've only got a minute left. Talk to someone reach you a new website. It's valid Dr Dot Com V. A. L. A. R. Dot Com and you can contact me there on the get a quote button or just hello valid are dot com and someone can follow up with you right away to find out how we can help you with your event program. I'm a firm believer that every event producer out there is driving more value than their company recognizes so it's important to me that they get that value recognize their builders of wealth victor. Thank you for your time today for.

Jim Alber producer Victor Cafes firehouse subs Chris Steak House Ruth Sales Lead Management Associat Paul Robert founder S. l. engineer L. M. Lead Management Company sales manager Lippi marketing manager Wendy Alachua Marquel L. Technology director
Hitting Your Number and Doing it the Right Way:  This and More Advice from Workfront CEO Alex Shootman

OC Talk Radio

21:20 min | 2 years ago

Hitting Your Number and Doing it the Right Way: This and More Advice from Workfront CEO Alex Shootman

"Here comes again lunch will be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new Jamaican jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Carribean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs APP firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery welcome back time for another episode Pipeline Radio Ford. We're GONNA swim out into that. Sea of ideas man hines who's coming to us from outlier today Matt Welcome everyone to another episode of sales pipeline radio. Thanks so much for joining us for those of you. Listening on podcast feed thank you so much for subscribing could find every current past and present episode of Sales Pipeline Radio at sales pipeline. I PLAN RADIO DOT COM every week. We are featuring some of the best and brightest minds in B.. Two B. Sales Marketing. Today's absolutely no different. I am extremely excited to have with us today. Alex shoot man he is the C._E._O.. Of workfront I got to know him very well back in the eloquent two days. We got so many topics we can cover talk about the book done right how tomorrow's top leaders get worked on. Thanks so much for joining us today. Be here is always to work with you. Thank you for that and I was. I was mentioning to you no justice in our prep here that your name comes up very often from people when we asked them at the end of interviews for sales pipeline radio we ask them. You know who is someone or a couple people that have had a big impact for you in your life and your career and the name Alex you comes up a lot especially the people that have worked with you in past roles that were part of the eloquent team up in through going public and one topic that comes up a lot is something that you shared with me. I've heard many many people that you work with quotas well and it's a big part of this book done right and it's the idea of hitting your number and doing it the right way and how you think about the answer to those questions and what it means for the people in your organizations I let's start off by. Maybe just giving people an overview of what that what that philosophy is like for you know one of the things that we talked a lot about Alachua. We talk a lot about here at workfront. Is this notion of getting it done and doing it right in mentally if you think about a two by two grid with a vertical axis being getting it done in the horizontal axis being doing it right. It's a notion of the vertical access is load a high or are you getting it done or do you not getting on doing it. Right is living up to the values of an organization knowledge vantage hardens itchy and it's this notion love if you're not getting it done now during the rights not great place for you if you're doing it rang tonight getting it done you have the values of the Organization but my needs some coaching on how to objectively accomplish the role that you've been given if you're you're unique. You're doing it right. You're the person that everybody ought to see their name in lights and the tough one is if you're getting it done but you're not doing it right. You probably will be fired faster than the organization because nothing destroys the the pursue of the culture that you want in a company faster than being willing to tolerate people who can accomplish their goals but don't live up to the values of the organization so that's the notion. Ocean or shared and what I found over time is not believe people are good people WanNa do the right thing a Lotta Times. They just haven't been given the stage to put a premium on values. I love your explanation of all it excellent SANSOM. It sometimes falls into the category all easier said than done. It'd be people here that they're not being very. We WanNA maintain culture with erode erode. I see many organizations struggle. Sometimes you'll awesome of your best performers perhaps in a sales role hitting their number supporting the sales or sales numbers and sometimes it's it's easy you turn a blind eye to the way that they're doing it either internally or externally externally but as you know al we will seem sometimes in the market that is a poisonous than to allow to continue the organization that you mentioned is. You don't just fire them. You've are them more than anybody else. Talk a little bit about the culture impact of of doing that or not doing that how that very quickly changes trajectories of businesses we all. I think the one thing we have to remember. Is You know we're talking about B. to B.. And so my my main perspective comes from a lot in years the B. Two B. Technology Space and what you find as you go through the years is that the world gets smaller and smaller and smaller and customers have a very very long memory and so I think the biggest impact act is if you're willing to do the wrong thing to bring in revenue that your customers will notice sooner or later and yeah you might make the quarter but you're not gonna make the decade because overtime customers want to do business with people that are invested in their success and so I think that's the biggest impact to be sellers. They live in a market market. You know or Chicago you're making your career and your reputation matters over time what you what you really trading is your reputation and market not the firm who are not alone in this again. I appreciate what you've done to codify lot in your new book done right but you know this book is based on over thirty interviews with leaders across a variety of industries share a common in philosophy around as an and I imagine that you know your philosophy here is born out of your values but also worn out of some of the leaders you learn from top a little bit about some of the companies that you spoke with him that you put into this book that have also put this is philosophy practice purpose to be clear what the what the book is specifically about is the challenger getting stuff done in a modern work environment so at workfront much like salesforce automates sales and workday automates human capital management workfront automates knowledge work in an organization and so our customers have been faced with the challenge of getting stuff done in amongst the turmoil all of all of the digital transformation that's occurring and so we would sit down with our customers after we talked about our technology the asked this basic question of okay that's great but how do I actually get stuff done in a complex organizational he kept hearing that and. And that's what we decided to write a book upon and so we did we interviewed forty different people many of them customers some of them leaders in their own field natio- commanders Deborah Zero who was the first woman to row solo across the Atlantic and we estimate basic question which was how do you actually get stuff done and their answers are what we translated into this which are just some basic principles of how you get stuff that I think that you know that the environment that people are facing certainly include internal and external factors makes a well-meaning businesses. You know a number of challenges execute that talk a little bit about not surprising to see your career progress into C._E._O.. Role but also not surprising to see it at a company like workfront that puts suggest focus on helping to manage people effectively todd a little bit about what attracted you to work front talking to Alex today you the C._E._O.. workfront in the author of the New Boat Down writes about why you chose were front as an eight year career and why the work they're doing has been so important but you know I've been very fortunate to be at two different companies that have had going back to Eh B._M._C. which was the precursor to Sam as you mentioned before to be Ella which was all about marketing automation being fortunate to be here which was T._m.. And it's so because because that you start to see some pattern recognition and the pattern recognition that I can see that all categories are born from an external pressure that is a huge extra pressure you think about eloquence aqua it were repeatedly martyr. She were starting to realize that way. Marketing was going to be executed was was completely going to be impacted by the digitisation of consumer marketing so here at work what we see is that a percent of C._e._O.'s believed that their current business model survive and so they do it see Ios do they send a lot over one trillion dollars this year on digital risk and they don't achieve their intended results because they need multiple groups of people to work together effectively the product team with the technology team with marketed distribution team and so what I could see from workfront as with the transformation efforts inside their enterprises so that's why I work from home as forcing a break with Alex when the C._E._o.. Workfront in you know what this book. You've written is not just got a great a lot of great advice but it also it's got a number of tools that allow people to start to put these ideas into practice right in the very beginning of the book where you get into it. There's this exercise workflow that you know this progression going from your vision statement into how you are working in managing and and responding to what happens in the business in the market you can download a lot of it is just downright. Book Dot Com to a more specific operational exercise level <unk> pay some bills one right back with with more without a little more about some of the components of the dun-rite workflow including making sure you got the foundational pieces in place and have the tools and the strategies to make adjustments along the way. We'll right back on this episode of Pop. Arabia the way we do business is advancing faster than ever before in amongst disruptions. There's one pillar that stay standing through it. All the power or a relationship relationships are the core of everything so Howard today's organizations developing nurturing and leveraging them to drive success join Matt Heinz and Sisters V._p.. Of Marketing Justin Keller for the on on demand Webinar the state of relationship marketing and learn how your team can bridge the gaps between relationships and Revenue Listen now at Heinz Marketing Dot Com. That's H.. E. I. N. Z. Marketing Dot Com all right. Let's pick it back up with Matt and the second part of his interview well radio. Thanks so much joining us today. I feel like we could go for an awful long time talking today to our guest today outshooting and he is the C._e._o.. Of were fronts he has run many companies. He was the president of Alachua leading through the I._P._O.. Acquisition by Oracle he has been on the board of numerous companies now not Zeo front but also the author author of the new book done right before the Break Asher hockey does exercise workflow and there's so many great servants holes in here. I feel like even if people don't take the entire tool kit and workflow. There's components that are really really important. One of the very end of the workflow you call done right value pyramid. Can you talk a little bit about what that is and how people put that into practice where we actually do at the very end is is each chapter is a building block basically in terms terms of building a plan that allows you to be to be successful in executing work and so starting from the very beginning of are you able to explain to people why you're doing the tasks. Ask that you're doing your wire. You're pursuing the work that you're doing through to. Who are you serving right? Who is the financial beneficiary of the word who actually has to do the work of who gets served by the work and so every single chapter bills on a bills on each other into you haven't overall word plan so with that final chapter is in terms of Lego blocks that come together to say if you've done all these same's your position position to execute work? I think you can definitely get a copy of these exercises. Learn more about the pyramid the website hold on a second website done right book Dot Com the other thing that was really interesting to me and as mentioned the couples his idea of commanders intense as I love the idea of having a strong or objective content upfront talk a little bit about what that means from your perspective in how you manage that in a work environment environment that tends to be maybe a little less autocratic in many companies than used to be like how does that work those things together. I learned commanders ten from a friend of mine commander Martin McGuinness who had spent he spent over twenty years in the navy seals and the actual notion of Commander's intent is not to be are not right. The notion of Commander's intent is as mark taught me as the leader my role. Oh explain what we're trying to accomplish but then my ex job is to get out of the way because you're really smart and you are able to come up with approach to accomplishing the task. Ask Hand if you can turn it over to your team to figure out how to commanders is is not meant to be autocratic. It's actually to create a lot of freedom in a dynamic work. Environment by founded on is your point. Is that a lot of times even though people don't want to be told what to do as a command. They want to know where their work is coming from. They want a strong leader that can tell them. Here's where we're going. Here's our going to do width back news this idea of doing or the right way and you mentioned earlier. The people generally are going in are willing to do the right thing. How do you as an employee someone working? We're managing your career find organizations that are doing the right thing. I mean it's one thing to look at what people's values are on their website or maybe on the wall. But how do you truly find evidence of companies that are going to live those values answered Olivia intense. You have in the book here when you haven't haven't been able to sort of spend time living breathing both where I mean transformed size of the organization but what I would look for is like if you came to work front I would enact if I was interviewing at workfront. I would ask people. Hey can. You tell me who you tell me who you think is a really great employees inside at work. Tell me who has been recognized lately for doing a great job inside a workfront. Tell me their names and then tell me some of their behaviors. Tell me being rewarded for those for those behaviors because you see this. Here's the thing about the thing about a coach. Rate Culture is purely external journal manifestation of a shared a shared set of values of a group of people much like behaviors and individual is merely the external manifestation of the beliefs of that individual. My wife and I have been getting for thirty four years after thirty four years. She does mostly no but she still doesn't know me completely in the way that she forms her opinion of me is how I behave however hain is related to what I believe and so I think if you go into a company and you ask people the winner's side of the and how do they behave and how to other people talk about the way that they behave. You'll start up on some organization really values but if you're minutes here with Alex shoot was C._e._o.. Of workfront definitely encourages check out his book done right for the number of people that I've heard talk about just how much they've learned from Alex Alex on leadership and on culture and just doing things that right Wayne Organizations spoke codified a lot of that so definitely encouraging check it out you can get a copy learn more at dun-rite book dotcom Alex. I think you know I was Kinda. End where we started. I mentioned to you how how many people we've interviewed on the show have mentioned you as an inspiration their career who are some people that you have looked to the administration for you. Either have been managers in the past of sort of mentors they can be authors. There could be alive or dead people that are mel. allots you that maybe recommend other people seek out who won for shire's bill miller bill is currently at e._m._c. software and bill actually hire me into i._b._m. a million years ago in in a bill was the bill was the person that taught me that there's a right way to do things and that it's worth doing things the right way so my first loss ever was used to great <hes> fingerprint on me that said there's no shortcuts do things right way another person who was at sea is he's now retires getting your bet nice and darryl took a big risk on me and ask me to do a pretty big job at b. m. c. <hes> and then i'd say the last person he's a board member today they're not feel like he was a partner when we were allegra was was joe thing about joe than i that i just always that always stayed with me is you just cannot outrun your customers you have got to do a great job by your customers and your customers are in future reputation of bill and darryl in joe and then finally the acknowledgement of the bar got running or will she do as my mentor for years in many of the principles that are in the book i learned you know late nights at arch ranch in bernie's is hard for me to think about joe pain without imagining him or seeing him again in a spacesuit abban stage at alachua experience but you know his his lesson around sort of you know putting a greater focus on your customers could not reinforce that researches reiterates that more from analogous damp while we were alkyl customer elbow partner you know for a long time and you know there aren't that many conferences you go to where you see more hugs handshakes at i've been two maybe three in my life than and one of those was at renault experience it was the the community there was a relationship with customers it was the culture when clearly jalen others adults very successfully will want to learn more about how bill for yourself in your organization not just your sales marketing team thrower organization get a copy of gun rights more information at dun-rite book dot com i don't think our guest ally shubin for joining us today if you wanna learn more about al how's your this episode of his new organization check out a copy on demand by on radio dot com shirley thanks so much join us we'll be here again actually you've been listening to another episode of sales pipeline radio right here in the funnel radio network listener like introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit mcdonald's we don't need that music made with tender chicken let's lose the echo on warm buttermilk biscuit perfect juicy simplicity of our buttermilk crispy chicken biscuits speaks for itself get it now for just three bucks and get a two dollars sausage mcmuffin with egg or one dollars small hot coffee all from the one two three dollar menu simply your breakfast that mcdonald's prices and participation vary <unk> be combined with any other offer combo meal the world is changing at a rate like never before so why isn't

workfront Alex Alex firehouse subs Alachua B. Sales Marketing Matt Heinz Commander Atlantic Justin Keller Oracle Arabia bill miller Chicago Deborah Zero Heinz Marketing Martin McGuinness mel. Howard president
When Marketing is Led by the Customer: The Economics of the SaaS Business

OC Talk Radio

21:59 min | 1 year ago

When Marketing is Led by the Customer: The Economics of the SaaS Business

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and the life few onto live CD medic target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease welcome. Everybody's time once again to grab your board. Maybe snowboard this time of year and ride that sales pipeline highflying with our gold medal winner Mannheim's. We're GONNA get to customer success and advocacy. We've got a lot to talk about today. Thank you so much everyone for joining us on another episode of sales pipeline radio. We we are here every week. At Eleven thirty Pacific two thirty eastern. We're live on the lead a funnel media radio network and we are featuring every week experts in B. Two B. Sales the marketing today is no different. We have Jocelyn Brown. She is the VP of Customer Success Al Acadia. She is from Canadia really really excited to have her join us today. talk a lot more about customer success in Customer Advocacy Jocelyn. Thanks again for joining US my pleasure man. If you listen to the show in the past you know that we are is guilty not as a lot of marketers and that we spend the majority of our time talking about acquisition we tend the majority of our time talking about getting customers on board and when you look at the budgets and the resources a lot of beating me marketing marketing groups I think that's reflected there as well. You've got all these people and budgets and marketing technology do acquisition and then when it comes to sort of keeping customers oftentimes it's it's a toll free number an and occasional newsletter and I don't know if you saw just this morning a friend of both of ours politics Shema who's the CEO of nudge. You put something up on Lincoln talking about customer success than in now that previously obviously it might have been more reactive. It was more important service now. It's really a a revenue driver for the business to drive advocacy basset of the brand expansion so maybe used to be kind of a maybe after thought. Maybe something that was thought of as more reactive administrative and tactical is now very much a strategic part of the business so would love to have you kind of talk about your perspective there and then what you guys are doing a without allocating as well yeah. Absolutely I think probably the advent of subscription economy really of SAS is what has is put just such a spotlight on retention on investment in your customers and stop business model really has given a seat at the table to those folks that actually work with the customers Dan Day out because we sort of have to earn their business every day. Either barrier to leave is very low and we need to make sure that they are are constantly feeling like they're getting value in feeling valued in that sort of business relationship. I've been doing it for ten. Plus years probably early longer than that if I were to really admit it and really for me being with the customers where it's at it is really the center of the company from results from revenue from mm-hmm from sort of anything I actually work with customers Po sale but I also owned a fairly large number in that I am responsible for all the renewal revenue and also so oliver expansion revenue which accounts for a very significant part of our growth so to say it's just kind of an afterthought or a piece is a gross misunderstanding of the economics of Saas Business so certainly allocated the the customer is the center really bevery thing and you know we built our product for that we organize denies our journey for that. Our customers really lead our marketing they are best kind of voice in the market. peer to peer references are kind of valuable due to our prospects so putting the time and effort and attention into our customers to make sure that they are receiving value means that they're going to talk about it. They're gonNA explain it in the market. They're going to continue to work with US and advocate for our business so I think those that haven't figured that out yet are behind. I wholeheartedly agree and let's let's talk about how that relates to what we talk a lot about here even on the acquisition side which is the buying journey and I think oftentimes we think of the buying journey too often his ending when someone one buys like that may be the middle may be the end of the sales process but it's really the middle of what I'd call the Revenue Bowtie you know the you may have gotten someone to buy but that's when things really begin as someone who's spent quite a bit of time and I want to get back and talk about the Likud as well. How do you as a customer success professional think about the buying journey? It's way beyond the on the deal right. Absolutely I think also just in the nature of how people by now because it's a lot easier to try things because it's a lot easier you're to sort of start small and grow from there you also are seeing that people are really trying and then expanding so that land and expand strategy that we were successful with that Alachua and is a very big piece of our strategy at allocated is let's get people in in experiencing our product experiencing our team solving their problem. Maybe the smaller scale and then help them kind of map out how to get got to a fully executed strategy fully executed and that there's there's really no downside to US bringing in customer at a sort of smaller scale L. because we know first of all that our technology is going to help them. We know that our team understand what's going on has done it many many times before and is going to provide provide them the right kind of guidance and we know we let them kind of set the terms of how they grow that it's going to be the right solution and the right fit. We're not going to kind of have to back back into it based on a sale cycle that maybe not everybody knew enough to run really well so for us. There's no fear of people coming in and sort of trying. Take a bit first because history tells us that a great place for us to start and grow and we've had great success there and then it makes the whole process a loophole less the friction in the process for the customer and a lot easier. They don't have to fix everything all at once. We don't have to do a big bang. Release can really kind of move them along and that's a little change in the buying in process. That's a little change in technology. Were Immigrations and things like that are easier but that's also just our philosophy. We want you to get a feel for technology to feel some relief of us being able to help solve that problem and then experience our team because our team really is so invested in making sure that you are successful that you're going to partner with us. It's GonNa feel like a real partnership talking today on sales pipeline radio with Jocelyn Brown. She's the vice president of Customer Success at allocated I mean this is a company that clearly is spot in on doing customer success right I think by by having your position there by having the resources and the focus there I think it is part of the culture as a part of the priorities and I think that was clear to me as well when I think I met you for the first time back when you were at Alachua which is eventually bought by Oracle and the local experience conferences. There aren't very many conference. Is I go to where you see more hugs handshakes you know when you see people that hadn't even met each other before but because of the relationship they built because of the bond that exists between customers and not just the company but the people at the company that isn't an incredible comparative advantage talk about how customer success and customer advocacy was really at the heart of the culture of Alachua and how that's really sort of developed the programs you built from that point forward. I mean there's no question that part of my goal is to recreate some of what was so great at Alachua and I've been very fortunate and then there are a lot of people here that are willing to come along that ride with me. There are so many good examples of what we did there but I think the primary one was that everybody believed that the customer was at the center of what we were doing. There was sort of a concept. The customer was in the room all the time. All of our meeting rooms were named after customers. everyone in the company had some portion of their compensation tied to a customer success type of metric. It really was pervasive. We talked our marketing was led by the voice of our customers. We told stories all the time they were always there. They were ever present and I think that just meant that we were always thinking about them and we were very invested in not just the companies we're helping but the individual people and relationships that were driving that another part of the customer evangelism and Customer Experience Program at Alachua that I I would certainly part of it as well as a as a l quick customer and partner was top line your customer success staff extended into your customers. You had customers that were essentially ambassadors and support staff in many cases for each other talk a little bit about where top leaders came from or the why that was such a key part of the success for you the investment or the choice to really put that kind of investment in their came out of a project called ice was the ideal customer experience where people from sort of all of the postals Louisville's functions got together and try to figure out where all the ways that we can make this experience even better for our customers where we can make it easy to do business with us where we can celebrate great success where we can share stories where we can help people grow together and it was just clear that we needed to get as much of our expertise not just from the staff but from the customers that had grown up with us through got through transformation in marketing into marketing automation out there as we could put and really who's also an extension of various successfully been running a small customer events throughout our region mostly in the US but even in Europe where where we get customers together and we almost didn't have to present anything they wanted to talk to each other and we just saw this amazing networking effect and this incredible edible desire for everybody to help everybody else so. We really felt like we were building something. It was a pretty transformative time in the B. Two B. Marketing space than everybody was on that same mission and everybody wanted to help everybody else so top learners really was our best way to kind of amplify that and as you we know it really did exactly that where our customers became our best educators are best marketers and really the best source for expertise top liners just I just said this would be was basically a discussion board. It was a it was a discussion board with common threads where you could attach documents and I mean a lot of companies have those does but I think hopefully what you've heard from Jocelyn so far is there was something very special about the culture there was something about the priorities of the organization the people that are leading the people that founded it and you know that that really drove what happened with customers and I think you know you can set up message boards. You can start newsletters but unless you have that culture. It's not going to go where you want it to go. We're going to have to take a quick break here. Pay Some bills. We'll be back in a couple minutes with more with Jocelyn Brown vice president of customer success and allocated. You're talking a lot more about advocacy a little more about the old eloquent days and what she she sees moving forward in terms of driving more revenue responsible customer programs you're listening sales pipeline radio in a world where the speed of innovation and change and be to be marketing has never been greater. The only thing bigger is the need for clarity for a blueprint for guide to what's really working king and how about a way to apply specifically today to increase sales pipeline growth velocity and most of all conversion it. That's what you'll find in the modern marketers field guide and mazing league can download it for free hines marketing dot com just like it sounds H. E. Z. The M. A. R. K. E. I. N. G. IT encompasses the entire sales and marketing cycle but in quick bursts with lots of specific actionable ideas strategies tactics you can put to work right away like today the low table of contents helps them narrow in and tackle cla problem and it's something you can come back to over and over again as a reference guide why not download your free copy of the modern marketers field guide. It's free hines marketing dot com just like it sounds. Hei Z. Marketing Dot Com all right back to our program with Matt. Hi thank you so much everyone for joining. If you like what you're hearing today make sure you join us every week coming up in the next couple of weeks and next week on sales pipeline radio we have Joe Hyland. He's the CMO of on twenty four. We're going to talk talk about secrets of CMO's secret successes behinds mobis revenue leaders joey started a podcast called confessions of CMO. We talked a little about that and the week after our first episode in March. I'm super excited. We have Jill Conrad. She is one of my favorite people in the B. Two B. Sales world. She's written a number of books including snap selling and just huge hugely hugely influential to me into others in B. Two B. Sales so excited to have her join. The program is well today. We still have a little more time with Jocelyn Brown. She's the VP of customer MMA success at Ala Katya Jocelyn from your journey from eloquent Oracle to where you are today having that sort of culture and focus on customer success is great but I think continuing to provide fight ideas and insights to your customers oftentimes and I think we've seen this data from Gartner and CB in others. It's not just providing phone number to call. It's not adding more features. It's really helping helping your customers become smarter giving them new ideas and insights that is a huge competitive differentiator so the content or seeing online and then what you're providing to customers is a huge part of your job as well absolutely and I think to bring it to sort of brass tacks as much as we talked about a lot of softer stuff in the culture of Alachua that really drove such an amazing community for us. I mean that resulted in in real impact in real results and not came with investment doesn't happen by accident and and there is a real outcome to that so customer success should not be mistaken for dialing for smiles. It's absolutely not that when you understand stand a customer's business with when you have a great relationship and great empathy for what they're trying to accomplish and you're really trying to help them solve that problem. You will make that company company successful and they will grow by more and you will make that individual successful and they will remember that and they will take you everywhere they go and not amplifying effect of advocacy advocacy comes from the real work of listening understanding and providing solutions for your customers that includes clued your software but also in advice gyns in connections in helping them talk to peers that are struggling with the same things I would want anybody to mistake customer success just for service or something saw it has a true and very real business benefit absolutely a lot of people listening. Probably you're in that that can't we talked about the beginning ending of the of the episode around just not really having people not having resources and so if I'm if I'm a VP mark listening saying yeah this makes sense. We need to be doing this but I don't have Jocelyn on my team yet I don't have you know we have this in my budget. What are some things people can do to build the foundation for a more impactful customer success effort effort yeah absolutely the the good news is it's probably an extension of some of the stuff you already do that? Idea of journey mapping notes talked about a lot in the the marketing. It's extending that all the way through the customer life cycle and understanding the touch points the contents the tools the other other types of things the triggers all the way through that they're going to help the customer better going to provide opportunity for your company and sort of seeing where your gaps are and where you might be able to get the biggest bang for your buck in terms of closing that gap understanding the journey that your customer is going through and using your tool is just as important as understanding the journey Ernie that they go through in researching understanding and making a buying decision but a lot of the same tools apply a lot of the same theory applies a lot of the same work can be done for me. It's always going to involve a team. I think that in certainly be nothing really can replace that relationship and that empathy and somebody really feeling like you care what happens to them in the context of how you're working with them. I had the version of a customer who I've realized I worked with for eleven years. Come visit us in our headquarters and just before she got up to tell her story she returned to me and said having a company really care about you. Matters maters a lot and she's a buyer. She's the person making that decision and not matters to her so I think sometimes people forget the human equation that there's real you work in building relationships and those relationships carry an inherent value for the customer and for the company. That's sort of working now. There's no doubt about that. There aren't enough people that I think prioritize that I think too often we look at the spreadsheet and we managed through you know the numbers we wanna hit we look at customers is buildings but buildings don't actually sign checks the people inside the buildings do and there's something about having a good relationship with someone in showing and proving that you care that not only generates loyalty but gives gives you a little bit of the benefit of the doubt you know you've got you know things are going to break you know things are going to not work the way they want. You want them to so you know I think in the right environment you know in in in in most environments comments you get pro customers that are angry and yell and scream and get upset in an environment where you actually make this part of the culture where you make you make a care they call and wonder what they can do to help you there rooting for you who took to do it well before we have to wrap up here in a couple of minutes. You've been doing this for a while. I think there's a lot of people that I know that you've worked with that. We've talked about in the past that you've learned from who for people people that want to learn more about how to do this right who are some of the people that have been influential for you people in terms of Customer Care Customer Advocacy that you'd recommend people go and read I take just an incredible amount of learning from my days at Alachua and I continue to work with those people and talk to them. So you mentioned Politici- Ema he certainly were right on customer success in the power relationships. Heather Fe is WHO's at look book is probably one of the most talented advocacy leaders that I've really ever met. I'm against that customer so I spent a lot of time reading their content and have had a chance to meet Alison pickens. I think she writes some really great stuff. It's really practical stuff. Maybe about the operational organizational things that maybe people are kind of craving. You've got you've actually got a plethora of people talking about it ran right now what I would suggest is fine the meet up in your local city and go and talk to a bunch of people it's really in that networking effect in not community that I get at my best ideas and I get my greatest value because as we are kind of building on this kind of a profession you don't know who's GonNa have your next best idea and and I think people are bringing experience from lots of other functions that is just accelerating the growth of customer success just making us better so find your friends. I love to hear hear from people. I'm very happy to talk to them. So you can find me on Lincoln my twitter handle is Josh Brown. JC Brown. I'm happy to interact on on this stuff because that's what's fun for me appreciate you doing that and I think you know your coach. Share in your answers reinforce everything I know about you just being a very genuine very customer centric person very very open to sharing ideas is and and your experience with other appreciate that very much I would echo the fine friends meet friends stay connected with friends that also have similar roles not necessarily in your industry not necessarily what your same the type of customer I think sometimes if you get into other industries other customer situations you might discover something that you hadn't thought about in your four walls that someone else is doing because of what feels natural them that might be truly innovative new in your industry that gives you another edge so definitely important to continue to be lifetime lifelong learners. We'll speak in Paula lifelong learners. We're going to have to wrap things up here. You're on another episode of Sales Piper. If you like what you hear today and if you want to share this episode with other people on your team you can do a number of different ways you can go and a couple of days to sales pipeline radio radio DOT com we will have this entire episode on demand and you can share that with your fear your friends peers and colleagues all episode past present and Future of Hill Pipeline Radio Radio on sales pipeline radio DOT COM don't miss another episode subscribe to the series up on itunes store Google play and we'll have a highlight of this session in on hines marketing dot com in just a few days as well with links to the Al Acadia content page with links to the upcoming workshop and then we'll put a link to Joscelyn's twitter account account as well so thanks very much Johnson joining us today got a great couple of weeks of episodes coming up as usual. Thank you very much for joining us on behalf of Migrate Producer Paul this is Matt Heinz. 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Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

FoundMyFitness

1:18:48 hr | 7 months ago

Dr. Giselle Petzinger on Exercise for Parkinson's Disease

"Welcome back, foundmyfitness listeners. This episode features a big bold returned to our expert interview series with guest Dr to sell pet singer just sell is a board certified neurologist specializing in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease she divides her time between clinical care of patients in laboratory research at the University of Southern California. One of the areas of research. I'm particularly interested in is the role of exercise in slowing the progression of Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's disease is progressive nerve degenerative disease with no cure. It's caused by the death of dopamine producing neurons in a region of the brain called the substantial Negro, an area of the brain involved in movement. Genetic. Mutations and exposure to certain pesticides are risk factors for Parkinson's because they inhibit complex one of the electron transport chain in the Mitochondria, setting up an energy crisis leading to the death of dopamine producing cells. No therapy can slow or halt Parkinson's disease progression, dopamine replacement drugs such as Elba, provide some symptom relief. But as the disease advances more frequent dosing is needed and debilitating side effects often develop. and. This is where exercise comes in mounting evidence suggests that people who exercise are less likely to get Parkinson's disease. Later in life and discuss in this episode, exercise can benefit those already diagnosed with the disease. The functional symptoms of Parkinson's don't manifest until about half of the dopamine producing neurons are lost using imaging studies. Scientists can detect changes in dopamine receptor density in the brains of living patients allowing them to assess the effects of exercise base interventions. For example, one study showed that eight weeks of intensive treadmill training increase dopamine receptor expression by eighty to ninety percent. These changes in dopamine receptor expression are clinically meaningful and correlate with improved posture control. The take home from these imaging studies is that the right intervention can be profoundly helpful in Parkinson's disease. Other clinical trial show that moderate to high intensity exercise increases neurotrophic factors such as brain drive neurotrophic factor improves gait and balance and may even slow the disease progression. In one trial, high intensity exercisers experienced no disease progression over six months while non exercisers got fifteen percent worse this is remarkable because not drug or treatment has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease delaying. This neuro degenerative disease progression can profoundly improve a person's quality of life. What I hope that most of you will take home from this conversation today is that even devastating diagnoses like Parkinson's disease have the potential for very different trajectories at least partly affected by the lifestyle choices, we make each day. In today's episode Dr Pet Singer and I discuss what Parkinson's disease is what causes it and how common it is and the population. How a tragic event in the nineteen eighties involving IV drug users propelled the field forward illustrated to scientists that environmental factors such as pesticides could cause Parkinson's disease. How genetic mutations and pesticides can disrupt a condo complex one leading to the death of dopamine producing neurons in the brain. How the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear only when fifty percent of dopamine secreting neurons in this substantial Negro lost. How other circuits in the brain can compensate for the loss of function of this substantial Niigara how observational data suggested exercise can lower the risk of Parkinson's disease how animal research indicates that different brain circuits are stimulated by different types of exercise how skill based activities such as Yoga, Tai Chi boxing tango, or skateboarding may play a special role in ameliorating some of the effects of the disease how intensive exercise training increases serum brain drive neurotrophic factor levels in patients after one month and how this affects cognition. How vigorous exercise improves motor scores and slows disease progression. How exercise increases dopamine receptors in the brain to Parkinson's disease, allowing them to better use their remaining dopamine. How in both rodent and non human primate models the Omega three fatty acid Dha decreases love Adoga induced disconnect a long lasting negative side effect that occurs in many patients. How people with Parkinson's disease have higher circulating levels of pro inflammatory cytokines which might contribute to the disease and we discussed how diet may play a role. Dr Pet. Singers bottom line on frequency dosing type of exercise that is therapeutically beneficial in Parkinson's disease and so much more. But before we jump in, want to mention a couple of things if you've been enjoying podcast, I encourage you to subscribe to our newsletter and get the most up-to-date information on our new podcast episodes in ongoing in-depth analysis on crucial health related topics subscribing to our newsletter is the easiest way to make sure that you don't miss when we post one of our fully referenced topics pages or when we have a really exciting podcast coming up. To sign up just head over foundmyfitness.com there, you can also check out the benefits of our premium membership. If you appreciate the work we are doing at foundmyfitness. Our premium membership is a great way to give back and enjoy some added benefits as well. For example, once a month, you can join a live Cuna with me and listen to my answers to questions submitted by you and other supporters plus a lot of other great benefits including the Alachua. Our new members only podcast that curates and remix his the best of foundmyfitness head over to foundmyfitness DOT COM to learn more. One. Final note before we jump into the interview, if you were a loved one has Parkinson's disease. This episode is not intended as medical advice and it is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or care if you mean medical advice seek it out. Please enjoy this great conversation with brilliant doctor just sell pet singer and watch out for more interview episodes like this one coming soon. And now onto the podcast. Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. Excellent. So Can you talk a little bit about? What Parkinson's diseases maybe just from from a basic standpoint. Absolutely. So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. So we consider it a disorder of aging. and. Generally speaking, we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. In fact, clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. And or stiffness. So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. then. Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. So generally speaking, it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. So walking an example, but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, they feel that things are taking longer to do. And sometimes, that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. So as I mentioned, Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. Now again, some of these other features are not specific. So none of these are specific. Kind of evaluating everything together. But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. Other non motor. So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. Could be mood, for example, society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, two years, and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized other things that are nominated that again, me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves or innovate smooth muscles. So this is things like your gut. Your heart. Your sweat. Glands. And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. So constipation again, in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. Changes in the innovation to the heart. These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, Oh yeah before that, there were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. So the point is, is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and We're appreciating that more and it finally. I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. Now, that's not the same thing as dementia. So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well So these things again haven't quite there's some understanding of why this may be happening but they're certainly part of park disease. And also the idea that they are very much interrelated. So. Motor and cognition probably had some relationship to in terms of the idea that cognitive issues can sometimes contribute to more motor problems or cognitive issues can get you more mood related issues. So they're they're not really separated. They're very much interrelated and we'll begin understand how and why that may be happening either from a chemical point of view from circuit point of view yeah. So so thinking about what's actually you know causing Parkinson's disease you talking about this overlap between the content issues and the and the motor dysfunction there may be like you know a connection there From what I read is that you know don't Parkinson's disease associated with A. Loss. In the dopamine producing neurons in the substantial. Niagara. Right and I had read somewhere that like. You lose between anywhere between fifty eighty percent of them before you actually cynical. Right so so you're right I mean. So the idea is that there is a social phenomenon with Parkinson's essentially. It is. Dopamine dopamine losses a big component of what man with the manifestations of Parkinson's disease of we. Actually about forty percent forty, let's say to fifty percent cell loss fly and sixty to eighty percent took. So there's a bit of a disconnect between the Mount of sell offs and depletion and the reason that's important and say it that way is because the idea that Parkinson's is loss Sherp in social cell dysfunction. So remaining cells that are still there are also having some problems as well and that that's important because it may play out in terms of some issues happened over time with how those reading skills handle doping things like wearing off and disconnection these sorts of things that manifests later on May have. Some role cell dysfunction as well. I think the other point to bring out is you know we tend to think of the behavioral features of Parkinson's disease is sort of being this one to one with a lost the idea being like oh The Cell Selnow tremor. But the reason I want to clarify a couple of points. So don't be loss is clearly important, but we're we're recognizing more and more is that behavior at the end of the day circuit right? So the idea is that dopamine is actually impacting circuitry. So don't be loss occurs. One of the fundamental things it does is disrupt circuitry and said that disruption of circuitry that causes behavioral problems. So where's A circuit problems that are underlying these behavioral issues. Well, we can take the motor circuit as an example, and in the motor circuitry, we know that there's a couple big areas circuits that involved in motor control. The biggest when we talk about is that at the Basal Ganglia rights basically to the CORTEX corticospinal and that's essentially responsible what we call automatically automatic movements. So this move set had been learned. Over time I mean. So you don't come out of moms womb like walking around and dancing right see have to practices over time, and so there's element of practice multiple practices they get you good. Don't mean as actually Porton floor. Facilitating. Synoptic city there, and there's a couple of forms that are developing. In that stratum. Ltd is the predominant form that's thought to be occurring in stratum particular motor control The issue though is that fundamentalists practice. So practice with dopamine as an enabler so don't. Robbing you losing functional and physical connections and we see that we know that that's happening. So the behavioral issue is probably that the circuit itself. Now, the reason we care is because there are other circuits evolved in motor movement movement through space, and one of those things is a frontal straddle circuit as an example and kind of keep that simple because there's other circuits in interacting with the prefrontal frontal system but the idea behind the frontal straddle is sort of volition movement. So my my ability to kind of update movements my ability to move into new spaces in actually my ability. To learn new movements so That's sort of what we call a bullish aspect of movement. So have the automatic movement you had the act ex movement, they're happening together all the time right and so if I'm losing my authenticity, if I'm losing that circuit hard because of doping depletion, I can compensate I can absolute concept by by kind of adapting towards a more volition type of movement and. If you ask Patiala Parkinson's they, they all do that. They'll tell you I have to think more bump and so the reason that's also interesting because at same circuit, many of those same circus had sort of a dull sort of dual behavior has a cognitive behavioral aspect of it of of what we called executive function, which is planning processing although sorts of things that. You're also kind of doing day to day. So there's sort of saturation effect capping here. I'm now depended on it more and I'm also using it to plan my day. So is that sort of the tipping point right there I've saturated and now that I can't do it anymore now that I'm I can take much for me to fall because now I'm using. It already also winters or firing, and now I have know now I have to hold plates and walk to the kitchen or something like that kind of supersaturated that frontal system and non falling right. So so that's why this whole idea of compensation threatful if we bring it up to the circuit level that may also begin to explain this that makes sense and finally. On the back end the idea of the world of cerebellar. Film also plays A. Role for motor control for motor. Planning. For a cognitive aspect to it as well, and the idea here is There's a lot of good data that shows for example in Parkinson's models that when we have it, just the beginning aspects of learning excise. That's our Bellum is on fire it's lit up like light bill. So we have to other circuits that are trying to put adapt, and so these are kind of principles, but we're going to talk about in just a bit but the whole idea of what? Is the fundamental aspects of brain change in homies stasis, which is reaching a new level balance or or. homeostasis stasis so that brain can function if you will. And what's interesting? Is that you begin to see like those are all sort of contributing to the Parkinson's and features right. So the dopamine depletion with the loss of ultimate tizzy, and then these other competitors circuits is that good or not good is I contributed some symptoms or not contributing to some symptoms so changes bring changes that happened the brain because of injury or in this case, dopamine depletion leads to lot of adaptation, some of which is good in terms of behavior and some of them not desirable. So it has kind of an interesting concept for the point of view that it may be kind of for some of these compensatory strategies that may be alive for some threshold at the same time, it may be causing some problems down the road, right? Yeah. Definitely. You're kind of touching on the things that that Seem to be to be important with with exercise and practicing. Certain types of gold, base. Expenses but I kinda wanted to ask you a little bit about before we get into that just you know. How many how many people I mean worldwide in the US have Parkinson's disease and maybe some of the the the environmental versus genetic causes of Parkinson's disease or what we know what the field knows. Right. So I mean I think in general. So the ideas that one hundred over the age of fifty have Parkinson's these and Don't know the exact. It's the second leading second-leading. Yeah. Definitely. The second right behind Alzheimer's and I think in terms of genetics genetic. So in general, we think that. Genetics play. Certainly the genetic risk factors, but in terms of strong genetic contributions. Most that data seems to be young onset by young women younger than thirty five, for example, not as common over the age of thirty five although now certainly recognizing that there are these risk factors like lark to, for example, where there may be running in certain ethnic groups. That where there may be some. Predisposition right to twos genetic mutation but the still in general I, think the ideas that most of these genetic predispositions are happening in younger onset people and that in the older in again older being anybody over the age of thirty five says an example or over the of forty at least that there's probably a mix between as environmental genetic factors and we've heard that again. By some work by a number of very. Important Best Gators who've been able to show us. That epidemiologic data, which is the idea that there has been some higher risk and in rural settings and in urban settings the idea that environment does seem to play a role. and. So in general, we would say still in Parkinson's these that it is sort of There's a number of different risk factors maybe genetic as we get older those genetic influencers. May Have some specific role in certain certain populations in general but that we would say that it's environment overs factors and maybe even things that play a role in genetics. that. How that are related to metabolism how we metabolize, for example, if decides right and and also the other genetic aspect of it is still questions related to plus this itself repair mechanisms is another example. So you can see that it gets complex pretty fast in terms of what genetic factors may be in what environmental factors may be and I think. I guess the point is people are beginning to recognize the Parkinson's may be kind of a common final pathway of a number of mechanisms which kind of makes it challenging away because it is late, every single one of those targets can be can be hard because it may not be one single doctor sample likely. Yeah. I was talking to you before we started rolling that basically the field seemed to really advanced back in the nineteen eighties s when you know this this precursor to our neuro talks and empty was found to basically 'cause Parkinson's symptoms and people I guess chemists. Synthesizing. It or even think IV drug use. It was actually the jugaris chemists seem to not get the problem drug users right? Exactly and the basically this This. This neuro toxin essentially inhibits mitochondrial function. Across the blood brain barrier. Affect, all sorts of you know. Bring regions and dopamine neurons. the thing that was very disturbing was the similarities between some of these insecticides and herbicides rotenone. Essentially have the same mechanism of action. Can cross the blood brain barrier right absolutely and are used as. Animal. Exactly, they're very effective. Aren't they? Yeah. I think the thing about that that you know obviously that the final of the. In the nineteen eighties so to clarify essentially what happened was. In the nineteen eighties, there was A. Outbreak, if you will of Parkinson's and what was so unusual about it is that these these particular individuals and there about eight individuals let's say that presented around the bay area and various emergency rooms had essentially developed Parkinson's futures overnight and nothing like that ever been seen, and there was sort of some really interesting investigative work that had been done to try to. Identify, what was the commonality between all these individuals and what they failed right off the bat was there had they had been heroin users and that they had gotten some access to some synthesized heroin essentially that had been tainted with this pro toxin. If you will be sort of pro toxin, it gets delivered to the brain and there it gets converted to MPP plus. But in essence they were not aware of course that this was in kind the heroin itself and it had been synthesized inadvertently by these chemists because they had changed the the kind of the the. Protocol if you will in how they were synthesizing this compound by changing the temperature, simply changing the temperature of the reaction had brought out this particular of toxin and when they injected it directly into the vein. The essentially blew out there. They're Niagara so killed doping sales, and we know that, for fact, because for some of the. These individuals who passed on the brains were looked at and also they had gain access to some of the material and used it in primates able to see replicate Parkinson's essentially be able to see that they'd killed sells at cost depletion that disturbs circuitry and that it caused modem paramount like Parkinson's disease. So the difference was this was a cute right, but I think what was so important about that was that. It was created a model that we could study to it validated the whole idea that there are environmental. Products by. Exposures of toxins that could absolutely contribute right to an agenda disorder and so kind of reconfirmed etymological doubt that rural aspects of where you live may influence. Contributed at to this. Kind of disease of aging maybe accelerating it or certainly in this situation bringing in l. even faster. So again, affecting house, how fast meet people may get it right and I think you mentioned earlier how there's probably a lot of combining factors perhaps added it in some cases you know. So so you may have higher exposure to some of these pesticides maybe farmer in fact, farmers have been shown to have a higher incidence of Parkinson's disease they're working with. So in combination with other things maybe being sedentary and. Inflammation and just like you know the perfect storm, I. Wait. Environmental factors that that can increase your risk. So right exactly and I think. It's it's hard to. Necessarily, pick out one thing in. What happened to that MP? Obviously. Tragically happened to these individuals. Fortunate. We've never seen an outbreak like that since then. But it does sort of point out the idea that you know. Right that there may be a contribution of things either over time or a number of different risk doctors that can certainly contribute to this right I think with those two in particular those to you know wrote known as a insecticide paraquat reserve aside and I know that rotenone I think is is really only used now in the US to kill fish. Piscopo side or something is right. Is this I don't know how much of it's in the water right? Kind of like you know I all these things to think. But paraquat I think it's like pretty pretty much phased out you have to really have it's restricted use in the maybe in developing countries and stuff but. The question becomes should I worry about if I have a you know my is not organic but but I'm exercising and you know I'm refined sugar and I'm doing everything else is not such a big deal right? Maybe I haven't genetic risk factor don't there's a lot of things to consider maybe you don't have a complete fear I've decided I'm meeting organic just yeah because I do eat a large quantity of them and some you know blaming him and smoothies and stuff. I'm so but you know it is one thing to consider of. Different you know possible risk factors. So one of the probably most compelling lifestyle factors that at least from my reading and certain from research like yours, that seems to impact Parkinson's disease in the positive way mean. Decreased risk. And also seems to be associated with Modulating, this verity of the disease is exercise. So. There is literature that has linked to decreased risk of Parkinson's Parkinson's people that are more physically active right? Correct. Is that's correct. Yeah. Exactly and I mean exercises pretty much. It's like a panacea you're talking about decreasing the risk of Alzheimer's disease, and in in fact, it's been shown to help you know with recovering from traumatic brain injury in a way Parkinson's disease is kind of like A. Traumatic brain injury. You know like just extended out right now you're. Yeah and I think that's also why. So. Yeah. So excise, obviously there's a lot of. Interesting data compelling data. Certainly from epidemiologic point of view that it may lower risk for Parkinson's disease. I like to think about exercise and lifestyle in general. Obviously, we're going to talk a little bit more specifically about exercise. The counterweight to every type thing we talked about before. So the idea that. Multiple things genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors. And disuse if you will stall factors. Contribute to brain injury brain. Changes over time. So sort of an insult to the brain that bring out diseases Parkinson's as an example of that. And it sort of plays out fundamentally at a circuit level meaning behavior is what is underlying circuitry. So if we see behavioral issues, then whatever that damage is occurring happening because of synoptic connection losses either physical loss or functional loss of connections right. So then you can think of lifestyle exercises example as sort of being the counterbalance. Where whatever those Meka's Abso-, which we can talk about a little bit more detail or promoting right or promoting these sort of synoptic connections maybe keeping them healthier, facilitating them or maybe driving some of these compensatory circuits that allow me to function day today so I think the kind of cool thing about exercises is to think about it in in the in the idea that it is a kind of counterbalance right and so it may not be necessarily targeting every specific mechanism of every toxin or whatever those insults are. It provides a type of repair model. That allows some type of Brazilian. So the idea of resilience and I think that's important because it gets. To the idea of aging if you will and these insults if you will is sort of a part of life kind of spectrum of life that is ongoing, right? So the idea is that we don't live in bubbles. We were always going to have some type of exposure. So exercise and lifestyle sort of gives us this continual spectrum if you will of kind of a repair ongoing repair kind of the ongoing counterbalance. That allows me to deal with this sort of better so that the modification and or be sufficient enough for me to not even hit the threshold of the of the disorder of the of the diagnosis and what's interesting about that too is there's also a bit of a disconnect if you will between the pathology load and some of these circuits as well. Circuit impairment, for example, or circuit repair I give the example of. Alzheimer's and amyloid. It's an example where people have looked at, for example, unsteady where nuns had. Basically giving writing samples over time and showing. The level of education and cognitive capacity if you will. And yet having a fairly significant amel law load. So it just goes makes you think about how much whatever these lifestyle factors are. Interact with some of these protein aggregates. Parkinson's me another one either directly or indirectly. So it may not all be about moving protein load, but it's still able to do something beyond that in terms of maintaining some type of synoptic integrity or function. And I think it also gets back to the idea that we think about. Kind of benefits of exercise there still could be even though I'm able to function veterans of like that it doesn't mean that my brain doesn't have some changes. So there could be still some evidence of injury. On saying is that nothing's perfect height up in terms of pathology behavior circuitry it's what we're trying to understand and that's now. So in the context of exercise, the Model X. offers is sort of. The counterbalance to all the injury side. So exits offices model to understand all the repetitive magazines, all the resilience mechanisms that we believe at the end of the day or playing out a circuit level. Does that make so basically? What you're saying is that way and the exercise is. Activating all these resilient pathways, it's activating pathways that are involved in maintaining connections between neurons, making them stronger and repairing damage in. A variety of growth factors that are important for these signaling and and so that. So because the I mean, the exercise in his senses is a type of stress on the body we actually evolved doing we before we were in our industrialized societies where we sit in our office and cubicles we were out, you know hunting gathering getting our food and moving a lot right removing were meant to do that but it is a type of stress that activates all these resilient pathways and so in the face of another type of stress whether that's Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease or just the stress of aging. You're you're going to be more resilient to that stress you're going to deal with this better. You're going to have more of this brain drive neurotrophic factor that helps damaged neurons than you what you know. So so even though you're not gonNa take away that challenge, the challenge will be there I. Mean we're all aging right You're just going to do it better because I do have more of these. Resilient pathways are being activated, right? That's right and so in a way, it's sort of a continuum then. So then you don't think of it as before the Z's during the Z's right, it's just always there and so you kind of moving forward through an aging process with all these other risk factors happening that are causing some have without a doubt, some injury at some level, and so I mean the importance of US understanding excise a model is a model of or the mechanism. It's really trying to understand better what the brain is capable intrinsic repair mechanisms. What are we really ebeling there? You know what? What's the counterbalanced injury that we're able to tap into that allows us to compensate at a significant level and again, Parkinson's remember I mean think about that model self there's a threshold there I've lost. Forty percent of cells before I got I'm sure function parent, right. So that's important because it gives us an idea that the brain may be able to tolerate some level of injury if you will and through optimization. which we still believe has to happen at a snap Dick Level behavior is synoptic. So to get function improvement behavior, you need something at a certain level. So it's more than just sells that's the other important thing. Yeah. That's cute. Understanding those repair mechanisms and so I think people in the exercise field you know obviously, we're thrilled that we can be able to understand this better to enable people to do more things and to be more involved in care and these sorts of things I think other bigger issues or kind of the field of repaired of mechanisms and self. It's sort of like. Thinking about science spaces a final frontier, but there's so much. We don't understand about how the brain is able to drive repair mechanisms. What's the limit of that? Which is very interesting. Yeah. Absolutely. I think that. Not only we're talking about exercising in general term, but the specific types of exercise right and how they're how they're. Maybe Y- differentially improving there's different repair mechanisms happening doing high intensity intervals grant. Says Resistance Training I sixty S or seventy percent max heart rate might or you know treadmill walking in coordination so there's all different absolutely absolutely and I, think I think. There's an issue that different types of excise and also kind of getting into that discussion. Sort of underlying that is is obviously the mechanism question, right? So are they doing something differential right and and I think the reason we care about things like that is because I think one of the whole early concepts of exercise in general has been really more about bodies effect on the. Brain. As. The brain is a past recipient of all these sorts of benefit somehow. I think when we're teasing apart these different types of excise, I think one of the questions that come up is. We care about these different types of excise because we do believe. That there are. Certain circumstances where the brain may play a more active role meaning it's driving some circuit specific effect and what I mean by that is this whole idea. For example, if I'm more engaged in what I'm doing if I'm more top down cog nvolved in in my process of movement through space and learning something that may be activating certain circuits right and that activation of circuitry by virtue of using it harder may itself drive some of these benefits example that type of physical activity right. So for example, let's say something that would be more skillful, right so we're I'm actually having to get better at it. It's actually quite challenging for example. California surfing as an example where I'm not only considering. How I- balancing on the board but in watching the Wade's I'm thinking about my speed getting up on the board, my weight distribution. So there's a lot of different things I'm thinking about as I'm trying to get better on that I fall off and do it again and and getting through a lot of different practices. So it's a lot of practice repetition learning feedback. where I'm really thinking hard about what I'm doing so that as a skill versus for example, a stationary bike right where I'm just moving. Just moving my legs trying to get up to certain speed but maybe not having to think about balances much these sorts of things what would be an example for someone for example, that has Parkinson's disease they probably aren't going to be out surfing. So, an example, another Tai Chi or yoga as an example, right in boxing as an example, non contact. So but also even a physical, you know many of physical therapists will they'll do as an example is just even gate imbalanced practice harder anytime you're making something harder more challenging whether it's to balance whether it's two way changed the dynamic balance working. Carter with dynamic balance speed. You're you know you get the speed up you have to make them more accurate all those sorts of things it's going to make it harder for you. So the idea would be getting out of your comfort zone problem solving how to get more accurate, how to get that speed up how to become more dynamic on that task. And as I said that can be done even in with physical therapists working on gate imbalance, right? That itself is going to be more skilful over the skillful exercise that you're describing. It seems really independent of. Talking about something else which would be the intensity of your exercise vigorousness like how like that's another yeah. What you're talking about specifically has to do I mean you're obviously getting physical. You're you're getting some physical activity, but it's a very specific type of activity where you're you're you're focusing on something you're getting that feedback of learning, right? You're you're basically engaging a lot more just like right and I think fundamentally you sort of getting it the the to kind of. To kind of discussions that are going on with exercise actually, there's other discussions with. And those sorts of things but I think fundamentally some of the questions that are coming up intensity in context of learning. So one is learning more about motor learning right? Which is definitely requires lots of practice in challenge to get good right like ton. It says an example, right? In the other type and intensity was the heart rate getting your heart rate up feeling your heart, pounding your chests and sweating. That's also intent. So they're both they can both be very intense, but for different reasons, right. So one more from the aspect of learning and practice and problem solving to get better at something from a physical point of view. So things can be very physically challenging to learn skateboarding or Tai Chi or yoga and Parkinson's disease. The bottom line is there gate isn't normal. The balanced is not normal. We're starting all over again. So this is not normal walking right in this is not normal. Dynamic balance, they have impairments in that. So we can start at that level where we're concentrating on getting the balanced better, the walking stride better the posture, all those things are recall more normal automatic gate that's practiced them to get good into make it harder and that was that as the disease progresses, those things are are dysfunctional or you're saying even from the beginning, right we're already working on it and making it harder can make it harder yet. I mean, we can make you know have you be more accurate with it? Make you go through an obstacle so we can make it harder yet to get us even better for balance an example now what I was saying is. In terms diagnose like does their balance like for example, if they were just diagnosed. You know is there are they going to be having problems with their balance as the disease progressive? Disease Progress in general but gate is very common. I mean not normal gait. So they'll have slowness in the gate, for example, and by gate mocking exactly. Yeah. So I mean we tend to target, and that's why you see many excise programs really target gait and balance because many times. So people definitely can have slowed us in their hand and stiffness trunk. Let targeted gain a balance is huge because that's really ultimately probably where the biggest deficits are and many times in targeting balance you really engaging different parts of the body as well. Arm Swing and he sorts of things. So it's a good place to start if you will now, obviously you can add more with things in your arms boxing example that we can add more and make it more complicated. Tasks and if people that are doing this rock steady boxing, it's called the non contact or they just like doing like a bag or is it like is? Yeah. So I have to tell you have never gone to rock steady boxing class, but the idea would be that, yeah they're learning different types of patterns of movements, for example, so it may not just be pure moving the arm, but it may be a pattern that they have to replicate, for example so that would make. That you're exactly right and I don't think anybody thinks that one one type of necessarily negates the other the there's no you know. No one thinks one is necessarily better. They're just different I'm saying and I think fundamentally the reason we care as we think that the mechanisms which underlie they may be different and that's why I think. We're doing. We're very interested in that idea and some of the work that a colleague. Dr Whole Snyder. Shown is certainly an animal models that we've been doing a looking trying to separate out or tease apart. These different mechanisms were one group of rodents with Parkinson's have gone through a type of exercise practice more skillful meaning they're on a motorized wheel with spokes removed animals definitely need to pay more attention versus a group of Annals Parkinson where there aren't spokeswoman. So it's nice and smooth. They don't have to think as much about what they're doing say match for speed the animals that have the spokes moved have blood flow in top down circuit cognitive domains much more. So than animals that don't. So kind of the proof of concept that okay of exercises just excises exercise we shouldn't be seeing differences in blood flow to different circuits. Wow, right. Yeah Right. They were doing the same intensity. Yeah right and so again, why do we care I think the biggest thing honestly is that it's just beginning to say, Hey, guess what the rain is not passive this is not a passive effective excise brain is engaged very much in this repaired of mechanism and is driving this effect. So it's not just take blood and dump it onto the brain. No the brain is an important signal of this effect, and that's huge to think about I also think to some degree you know. Maybe. This is like the. With the animals like there wasn't like a dose that you haven't you know maybe a response would be an interesting to do as well in terms of intensity because I know from experience when I. Go really hard when I'm pushing my intensity to something like eighty to eighty, five percent of my maximum rate, and by the way, people usually aren't measuring their heart rate like. I have like my my my watch and stuff and all that. But for people that aren't measuring the heart rate, would you say good gauge is sweat getting flushing face I? Mean this is my your dog. That's right. That's right. You've got to like out of comfort zone. Yeah. Japan's yes. I have to think about what undoing a lot more like even though. In class right and it's like if I'm pushing it to my like eighty percent Max zone. Yeah I am more calling to engage. Yes. Absolutely for us when I am doing. Fifty percent why? No? You're right. They're speed I mean. That's true. So there's a speed component, right where so as you get faster, you are dinky I see a lot more and you are starting to you're right now. And I think the point you bring up which I think is so important is it's a spectrum isn't so it's not really often just one of the other right. There's some that have certain types of activities that are going to have a higher BEC- content maybe than skill but as I've often been reminded by many my physical therapists call it colleagues. It's like it's actually also kind of impossible not to have some level of skill. In anything you do I mean it's hard to be completely mindless whatever you're doing. Even I mean I see weight lifting even the weightlifting is required to fight loading. You don't want to get right exactly. Not just like throwing weights around. So yeah. So the idea is that there's always some element skill even in biking even stitcher by thinking about the speed, it's kind of the issue degree also again, the intensity and the two probably. Obviously I'm different types of mechanisms that may be contributing to repair, but the ideas they may be different, and particularly when we're thinking about coggin circuitry as an example, we may want to be thinking about how we could add more Kaga bloating great and was curious about the sort of idea of cognitive loading. You know many times when I talked to people about cotton looting, the first thing they wanted to do is tell me about a. A A. Like across puzzle they've done and I'm going wait a minute. A. Our brain has evolved to be pretty effective and movement through space. I mean it's it's pretty you know. Pretty on board when it tries to figure out how to GET POINT A to point B I mean it's important in our volition. It's probably why we've still living today because we've been able to animals at harm us, we've been able to be successfully going for meals. I mean the idea of luminance space is huge for us and that the point there is at that's cognitive loading myself just problem solving movement through space whether that be because of the skill that I'm engaging or even a different environment, right? So the idea of mixing that up. Changing the environment is going to be another type of load. There's been animal studies that have shown that during that exact thing like like changing the environment and I particularly putting's an animal and more enriched environment they increases. Sanath connection live. Right, absolutely, and it was interesting about that field though is even in the context of Richmond many times. It's also what else is in there like the wheel I mean, there's always a physical component find is also important so I think it kind of just. kind of goes back to the idea that. Move into space is a big deal for brain. itself is a cognitive load. We can definitely ramp that up in a lot of different ways certainly from a skill point of view we can from an environmental or richmond making it. A novel environment for us moving effectively through space is also an a new space in a novel virus is also pretty big. I know there's a lot of interest nail looking at natural spaces and what that does for cognition as well, and there's some really interesting things coming out of that. Again kind of tying it back into movement though is really where it gets really interesting. Yeah. Right I mean certainly. So in addition to. All the benefits that exercise I mean there's been studies showing that you know in in Parkinson's disease patients Parkinson's disease patients that do you know a certain amount of you know thirty minutes exercise monitoring moderate to too high intense? Intensity increase. BNF in their plasma and medium have crosses the blood brain barrier to growth factor. It's more for maintaining after connections really for growing new neurons and you know cer- certainly important for. Repair. Of Damage sprains. There's there's there's definitely lots of factors that probably as you were mentioning, there's the you know the combination of these things I exercise it's anti-inflammatory. You're making anti-inflammatory site kind. You know in you know those things also are doing stuff in the brain absolutely as you mentioned, the brain and body are very connected or not disconnected I thought in fact, the immune system you know the these immune factors are getting into the brain. Has acted absolutely no. So there's definitely can absolutely I think one thing back. Again you're saying so this whole idea of how connected obviously, as you said, we're learning a lot about that. But. Also, again, the idea that which I always like to emphasize that the brain is not a passive recipient of this meaning. There's a lot of signaling were probably just beginning to understand in terms of what the brain needs and the idea that as you kind of create these sort of metabolic demands on these circuits by virtue of how you're using your brain right by virtue of the taxing nature of skill and the taxi nature of a cognitive load in the context of movement that those neurons and those synoptic activity and that high metabolic demand signaling the need for more fuel. and. So the idea there is all those sort of pathways that are you know metabolic in nature that Driving changes in blood flow that that are also kind of interesting because like I said I, many times do tend to think about these sort of Lysol effects is sort of being the sort of global kind of glow your body. It's sort of like it's a sort of wave. Your whole body that somebody gets better. It's well no no I mean these it's very active and it may be even more specific than we think and I think is as I said, the brain is a great model to begin understand that because it has some kind of cool repair mechanisms. Question is how does that signaling start? How much of that is driven right and yet top down? So we're not even talking about. In talking from the brain out brain signaling to the periphery. I need now to to be able to accomplish what I need to accomplish reaching my new level home. You stasis I asking for new level of type of connection that I now need I'm going to signal for the type of whatever support I need to make that happen right? Do you think. That I was talking with your colleague who happens to be your husband. Earlier about we're talking about. The exercise and the lactate that's induced from exercise. Now, this isn't your you know I'm not sure if there's a signal, you know basically lactates being generated and it's it's it's crossing the Bloomberg and getting the brain I don't know if there's a reason for that. You're Astra, sites make lactate. Highly like. Mostly I think they're using using glucose to make lactase that shuttled into neurons and used as a very. Easily used. Oxygen Oxidizer source of energy but also it accidentally molecule and it's affecting D. and F. and other things. So I just thought that was very interesting that you know there's another possible mechanism. Is like you're you've got this lactate that's being generated the brain wants it. I don't know right if like there's some it goes to other tissues I don't know if it. Goes in the brain name saying quite a bit right quite a bit and I, think the other thing I mean. So it is one of the interest of the lobby in general, which is understanding. How does lactate? How can we signal the need for lactate in the brain or how is the brain using lactate in the context of excise and and what is upstream mechanisms for driving the signal? There are a number of different pathways that people are looking at but one of them are transcription factors and hypoc sucessful factor each one. Alpha is one example of transcription factor that is known to be. Up, regulated in the context of hypotheses and now ourselves and other groups that reported some upper glacier at the context of exercise. So the idea of a stressor, right? So the idea of this sort of disconnect between. What the Neuron is doing in terms of activity in the metabolic demand, itself may be driving transcription factor changes that then may up regulate metabolism or alterations and lactate transport as an example, right and that's some of the interests that we have right now. which may be Driven. So the ideas that neurons through activity are, as I said, upper getting transcripts that are detecting this mismatch if you will that may change metabolism right and then and then allowing for better use close or even use personal lactate do changes in transport. And Buffalo. So that's kind of cool right. So so now you're thinking about per full of facts whether that's immunity traffic factors on one hand, and then you're thinking about signaling that essentially driven by stressors we certainly know cancer can do that as an example it's kind of a kind of ironically a kind of an interesting model for us because it kind of does the same thing and it kind of. A changes the demand on the brain it's changing the metabolic demand that it needs and it's changing blood flow to the to the tumor itself, and we're sort of seeing those sorts of things with exercise based on how we're using circuitry. Which is interesting right. And I think it all goes back to the idea of what home stasis is. Right. So the idea that. Is Sort of trying to reach this new type of balance this new type of. Kind of. To brain change responded to injury, that's responding to a new demand on the brain right that it recognizes where it's beginning to need more fuel better blood flow more support. And that we can influence to some degree based on what we do right which is crazy right. But didn't you also publish a few years ago you had a very small pilot trial where you showed pay patients with Parkinson's disease early early diagnosed I think they were medication free even and you had them doing this sort of moderate to intense high-intensity. TREADMILL exercise and it seemed to change the way the sensitivity of their brain dopamine Hartson. Actors, DO I. Yes. Like they're basically using it better. The little they have better at it. More? Efficient. Yes. Is another thing that we'd seen which is actually changes and told me receptors right. So the idea was that we take in patients who had not been on the thing and Essentially nomads anyway, and we're really recently diagnosed and then putting them on a on a treadmill, and I would argue that although the again. So intensity in two ways one obviously getting their heart rate up but they were actually also getting a lot of feedback on gate imbalance again, correcting constantly correcting going up on speed. So they had to become more having a personal trainer seem kind of US Warton. Yeah. They were getting tons of feedback by going on speeds. Now you're having to work harder to make sure you're accurate. So again, you're in zone if you will. But any event. Yeah. So we're able to show that we saw changes in. Levels. But the idea being that the amount of mean you have with a better receptor expression, you're becoming more efficient and that was duplicating what we saw in the animal model. This was kind of Nice to be able to show it in both a rodent model and. It goes along with that patience you were just absolutely. Absolutely. I would ask though for someone that is does have Parkinson's disease. It. Sounds like having a personal trainer may be a good idea because you're getting all these things that you're mentioning. You're getting feedback someone to help challenge you more if. You don't want to spend your comfort zone I. would if you were walking your dog right push yourself more right. So you're helps to have someone it has a group class feedback and right I mean I think is great. You've touched on a number of different things I. Think First of all. Number one I think. In general, we like having patients with Parkinson's have exposure to physical therapy one one periodically and I think the idea there's what you said for a couple reasons obviously one you want to make sure you're challenging yourself you WANNA make sure you're not hurting yourself but also you really are gaining kind of tool set and feedback on what you need to be working on and it is as I said, you know getting the feedback to be accurate and problem solve to do it again better right and so you definitely want to progress and get better number one. And two, you can kind of use those tool sets to apply to a class which you're doing you know your class, but you kind of know what you need to be working on. So I kind of like that that combination I think the other thing So getting one I think is always great and I think for Parkinson's that's particularly true because they have some deficits that they really should be working on focusing on getting that feedback is important they may not recognize it. So that is important. The other thing I was gonNA. Say is. I like people also. To kind of mix things up a little bit do a lot of different things. So you know once you've tried one thing, maybe mix it up and do something a little different. I, think that's also Porton. Doing something you love the whole idea of self belief. Is Self efficacy, self belief the idea that you're GonNa do better if you believe you can gain benefits from it, and if you enjoy what you're doing or really key and so I think that's also why the idea of obviously kids sophie about physical therapy but then doing something you love you enjoy you WanNa? Learn is good mixing it up both from the skillset different things and mixing up from the different environments I always say look we live in southern California you we've got I don't know how many different types of terrains here. It's not that hard to mix this up. So so it's really going back to the idea of mental disability exploaration and fundamentally play. Play. which is all those things definitely increases compliance that you'll keep doing it but something you enjoy doing thing but to a certain extent, you also want to make sure it's not I mean it's it's play, but you're also like pushing yourself right? You're not. Yeah you know I I'd play was that study I think Jaama medicine the one that was published in December two, thousand, seventeen were they. Did. The Dose Response Intensity of exercise that took Parkinson's patients and had a group of you know basically not do any exercise and other group did moderate intense. So they've been doing about sixty, sixty, five percent maximum heart rate, and the other one was high intense where about eighty to eighty five percent again, people that aren't measuring their heart rate you know when you're sweating and your flush. Kind of good indicator when you don't when you feel uncomfortable because watching it, right exactly. That's a good example. This was a six month trial and the the people who did not exercise according to the various the tests that they measure for disease progression. We talked a little bit about this and maybe you know there's some caveats there. But according to that you know test, they do the people that did not exercise progressed fifteen percent worse over the six-month trial the ones that didn't modern intensity progressed seven point five percents about half of what the ones that didn't exercise and the people that high-intensity had zero progression over six months which to me. Is Huge when I think about an. Parkinson's disease and a friend of mine. A close friend of mine who to be enroll adjust well, motor she specializes in motor. Motor dysfunction as well. Her mother has Parkinson's disease and I watched her progress over the last. Fifteen. Years and I've seen it progress from tremor a little little bit of the gate problems to now she can't walk she can't dress herself I mean. You know it's progress now full blown dementia. So there's definitely progression there and and I'm wondering it's like if you could take someone and have them this. Sorry. In the study, they did it was thirty three times a week and it's about thirty minutes of intense exercise with a little bit of a warm up and cool down if you could take someone and have them do an intense workout like that three. Times a week and slow the progression where you're talking you know just having a little bit of a tremor and maybe some of the slowness you know, maybe you'll just a little bit of that initial stage. But like having their quality of life where they can still dress themselves and put their makeup on and I know like they still have their mind I mean. That's a huge difference in quality of life. That is huge. That is huge I think and again I mean we still have a lot of room to go I, mean we understanding how this affects Parkinson's disease. We've got some really great promising data I. think There's still gaps piddly. I would say still in the cognitive room, we got a lot to do there in terms of understanding what that cognitive impact is and and again we talked about the idea that cognition pyramids common and Finally, the biggest disability over down. So obviously work to do there but certainly were heading in the right direction in terms of. One trying to understand many different different types of studies clinical in animal models to to try to understand how. Well, they can pack these different circuits particularly carbon circuitry as an example. And then also I think. The cool thing is you're right. We actually have some data without a doubt that we can use now right and so the idea of of definitely making sure that our that our patients. Are Well informed in terms of the idea that it's important right so they need to be using. You know we always say fifty percent of treatment should absolutely be lifestyle and exercise and all the things we just talked about making attached, having a physical therapist that can help you really challenge yourself. We talked about data balance because it tends to be the bigger issue and when you train gained balance, it's going to incorporate many other different things. Making tents partly aerobic partly from practice. Those are all important. One of the things I have to say though that I always tried to make clear to people is. One it, there's no doubt that it stops disease. So that's the one thing I. It's never shown. It occurs Parkinson's and two. I also want to make sure that we inform patients that it's not a replacement for dopamine and the reason that's important is because we also had some experience with individuals who Were frightened of dopamine and I. Know There's a lot of literature that's can be very frightening for people. But the idea that they were taking dopamine mean all all they want to do exercise and and what we noticed and. Is that those people really struggled. They really were not able to get the most out of practice have. FIG ability when they tried to exercise and so the point was they didn't really get the benefits as excise because they couldn't do it right and so the part of the equation is there's a reason for me and so dopamine has a role for snappy city. Obviously, practices is important but don't mean enables can you talk a little bit about? So there's the standard of Care Treatment Right now is Lebedova, carpet Oba right right. So dopamine replacement because Parkinson's disease is I said is it's obviously don't mean depletion with circuit changes the doping depletion is also it's driving some of this loss loss of connections We need doping back because don't mean is what is what enables synapses to form as well along with practice in it also alleviates the symptoms themselves. So treating with dope will help a lot of the symptoms of slowness and stiffness that will allow you to get the most out of practice I can move better. I can move more accurate when I can you know I'm not feeling Steph. So again I think of the elbow, which is what we give carbon believable Gobert gets converted. Adoga. Yes yeah. Bizzare pro drug that I just with Carbon Yoga or? Blocks the personal metabolism ldl. It doesn't break down in the blood or make me sick covered up prevents elda from becoming dopamine before gets into the brain right? Right. That's correct and then but the idea there is once elder but makes into the brain. It gets converted in the brain in those remaining cells to dopamine, and that is now targeting those circuits that I mentioned automatic circuits right and that's allowing it to work more efficiently, and then the ideas with adding exercise it also Dr Repair. Right so you're saying that's exercise not a replacement for the although by Yoga, but it's in combination. Obviously still need the dopamine and. I think I think that the the L. Dopey and the carpet up itself doesn't actually slow disease progression, but it does help treat symptoms but that's Y-. After a certain time doesn't some of those become refractory doesn't is it's more I would say. There are civil points. One is that it? Because they'll cells not storing as well. To dose more frequently, that's a cell dysfunction problem and then secondarily. There are other circuits cognitive circuits as an example that are getting affected, and we know cognition plays a big role in my ability to move safely through space, and so that's going to be a big contributor. Elba does not do as much. It's not as effective for cognitive function. It has wool there last one of many different chemicals Acetylcholine beating another one sir tone and open effort being other ones. They things are also modulated exercise and there have been Meta analysis that have been done looking at various types of exercise and their effect on Communist function executive function, global cognitive function. And those things can be improved right the right in aging field I'd say is a little further ahead of us in terms of their data it's probably the strongest dot is in the field right now -solutely. But there are some in with Parkinson's patients that they have looked at and so it it certainly is affecting cognition as well at the exercise you know. So again, it's just like you know doing i. You know I just feel like it's like driving at home you know it seems. How do you? You know we hear about exercise and how important is like every day and the press I mean everyone's heard it. You know. The question is like how do you get your patients that how Parkinson's that maybe sedentary? Maybe you know you know not not there's a there's a quite a few people that are sedentary in their late sixties. And how do you? How do you? Convey the importance right how critically important it is to do exercise along with their with their tree. I think one of the first things I would say education I mean I think I know having the data. That's huge. So you know it's one thing to say, okay access important. The other thing I would say now we have a lot of data and I'M Getting the word out but more importantly showing the data what we're seeing why we think it's happening. Definitely, add some motivation I find many times when I talked to my patients about it they're. Pretty motivated after I talked to him. I think the other thing too like anything else. Having some goal setting what? Being clear in your mind while you're doing this right. So the educational piece, what I'm trying to get out of it. Having, resources clearly, I think most people like to have things that are close in available to themselves. So identifying resources that are close to them. Classes that are close to them, and then you know having other kind of motivators in your life people around you that support you. So I'm definitely a big believer in community in the health and wellness start low of community, and so having those sorts of support system to help you want to Change Your Life WanNa get more active is important. I have to tell you many times when I'm talking to people with Parkinson's. Turn look at the whole family go. This is not Parkinson's. Just say this. About everybody here. So so I think you know that's helpful because I'm like, no, it's not just Parkinson's I think all of you could start working on this. So getting the partner out there whatever is important as well. I'm not saying it's always easy I mean, heck you know we're talking about change your whole Western culture here because we're sedentary right so small steps are good steps and I tried to get the word out keep them motivated find different ways, mix it up these sorts of things are huge I think we still have a lot of work to do. Obviously I think there's a lot of other issues and Parkinson's that make make them a little bit more vulnerable apathy in these sorts of things. So it's not always easy. I'm not saying that it is. So close something we need to work on in Parkinson's disease, but I would also say our culture in general it sounds like it'd be easier author to intervene earlier like if you're. Messed up gets worse it is but I have to tell you I. You know for me it's like everybody I don't let anybody off the hook. Yeah nobody good I mean this is I think also just communicating like you need to the patient that's like look there's one thing that I it is infecting your symptoms. Okay. Yes. There's improving your system symptoms and they think why can get that from my pedal right but talking about like the way this disease will progress like ten years from now potentially like that should be motivating enough. Pill Thinking GonNa do that like. Symptoms and stuff. That's a big deal. Yeah. And I think those sort of testimonials I mean again, it gets back to the communities and stuff having other people talking about what they're doing is so helpful. It certainly, not just from us. It's from their own support groups and stuff like that I think is extremely helpful to get people motivated in making it a community based event as opposed to pd specific or eighty, which is not that at. All right. So. Aging goes back into the ageing field and and trying think about how to incorporate this entire lifestyle is part of our culture. I. Think those are things we certainly need to work on more but yeah, totally a couple of things I just wanted to mention quickly before we wrap up I, know you're you may not be so familiar with this field but more like the nutritional aspect there's there's been some interesting evidence with the Omega three fatty acid Dha which is an important component of cell membranes and the brain that's that's been done. observational studies have shown like people taking Fischl Lawrence Parkinson's but then you can never establish causation some interesting animal models both rodents and primates showing in the empty model where you kind of induce this Parkinson's like. Symptoms that the taking pretty high. Dha specifically what would be a human equivalent of dose of like an hundred eighty pound man like three grams a day pretty much which is like six pills standard fish oil lake. It it in both the rodent models. The primate models hit non human primate models lowered the the. Juice disconnecting nothing happen. And I thought that was pretty interesting because it is a negative side effect that can occur with with that. Little Dope Carbon Dope. And the fact that it was like you know multiple animal animal species everything was happening. I thought that was very interesting finding that I kind of wanted to bring get on your radar just get on your radar to look look look and read them. Still Yeah and of course. Dha. Interestingly. Has Been shown with dopamine in the context of traumatic brain injury. Models as well. Probably some thing going right exactly. Yeah I. Think I mean the whole diet field I think it again, lifestyle diet and exercise really go together right so absolutely, I think the field is Tremendous and it's going to give us a whole another way to think about again how these things are interacting and I have to say for for right now, I would say in the Parkinson's. Not as much I mean we're again. Probably get more in the aging field but I think in general we get. We borrow from each other's feel but I think probably the the probably the most comfortable thing that we feel safe in saying be something like the Mediterranean Diet again from again based on epidemiological data and and that of course includes things like fish and unless sugar in higher you know just green vegetables vegetables in general nuts looms. And stuff like that to Parkinson's people with Parkinson's have higher like, for example, higher levels of plasma circulating inflammatory sites and our plasma. Yes. So there's some data I mean interesting. The you know there are hints here and there it's again, not as well. WORKED OUT IS MS example. But yeah, the idea that there's t.f Alfa L. Six. So the idea that there may be higher pro inflammatory cytokines. And that's something that we're going to try to explore and some of the work that we're doing right now. So we you know people do believe that you know again, it may not be the cause of Parkinson's but maybe something that's adding to the progression, which is things like inflammation what role diet, the microbiome I mean they all sort tiding together there. That may play as mechanism is going to be important and something that definitely needs to be investigated further. So again, another place where we may be able to modulate the disorder. But right now, it seems as the thing that's that's pretty repeatable exercise. Yeah. That's do you tell them three times a week? Yeah. I mean we we basically most of the studies are about three times a week. So I would say about three times a week mainly thirty minutes, three times a week and trying to make it as intense tangible I, and then we add that it was part of that. That should also have some skill component particularly involving gate unbalanced related task, and there's a lot of things that do that. So I don't pick out any one in particular I don't whether. That's Taichi Yoga's surfing whatever they like to do I. think that's important as well, and I think as you pointed out before having someone to give you the feedback so that you're accurate and challenging yourself is actually quite important. So I think having that one particular Parkinson's is a smart thing and we do try to get people into someone along therapy I I usually do at least two times a year, and actually I start right away and there isn't anybody that I don't send because we can always make it. Always. Make challenging for you. I think absolutely that's really key the having having someone there that's going to really help push you pass your comfort zone. Yeah. That feedback. I. Just you know it's really important for people particularly people that are less prone to push themselves like I'm I'm one of those people and I'm pushing myself I wanna be I wanna be the hardest working real in class. That's right but but. I don't have these neurological problems and apathy and all this other stuff that comes along with Parkinson's disease, right? I've been younger and this is sort of my. getting someone to do that push themselves. It's so key oftentimes. I might say to someone you know exercise is really important like why walk my dog and I, hear that a lot around here. I Walk my dog. Well, that's. You argue red in the face fighting pushing yourself. Are you running with your dog? Yeah. Right. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta be tough. You gotta be a little tough and anyway I tried to be pretty tough. But also like I said, there isn't anybody I don't care if they're even been in a wheelchair I'll I'll try to get them up. We'll see what we can do I'm not. You know we do everything safely but I think that I'm so passionate about that because you know when I was a field you know it's been a while obviously but. I was in the field of time. Excise is not thought like that. In fact, it was pretty much do anything and so patients with Parkinson's. We may give him a wheelchair or Walker, but there was no plan to make it make it hard and I think that's the thing in general. I think people kind of feel like Oh, you know as you're getting older, you know just chill and don't do anything and it's like young no, no, no, no people are afraid of falling. All right. No I think it's this idea that somehow you can't gang something. Former you you just can't do it. I'm not sure but Yeah. So forget that yeah. No everyone is using improvements like with your people that are more have more severe than everybody gets better I. Mean we see improvement everybody I you know that's the thing you know and even small gains a good games I mean. So yeah, and I like them to mix it up by you know tell them to play instruments even to get more hand skill going and I mean, yeah, I mean I think that's the thing we. In Way we're too easy on each other and as people get older, it's like, yeah. Get out there. Learn something go out there and learn a new skill take-up racket ball I mean are there are there is this a common for clinicians in the Parkinson's field? Are they commonly? Emphasizing exercise do you know is this like something that's been more embraced or we have to push it more in Chile has been more embraced but I have to say in general I'm very. You know do research harsh you? Don't let anybody get away with not talking to patients about lifestyle and and I think the data is pretty clear and this is not just Parkinson's fifty percent of any neurological disorders lifestyle and I I'm very I tell everybody told my residents whenever educating people whatever going around rounds fifty percent of any discussion of treatment has to be lifestyle, and if you're not doing that you not giving a fair balance of what we really know and So yeah, I think that message loud and clear and there's no excuse anymore and it's never too late. It's never too late never too late. Well, thank you so much to sell for this. Wonderful research you do. Thank you so much. Thank you very much. Thank you Dr Patankar for coming on the podcast and thank you listeners for tuning in. If you know someone who can benefit from this information, please share this podcast with them. I also discussed Parkinson's disease in episodes number five and number eight of our members only QNA series you can listen to these QNA's and access all of our other members benefits by becoming a foundmyfitness premium member. Here I found my fitness. We understand that getting accurate information is difficult especially now, and there's a lot of noise and misinformation online. Our team wants to make sure that you're getting well-sited, accurate and trusted information. If you value with the team and I are doing please consider becoming a premium member when you become foundmyfitness supporter not only will you get additional member exclusive content such as our monthly QNA's alachua episodes but you will also directly help to support the important work we are doing it foundmyfitness curated and synthesizing cross disciplinary science into understandable information designed to be shared far and wide with your Support, we can produce and deliver even more high quality well, researched information and the wider public and scientific community can continue to enjoy the beneficial impact of an utterly unique idea incubator serving the fields of aging nutrition, wellness, mental health wellbeing, and more visit the website to become a premium member at found my fitness dot com and click the become a member button at the top of the homepage. Talk. To you guys soon.

Patiala Parkinson Parkinson's disease Parkinson dopamine US degenerative disease Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer skateboarding Disease University of Southern Califor boxing Dr Pet Dr Pet Singer Alachua Adl Dr Sell biking
Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast Podcast with Paul Teshima and Matt Heinz

OC Talk Radio

24:01 min | 2 years ago

Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast Podcast with Paul Teshima and Matt Heinz

"Emerging technologies are transforming the healthcare industry as we know it investors say hello to h tech a portfolio dedicated to capturing the significant growth potential of healthcare innovation learn more at Robo global dot com slash H._t._c. we see well. It's that time again signed to pick up your board and catch away the latest waves in sales pipeline growth and development from the agenda. I night himself Matt Heinz always wanted to be a Jedi knight favorite movies growing up Star Wars for sure. Wasn't everybody into the Brotherhood or whatever it's called the silver surfer. I've been the Guardian the Galaxy Galaxy. You always come up with something new tonight might take the cake by favorite so thank you very much Paul for the introduction. Thanks for joining us today. On sales pipeline radio excited to be here again as we always are live every Thursday at two thirty eastern eleven thirty Pacific glad if you're joining us as for the first time thanks very much for joining us hope you enjoy the present the broadcast today for those of you listening. They've been with us before thanks again for joining us again always humbled by the folks that are engaging with us. Both the live show that we do on the sales lead management network as well as through our podcast on on the eighteenth store and Google play check every past episode if you want to catch up not only through the podcast but also sales pipeline radio DOT COM each week we attempt to feature some of the brightest minds in sales and marketing with a focus on those that are both executing executing as well as creating some of the tool strategies and everything else that's helping to make us create more scalable more predictable more efficient a sales and marketing pipelines than the excited today to have joining US politics Shema who has a long history in the B._B._C. World has spent a quite a bit of time with alachua in Oracle Rogers communication and is now the CO founder and C._E._o.. Of Nudge Software Paul thanks very much for joining us today on sales pipeline radio. Thanks for having me. I'm pumped me on the show awesome awesome well. I mean you guys are doing some really awesome. Stuff at nudge software WANNA get into that talk about a little bit of your background sort of where you've come from on the B._B._C. Sales and marketing side and so two how that came together one over three years ago I guess when sort of nudge was born yet right and you it would really started way back at your level of fourteen years ago. When Steve was an I started that that company up in the marketing side of the House and I think through that journey and working with marketing and sales execs we saw time time again how <hes> the best sales L. People did this incredible job managing relationships in their network and use that as part of the reason to get into a deal to help move a deal along or close the deal and we want to really help salespeople today especially in this modern world of thousands of connections and followers? I use their network better more business and that's where we found it much and I really love what you guys are doing. I mean there's clearly there are relationship management tools all over the place. Some people see that as part of what C._R._M.. Does I mean a lot of people use linked in Lincoln sales navigator. They don't want to talk a little bit about how nudges different sort of how you guys aren't just reinforcing communicating where relationships are but but leveraging relationships strength to help find the strongest path to deals strongest path velocity within target deals. You're going after talk live about the importance of that as a differentiator in in driving more efficient interactions with your prospects yet. You and I think it starts off with by the way Lincoln Affect Traffic is that work at certainly will never be replaced but I think one of the challenges that created get from it due to its own success that connection today online then don't always represent a true relationship but I think sales professionals. I talked to you time and time again. They're saying that that is actually a challenge and so by focusing on actually tracking the strength of relationships. <hes> by tying into the communications matter like email calvert foam we can then provide sales professionals sales executive to believe to see who actually does have a good relationship at an account or with a buyer that they're trying to engage with and as you know eighty percent of all V._D._B.. By their started with a referral and the rub you always wanted to be the first in or be brought into a trusted referral starts. The relationship often a really strong strong. Oh talking today. I'll sales pipeline radio with politics SHEMA. Who is the CEO of Doug? You can learn more about nudge nudge N. U.. D. G. E. Dot A._I.. Definitely Courage to check it out. Give it a test drive because I've been playing with this tool. I mean I love it. I use it I use literally every day and it gives me insights into not just my prospects but also network where I should be playing putting attention made you see this. Is this a social selling tools as a referral tool. Is this in A._B._M.. Tool is it unfair to categorize it like how you guys sort of place that into some of the some of the categories of focus for a lot of B. Two B. Marketers today so good question. I think we have two parts of the tool. Certainly one is four more social personal network almost like a personal here and that's the free product that you can get but the the one that we've come up more recently the B. Two B. team product is really focused on outbound sales so certainly we've been buckled under the sort of the Avian C._B._S.. Category of tools especially for sales and again we think about outbound going to need accounts. Those accounts is much more about quality quantity ineffectiveness versus efficiency so the idea that you can use a <hes> relationships help better present yourself in a large account certain where we're Pogos Hillary Valley. It's a great way to position. It and I think it was a salesperson. I mean coming from a small consulting for myself where I am the sales team <hes> you know it's it's enormously helpful. Talk a little bit how the scales I mean if you scale this out to a broader sales team I mean is this a sales I mean I think you guys call this modern sales platform is this something to sales team is bringing in is this something marketing is bringing in to the sales organization like where's the primary entry point you know we have people people that are in the sales side as well as the marketing side listening like how do they bring this in. It was the opportunity for scale across an entire sort of sales or marketing organization to make this effective. You know I think that would be fair a lot of times. We're going into the organization I because we do have the free three product may ten thousand users on that so they're already getting the chance to try a part of the value proposition of very quickly and so we brought in sometimes because we have ten users at an accountant and we get introduced to the manager or director level who then we can show them the enterprise this product more and more resistance situations. I'm sure you're well Matt where <hes> an Agr team or your teammate report into marketing and we may be brought into the Martin House as well because they are responsible for cultivating accounts and bringing them do certain point that you can hand them off with sales organization rotation. That's what they fail start or starting to see more interest from the Martin size well especially in the navy and play yeah. It's it's interesting to hear you say that I think the as more and more companies develop the dedicated sales enablement teams which sometimes come from the marketing team sometimes come from within sales but as that effort is focused on increasing efficiency of sales teams providing content tools technology to you know not only provide more efficiency but I mean I think in your position you talk about the strongest path the buyers. Are you seeing more marketers. Look at this as it from a sales enablement perspective. Is You know you see moving forward this as a bigger opportunity for marketers to embrace work they can do to more directly impact sales effectiveness in conversion. Listen I think so and I think that you can take a step out another just think about the marketers dilemma especially in the county scenario rate do have a lot more of a move to support function versus source of needs right the named accounts silky or engage in some some groups and subgroups that are less it larger buying committees and so what they're left with is. How do I make sure I don't over target? The people are already engaged in focus on the influencers shortness. They're showing up the meetings until they really need to get a better understanding of. We're the relationships are starting to Bill Zale team and the account and we're there week where they're not doing well getting penetration and with a jewel like nudge you can actually provide that data real time basis at a contact and account that whole to marketing into some so they can really target the support function around he relationships that salespersons are building and that's a very important thing to do in a cafe strategy so we'll take a quick step back and go a little bit on the way back machine but you started eloquent in September two thousand and you're there for thirteen fourteen years. What number employees were you at Alachua? At that point. I was number three. That's amazing so you were literally. I mean almost from the very start of eloquent just like you are obviously with nudge talk a little what about similarities of early stage companies eloquent clearly is a success story on a number of fronts right. I mean he has has become you know one of the largest marketing automation platforms on the Planet Successful I._P._O.. Successful acquisition but in the early days you know I'm sure that it was not quite that clear or quite that sure thank talk a little bit about you know what it's like to be back in an early stage company. You guys are well beyond employee number three at this point at nudge but you know what is it like to be at that early companies. What are some of the lessons you learned at Alachua? You've been able to port over your time at nudge great question that you know I say that right off the bat. Keeping Larry is wow. It's still a lot of hard work. You know there is no magic bullet to being successful than working hard thinking smart and trying to you know oh be your competition by hustling. I got the same other. They're probably more than ever today but still there. I think there are some differences aside for me not having back my parents has live which was what happened. Two Days for Office Guard up entrepreneur her second timers the one thing even I have the luxury of as one knowing when we added ask for help and then know who to ask for that help and that's because we did invest in our network that fourteen year journey at Ella so we don't know how to do something or something new we can go to that network and say hey you seen this for at least two or three times more than us. Can you give us a version that maybe help us get get us going and we never did that in the early days that quote and we never were smart enough to do that. I think that's a big change so a quick follow on that before. We have to jump off to a break here I mean I think I've seen most entrepreneurs that have done this. Multiple Times have seen failure. Failure is a part of that path to innovation. I've heard different schools of thought to say listen. If you've been through a successful company and Exit Zip Code clearly eloquent was that that really set you up for the next thing. Some people say that actually going through the pain of having an unsuccessful company for valuable I could argue either way and sometimes I think you know having people with both of those perspectives is part of that and you mentioned Steve a couple of times Steve Woods. Who's your co co-founder? One of the cofounders avella fantastic thought leader in the industry as well. You know what your perspective on sort of having starting this again like what are the experiences prepared you for success release best armed you for successfully forward. I think the part that that's pretty hard to understand if you haven't had a big success that through that big there was probably many many serious failures along the way. We were just lucky enough to get through those times that were pretty well closed donald that failure. I think you'd Alachua in the early days. I remember in order to avoid leading rent because we couldn't we couldn't actually money from customers pay rent. We had to sleep in the office. She turns so that the landlord wouldn't kick us out until we collect money and that was supposed to failure got along that journey in taught us the importance to sell customers to imports money upfront unless than staff that were early learned and so I think that on the path to success that Alachua they were many more failures series failures along the way that we had to recover from. We were just one of the lucky ones who got all through those enough to actually get finished. I love that you share that story and I think that it's it's important anybody who's WHO's at a company that you know even if things are going well. There's always things that aren't going the way you want them to know. One of my favorite books from last year was shoe dog by Phil Knight. Who's the founder of? The Chairman of the board at Nike and then in the book starts before he started the company that ends right before the I._P._O.. And most the book is chronically. The many many many times the company almost that they were almost out of money or just on the brink not just failures but just things didn't go the way that you want them to and I think that it is that is the entrepreneurial journey and I appreciate you being willing to share a couple of those stories and you know even for those on the on the on sales pipeline radio here that aren't you know. Startups aren't going through entrepreneurial journeys themselves just to know that that's part of the process even in the company. You're working foreign sales or marketing that is that is the path. There are no shortcuts the path to success in any start up. You know the elevator is broken. You have to take the stairs. Sometimes the stairs are broken so anyway. We got a lot more time to spend here on sales pipeline radio with Paul to Shema. Who's the CO founder and C._E._O.? OF OF NUDGE WE'RE GONNA be talking a lot more about relationship selling relationship marketing how to do that at a strategic and a tactical level. We'll take a break pay some bills we write back sales pipeline radio building a sales development competency is critical critical to lasting revenue growth learn how to grow your business and register for the modern marketers workshop sales development the essential building blocks for revenue growth a fully online interactive workshop on June sixth and seventh from eleven. I'm an at twelve thirty P._M.. Pacific you'll learn how to build a scalable united sales and marketing engine to lead your organisation toward your revenue objectives visit W._W._w.. HINES MARKETING DOT com slash workshops. That's H.. E. I N. Z.. Marketing Dot Com and register today all right. Let's pick it back up with <hes> Matt and his guest. We did have a twitter question. Come in on if you WANNA take that or not but somebody wanted to know since this is a program about sales sales pipelines. How long does it take for L.? ACQUITTED DEVELOP A predictable sales pipeline. That is a great question. I write that one down because I definitely want to have Paul address that <hes> you know my <hes>. I've got my perspective on that as well. Maybe Paul has the Magic Pixie dust that we have that I have not found in the number of years. I've been doing this follow if you have some. I think you should shutdown. Just sell that's because that is what everyone is looking for so excited to have POLITICI- ema the C._E._o.. co-founder of nudge if you like what you're hearing this is what we do on radio hope you'll join US each week. We are live at two thirty eastern eleven thirty Pacific make sure you check out the podcast as well for all our <unk> fast episodes on the I tune store and Google play coming up in the next few weeks until next week the first day of June we have Carrie Cunningham and Terry flaherty to senior analyst from serious decisions. They're going to be talking to us about the new demands unit waterfall from serious decisions it was unveiled last week of the series decision summit F- lots of advantages lots of improvements movements one enormous caveat that I've given a on that on that waterfall that actually Harry and Terry agree with and we'll talk about that next week followed by grant Cardoni. He's going around us out as we head into June. Talk about attacks your results grant his prolific writer author often controversial controversial. We'll see what we can do to stir the pot a little bit with him and then following that we've got Daniel Gaga. Who's The C._M._o.? At e._F._l.. We're GONNA talk about Omni Channel Marketing Online offline integration to get the results you want but today we're going to spend a little more time with politics Shema. Who is the Co Founder C._E._O.? We O of Nudge and spent thirteen years at Alcoa. He was the number three employees that what became a publicly traded company and a highly successful acquisition from Oracle so all right Paul so the question comes in what did it take to build a predictable pipeline eh eloquent. I'm sure that you know you you spend an awful lot of time. On the customer success in the product development side brought management side at Alachua but I'm sure that you know you were involved as well on acquisition and you know have some scars from seeing that pipeline grow and create some consistency. What do you have the sheriff from that position question because at that time if you remember back then you'll series they come out with their waterfall methodology and and really this idea of integrated Martinsville's funnel just started and we reported that dirty and helping build? Input that input feedback loop on what works and they took us a while to get to a point where we integrated that as part of our process. You're driving invasion around in terms of sale pipeline. I will say that I'm not so sure we ever got what is called a truly one. Hundred percents predictable pipeline for we actually got to a point where at least marketing and sales were agreeing on the different elements of that pipeline what was important where we should focus where the problems were and so for me that was as much a win at anything because I think for that time. That was the biggest first step. Is You that most parking Judaization state. I don't know what you think that but that's kind of where we landed at scale eighty ninety hundred million in revenue well you know there's there's the playbook right. There's the things that have worked elsewhere. There's things does that work in most companies and then there's your company right. I mean I think if you read the book in the hard thing about hard things you realize that you know no matter how many times you read predictable revenue to Miami Times you read good great you can read all the strategy and all the insight book she want but figuring out that for your industry history your business your moment in time is difficult so I guess you know to to round that out. Then you know take all that learning all that success from alachua applying that to nudge I mean I'm sure there's plenty of places where you are already having advantage because you've done it you you so you've learned that you have some of that playbook but now you're in a different business with a different product with the different everything those lessons aren't always immediately transferable are they that absolutely correct in fact. I would say that the biggest thing with checkers on what we learned ten years ago or eight years go doesn't apply modern marketing. I mean look at companies like slack or entercom where they've taken a very product lead go to market strategy and they're supplementing. Enterprise sales growth will sell silvers revenue the very different model where you can land expand with ten Chelsea twenty marketing seats and they grow from there and so I do agree with you completely phased on your business model your go to market your industry can't be different well and just a just a to go further on this twitter question we had. I think you know the behind behind that question might be. I don't want to infer what someone's thinking but it might be like. When is this going to work? When is it going to be easier about a lot of companies? Come to us and say let's just once. We have a couple more successful companies once we get some case studies published once we launch <unk> our Ford auto product. It's GONNA be easy. Everyone's going to be knocking down our door and I have yet to find your business or industry or a situation. Where selling is easy? I mean I think the best situation that I wrote about this on our blog a couple of years ago the best possible selling situation that I have seen environment a couple years ago ago. The Golden State Warriors were just beating everybody right and I think the big news last year the year before when they had the super bowl in town and you know the Saturday before the Super Bowl they had the the city thunder were in town so it was a big game right for the super bowl bunch of celebrities in town. A friend of mine runs <unk> premium sales suite sales for the warriors and you would think in that moment of time he has the best sales job in the world and he said it was incredibly stressful. Yes we had great demand. Yes lots of people wanted stuff but we were still trying to get top dollar. We weren't just trying to fill sweets. We were trying to get people to buy food and beverage. We're trying to get them to get the backup to show up and as soon as every one of those games ended the inventory was gone so even in the best of conditions selling his heart and there is never a time that I've found where it gets easy or it gets automatic. You are grinding on a regular basis than if you're in sales if you've done sales you know that there are things that could make your job easier. Inbound leads can make things easier. Market awareness can make things easier a big well-known company that makes him so that people might answer the phone but you still. I'll have to get the deal you still have to get people to sign you still have to get someone who's distracted and busy to make a commitment and as I don't mean to discourage people I think more just to share sort of from Paul's perspective as well as what we've seen in across multiple different industries and businesses <hes> you could create that pipeline. There's always going to be a level of challenge in difficulty in making that work. I'll get off my soapbox. Let's talk about nudge. How about that? If for those of you that are interested in learning more about this this this great. Relationship selling tool. I definitely encourage you to check it out. Go to nudge dot A._I.. That's N. U.. D. G. E. Dot A._I.. And one of the questions I often get hall from people that are you know whether they're using nudge that using Lincoln sales navigator you know they're getting buying signals. They're finding opportunities to engage. Translating insight into action can sometimes be difficult for people understanding okay like so. I see that I should contact someone. I see that something happened in their business. Like how exactly do I reach out to. We just call and say hey I saw this. Do I call and use that as a way to sell l. someone like what are some of the best practices you've identified in that you guys evangelize at nudge for how to translate those insights into a next step in an action. That's a really great question actually the question actually that we are right now working with customers customers on because it's very different from say a B._D._r.. Respected how site where you may just want to high level mentioned something to show all you're trying to show in that situation is hey. I actually spent some legitimate time looking at you and your company and your situation versus just rafting out a series of of emails of La la La thought versus in sales process when you're actually engaging where you actually have to provide context around the insight because you're not just now trying to say hey respond to my email. You're actually trying to show you understand in their business and so what we actually developed is a series of play books that looked at different insect types whether it's an exact change or earnings announcement or a event or of your product line and then allow in that disorder chiller by the role all within the sales profits because it is so as playbook sound interesting are those are those available primarily that customers you have those available up on the website as well yeah right now. They're with customers but certainly we will be publishing them because we think that you know that content tactic for anyone that consuming it is other people develop their own labels again insight driven type sales activities and so yes the answer yet. That's up will be available soon but right now. We're working on him with customers. Now it's great. I definitely look forward to checking that. I think that is a big. It's a big gap for a lot of companies and I think his company's not only think about how to do this. <hes> you know with individuals but how to scale it like you know. What can they do to achieve that we are unfortunately running out of time already on sales pipeline radio? I want to thank our guest politician. Who's the CEO and Co founder of nudge again highly highly recommend checking out the checkout the product give it a whirl? They got lots of great content on relationship selling as well check out a nudge and U.. D. G. E. Dot A._I.. Put a link to that next co notes <hes> speaking of show notes. If you WANNA hear a replay of our conversation with Paul you WanNa show that was some of your colleagues you can check that out in a couple of days sales pipeline radio DOT COM. We'll have a transcript is sort of a highlights blog post featuring Paul and his comments today on hines marketing DOT com here in a couple of days. Well make sure you don't miss any future episodes of sales pipeline radio of our podcast Google uh-huh play itunes store lots of great episodes coming up featuring even more insights from some of the thought leaders and some of the leading experts in sales and marketing in B. Two B.. <hes> thanks very much for joining us again today on behalf of Migrate Producer Paul. This is Matt Heinz. Thanks for joining us again on sales pipeline radio. You've been listening to another episode of sales pipeline radio part of the many shows on the ever-growing Funnel Radio Channel Fretwork listeners like you by tea with caffeine from green tea leaves. It's delicious energizing incomes and three amazing flavors with zero sugar and four calories it fits your life with its combat size and portability it goes where you go to the campsite the hiking trail the beat without weighing you down by our T. 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nudge Alachua Paul Matt Heinz marketing and sales D. G. E. Dot CO founder sales executive US Google Steve Woods twitter Nudge co-founder Robo global HINES MARKETING DOT Lincoln Pogos Hillary Valley Phil Knight
When Marketing is Led by the Customer: The Economics of the SaaS Business

OC Talk Radio

22:00 min | 1 year ago

When Marketing is Led by the Customer: The Economics of the SaaS Business

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you in the life. If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC FREE HEMP oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease welcome. Everybody's time once again to grab your board. Maybe snowboard this time of year and ride that sales pipeline highflying with our gold medal winner Mannheim's. We're GONNA get to customer success and advocacy. We got a lot to talk about today. Thank you so much everyone for joining us on another episode of sales pipeline radio. We we are here every week. At Eleven thirty Pacific two thirty eastern. We're live on the lead a funnel media radio network and we are featuring every week necsports in B. Two B. Sales the marketing today is no different. We have Jocelyn Brown. She is the VP of Customer Success Al Acadia. She is from Canadia really really excited to have her join us today. Talk a lot more about customer success in Customer Advocacy Johnson. Thanks again for joining US yeah my pleasure man. If you listen to the show in the past you know that we are is guilty. There's a lot of marketers and that we spend the majority of our time talking about acquisition we tend the majority of our time talking about getting customers on board and when you look at the budgets and the resources a lot of beatty marketing groups I think that's reflected there as well. You've got all these people and budgets and marketing technology acquisition and then when it comes to sort of keeping customers oftentimes it's it's a toll free number occasional newsletter and I don't know if you saw just this morning a friend of both of ours politics Shema who's the CEO of nudge. You put something up on Lincoln talking about customer success than in now that previously obviously it might have been more reactive. It was more important service now. It's really a a revenue driver for the business to drive advocacy basset of the brand expansion so it may be used to be kind of a maybe after thought. Maybe something that was thought of as more reactive administrative and tactical is now very much a strategic part of the business so would love to have you kind of talk about your perspective there and then what you guys are doing a without allocating as well yeah. Absolutely I think probably the advent of subscription economy really of SAS is what has is put just such a spotlight on retention on investment in your customers and stop business model really has given a seat at the table to those folks that actually work with the customers day in day out because we sort of have to earn their business every day either barrier to leave is very low and we need to make sure that they are are constantly feeling like they're getting value and feeling valued in not sort of business relationship. I've been doing it for ten. Plus years probably hardly longer than that. If I were to really admit it and really for me being with the customers where it's at it is really the center of the company from results from revenue from mm-hmm from sort of anything I actually work with customers Po sale but I also owned a fairly large number in that I am responsible for all the renewal revenue and also so all over expansion revenue which accounts for very significant part of our growth so to say. It's just kind of an afterthought or a piece is a gross misunderstanding of the economics of Saas business assisted allocated the the customer is the center of every thing and you know we built our product for that we organize denies our journey for that. Our customers really lead our marketing they are best kind of voice in the market. peer to peer references are kind of valuable all to our prospects so putting the time and effort and attention into our customers to make sure that they are receiving value means that they're going to talk about it. They're gonNA explain it in the market. They're going to continue to work with US and advocate for our business so I think those that haven't figured that out yet are behind yeah. I wholeheartedly agree Rian. Let's let's talk about how that relates to what we do. Talk a lot about here even on the acquisition side which is the buying journey and I think oftentimes we think of the buying journey too often his ending when someone someone buys like that may be the middle may be the end of the sales process but it's really the middle of what I'd call the revenue bow tie. You know you may have gotten someone to buy but that's when things really begin as someone who's spent quite a bit of time and I want to get back and talk about the liquid as well. How do you as a customer success professional think about the buying journey? It's way beyond the deal right. Absolutely I think also just in the nature of how people by now because it's a lot easier to try things because it's a lot easier you're to sort of start small and grow from there you also are seeing that people are really trying and then expanding so that land and expand strategy that we were successful with it Alachua and is a very big piece of our strategy at allocated is let's get people in in experiencing our product experiencing our team solving their problem. Maybe the smaller scale and then help them kind of map out how to get got to a fully executed strategy fully executed and that there's there's really no downside to US bringing in customer at a sort of smaller scale tale because we know for small that our technology is going to help them. We know that our team understand what's going on has done it many many times before and is going to provide them the right kind of guidance and we know we let them kind of set the terms of how they grow that it's going to be the right solution and the right fit. We're not going to kind of have to back back into it based on a sale cycle that maybe not everybody knew enough to run really really well so for us. There's no ear of people coming in and sort of trying handed out a bit first because history tells us that a great place for us to start and grow and we've had great success there and then it makes the whole process a loophole less the friction in the process for the customer and a lot easier. They don't have to fix everything all at once. We don't have to do a big bang. Release can really kind of move them along and that's a little change in the buying time process. That's a little change in technology were immigrations and things like that are easier but that's also just our philosophy. We want you to get a feel for technology to feel some relief of us being able to help solve that problem and then experience our team because our team really in so invested in making sure that you are successful that you're going to partner with that's it's GonNa feel like a real partnership talking today on sales pipeline radio with Jocelyn Brown. She's the vice president of Customer Success at allocated I mean this is a company that clearly is his body in on doing customer success right I think by by having your position there by having the resources and the focus there I think it is part of the culture as a part of the priorities and I think that was clear to me as well when I think I met you for the first time back when you were at Ellicott which is eventually bought by Oracle and the local experience conferences. There aren't very many conference. Is I go to where you see more hugs handshakes you know when you see you know people hadn't even met each other before but because of the relationship they built because of the bond that exists between customers and not just the company but the people at the company that isn't an incredible competitive advantage talk about how customer success and customer advocacy was really at the heart of the culture of Alachua and how that's really sort of developed the programs you built from that point forward. I mean there's no question that part of my goal all is to recreate some of what was so great at Alachua and I've been very fortunate and then there are a lot of people here that are willing to come along that ride with me. There are so many good examples of what we did there but I think the primary one was that everybody believed that the customer was at the center of what we were doing. There was sort of a concept. The customer was in the room all the time. All of our meeting rooms were named after customers. everyone in the company had some portion of their compensation tied to a customer success type of metric. It really was pervasive. We talked our marketing was led by the voice of our customers. We told stories all the time they were always there. They were ever present and I think that just meant that we were always thinking about them and we were very invested in not just the companies we're helping but the individual people and relationships that were driving that another part of the customer evangelism and customer for experienced program at Alachua that I I would certainly part of it as well as a as a customer and partner was top line. You're a customer success staff extended into your customers you had customers was that we're essentially ambassadors and support staff in many cases for each other and I can talk a little bit about where top leaders came from or the why that was such a key part of the success for you the the investment or the choice to really put that kind of investment in their came out of a project called ice leaves the ideal customer experience where people from sort of all of the post I fills functions got together and try to figure out where all the ways that we can make this experience even better for our customers where we can make it easy to do business with us where we can celebrate great success where we can share stories where we can help people grow together and it was just clear that we needed to get as much of our expertise not just from the staff but from the customers that had grown up with us through got through transformation in marketing into marketing automation out there as we could put and really who's also an extension of we'd various successfully been running a small customer events throughout our region mostly in the US but even in Europe where where we get customers together and we almost didn't have to present anything they wanted to talk to each other and we just saw this amazing networking effect and this incredible credible desire for everybody to help everybody else so. We really felt like we were building something. It was a pretty transformative time in the B. Two B. Marketing space than everybody was on that same mission and everybody wanted to help everybody else so top learners really was our best way to kind of amplify that and as you you know it really did exactly that where our customers became our best educators are best marketers and really the best source for expertise top liners just I just said this would be. It was basically a discussion board it was it was a discussion board with common threads where you could attach documents and I mean a lot of companies have those does but I think hopefully what you've heard from Joscelyn's affiars there was something very special about the culture there was something about the priorities of the organization the people that are leading the people that founded it and you know that that really drove what happened with customers and I think you know you can set up meshes boards. You can start newsletters but unless you have that culture. It's not going to go where you want it to go. We're going to have to take a quick break here. Pay Some bills. We'll be back in a couple minutes with more with Jocelyn Brown vice president of customer success and allocated. You're talking a lot more about advocacy a little more about the old eloquent days and what she she sees moving forward in terms of driving more revenue responsible customer programs you're listening sales find radio in a world where the speed of innovation and change and be to be marketing has never been greater. The only thing bigger is the need for clarity for a blueprint for guide to what's really working king and how about a way to apply it specifically today to increase sales pipeline growth velocity and most of all conversion yeah. That's what you'll find in the modern marketers field guide and MAZING LOUIS CAN download it for free hines marketing dot com just like it sounds H. E. Z. Z. M. A. R. K. E. I. N. G. IT encompasses the entire sales and marketing cycle but in quick bursts with lots of specific actionable ideas strategies tactics you can put to work right away like today the low table of contents helps him narrow in and tackle Tila problem and it's something you can come back to over and over again as a reference guide why not download your free copy of the modern marketers field guide. It's free hines marketing dot com just like it sounds. Hei Z. Marketing Dot Com all right back to our program with Matt. Hi thank you so much everyone for joining. If you like what you're hearing today make sure you join us every week coming up in the next couple of weeks and next week on sales pipeline radio we have Joe Hyland. He's the CMO of on twenty four. We're going to talk talk about secrets of CMO's secret successes behind some Abe's revenue leaders joey started a podcast called confessions of CMO. We talked a little bit about that and the week after our first episode in March. I'm super excited. We have Jill Conrad. She is one of my favorite people in the B. Two B. Sales world. She's written a number of books including snap selling and just hugely influential to me into others in B. Two B. Sales so excited to have her join. The program is well today. We still have a little more time with Jocelyn Brown. She's the VP of customer Mer six asset allocation Jocelyn from your journey from eloquent Oracle to where you are today having that sort of culture and focus on customer success is great but I think continuing to provide fight ideas and insights to your customers oftentimes and I think we've seen this data from Gartner and CB and others. It's not just providing phone number to call. It's not adding more features. It's really helping helping your customers become smarter giving them new ideas and insights that is a huge competitive differentiator so the content or seeing online and then what you're providing to customers is a huge part of your job as well absolutely and I think to bring it to sort of brass tacks as much as we talked about a lot of softer stuff in the culture of Alachua by that really drove such an amazing community for us. I mean that resulted in in real impact in real results and not came with investment doesn't happen by accident and and there is a real outcome to that so customer success should not be mistaken for dialing for smiles. It's absolutely not that when you understand stand a customer's business with when you have a great relationship and great empathy for what they're trying to accomplish and you really trying to help them solve that problem you will make that company successful and they will grow in by Moore and you will make that individual successful and they will remember that and they will take you everywhere they go and not amplifying effect of advocacy advocacy comes from the real work of listening understanding and providing solutions for your customers that includes includes your software but also in advice gyns in connections in helping them talk to peers that are struggling with the same things. I wouldn't want anybody to mistake customer success. Just I service or something saw it has a true and very real business benefit absolutely a lot of people listening. Probably you're in that that can't we talked about the beginning inning of the of the episode around just not really having people not having resources and so if I'm if I'm a VP mark listening this this makes sense. We need to be doing this but I don't have Johson on my team yet I don't have you know we have this in my budget. What are some things people can do to build the foundation for a more impactful customer success effort effort yeah absolutely the the good news is it's probably an extension of some of the stuff you already do that? Idea of journey mapping the talked about a lot in the to be remarketing. It's extending that all the way through the customer life cycle and understanding the touch points the contents the tools the other other types of things the triggers all the way through that they're going to help the customer better going to provide opportunity for your company and sort of seeing where your gaps are and where you might be able to get the biggest bang for your buck in terms of closing that gap understanding the journey that your customer is going through and using your tool is just as important as understanding the journey Ernie that they go through in researching understanding and making a buying decision but a lot of the same tools apply a lot of the same theory applies a lot of the same work can be done for me. It's always going to involve a team. I think that in certainly VDB nothing really can replace that relationship and that empathy and somebody really feeling like you care what happens to them in the context of how you're working with them. I had the version of a customer who I've realized I worked with for eleven years. Come visit us in our headquarters and just before she got up to tell her story she returned to me and said having a company really care about you matters. I matters a lot and she's a buyer. She's the person making that decision and that matters to her so I think sometimes people forget the human equation that there's real you work in building relationships and those relationships carry an inherent value for the customer and for the company. That's sort of working read them now. There's no doubt about that. There aren't enough people that I think prioritize that I think too often we look at the spreadsheet and we managed through you know the numbers we wanna hit we look at customers is buildings but buildings don't actually sign checks that people inside the buildings do and there's something about having a good relationship with someone in showing and proving that you care that not only generates loyalty but gives gives you a little bit of the benefit of the doubt you know you've got you know things are going to break you know things are going to not work the way they want. You want them to so you know I I think in the right environment you know in in in in most environments armaments you get pro customers that are angry and yell and scream and get upset in an environment where you actually make this part of the culture where you make you make a care they call and wonder what they can do to help you there rooting for you. Who Do it well before we have to wrap up here in a couple of minutes? You've been doing this for a while. I think there's a lot of people that I know that you've worked with that. We've talked about in the past that you've learned from who for people people that want to learn more about how to do this right who are some of the people that have been influential for you people in terms of Customer Care Customer Advocacy that you'd recommend people go and read I take just an incredible amount of learning from my days at Alachua and I continue to work with those people and talk to them. So you mentioned Paul Tishina. He certainly work on customer success in the power relationships. Heather Fe is WHO's at look book is probably one of the most talented advocacy leaders that I've really ever met. I'm against that customer so I spent a lot of time reading their content and have had a chance to meet Alison pickens. I think she writes some really great stuff. It's really practical stuff. Maybe about the operational organizational things that maybe people are kind of craving. You've got just you've actually got a plethora of people talking about it right now. What I would suggest is fine the meet up in your local city and go and talk to a bunch of people it's really in that networking effect in not community that I get at my best ideas and I get my greatest value because as we are kind of building on this kind of a profession you don't know who's going to have your next best idea and and I think people are bringing experience from lots of other functions that is just accelerating the growth of customer success just making us better so find your friends? I love to hear from people. I'm very happy to talk to them. So you can find me on Lincoln my twitter handle is Josh Brown. JC Brown. I'm happy to interact on this stuff because that's what's fun for me appreciate you doing that and I think you know. Your approach. Share in your answers are reinforced. Everything I know about you just being a very genuine very customer centric person and very very open to sharing ideas is and and your experience with other appreciate that very much I would echo the fine friends meet friends stay connected with friends that also have similar roles not necessarily in your industry not necessarily what your same mm type of customer I think sometimes if you get into other industries other customer situations you might discover something that you hadn't thought about in your four walls that someone else is doing because of what feels natural them that might be truly innovative new in your industry that gives you another edge so definitely important to continue to be lifetime lifelong learners. We'll speak in Paula lifelong learners. We're going to have to wrap things up here here on another episode of Sales Piper if you like what you hear today and if you want to share this episode with other people on your team you can do a number of different ways you can go and a couple of days to sales pipeline radio DOT com we will have this entire episode on demand and you can share that with your your friends peers and colleagues all episode past present and Future of Hill Pipeline Radio Radio on sales pipeline radio DOT com make sure you don't miss another episode subscribe to the series up on itunes store Google play and we'll have a highlight of this session Shen on a Heinz Marketing Dot Com in just a few days as well with links to the AL locadia content page with links to the upcoming workshop and then we'll put it linked to Joscelyn's twitter account as well so thanks very much Johnson joining us today got a couple of weeks of episodes coming up as usual. Thank you very much for joining us on behalf of Migrate Producer Paul this is not hines. CNN Week Week until pipeline radio once again you've been riding the sales pipeline with Matt Hines hines marketing right here in the funnel title Radio Network for our listeners. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting between you and a life you want to live. CBD MEDIC targets your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active ingredients plus the added benefits of THC hemp oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and

Jocelyn Brown Alachua US customer advocacy VP of Customer Success Al Acad Customer Care Customer Advocac vice president of Customer Suc cure Matt Hines FDA Oracle gold medal Lincoln partner VP Joscelyn CBS Paul Tishina Mannheim Paula
Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast Podcast with Paul Teshima and Matt Heinz

OC Talk Radio

23:45 min | 2 years ago

Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast Podcast with Paul Teshima and Matt Heinz

"Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money you make the reliable investment in reliable energy the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment to find out more go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com well. It's that time again signed to pick up your board and catch away the latest waves in sales pipeline growth and development from the agenda. I night himself itself. Matt hines always wanted to be Jedi knight favorite movies growing up Star Wars for sure. Wasn't everybody into the Brotherhood or whatever it's called the silver surfer. I've been the Guardian the galaxy a you always come up with something new which at night night might take the cake that my favorite so thank you very much Paul for the introduction. Thanks for joining us today on sales pipeline radio excited to be here again as we always our live every Thursday at two thirty eastern eleven thirty Pacific glad if you're joining us for the first time thanks very much joining us hope you enjoy the president the broadcast today for those of you listening to have been with us before thanks again for joining us again always humbled by the folks that are engaging with us. Both the live show that we do on the sales lead management network as well as through our podcast on the eighteenth gene store and Google play. You can check every past episode if you want to catch up not only through the podcast but also sales pipeline radio DOT COM each week we attempt to feature some of the brightest minds in sales and marketing with a focus on B._b.. Those that are both executing <music> as well as creating some of the tool strategies and everything else that's helping to make us create more scalable more predictable more efficient assails marketing pipelines than the excited today to have joining us politics Shema who has a long history to be sales world has spent a quite a bit of time with alachua in Oracle Rogers communication and is now the CO founder and C._E._o.. Of Nudge Software Paul thanks very much for joining us today on sales pipeline radio. Thanks for having me. I'm Pumpkin on the show awesome well. Can you guys doing some really awesome stuff at nudge software WANNA get into that talk about little bit so your background so to where you've come from on the B._B._C. Sales and marketing side and sort of how that came together a little over three years ago I guess when sort of nudge was born yet it right and you know it really sorta way back at Ella fourteen years ago when the was an I started that that company up in the marketing side of the House and I think that journey and working with marketing sales exact we saw time time again how <hes> that sales people how did this incredible job managing relationships and their network and use that as part of the reason to get into a deal to help move a deal along or slow the deal and we want to really help sales people today especially in this modern world of thousands of connections and followers you their network better more business and that's where we founded much and I really love what you guys are doing. I mean there's clearly there are relationship management tools all over the place. Some people see that as part of what C._R._M.. Does a lot of people use link dinner Lincoln sales navigator but I wanNA talk a little bit about sort of how nudges different sort of how you guys aren't just three enforcing communicating where relationships are but but leveraging relationships strength dealt find the strongest path to deals strongest path velocity within target deals. You're going after talk a little bit about the importance of that as differentiator in in driving more efficient interactions with your prospects yet. You and I think it starts off with butter with Lincoln is a fantastic it does that work at certainly will never be replaced but I think one of the challenges that been created from it. I do its own success. Is that connection today. Online then don't always represent a true relationship but I think sales professionals than I thought you time and time again saying that that is actually a challenge and so by US focusing on actually tracking the strength of relationships <hes> by lifetime into the communications that matter like email powder foam weaken then provide sales professionals sales executive deleted see who actually does have a good relationship that an account <hes> or with a buyer that they're trying to engage with and as you know eighty percent spent all be to be buying cycles or started with a referral and the revenue always wanted to be the first in or it'd be brought into a trusted referral starts the relationship off on a release strong strong note talking today. I'll sales pipeline radio with politics. She who's The C._E._O.. Of Nudge you you can learn more about nudge nudge and you D. G. E. Dot A._i.. Definitely encouraged to check it out giving a test drive. 'cause I've been playing with this tool. I mean I love it. I use it use literally every day and it gives me insights into not just my prospects but also that work in where I should be playing right putting attention but you guys see. This is a social selling tools referral tool. Is this in A._B._M.. Tool is it unfair to categorize it. Like how do you guys place that into some of the some of the categories of focus for a lot of marketers today so that's a good question I think we have issue parts of the dual. Certainly one is four more social personal network almost like a personal here and that's the free product that you can get but the one that we've come on reasonably the B. Two B. team product is really focused on outbound sales so certainly we've been bucket and under the sort of the A._B._S.. Ask category of tools especially for sales and again we think about outbound going to need accounts and those accounts is much more about quality quantity ineffectiveness versus efficiency so the idea that you can use a <hes> usually ships to help oh better present yourself in a large account certain where Republicans and delivery. It's a great way to position it and I think you know as a salesperson in Minnesota coming from him so small consulting for myself where I am the sales team. <hes> you know it's enormously helpful talk about how the scales. Sales I mean if you scale this out to a broader sales team I mean is this a sales. I mean I think you guys call this modern sales platform is this something to sales team is bringing in is this something marketing is bringing in to the sales organization like where's the primary entry point you know we have people that are in sales side as well as the marketing side listening. How do they bring this in? It was the opportunity for scale across an entire sort of sales or marketing organization to make this effective. You know I think that fair a lot of times we're going through the Organization for because we do have the free product Ed ten thousand on that so they're already getting the chance to try part of the value proposition of very quickly and so we brought in sometimes because we have ten sales users at an account and we get introduced the manager director level who then we can show them the enterprise product one more resilience situations. I'm sure well Matt where <hes> an eighty R._T.. Or An S._T._A._R._T. May report into marketing and we make you brought into the Martin side as well because they are responsible for cultivating accounts and bringing them do certain point that you can hand them off with sales organization and they failed to start or starting to see more interested in the Vartan Sizewell especially the navy play yeah. It's it's interesting you hear you say that I mean think the as more and more companies develop the dedicated sales enablement teams which sometimes come from the marketing team sometimes come from within sales but as that effort is focused on you know increasing efficiency of sales teams providing content tools technology to you know not only provide more efficiency but I mean I think in your position you talk about the strongest path the buyers. Are you seeing more marketers. Look at this as it from a sales enablement perspective. Is You know you see moving forward this as a bigger opportunity for marketers to embrace work they can do to more directly impact sales effectiveness in conversion. I think so you can take a step out another just think about the marketers dilemma especially in the county scenario rate do have a lot more of a move to support function versus source of needs right the inner named accounts Silky or already Gaijin some groups mm since groups that are less than larger buying committees and so what they're left with. How do I make sure I don't over target? The people aren't engaged in focus on the influencers organiser showing the meetings until they really need to get a better understanding of where the relationships are starting to bill treselle team and the account and we're there week where they're not doing well getting penetration and with a dual like nudge you can actually provide that data realtime basis at a contact and account the whole to marketing automation awesome so they can really target the support function around he relationships that has salesperson's already building and that very important thing to do a cafe strategy so I'll take a quick step back and and so go a little back in the way back machine but you started eloquent in September number two thousand and you were there for thirteen fourteen years. What number employees were you at eloquent that point? I was number three as amazing so you were literally. I mean almost from the very start of eloquent just like you are obviously with nudge talk a little bit about <unk> similarities of early stage companies eloquent clearly is a success story. A number of fronts riding me has has become one of the largest marketing automation platforms on the planet a successful I._P._O.. Successful acquisition but in the early days you know I'm sure that it was not quite that clear lawyer or quite that sure of a talk a little bit about you know what it's like to be back in early stage company. You guys are well beyond employee number three at this point at nudge but you know what is it like to be at that early stage companies order some lessons learned at Alachua. You've been able to port over. It's your time at nudge yeah. It's a great question that day that right off the bat keith an Larry is wow. It's still a lot of hard work you know there is no magic bullet to being successful than working hard thinking smart and trying to O._B.. Your accomplish by hustling. I did the same other. They're probably more than ever today but still there. I think there's some some differences aside for me not having new back my parents has to live which was what happened days for office guard a bunch nurse second timers the one thing Stephen I have the luxury of one knowing when we added ask for help and then know who to ask for that help and that's because we did invest in our network that fourteen year journey at Ella so we don't know how to do something or something's new we can go to that it network and say hey you've seen four at least two or three times more than us. Can you give us a version that maybe help us get going and we never did that in the early days Alachua and you never were smart enough to do that. I think that's a big change so cook following own that before we have to jump off to a break here. I think I've seen most entrepreneurs that have done this. Multiple Times have seen failure failure is a part of that path to innovation five heard different schools of thought to say listen if you've been through a successful company and exit because clearly eloquent was that that really set you up for the next thing some people say that actually going through the pain of having an unsuccessful company for valuable. I could argue either way. Sometimes I think you know having people with both of those perspectives is part of that and you mentioned Steve a couple times Steve Woods. Who's your co founder? It's one of the CO founders of alachua fantastic thought leader in the industry as well. You know what your perspective on having starting this again like what are the experiences for paired you for success release best armed you for successfully forward. I think the part that that's hard understand if you haven't had a big success is that through that big there was probably many many serious failures along the way. We were just lucky enough to get through those times that were pretty well closed donald failure. I think you'd Alachua in the early days. I remember in order to avoid paying rented we couldn't we couldn't actually plus it money. From customers pay rent. We had to sleep in the office. She turns so that the landlord wouldn't kick us out until we cut money and that was supposed to failure got along that journey in taught us one important the shelves customers to the Imports Click Money Upfront in less than SAF that were early learned and so I think that on the path to success that Allah they were many more failures series failures along the way that we had to recover from. We were just one of the lucky ones who got through those. Enough to actually get I love that you share that story and I think that it's it's important anybody who's who's in a company that even if things are going well there's always things that aren't going the way that you want them to. One of my favorite books from last year was shoe dog by Phil Knight. Who's the founder of the chairman the Board at Nike and then in the book starts before he started the company that ends right for the I._P._O.? And most the book is chronically. The many many many times the company almost that they were almost out of money or just on the brink not just failures but just things it didn't go the whether you want them to and I think that is that that is the entrepreneurial journey and I I appreciate you being willing to share a couple of those stories and even for those on the on the on sales pipeline radio here that aren't you know. Startups aren't going through our entrepreneurial journeys themselves just to know that that's part of the process even in the company or working for and sales sales are marketing that is that is the path there are no shortcuts <hes> the path to success in any startup. You know the elevator is broken. You have to take the stairs and sometimes the stairs broken so anyway. We got a lot more time to send here on sales pipeline radio with Paul to Shema. Who's the CO founder and C._E._O.? OF NUDGE WE'RE GONNA be talking a lot more about relationship selling relationship marketing how to do that at a strategic and a tactical level. We'll take a break pay some bills we write back sales pipeline radio building a sales development competency is critical to lasting revenue growth learn how to grow your business and register for the modern marketers workshop sales development the essential building blocks for revenue growth a fully online interactive workshop on June sixth and seventh from Eleven A._M.. The twelve thirty P._M.. Pacific you'll learn how to build a scalable united sales and marketing engine to lead your organization toward your Revenue Objectives Visit W._W._w.. HINES MARKETING DOT com slash workshops. That's H.. E. I. N. Enzi Marketing Dot Com and registered today all right. Let's pick it back up with <hes> Matt and his guest. We did have a twitter question come in. I don't know if you WANNA take that or not but somebody wanted to know since this is a program about sales pipelines pipelines. How long does it take for eloquent develop a predictable sales pipeline? That is a great question right that went down because I definitely want to have pol address that <hes> you know my. I've got my perspective on that as well. Maybe Paul has the Magic Pixie XC does that we have than I have not found in the number of years. I've been doing this follow if you have some. I think you should shut down. Just sell that's because that is what everyone is looking for so excited to have a politician of the C._E._o.. co-founder of nudge if you like like what you're hearing this is what we do on sales ready. I hope you'll join US each week. We are live at two thirty eastern eleven thirty Pacific make sure you check out the podcast as well for all our <unk> vast episodes on the I tune store and Google play coming up in the next few weeks on sales by next week the first first day of June we have carry Cunningham into Terry flaherty to senior analyst from serious decisions. They're going to be talking to us about the new demands unit waterfall from serious decisions. It was unveiled last week series decision summit lots of advantages lots of improvements one one enormous caveat that I've given <hes> on that on that waterfall that actually carry in Terry agree with and we'll talk about that next week followed by Gret Cardoni. He's going around us out it. Has We head into June talk about how to ten x you results grant his prolific writer author often controversial still we'll see what we can do to stir the pot a little bit with him and then following that we've got Daniel Gaga. Who's The C._M._o.? At e._F._l.. We're GONNA talk about Omni Channel Marketing Online offline integration to get the result you want but today we're gonNA spend a little more time with politics Shema. Who is the Co Founder C._E._O.? Of of nudge and spent thirteen years at Al he was the numbers three employees that what became a publicly traded company and a highly successful acquisition from Oracle so are at pulse of the question comes in what did it take to build a predictable pipeline at Alachua local. I'm sure that you spend a lot of time on the customer success in the product development side product management side at Alachua but I'm sure that you know you were involved as well on acquisition and you know have some scars from seeing that pipeline grow and treat some consistency what they have the sheriff from that positioning question because at that time if you remember back then series they with their waterfall methodology and and really this idea of integrated St Martins sales funnel had just started and we reported that journey and helping build and put that add feedback loop on what works and they took us a while to get to the point where we integrated that as part of our process. You're driving invasion around in terms of sale pipeline. I will say that I'm not so sure we ever got what I'd called a truly one hundred percent predictable pipeline for we absolutely got to a point where at least marketing and sales were agreeing on the different elements of that pipeline what was important where we should focus where the problems were and so for me. That was as much a win at anything because I think for that time. That was the biggest first step issue that most parking Judaization safe. I don't know what you think that but that's kind of where we landed at scale eighty nine hundred million revenue well you know there's there's the playbook right. There's the things that have worked elsewhere. There's things that work in most companies and then there's your company right. I mean I think if you read the book into the heart thing about heart things you realize that you know no matter how many times you read predictable revenue mammy times you read good degrade you can read all the strategy and all the insight books you want but figuring out that for your industry your your business your moment in time is difficult to round that out then you know take all that learning all that success from Alachua applying that to nudge I mean I'm sure there's plenty of places where you are already having advantage because you've done it you you. You've learned learned you have some of that playbook but now you're different business with the different product with different everything those lessons aren't always immediately transferable. Are they that that correct in fact. I would say that the biggest things checkers on that what we learned ten years ago or eight years ago doesn't. Dogs play world modern marketing. I mean look at companies like slack or entercom where they taking a very product lead go to market strategy and they're supplementing. Enterprise sales growth will sell sobers revenue two very different model where you can land and expand the end with you know ten twenty marketing seats and they grow from there and so I do agree with you completely based on Your Business Model. You're go to market and your industry. It can't be department well and just a just a to go further on this twitter question we had. I think you know the behind that question might be. I don't want to infer what someone's thinking but it might be like. When is this going to work? When is it going to be easier about a lot of companies? You know come to say let's just once we have a couple more successful companies once we get some case studies published once we launch our Ford auto product. It's going to be easy. Everyone's GonNa be knocking down our door and I have yet to find your business or an industry or a situation. Where selling is easy? I mean I think the best situation I wrote about this on our blog a couple of years ago the best possible selling situation that I've seen environment a couple of years ago the Golden State Warriors were just beating everybody right. I think it'd make me was last year the year before when they had the super bowl in town and you know the Saturday before the Super Bowl they had the the city thunder were in town so it was a big game right for the super bowl bunch of celebrities in town. A friend of mine runs premium A._M.. Sales and sweet sales for the warriors and you would think in that moment of time he has the best sales job in the world and he said it was incredibly stressful. Yes we had great demand. Yes lots of people wanted stuff but we were still trying to get top dollar. We weren't just trying to fill sweets. We were trying to get people to buy food and beverage. We are trying to get them to get the mask off to show up and as soon as every one of those games ended the inventory was gone so even in the best of conditions selling his heart and there is never a time that I've found where it gets easy or it gets automatic. You are grinding on a regular basis than if you're in sales if you've done sales you know that there are things that can make your job easier. Inbound leads can make things easier. Market awareness can make things easier a big well-known company that makes him so that people might answer the phone more but you still have have to get the deal you still have to get people to sign you still have to get someone who's distracted and busy to make a commitment and as I don't mean to discourage people I think more just share sort of from both Paul's perspective as well as what we've seen in across multiple different industries. He's and businesses <hes> you can create that pipeline. There's always going to be a level of challenge in difficulty in making that work. I'll get off of my soapbox. Let's talk about nudge how about that. If for those of you that are interested in learning more about this this this great relationship zip selling towards encouraging check it out go to nudge dot A._i.. That's M._U._d.. G. E. Dot A._I.. And one of the questions I often get hall from people that are you know whether they're using nudge that using Lincoln sales navigator. They're getting buying signals. They're finding opportunities to engage age. Translating insight <unk> action can sometimes be difficult for people understanding okay like so. I see that I should contact someone. I see that something happened in their business. Like how exactly do I reach out to. We just call and say hey I saw this. Do I call and use that as a way to sell someone like what are some of the best practices you've identified in that you guys evangelize at nudge for how to translate those insights into a next step in an action. That's a really great question actually the question actually that we are right now working with customers on because it's very different from say B._D._R.. Respected how site where you may be just want to high level mentioned something to show all. You're trying to show in that situation is hey. I actually spent some legitimate time looking at you and your company in your situation I it's just dropping the series of of emails about block letter law thought versus in sales brought this when you're actually engaging where you actually have to provide context around the insight because you're not just now trying to say hey respond to my email. You're actually trying to show you understand their business this and so what we actually developed is a series of play books that looked at different instinct types whether it's an exact change or earnings announcement or a event or of product line and then allowing that disorder chiller by the role within the Zale's prophets because it is different so playbook sound itching are those are those available primarily customers you have those available on the website as well yeah right now there with customers but certainly we will be publishing them because we think that you know that type of content attack for anyone consuming heat that the people develop their own labels again insight driven type sales activities so yes the answer yet will be available but right now. We're working on them with customers. Now it's great. I think definitely look forward to chicken that. I think that is a big. It's a big gap for a lot of companies and I think is companies. He's not only think about how to do this <hes> with individuals but how to scale it like you know what can they do to achieve that we are unfortunately running out of time already on sales pipeline radio WANNA thank our guest politician who is the CEO <hes> and co-founder of nudge again highly recommend recommend checking out there site check out the product of world. They got lots of great content on relationship selling as well check out a nudge and U._d.. Dot A._I.. Linked to that Mexico notes <hes> speaking of show notes. If you WANNA hear a replay of our conversation with Paul you WanNa show that was some of your colleagues you can check that out. A couple of days sales pipeline radio DOT COM. We'll have a transcript is sort of a highlights blog post featuring Paul and his comments today on hines marketing DOT com here in a couple of days as well. Make sure you don't miss any future episodes of sales pipeline radio of our podcast Google play. I tuned store. Lots of great episodes coming up featuring even more insights from some of the thought leaders than some of the leading experts in sales and marketing in B._B.. Thanks very much for joining us again today. On behalf of Migrate Producer Paul this is Matt Hines. Thanks for joining us again on sales pipeline radio. You've been listening to another episode of sales pipeline radio part of the many shows on the ever-growing Funnel Radio Channel Fretwork listeners like you. Let's say you just bought a house bad news. Is your one step closer to becoming your parents. You'll proudly mow the lawn ask. If anybody noticed you mow the lawn. Tell people to stay off the lawn compared to your neighbors lawn and complain about having.

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How to Convert Marketing from a Cost to a Profit Center

OC Talk Radio

24:06 min | 2 years ago

How to Convert Marketing from a Cost to a Profit Center

"Here it comes again. Lunch will be the same old same old or you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new Jamaican jerk Turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked Turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of Carribean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new Jamaican Jerk Turkey sub on the firehouse subs APP firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives participating locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery welcome aboard again. You're not just surfing the web you are riding the pipeline the sales pipeline with that sale surfer himself Mannheim's from Heinz Marketing. Hey Matt the sale surfer. You're the silver surfer of sales sales. How many more can we get? I am not a I am neither a surfer nor silver but we are GONNA be talking about sales sales pipeline radio. Thanks for joining lioness again having a lot of fun with this show it is it is march people is crazy. I feel like I was just watching the Rose Bowl parade and it is March. If you are in sales you are either two months down with tend to go or we're entering the stretch run of your Q.. One one in first quarter of the year so <hes> either excited her terrified or probably a little bit of both of those here. We are can't believe how quickly this year's going by but hopefully you're out there executing selling making your buyers happy <hes> we're having a lot of funding on the show. I have a very special guest is going to join us here in a second <hes> Megan Eisenberg who's The C._M._o.. Of Mungo D. being a very honored to have Megan here today. She's just done so many things in the B.. Two B. Marketing World I think we've been mostly featuring on as guests experts in speakers in the authors on the sides of finally. We're going to spend a little time next couple episodes on the marketing side of the business talk particularly to marketers that are embracing revenue responsibility that are taking advantage of the opportunity to convert marketing from a cost center into a profit center so important in B. Two B. Marketing these days to make picture of what you're doing is driving business results and I can't think of a better person to feature than Megan from Mongo D._B.. Megan how you doing great thanks for having me on. Thanks again for joining us. If you don't know Megan Eisenberg in in your in the B. Two B. Space you must be living under a rock. She's on most most of the events and conferences she sees being featured onstage in for very good reason she spent years working at Docu sign really helping that business grow driving demand Gen and she is literally advising half the startups in Silicon Valley. It looks like from Your Lincoln Profile Yeah. Thanks very much for joining us. One of the reasons why you've been deemed by many physicians visionary and marketing is giving not only the results you generated for Docu sign and others but the work you've done on the marketing technology side. I'd love to start their given how important it's been to your success in how increasingly important it is to the success of beauty marketers how and when and why did you start putting focus on marketing technology in your career happened about seven years ago eight years ago I had joined a company that had failed team. We didn't have much we had failed for the not a huge down on it and I had just learned about Ella without implement Alachua and I really just started to understand the automation of email and nurturing and scoring and from there they learn the benefits that platform gave as they went to each company after I kept reading L. Quebec in and the ecosystem of grind and there's all the connectors ver- your webinars and and start to learn more and more about the different technologies and seeing the benefit on driving. The more qualified leads in the pipeline and helping accelerate our deal. I became a heavy doctor of when you started doing that. Did you face any pushback internally either from management team or C._F._O.. This used to spend the money on media or from a sales organization even an I._T.. Organization that wasn't used to marketing so much I guess sort of focus on technology interesting I was at the TRIBECA which was eventually acquired by IBM and I had such a good in case together on why we need the by the technology and I think because I had started product marketing and I had to put a value prop together and fell to other people. I had to do that same thing internally and actually received received an award from our C._E._o.. George on at the time and you recognize that I am not one that by technology news certainly not marketing technology but the results were seen out of this and so was rewarded for doing it and implementing it successfully and so yeah initially I did I I had to put my own product marketing deck together to buy it and so the return we would have how long it would take to make back the investment. It's amazing. There's still a lot of marketing organizations that are still there right where the you know. The organization either is used to more traditional media marketing group <hes> just not used to marketing making and driving those I._T.. Decisions isn't that same process. Can you talk about sort of your your ability to transform sort of marketing from from hey. How much should we be spending on marketing because that's what mark companies do to really seeing marketing as a prophet independent of technology but just revisiting the way marketing is viewed and really the way that you perform execute on that function? I think the most important swift that happened in two things one understanding that it was a partnership with marketing and sales and understanding their targets and goals but to make sure that we were not looking at volume of leads that it didn't matter the quantity it was really the quality and understanding how to measure quality and I was introduced a series decision and really fell in love with the waterfall and the different definition and then how do I go mark those through machines. It's very objective. It's subjective than Failsworth Pauling M._Q._l.. Because it meets the criteria the failed team except that and marked it because it is qualified they create an actual opportunity in the opportune closes the really focused on what was influencing gene opportunity creation and close one for the volume and when you start to track and so that then you become more of a revenue marketer than someone who's doing media buys completely changes the way the organization so it looks marketing and now's at a conference last week that it was talking about account based marketing and someone who had a flippant response in the audience about like Oh wouldn't it be awesome marketing had a blank check and the more I think about that the more I think the way that you just described Ed marketing the way you just described how to justify marketings doing and to correlate activity in expense to our Y. If that's a positive equation if you can spend a dollar and make five the kind of an open checkbook cash is cash but doesn't that that give an incredible amount of freedom license to marketers if you find something that works scale that really helped when you go through your budget reviews for the next year and you can print them yeah for sure but obviously cash is cash and there's always trade-offs but it's you know there's still plenty of marketers that are thinking about their business and thinking about their budget is just activities right. You know they're like we do the show him. You have to do it again because we always do it and there's really no revenue responsible behind it. Talk a little bit about how that works. When you integrate with the sales organization right you know these because I think you'll gone are the days when marketing purely creates a lead even if it's a marketing qualified lead with agreed upon definition and just shoves it over the fence and says we're done what have been your sort of best practices for working with your sales counterparts to create a more integrated in successful? Funnel faith on building the model together so looking at their revenue targets looking at the average deal size from the past year the historical looking at the conversion rate that each of the stages and backing into one of that look like if we want to hit these targets and also putting the length of your sales cycle in their from velocity sampling to understand what do we have to deliver at the top middle of funnel for them to make their target and then actually working with them who they want to talk to you know here at at Mommy be developers are doing awesome things with it but the ones that are taking it into production our I._T.. Management and Devi advent and operation so while we have a lot out of developer ten million plus were working on longer to be the ones that sell really wants to talk to you are the ones that have the budget and are managing it in production and he's mission critical environment and truly understanding that definition and making sure we're delivering the people that we're GonNa pay not that the people using the open source software but those that have a need there to be secure it and optimize it can't imagine a whole lot of marketers or sales people disagreeing and with that definition and I think strategically it makes a ton of sense what I found in some cases when the rubber meets the road and you end up delivering a smaller number of leads right when you end up generating leads the don't go to the sales team when you're up into the right charter lead volume now. All of a sudden gets a a little more complicated. There's an executive team. There's there's board members. There's investors that don't always understand that so what have been some of your best practices or what have been your experiences. I guess of you know trying to communicate that more advanced vision of pipeline contribution from marketing getting beyond pure quantity of leads if I look at Mamma Devi we send eighteen percent of all leads that come in to go in front of sales and are assigned fails so we only assign M._Q._l.. How we show from the quantity standpoint is every four that we're showing ties to influence on the opportunity and the deal clothing and we're agreed upon the process we've got technology plays called Full Circle C._R._M.? Which is agreed upon way of attributing swords and influence that we've made the decision of the Organization of Marketing and sale and how do I sell it? I I'm very aligned with our C._R._O.. Carlos we have to partner we agree where we see issues. We work together to solve them as a very much a partnership and if I didn't have that partnership I don't think we would be successful or I would be successful so and part of that makes sure I'm listening to what they need taking start showing them the result and that I can back up what we're doing and why we made the decision that we made and when we do something wrong we have full disclosure. Hey we messed up here. We're not gonNA do that again. Learn from it and move on we come back to the break. I want to talk a little more about so your current aren't marquette stack of what you're doing the across the dimension full circle which are doing with other tools. You're prioritizing real quick before we get there. You know one group. We haven't talked a lot about is the team. I think you know I think the last time I saw you on stage at the series decisions conference your Docu sign and you're you're up there. I think with your either with Your C._T._o.. Or someone from the outside you know how important is it to make sure that you're tied in and coordinated from the operations in I._T.. Side as well to make sure all this stuff comes well our involvement with I._T.. Medically that we're following the security guideline that were doing doing the right audit that they have certain security threshold certainly if it involved people logging in making sure we have authentication and the sign on process goes through our standard process so and no partnering with them to bring bring that we manage the stack. We have all twenty technology. We managed that within marketing systems in op but we make sure that we respectfully worked with our I._T.. Team when it involves view. Humanity men or men when it involves security or any integrations at the major of the film work's Ella Awesome. We are so blessed to have Megan Eisenberg on the show with us today a C._M._o.. Mongo D._B.. I see literally a world traveler avelar. She is an incredibly busy currently unamed so happy to have a couple minutes with her. If you want to check out more for stuff she's on twitter. M Eisenberg literally do a search on slide share youtube and you're gonNA find a lot of stuff that she's talked about a lot of her presentations and content good stuff. We'll be right back sales pipeline radio the way we do business is advancing faster than ever before in amongst disruptions. There's one pillar that stays standing through it. All the power of relationship relationships chips are the core of everything so our today's organizations developing nurturing and leveraging them to drive success join Matt Heinz and Sisters V._p.. Of Marketing Justin Keller for the on demand Webinar the state of relationship relationship marketing and learn how your team can bridge the gaps between relationships and Revenue Listen now at Heinz Marketing Dot Com. That's H.. E. I. N. Z. Marketing Dot Com all right pick it back up with Matt and the second part of his interview. I'm not the silver surfer anyway I was. I was GONNA put some Surf Joke in there and I thought no. This is too serious conversation so I can't do that. We get serious when we need to. Hey Sales Dell's pipeline radio. Thanks for joining us today cited to have Megan Eisenberg here C._M._o.. Of Mongo D._B.. If you WANNA hear this president earlier this discussion again if you want more of your team. If you want your executives to here for Meghan directly you'll be able to check out a replay of this show show on sales pipeline radio DOT COM but you can catch megan you can catch some of our past guests all the episodes of sales pipeline radio available for streaming radio DOT COM coming up in a couple of weeks our next episode. I am so excited. We've got trish per Tuesay coming but we're talking today with Megan Edinburgh from Mongo D._B.. WHO's been a marketing leader in BBC for many many years has been leading doing particularly innovative work on the marketing technology side Mega? Maybe have you talked a little bit about what your current martigues doc looks like you mentioned having gotten started centered around Alachua you mentioned full circle insights from attribution standpoint. I don't need to walk through the whole inventory but maybe highlight some of the key focus areas and maybe key tools technology have really been sort of driving your progress and execution currently I they are core and really Alachua and we've got demand bathed which during the personalization and append on the back end from a social side we've got we used sprinkler and we use insight pool and so in cycle really been helping Albina nerdier through so he'll channel Dot from customer advocacy side and really customer focused got in fluid for our advocate hub and we have gained sight and then we've got from a really reporting standpoint viewpoint on on wasn't working. What's not we've got high nine and then we do a lot of work with tracking and web the visible Google analytics optimized -ly? We've been working with Capterra on on our S._E._O.. Work and at the end a lot of organic work being done there inside you help them with some append work as well on the side of Gut gag lamp and of course we're big fan of video vineyard. I'm acting really cracked. They just gave us a stat. Our customers really engaged with us over video. We had over one hundred fifty thousand view in minutes per month and their average customer has fourteen thousand so a lot of folks are getting with Mambi over video the university videos that typically webinars customer testimonials and though I'm definitely excited to see what's going on video and that's amazing as you went through that list. I can literally hear hands cramping. Ramping from people writing down what Megan's secure data writing down what you're what you're stack is currently I mean you've been doing this a long time. I think but I think for a lot of people thinking about that list is intimidated right and so I think you know if you were to prioritize things if you were to sort of addressing people that maybe you need to start from square one. If there are particular tools that are important five that are there particular functional areas that are particular sort of needs or marketing objectives that you think are most important to address with technology first and foremost the similar back Outta Docu sign took over three years how we were able to do it in about eleven months here because of experience and understanding understanding the value of what we wanted but you're right you gotta start. I think fundamentally at the start with a marketing automated platform so you're picking Alachua or Marquette or whatever your platform is have bought and then building on what you need and so as we saw we needed a video platform. We need a way to engage with our customers. We Have Art Belfort. Community is extremely social and making sure we had the right tool to highlight focus engage with the social side we picked a tool pretty pretty quickly and that was the sprinkler one and incite pool and so yeah I think it's dependent on your business and how your customer the prospect pin gauge and so you know get your core platform in place and then figure out the channel that what they're going to help radio and then I think everyone have to optimize their website and so half our back what we do to optimize and the experience our web properties Dot Com and not work nice. I mean you have years of null using but also evaluating valuating technology solutions speaking to vendors <hes>. I know that a lot of people that you know even if they have experienced it's very easy to get intimidated and confused. Yeah you got to go to a Marchetto conference. You go to serious summit you go to dream force and your everything sounds great like you're going to hear a lot of great stories knowing that there is going to say you don't need this so what are some of your strategies for filtering for evaluating their particular questions you ask or things you're looking for to help you sort through everybody and find the tools that that are most likely to be most valuable to you yeah so couple things every week I probably meet with a minimum of two vendors at least thirty minutes on one hundred banding and keeping on top of what technologies out there that part of it is continuing talking about it. I also do a lot of talking with my peers. I love Nikola drunk over at Twa Leo and got her head over at elastic just like keeping up with my peers. Hey what do they need that they love and that they're getting good return or non and resolve and say I try and really keep up with my peers and then of course having used it when I get good result taking that technology with me to the next job and so my advice would be take the time to evaluate right and do it on a regular basis and then network active conferences talk to your peers in Africa what they're using absolutely we've got a couple of minutes left before we're you know we're GONNA have to wrap up but I'm curious stepping outside of the tech world what does your marketing. They look like now join Mondo Mungo. I believe about a year ago <hes> just curious what you've done as you've built it. What are the functions you've prioritized? What are the groups in you know you get into as much as you're comfortable giving what would love to hear sort of how you're prioritizing staff and resources sources you grow yeah? I've known we're about twenty eight folks on the team and we're now thirty six. Fortunately I came into a very strong team of needing the Technical Support Award and immigration guided guide so I really started out by bringing in a marketing technologist who was awesome at the technology awesome at the website and awesome at operation and though he really came in and and. We Know Ryan who are built out the team brought in some front end web developers and hadn't we had an obscene market operates in automated platform team and they were awesome and they learned eloquent very quickly that one made bogus and that was and that was really getting an understanding of the data we have today. What are what are we looking at? What's working not with the current systems and then the second piece of it one everyone's job with kind of only social and digital there wasn't really a a a clear leader on it so I brought in a leader to run social and digital that really cleaned up all of our channels and properties broaden sprinkler Ben Practices worked with H._R.? Work with university in engineering it does dominating job this past year and then also beefed up our creative team gave them more resources because I think as a marketer the things that you need to to be the vet and we need to be able to have the fifth of the KNOB. You need the confidently product marketing team with I was fortunate enough to have and then you need that the market absolutely it sounds like you've done a nice job of building a well rounded team and as you mentioned you know <hes> Ryan Shorts. This is key on your team at Docu signs does not surprised as he move over but you know Megan Megan Gill Sam and others on your team certainly have a good reputation so nice field jumping to that to know so what does this all go right. I mean I think you know moving forward. What are some of the things that you see as as trends that will continue to sort of hone how B. to B.? Marketers focused on any front it could be technology. It can be on channels. It can be sort of on the integration side. Where do you think B.? Two B. Marketers winning increasingly need to lean next to continue. You'd be successful. I mean for me. It's still content when we looked at what was the number one thing influencing deal with our online collateral so making sure we have a good content calendar rebuilding now relevant technical information for our are different audiences. Certainly that's important I think social channels and mobile still very important things that we can do to get through the noise and however we can boost customers and what they're talking talking about and get them out there for that social proof and the peer to peer network in just like I I find technology via Mike Peers. I know people that are decided. You think thing think Megan Eisenberg worked very much C._M._o.. Mongo D._B.. Joining US you're super busy and really really appreciate you take some times when great insights and Best Practices here. Thanks for joining us today. Sales pipeline radio join US again in a couple of weeks on March seventeenth. We'll be back live at our new you time eleven thirty Pacific two thirty eastern. We've got Trish <unk> suzy. <hes> who is a inside sales longtime inside sales expert recent author of the sales development playbook check her out in a couple of weeks. We'll have Megan's episode on E.. Play up bond sales pipeline radio DOT COM. She'll be joining Aaron Ross Joanne Black Mike Weinberg and many others. We've included the sales pipeline radio guests in the past if you're interested in joining sales pipeline radio if you have an idea for a guest idea for a topic please please check us out. Let us know sales pipeline radio DOT COM. Thanks very much ben apparently the silver surfer sales time Yes indeed you've been surfing along with the silver surfer of sales himself Mannheim's for minds marketing kidding we ride the wave sale technology and sales ideas five our T. with caffeine from green tea leaves. It's delicious energizing and comes in three amazing flavors with zero sugar and four calories it fit your life with its combat size and portability it goes where you go to the campsite. The hiking trail the beach without weighing you down by our T. Caffeine from green tea leaves release your natural side from the makers of five hour energy for more information visit by.

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Hitting Your Number and Doing it the Right Way:  This and More Advice from Workfront CEO Alex Shootman

OC Talk Radio

20:50 min | 2 years ago

Hitting Your Number and Doing it the Right Way: This and More Advice from Workfront CEO Alex Shootman

"Welcome back time for another episode my Radio Ford. We're GONNA swim out into that. Sea of ideas man hines who's coming to us from here today today. Matt welcome everyone to another episode of sales pipeline radio. Thanks so much for joining us for those of you listening on podcast feed thank you so much for subscribing you can find every current past and present episode of Sales Pipeline Radio at sales pipeline pain radio DOT com every week we are featuring some of the best and brightest minds in B.. Two B. Sales Marketing. Today's absolutely no different. I am extremely excited to have with us today. Alex shoot man he is the C._E._O.. Of workfront I got to know him very well back in the eloquent days days. We got so many topics we can cover talk about the book done right how tomorrow's top leaders get worked on. Thanks so much for joining us today. News Grimsby here is always to work with you. Thank you for that and I was. I was mentioning to you justice in our prep here that <hes> your name comes up very often from people when we asked them at the end of interviews for sales pipeline radio we ask them. You know who is someone or a couple of people that have had a big impact for you in your life and your career and the name Alex you comes up a lot especially people that have worked with you in past roles that were part of the eloquent team up in through going public and one topic that comes up a lot is something that you shared with me. I've heard many many people that you work with quotas well and it's a big part of this book done right. I and it's the idea of hitting your number and doing it the right way and how you think about the answer to those questions and what it means for the people in your organizations I let's start off by. Maybe just giving people an overview of what that what that philosophy is like for you. Oh you know one of the things that we talk a lot about Alachua. We talk a lot about here at <hes> workfront. Is this notion of getting it done and doing it right in mentally if you think about a two by two grid with a vertical access being getting it done in a horizontal. Where's on laxest being doing it right? It's a notion of the vertical access is low to high or are you getting it done or do you not getting on doing it. Right is living up to the values of an organization. You're not living vantage hardens itchy and it's this notion of love if you're not getting it done now during the rights great place for you if you're doing it rang tonight getting it done you have the values of the Organization but by need some coaching on how to objectively accomplish the role that you've been given if you're you did not in. You're doing it right. You're the person that everybody ought to see their name in lights and the tough one is if you're getting it done but you're not doing it right. You probably ought to be fired faster than the organization because nothing destroys the pursue of the culture that you want in a company faster than being willing to tolerate people who can accomplish their goals but don't live up to the values of the organization so that's the notion Asian shared and what I found over time is not believe people are good people WanNa do the right thing a Lotta Times. They just haven't been given the stage to put a premium on values. I love your explanation of all it makes. Taunt Sanson it sometimes falls into the category all easier said than done. It'd be people here that they're not being very. We WanNA maintain culture with erode erode. I see many organizations struggle. Sometimes you'll have how some of your best performers perhaps in a sales role hitting their number supporting the sales or sales numbers and you know sometimes it's it's easy you turn a blind eye to the way that they're doing it either internally or externally Turnley but as you know al we will seem sometimes in the market that is a poisonous than to allow to continue in the organization that you mentioned is. You don't just fire them. You've are them more than anybody else. Talk a little bit about the culture impact of doing that or not doing that at how that very quickly changes trajectories of businesses we all. I think the one thing we have to remember. Is You know we're talking about B. to B.. And so my my main perspective comes from a lot in years in the B. Two B. Technology Space and what you find as you go through the years is that the world gets smaller and smaller and smaller and customers have a very very long memory and so I think the biggest impact act is if you're willing to do the wrong thing to bring in revenue that your customers will notice sooner or later and yeah you might make the quarter but you're not gonNA make the decade because over time has customers want to do business with people that are invested in their success and so I think that's the biggest impact to be sellers. They live in a market tickets. You know or Chicago you're making your career and your reputation matters over time what you what you really trading on is your reputation and market not the firm arm who are not alone in this again. I appreciate what you've done to codify lot in your new book done right but you know this book is based on over thirty interviews with leaders across a variety of industries share a common philosophy philosophy around as an and I imagine that you know your philosophy here is born out of your values but also worn out of some of the leaders you learn from top a little bit about some of the companies that you spoke with that you put into this book that have also put this is philosophy. Practice has to be clear. What the what the book is specifically about? Is that your challenger getting stuff done in a modern work environment so at workfront much like salesforce automates sales and workday automates human capital management workfront automates knowledge work in an organization and so our customers have been faced with the challenge of getting stuff done in amongst the turmoil all of all of the digital transformation that's occurring and so we would sit down with our customers after we talked about our technology the asked this basic question of okay that's great but how do I actually get stuff done in a complex organizational he kept hearing that and and that's what we decided to write a book upon and so we did we interviewed forty different people many of them customers some of them leaders in their own field navy seal commanders Deborah Zero who was the first woman to row solo across the. The Atlantic and we estimate basic question which was how do you actually get stuff done and their answers are what we translated into this bar which are just some basic principles of how you get stuff that I think that that environment that people are facing certainly include internal and external factors makes a well-meaning businesses to face a number of challenges execute that talk a little bit about not surprising to see you know your career progress into C._E._O.. Would also not surprising the at a company like workfront that puts suggest focus on helping to manage people effectively todd a little bit about what attracted you to work front talking to Alex today you who is the CEO workfront in the author of the new down a little bit about why you chose were run as the next eight year career in N._y.. The work they're doing has been so important but you know I've been very fortunate to be at two different companies that have had going back to B._M._C. which was the precursor to Sam as you mentioned before to be Ella which was all about marketing automation being fortunate to be here which was T._m.. And it's because has that you start to see some pattern recognition and the pattern recognition that I can see that all categories are born from an external pressure. That is a huge extra pressure. If you think about Kwa it were repeatedly martyr. She were starting to realize that way. Marketing was going to be executed was completely going to be impacted by the digitisation of consumer marketing so here at work what we she is that a percent of C._e._O.'s believed that their current business model survive and so they do it see Ios do they send a lot over one trillion dollars this year on digital a and they don't achieve their intended results because they need multiple groups of people to work together effectively the product team with the technology team with marketed distribution team and so when I could see from workfront is the transformation efforts inside their enterprises so that's why I work from home as forcing a break with Alex when the C._E._O.. Workfront in you know what this book. You've written is not just got a great a lot of great advice but it also it's got a a number of tools that allow people to start to put these ideas into practice right in the very beginning of the book where you get into it. There's this exercise workflow that you know this progression going from your vision statement into how you are working working in managing and responding to what happens in the business in the market down a lot of it is just downright book dot Com to a more specific operational exercise level <unk> pay some bills one right back with more without a little more about some of the components of dun-rite workflow including making sure you got the pieces in place and have the tools and the strategies to make adjustments along the way we'll right back on this episode of Pot Radio. The way we do business is advancing faster than ever before in amongst disruptions. There's one pillar that stay standing through it all the power. Of A relationship relationships are the core of everything so Howard today's organizations developing nurturing and leveraging them to drive success join Matt Heinz and Sisters V._p.. Of Marketing Justin Keller for the on on demand Webinar the state of relationship marketing and learn how your team can bridge the gaps between relationships and Revenue Listen now at Heinz Marketing Dot Com. That's H.. E. I. N. Z. Marketing Dot Com all right. Let's pick it back up with Matt and the second part of his interview well radio. Thanks so much joining us today. I feel like we could go for an awful long time talking today to our guest today outshooting and he is the C._e._o.. Of warfronts he has run many companies he was the president of Alachua leading through the acquisition by Oracle he has been on the board of numerous companies and is now <hes> not Zeo from also the author author of the new book done right before the Break Asher hockey does exercise workflow and there's so many great servants holes in here. I feel like even if people don't take the entire tool kit and workflow. There's components that are really really important. One of the very end workflow you call the done right value pyramid. Can you talk a little bit about what that is and how people put that into practice where we actually do at the very end is is each chapter is a building block basically in terms terms of building a work plan that allows you to be to be successful in executing work and so starting from the very beginning of are you able to explain to people why you're doing the tasks. You're doing your wire. You're pursuing the work that you're doing through to. Who are you serving right? Who is the financial beneficiary of the word who actually has to do the work of who gets served by the work and so every single English chapter builds on a bills on each other into you haven't overall word plan so with that final chapter is intrusive Lego blocks that come together to say if you've done all these same's you are in a position addition to execute work? I think you can definitely get a copy of these exercises. Learn more about the pyramid at the website hold on a second website done right book Dot Com the other thing that was really interesting to me and as mentioned arms of the book is this idea of commanders intense as I love the idea of having a strong or objective content upfront talk a little bit about what that means from your perspective in how you manage that in a work environment airman the tends to be maybe a little less autocratic in many companies than used to be like how does that work together well first of all I learned commanders ten from a friend of mine commander Martin McGuinness who had spent he spent over twenty two years in the Navy seals and the actual notion of Commander's intent is not to be are not writer. The notion of Commander's intent is as mark taught me as the leader my role. Who is to explain what we're trying to accomplish but then my ex job is to get out of the way because you're really smart and you are able to come up with approach to accomplishing the task <unk> hand if you can turn it over to your team to figure out how to Commander's intent is is not meant to be autocratic? It's actually to create a lot of freedom in a dynamic work environment by found and is your point. Is that a lot of time even though people you know don't want to be told what to do as a command. They want to know where their work is coming from. They want a strong leader that can tell them. Here's where we're going. Here's our going to do it. <unk> this idea of doing or the right way and you mentioned earlier. The people generally are going in are willing to do the right thing. How do you as an employee someone working? We're managing your career find organizations organizations that are doing the right thing. I mean it's one thing to look at what people's values are on their website or maybe on the wall. But how do you truly find evidence of companies that are going to live. Those values answered a Livy intense. You have in the book here when you haven't. I haven't been able to sort of spend time living and breathing both where I mean the size of the organization but what I would look for is like if you came to work front I would enact if I was interviewing at workfront I would ask people. Hey Ah tell me who you tell me who you think is a really great employees inside at work. Tell me who has been recognized lately for doing a great job inside a work. Tell me their names and then tell me some of their behaviors. Tell me rewarded for those for those babies because you see this thing about a coach rape. Culture is purely external. Oh manifestation of shared a shared set of values of a group of people much like behaviors and individual is merely external manifestation of the beliefs of that individual. My wife and I have been getting for thirty thirty four years after thirty four years. She does mostly no but she still doesn't know me completely in the way that she forms her opinion of me is how I behave how behaved is related to what I believe and so so I think if you go into a company and you ask people who are the winner side of the and how do they behave and how to other people talk about the way that they behave. You'll start up on some organization really the values but if you're minutes here with Alex shoot was C._e._o.. Of workfront definitely encourages check out his book done right for the number of people that I've heard talk about just how much they've learned from Alex. Let's on leadership and on culture and just doing things that right. Wayne Organizations spoke codified a lot of that so definitely check it out. You can get a copy learn more at dun-rite book dotcom Alex. I think you know I was Kinda. End where we started. I mentioned to you how many many people we've interviewed on the show that mentioned us as inspiration their career who are some people that you have looked to the administration for you. Either have been managers in the past of sort of mentors they can be authors could be alive or dead people that are mel lots. Lots you recommend other people seek out who won for Shire's Bill Miller bill is currently at E._M._C. Software and bill actually hire me into I._B._M.. A million years ago in in a bill was bill was the person that taught me that there's a right way to do things and that it's worth doing things the right way so my first boss ever was used to great <hes> fingerprint on me that said there's no shortcuts in yet either do things right way another person who was at B. M. C. is he's now retires getting your bet. Nice and Darryl took a big risk on me and ask me to do a pretty big job at B.. M. C. and I'd say the last person He's a board member today. The not feel like he was a partner when we were allegra was was joe thing about Joe than I that. I just always that always stayed with me. Is You just cannot outrun. Run your customers. You have got to do a great job by your customers and your customers are in future reputation of bill and Darryl in Joe and then finally the acknowledgement of the book got him. I'm or will she do as my mentor for years in many of the principles that are in the book I learned you know late nights at arch ranch in Bernie is hard for me to think about joe pain without imagining him or seeing him mm again in a spacesuit Abban stage at Alachua experience but you know his his lesson around sort of you know putting a greater focus on your customers could not reinforce that researches reiterates that more from analogous damp while we were eloquent our customer L. go partner. You know for a long time and you know there aren't that many conferences you go to where you see more hugs handshakes at I've been two maybe three in my life than and one of those was at Renault experience. It was the community there was a relationship with customers. It was the culture when clearly you enjoy each other's company had built very successfully. We'll learn more about how bill for yourself in your organization not just your sales or marketing team to our organization. Get a copy of gun rights more information at dun-rite but dot com guess ally Shubin for joining us today. If you WANNA learn more about Alex How's your this episode of his new organization checkout copy on demand by on radio DOT DOT COM Shirley. Thanks so much join us. We'll be here again. You've been listening to another episode of Sales Pipeline Radio Right here in the funnel radio network listener like Napa know this month at Napa when you buy a five four jug babbling full synthetic motor oil for just twenty four and ninety nine we're making a donation to the intrepid fallenheroesfund which means your purchase makes a difference so do some good and get a five-point jug babbling full synthetic for just twenty four and ninety nine quality parts helpful people. That's NAPA know how I know how general states pricing tails presses dramatically the applicable state local taxes recycling peace offering seven thirty one nineteen. 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workfront Alex Matt Heinz Alachua B. Sales Marketing Commander Darryl B. M. C. Napa Grimsby Atlantic Joe Justin Keller Pot Radio Chester Brooke Academy Prescho Sanson Deborah Zero ally Shubin Bill Miller Chicago